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Encyclopedia > Tenor
This article is related to a series of articles under the main article Voice type.
Voice Type (ranges)
Female voices
Soprano
Mezzo-soprano
Contralto

Male voices Tenor (from Latin tenor, holder, or tenere, hold) means generally: the true purport and effect of a deed or instrument; the character or usual pattern of something; the drift or general meaning of a statement or discourse; the concept, object, or person meant in a metaphor. ... Voice type, often called Fach (pl. ... Voice type, often called Fach (pl. ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... A mezzo-soprano (meaning medium soprano in Italian) is a female singer with a range usually extending from the A below middle C to the F an eleventh above middle C. Mezzo-sopranos generally have a darker (or lower) vocal tone than sopranos, and their vocal range is between that... In music, an alto is a singer with a vocal range somewhere between a tenor and a soprano. ...

Countertenor
Tenor
Baritone
Bass

Related concepts A countertenor is an adult male who sings in an alto, mezzo-soprano or (more rarely) soprano range, often through use of falsetto, or sometimes natural head voice. ... For other uses, see Baritone (disambiguation). ... A bass (or basso in Italian) is a male singer who sings in the deepest vocal range of the human voice. ...

Coloratura
Chest voice
Head voice
Sprechgesang
Vocal registration
Vocal resonation

edit this - view history Coloratura is an old word meaning colouring. ... Human voice is sound made by a person using the vocal folds for talking, singing or crying. ... Human voice is sound made by a person using the vocal folds for talking, singing or crying. ... Sprechgesang and sprechstimme (German for spoken-song and spoken-voice) are musical terms used to refer to an expressionist vocal technique that falls between singing and speaking. ... Vocal registration is the term used to denote various theories of how the human voice changes, both subjectively and objectively, as it moves through its pitch range. ...

The tenor is the highest male voice within the modal register, just above the baritone voice. The typical tenor voice lies between the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the C one octave above middle C (C5). The low extreme for tenors is roughly B2 (two Bs below middle C). At the highest extreme, some tenors can sing up to two Fs above middle C (F5).[1] For other uses, see Baritone (disambiguation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...


Within opera, the lowest note in the standard tenor repertoire is A3 (Mime, Herod), but few roles fall below C3 (one octave below middle C). The high extreme: many tenor roles in the standard repertoire call for a "tenor C" (C5, one octave above middle C). While some operatic roles for tenor require a darker timbre and fewer high notes, it is generally accepted that any tenor should be able to sing with a full timbre up to an A4. In the leggiero repertoire the highest note is an F5 (Arturo in I puritani), therefore, very few tenors can have this role in their repertoire.[2] For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Der Ring des Nibelungen, (The Ring of the Nibelung), is a cycle of four epic music dramas by the German composer Richard Wagner. ... This article is about the opera by Richard Strauss . ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... Also called a tenore leggero, a lightweight, flexible tenor voice. ... I puritani (The Puritans) is an opera in three acts, by Vincenzo Bellini. ...

Contents

Origin of the term

The name "tenor" derives from the Latin word tenere, which means "to hold". In medieval and Renaissance polyphony between about 1250 and 1500, the tenor was the structurally fundamental (or ‘holding’) voice, vocal or instrumental. All other voices were normally calculated in relation to the tenor, which often proceeded in longer note values and carried a borrowed Cantus firmus melody. Until the late 15th century introduction of the contratenor bassus, the tenor was usually the lowest voice, assuming the role of providing a harmonic foundation. It was also in the 15th century that "tenor" came to signify the male voice that sang such parts. Thus, for earlier repertoire, a line marked 'tenor' indicated the part's role, and not the required voice type. Indeed, even as late as the seventeenth century, partbooks labelled 'tenor' might contain parts for a range of voice types.[3] For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... In music, a cantus firmus (fixed song) is a pre-existing melody forming the basis of a polyphonic composition, often set apart by being played in long notes. ... This article is about the components of sound. ...


