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Encyclopedia > Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Think, Work, Serve
Established 1912
Type Public
Chancellor Charles W. Manning
President Melvin N. Johnson
Faculty 430
Undergraduates 7,118
Postgraduates 1,630
Location Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Campus Urban, 500 acres
Athletics 11 varsity teams; Ohio Valley Conference
Colors Blue & White
Nickname Tigers
Website www.tnstate.edu
© Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. The 450 acre (1.8 km²) main campus has more than 65 buildings and is located in a residential setting at 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd in Nashville, Tennessee. TSU is the only state-funded historically Black university in Tennessee. The Avon Williams campus is located downtown, near the center of the Nashville business and government district. TSU has approximately 8,750 students with a student/faculty ratio of 17/1. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) is a College Athletic Conference which operates in the midwestern and southeastern United States. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Avon N. Williams, Jr. ...


TSU projects itself to its students, faculty, and alumni and to the citizens of the State through the school's charge "Enter to learn, go forth to serve." and it's motto, "Think, Work, Serve."

Contents

History

Though it was organized as the Agricultural and Industrial State Normal School in 1909 and began serving students on June 19, 1912, its status was raised to a four-year teachers' college in 1922. It was then elevated to full-fledged land-grant university status by the Tennessee State Board of Education in 1958. Since 1972 it has been operated under the auspices of the Tennessee Board of Regents. is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tennessee Board of Regents as currently constituted is authorized by an act of the Tennessee General Assembly passed in 1972. ...


The present-day Tennessee State University exists as a result of the merger on July 1, 1979, of Tennessee State University and the former University of Tennessee at Nashville.


Academics

This university is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award 42 baccalaureate degrees, 21 master's degrees, as well as the two-year Associate of Science degree in nursing, dental hygiene, and doctoral degrees in public administration, administration and supervision, curriculum and instruction and psychology. The College of Nursing is accredited for the A.A.S., B.S.N., M.S.N. degrees by the National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission. The TSU College of Engineering, Technology & Computer Science is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) offering baccalaureate degrees in the areas of Architectural and Facilities Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, & Computer and Information Systems Engineering; graduate degrees in the areas of Computer and Information Systems Engineering, General Engineering (M.E.), Biomedical, Civil, Environmental, Electrical, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Engineering; with the Ph.D. in Computer and Information Systems Engineering with concentrations in Computer Communications and Networks, Control Systems and Signal Processing, Robotics and Computer Integration, and Manufacturing. It is also accredited by the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) offering the B.S. in Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with concentrations in Aeronautical Technology (through Academic Common Market), Aviation Management, Aviation Flight, and Industrial Electronics Technology (through Academic Common Market). The TSU College of Business was the first to earn dual Association of Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB International) accreditation (accreditation of both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the same time) in 1994.[citation needed] The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ...


The Geier desegregation case

In 1968, Rita Sanders, then a TSU faculty member, along with other Tennesseans, sued the state, demanding that the dual educational system be dismantled and made fair for all its citizens. The law suit is now known as the Geier case. Geier is a German word for vulture, also understood to refer to the Biblical gyrfalcon, generally recognized as a distinct species of carrion-eating bird whose range includes the whole of Europe and the western part of Asia. ...


The Geier v. Tennessee case went on for 32 years. TSU professors Ray Richardson and H. Coleman McGinnis intervened as co-plaintiffs in the lawsuit, as did the U.S. Department of Justice. After numerous court ordered-plans failed to produce progress on the matter, a mediated Consent Decree, agreed upon by all parties, was ordered by the court on Jan. 4, 2001. The Consent Decree effectively ended the lawsuit initially filed in 1968.


The university is to receive $40 million over the next five years as part of the closing settlement announced on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2006.


Greek Life

NPHC Fraternities

Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) Fraternity was founded on Friday, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three students. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... The Brotherhood of Iota Phi Theta was a local service fraternity at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1973 to 2001. ...

NPHC Sororities

Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, (ΔΣΘ) Incorporated is a non-profit Greek letter organization of college educated women committed to constructive development of its members and to public service with a primary focus on the