Tenor in choral music

In four-part choral music, the tenor is the second lowest voice, above the bass and below the soprano and alto. While certain choral music does require the first tenors to ascend the full tenor range, the majority of choral music places the tenors in the range from approximately B2 up to A4. The requirements of the tenor voice in choral music are also tied to the style of music most often performed by a given choir. Orchestra choruses require tenors with fully resonant voices, but chamber or a cappella choral music (sung with no instrumental accompaniment) can quite successfully rely on light baritones singing in falsetto.[4] A bass (or basso in Italian) is a male singer who sings in the deepest vocal range of the human voice. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... For other uses, see Baritone (disambiguation). ... Falsetto (Italian diminutive of falso, false) is a singing technique that produces sounds that are pitched higher than the singers normal range, in the treble range. ...


Even so, one nearly ubiquitous facet of choral singing is the shortage of tenor voices. Most men tend to have baritone voices and for this reason the majority of men tend to prefer singing in the bass section of a choir (however true basses are even more rare then tenors). Some men are asked to sing tenor even if they lack the full range, and sometimes low altos are asked to sing the tenor part.[4] For other uses, see Baritone (disambiguation). ... Bass (IPA: [], rhyming with face), when used as an adjective, describes tones of low frequency. ...


Other uses

In the Barbershop harmony musical style, the name "tenor" is used for the highest part. The four parts are known (lowest to highest) as bass, baritone, lead, and tenor. The tenor generally sings in falsetto voice (thus the term tenor used in barbershop terminology most closely corresponds to the term countertenor as used in classical music), and harmonizes above the lead, who sings the melody. The barbershop tenor range is, as notated, B-below-middle C to D-above-high C (and sung an octave lower). The "lead" in barbershop music is equivalent to the normal tenor range.[5] The Dapper Dans, a barbershop quartet at Disney World Barbershop harmony, as codified during the barbershop revival era (1940s-present), is a style of a cappella, or unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ... A countertenor is an adult male who sings in an alto, mezzo-soprano or (more rarely) soprano range, often through use of falsetto, or sometimes natural head voice. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...


In bluegrass music, the melody line is called the lead. Tenor is sung an interval of a third above the lead. Baritone is the fifth of the scale that has the lead as a tonic, and may be sung below the lead, or even above the lead (and the tenor), in which case it is called "high baritone."[6]


In rock and hair metal, there is a style of singing (that most of them use), that requires a tenor to use a head voice/falsetto scream to sing most of the melodies. This allows then to stay on high treble notes (many close to or on tenor C) for extended amounts of time. Singers of this style include Axl Rose from Guns N' Roses, Joe Elliot of Def Leppard, Brian Johnson and Bon Scottof AC/DC, Dee Snider of Twisted Sister, and Kevin DuBrow of Quiet Riot. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Classic Metal. ... W. Axl Rose[1][2] (born William Bruce Rose, Jr. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... Joe Elliot (born August 1, 1959) is the lead singer of the heavy metal band Def Leppard. ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... For other uses, see Brian Johnson (disambiguation). ... Ronald Belford Bon Scott (July 9, 1946 – February 19, 1980) was an Australian-Scottish rock musician, most well-known for being the lead singer and lyricist of Australian hard rock band AC/DC from 1974 until his death in 1980. ... This article is about the band. ... David Daniel Dee Snider (born March 15, 1955) is an American musician, radio personality, and actor. ... Twisted Sister is an American heavy metal band from New York City. ... DuBrow performing. ... Quiet Riot is an American heavy metal band, whose 1983 & 1984 success contributed to launching the 1980s glam metal scene. ...


It term tenor is also applied to instruments to indicate their range in relation to other instruments of the same group. For instance the tenor saxophone. The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ...


Tenor voice classification

Within Choral and pop music, singers are classified into voice parts based almost solely on range with little consideration for other qualities in the voice. Within classical solo singing, however, a person is classified as a tenor through the identification of several vocal traits, including vocal range (the lowest and highest notes that the singer can reach), vocal timbre, vocal weight, vocal tessitura, vocal resonance, and vocal transition points (lifts or "passaggio") within the singer's voice. These different traits are used to identify different sub-types within the tenor voice sometimes reffered to as fächer (sg. fach, from German Fach or Stimmfach, "vocal category"). Within opera, particular roles are written with specific kinds of tenor voices in mind, causing certain roles to be associated with certain kins of voices.[7] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In music, tessitura (Italian: texture) is a range of pitches compared to the instrument for which it was intended to be used. ... Passaggio is a singing term used to describe the pitch range at which a singers voice breaks or switches over from ones chest voice (natural singing voice) to ones head voice or falsetto (generally for males). ... The German Fach (pl. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ...


Following are the operatic tenor fächer, with their standard repertory roles:


Leggiero tenor

The male equivalent of a lyric coloratura, this voice is light and very agile and is able to perform dextrous coloratura passages. The Leggiero tenor has a range of approximately the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the E above tenor C (E 5) with some leggiero tenors being able to sing up to the F or even G. This voice is the highest tenor voice and is sometimes referred to as "tenore di grazia". This voice is utilized frequently in the operas of Mozart, Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini, and the highest Baroque repertoire for tenors. Leggiero tenors also frequently perform roles in the light-lyric tenor repetoire.[2] Coloratura is an ornate, flowery style in classical singing. ... Coloratura is an old word meaning colouring. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... Tenor C is the C one octave above Middle C. It is also known as C5. ... Also called a tenore leggero, a lightweight, flexible tenor voice. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Gioachino Rossini. ... Gaetano Donizetti Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti (29 November 1797 – 8 April 1848) was a famous Italian opera composer. ... Vincenzo Bellini Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (November 3, 1801 – September 23, 1835) was an Italian opera composer. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750. ...


To hear an example of a Leggiero tenor (Juan Diego Florez in the role of Tonio from Donizetti's La fille du régiment) click on this link: Watch Here Juan Diego Flórez was born in 1973 in Lima, Peru. ... Categories: People stubs | 1797 births | 1848 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | Italian composers | People born in Bergamo, Italy ... La fille du régiment (The Daughter of the Regiment) is a comic opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ...


Leggiero tenor roles in opera and operettas[2]

For the Beaumarchais play, see The Barber of Seville (play). ... Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... I puritani (The Puritans) is an opera in three acts, by Vincenzo Bellini. ... Bellini can mean: A family of Italian painters, the most famous of which is Giovanni Bellini (c. ... Die Entführung aus dem Serail (K. 384; in English The Abduction from the Seraglio; also known as Il Seraglio) is a opera Singspiel in three acts by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... La sonnambula (The Sleepwalker) is an opera semiseria in two acts by Vincenzo Bellini to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani, based on a vaudeville by Eugène Scribe. ... Bellini can mean: A family of Italian painters, the most famous of which is Giovanni Bellini (c. ... Don Pasquale is a comic opera (opera buffa) in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ... Categories: People stubs | 1797 births | 1848 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | Italian composers | People born in Bergamo, Italy ... Così fan tutte, ossia La scuola degli amanti (Thus Do They [f. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Il pirata (The Pirate) is an opera in two acts by Vincenzo Bellini to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani from a French translation of the tragic play Bertram, or The Castle of St Aldobrando by Rev. ... Bellini can mean: A family of Italian painters, the most famous of which is Giovanni Bellini (c. ... Litaliana in Algeri (The Italian Girl in Algiers) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Angelo Anelli, based on his earlier text set by Luigi Mosca. ... Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... Lelisir damore (The Elixir of Love) is a comic opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani, based on Eugène Scribes Le Philtre. ... Categories: People stubs | 1797 births | 1848 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | Italian composers | People born in Bergamo, Italy ... Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo (Cinderella, or Goodness Triumphant) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioacchino Rossini. ... Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... La fille du régiment (The Daughter of the Regiment) is a comic opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ... Categories: People stubs | 1797 births | 1848 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | Italian composers | People born in Bergamo, Italy ...

Leggiero tenor singers

John Aler is a contemporary American lyric tenor who has graced many of the worlds finest opera houses, concert halls, and theaters in operas, oratorios, and recitals. ... Luigi Alva né Luis Ernesto Alva y Talledo (1927) was the foremost lyric tenor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Rockwell Blake (Born January 10, 1951) is an American operatic tenor, particularly known for his roles in Rossini operas. ... Juan Diego Flórez (Born January 13, 1973) is a Peruvian operatic tenor, particularly known for his roles in Rossini operas. ... William Matteuzzi in an Italian tenor and opera singer known for his impressive vocal range and prominent upper register reaching a high F in full voice. ... Chris Merritt (born 1952, Oklahoma City) is an opera singer. ... The Italian tenor Tito Schipa (1888 – 16 December 1965) is considered one of the finest tenore di grazia (lyric tenors) in operatic history. ... Tagliavini. ... Fritz Wunderlich (September 26, 1930 - September 17, 1966) was a German tenor, born in Kusel, Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Alfredo Kraus Trujillo (24 September 1927–10 September 1999) was a Spanish tenor of Austrian descent, and considered among the legendary tenors of the 20th century along with others like Plácido Domingo, Franco Corelli, Jussi Björling, José Carreras, Jon Vickers and Luciano Pavarotti. ...

Lyric tenor

A warm graceful voice with a bright, full timbre that is strong but not heavy and can be heard over an orchestra. Lyric tenors have a range from approximately the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the D one octave above middle C (D5). There is a tendency to divide lyric tenors into two groups[2]: In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...

  • Light lyric tenor- A light-lyric tenor has a slighty warmer sound than the Leggiero tenor and some coloratura facility but does not have quite as high of an upper extension as the leggiero tenor. This voice is used frequently within French comic operas.[2]
  • Full lyric tenor- A full-lyric tenor that has a more mature sound than a light-lyric tenor and can be heard over a bigger orchestra.[2]

To hear an example of a Full lyric tenor (José Carreras in the role of Rodolfo from Puccini's La bohème) click on this link: Watch Here Opéra comique is a French style of opera that is a partial counterpart to the Italian opera buffa. ... José Carreras Coll (Catalan: Josep Carreras i Coll) (born December 5, 1946) is a Spanish operatic tenor. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ...


Light-lyric tenor roles in opera and operettas[2]

Le postillon de Lonjumeau (English: The Coachman of Longjumeau) is an opéra-comique in three acts by Adolphe Adam. ... Adolphe Adam Adolphe Charles Adam (July 24, 1803 – May 3, 1856) was a French composer and music critic. ... La dame blanche (The White Lady) is an opera in three acts by French composer François-Adrien Boïeldieu. ... François-Adrien Boieldieu (December 16, 1775 – October 8, 1834) was a French composer, mainly of operas. ... Original poster for Lakmé Lakmé is an opera in three acts by Léo Delibes to a French libretto by Edmond Gondinet and Philippe Gille, based on the 1880 novel Rarahu ou Le Mariage de Loti by Pierre Loti. ... Delibes is the last name of some famous people: Leo Delibes (1836-1891), a French composer Miguel Delibes (1920- ), a Spanish Writer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Les Pêcheurs de Perles (The Pearlfishers) is a three-act opera by Georges Bizet, to a libretto by Eugène Cormon and Michael Carré. While not nearly as popular as his far more famous Carmen, it contains a wealth of attractive music and has found some popularity despite its... Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875), was a French composer of the romantic era best known for his opera Carmen. ... Mireille is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Michel Carré after Frédéric Mistrals poem Mireio. ... Categories: Stub | 1818 births | 1893 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | French musicians ...

Full-lyric tenor roles in opera and operettas[2]

La traviata is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (The Master Singers of Nuremberg) is an opera in three acts, written and composed by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Lucia di Lammermoor is a dramma tragico, or opera, in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ... Categories: People stubs | 1797 births | 1848 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | Italian composers | People born in Bergamo, Italy ... La sonnambula (The Sleepwalker) is an opera semiseria in two acts by Vincenzo Bellini to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani, based on a vaudeville by Eugène Scribe. ... Bellini can mean: A family of Italian painters, the most famous of which is Giovanni Bellini (c. ... Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carrés play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Goethes Faust, Part I. It debuted at the Théatre-Lyrique in Paris on March 19, 1859. ... Categories: Stub | 1818 births | 1893 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | French musicians ... Tales of Hoffmann (Les contes dHoffmann) is an opera by Jacques Offenbach. ... Offenbach holds many meanings. ... Idomeneo, re di Creta ossia Ilia e Idamante (Italian: Idomeneo, King of Crete, or, Ilia and Idamante; usually referred to simply as Idomeneo, K. 366) is an Italian opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Roméo et Juliette (Romeo and Juliet) is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré, based on the play by Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. ... Categories: Stub | 1818 births | 1893 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | French musicians ... Die Zauberflöte, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Werther is an opera in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Édouard Blau, based on the novel The Sorrows of Young Werther by Goethe. ... Jules Massenet Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Mignon is an opera in three acts by Ambroise Thomas to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré, based on Goethes story Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre. ... Charles Louis Ambroise Thomas (August 5, 1811 - February 12, 1896) was a French opera composer. ...

Lyric tenor singers

Roberto Alagna (born June 7, 1963) is French operatic tenor. ... Marcelo Álvarez on the cover of a recital disc Marcelo Raúl Álvarez, born February 27, 1962 in Córdoba, Argentina, is an Argentine lyric tenor who achieved international success in the late 1990s. ... Johan Jonatan   (5 February 1911 – 9 September 1960) was a Swedish tenor and one of the most highly regarded opera singers of the 20th century. ... Joseph Calleja, (b. ... José Carreras Coll (Catalan: Josep Carreras i Coll) (born December 5, 1946) is a Spanish operatic tenor. ... The Italian tenor Giuseppe Di Stefano (born 24 July 1921) is a famous opera singer whose career spanned from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. ... Jaume Aragall y Garriga better known as Giacomo Aragall is a Spanish/Catalan tenor, born in Barcelona, Spain on 6 June 1939. ... The Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda (born July 11, 1925) is a famous opera singer and recitalist. ... Rolando Villazón, tenor Viva Villazón album cover Emilio Rolando Villazón Mauleón (b. ... Carlo Tagliabue (Mariano Comense, January 13, 1898 – Monza, April 5, 1978) was an Italian baritone. ... Joseph Schmidt Joseph Schmidt (March 4, 1904 – November 16, 1942) was a tenor and actor. ... Luciano Pavarotti performing on June 15, 2002 at a concert in the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI[1] (October 12, 1935 – September 6, 2007) was a celebrated Italian tenor in operatic music, who successfully crossed into popular music becoming one of the most...

Spinto tenor

This voice has the brightness and height of a lyric tenor, but with a heavier vocal weight enabeling the voice to be "pushed" to dramatic climaxes without strain. Some spinto tenors may have a somewhat darker timbre than a lyric tenor as well, without being as dark as a dramatic tenor. Spinto tenors have a range from approximately the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the D one octave above middle C (D5).[2] Spinto is a vocal term used to characterize a soprano or tenor voice of a weight between lyric and dramatic that is capable of handling large dramatic climaxes at moderate intervals. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...


To hear an example of a Spinto tenor (Luciano Pavarotti in the role of Riccardo from Verdi's Un ballo in maschera) click on this link: Watch Here Luciano Pavarotti performing on June 15, 2002 at a concert in the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI[1] (October 12, 1935 – September 6, 2007) was a celebrated Italian tenor in operatic music, who successfully crossed into popular music becoming one of the most... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Un ballo in maschera, or A Masked Ball, is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi with text by Antonio Somma. ...


Spinto tenor roles in opera and operettas[2]

La forza del destino (The Force of Destiny) is an Italian opera by Giuseppe Verdi. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Andrea Chénier is an opera in four acts by the verismo composer Umberto Giordano, set to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica. ... Umberto Giordano Umberto Giordano (August 28, 1867 - November 12, 1948) was an Italian composer, mainly of opera. ... Pagliacci (Players, or Clowns) is an opera consisting of a prologue and two acts written and composed by Ruggero Leoncavallo. ... Ruggiero Leoncavallo (March 8, 1857 - August 9, 1919) was an Italian opera composer. ... This article refers to the opera Don Carlos by Giuseppe Verdi (and its revised Italian version, known as Don Carlo). ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... For other uses, see Carmen (disambiguation). ... Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875), was a French composer of the romantic era best known for his opera Carmen. ... Der fliegende Holländer (The Flying Dutchman) is an opera, with music and libretto by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Ernani is an operatic dramma lirico in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Hernani by Victor Hugo. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... For other uses, see Tosca (disambiguation). ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Adriana Lecouvreur is an opera by Francesco Cilea. ... Francesco Cilea, (Palmi, near Reggio Calabria, July 26, 1866 - Varazze, near Savona, November 20, 1950) was an Italian opera composer, whose early success was not sustained, as taste in music changed. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Un ballo in maschera, or A Masked Ball, is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi with text by Antonio Somma. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Cavalleria rusticana (Rustic Chivalry) is an opera in one act by Pietro Mascagni to a libretto by Targioni-Tozzetti and Menasci, adapted from a short story by Giovanni Verga. ... Pietro Mascagni (Livorno December 7, 1863 – Rome August 2, 1945) is one of the most important Italian opera composers of the turn of the 20th century. ...

Spinto tenor singers

The Italian singer Carlo Bergonzi (born 13 July 1924) is one of the most admired tenors of the post-war period. ... For the song Caruso by Lucio Dalla, see Caruso (song). ... Aureliano Pertile (born November 9, 1885; died January 11, 1952) was one of the twentieth centurys most important tenors. ... This article is about an Italian operatic tenor. ... Richard Tucker (August 28, 1913 – January 8, 1975) was an American tenor. ...

Dramatic tenor

Also "tenore di forza" or "robusto" – a ringing and very powerful, rich, heroic tenor. The dramatic tenor has an approximate range from the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the C one octave above middle C (C5).[2] In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...


To hear an example of a Dramatic tenor (Franco Corelli in the role of Radames from Verdi's Aida) click on this link: Watch Here Franco Corelli. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... This article is about the opera. ...


Dramatic tenor roles in opera and operettas[2]

For the opera by Ferruccio Busoni, see Turandot (Busoni). ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... For the Rossini opera, see Otello (Rossini) or for the eurobeat artist see Gianni Coraini. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... This article is about the opera. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Luisa Miller is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play Kabale und Liebe by Friedrich von Schiller. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Samson et Dalila (English: Samson and Delilah) is a grand opera in three acts by Camille Saint-Saëns to a French libretto by Ferdinand Lemaire. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns (IPA: [ʃaʁl. ...

Dramatic tenor singers

Franco Bonisolli (born Rovereto, Italy, May 25, 1937 - died Vienna, Austria, Oct. ... Franco Corelli. ... José Cura, tenor and conductor José Cura (born December 5, 1962 in Rosario, Argentina) a world-famous opera tenor singer known for his intense and original interpretations of his characters, notably Verdi’s Otello and Saint-Saëns’ Samson, as well as for his unconventional and innovative concert performances. ... Mario del Monaco (Florence July 27, 1915 - October 16, 1982 in Mestre) was an Italian tenor. ... Plácido Domingo José Plácido Domingo Embil KBE (born January 21, 1941)[1] better known as Plácido Domingo, is a world-renowned operatic tenor. ...

Heldentenor

A rich, powerful, and dramatic voice. As its name implies, the Heldentenor (English: heroic tenor) vocal fach features in the German romantic operatic repertoire. The Heldentenor is the German equivalent of the tenore drammatico, however with a more baritonal quality: the typical Wagnerian protagonist. The keystone of any heldentenor's repertoire is arguably Wagner's Siegfried, an extremely demanding role requiring a wide vocal range, great stamina, and extended dramatic suspension. The Heldentenor has an approximate range from the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the C one octave above middle C (C5).[2] Romantische Oper (literally German romantic opera) was a genre of early nineteenth-century German opera, developed not from the German Singspiel of the eighteenth-century but from the opéras comique of the French Revolution. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Siegfried is the third of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...


To hear an example of a Heldentenor (Lauritz Melchior in the title role of Wagner's Lohengrin) click on this link: Watch Here Lauritz Melchior (often misspelled Melchoir) (born March 20, 1890 – died March 18, 1973) was a Danish and later American opera singer. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...


Heldentenor roles in opera and operettas[2]

Fidelio (Op. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Tannhäuser or Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf die Wartburg (Tannhäuser and the Singers Contest on the Wartburg) is an opera in three acts, music and text by Richard Wagner, based on the two Germanic legends of Tannhäuser and the song contest at Wartburg. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... For the famous train, see Rheingold Express. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Parsifal is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner...   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Siegfried is the third of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (The Master Singers of Nuremberg) is an opera in three acts, written and composed by Richard Wagner. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde) is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner...

Heldentenor singers

Bernd Aldenhoff (June 14, 1908 in Duisburg- October 08, 1959 in München) was a German Heldentenor. ... Ben Heppner OC (born January 14, 1956) is a Canadian tenor, specializing in opera and classical symphonic works for voice. ... James King may refer to: James King (soldier) (1589-1652), a Scottish commander in the Battle of Wittstock James King, 17th cent. ... Lauritz Melchior (often misspelled Melchoir) (born March 20, 1890 – died March 18, 1973) was a Danish and later American opera singer. ... Jon S. Vickers, CC , D.Mus. ... Ludwig Schnorr von Carolsfeld Ludwig Schnorr von Carolsfeld (July 2, 1836-July 21, 1865) was a german heldentenor. ... Wolfgang Windgassen (June 26, 1914 – September 8, 1974) was a tenor internationally known for his performances in Wagner operas. ...

Tenor buffo or Spieltenor

A tenor with good acting ability, and the ability to create distinct voices for his characters. This voice specializes in smaller comic roles. The range of the tenor buffo is from the C one octave below middle C (C3) to the C one octave above middle C (C5). The tessitura of these parts lies lower than the other tenor roles. These parts are often played by younger tenors who have not yet reached their full vocal potential or older tenors who are beyond their prime singing years. Only rarely will a singer specialize in these roles for an entire career.[2] To hear an example of a Tenor buffo (Norbert Orth in the role of Monostatos from Mozart's The Magic Flute) click on this link: Watch Here In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 РDecember 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Die Zauberfl̦te, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ...


Tenor buffo roles in opera and operettas[2]

Le nozze di Figaro ossia la folle giornata (Trans: ), K. 492, is an opera buffa (comic opera) composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, Le mariage de Figaro (1784). ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Siegfried could refer to: The opera by Richard Wagner; see Siegfried (opera). ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Die Zauberflöte, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... The Abduction from the Seraglio (K. 384; in German Die Entführung aus dem Serail) is a comic opera in three acts by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ...

Tenor roles in operettas

All of the Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas have at least one lead lyric tenor character; other notable roles are: W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Comic opera, or light opera, denotes a sung dramatic work of a light or comic nature, usually with a happy ending. ...

Candide is a comic operetta by Leonard Bernstein, based on the novella of the same name by Voltaire. ... Scene from the 1984 version. ... For the ballet, see The Merry Widow (ballet). ... The Student Prince is an operetta written by Sigmund Romberg (music) and Dorothy Donnelly (books and lyrics). ... Naughty Marietta is a musical comedy, with libretto by Rida Johnson Young and music by Victor Herbert, which opened on Broadway on November 7, 1910: one of its best-known songs is Ah! Sweet Mystery Of Life. ...

References

  1. ^ McKinney, James (1994). The Diagnosis and Correction of Vocal Faults. Genovex Music Group. ISBN 978-1565939400. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Boldrey, Richard (1994). Guide to Operatic Roles and Arias. Caldwell Publishing Company. ISBN 978-1877761645. 
  3. ^ Stark, James (2003). Bel Canto: A History of Vocal Pedagogy. University of Toronto Press. ISBN 978-0802086143. 
  4. ^ a b Smith, Brenda (2005). Choral Pedagogy. Plural Publishing, Inc. ISBN 978-1597560436. 
  5. ^ Averill, Gage (2003). Four Parts, No Waiting: A Social History of American Barbershop Harmony. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0195116724. 
  6. ^ Cantwell, Robert (2002). Bluegrass Breakdown: The Making of the Old Southern Sound. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0252071171. 
  7. ^ Appelman, D. Ralph (1986). The Science of Vocal Pedagogy: Theory and Application. Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0253203786. 

Sources

David Fallows, Owen Jander. Tenor, Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy, grovemusic.com (subscription access).


See also

A countertenor is an adult male who sings in an alto, mezzo-soprano or (more rarely) soprano range, often through use of falsetto, or sometimes natural head voice. ... The German Fach (pl. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A sopranist is a male singer who sings in the soprano vocal range. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Voice type, often called Fach (pl. ...

External links

  • Tenor voices in Opera with video examples

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tenor (87 words)
The male voice which has a range of C below middle C to G above middle C.
Any instrument of that range is said to be a tenor instrument, such as the tenor saxophone and the tenor recorder, etc.
In Medieval music, the tenor was the foundation or sustaining part or a polyphonic composition, and in the late Medieval era and early Renaissance, the tenor generally was the melody part.
tenor. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (167 words)
In medieval polyphony, tenor was the name given to the voice that had the cantus firmus, a preexisting melody, often a fragment of plainsong, to which other voices in counterpoint were added.
The cantus was arranged in notes of long duration, hence the term tenor, from the Latin tenere, to hold.
In certain families of instruments the member whose register corresponds to that of the tenor voice is called tenor, e.g., tenor horn and tenor trombone.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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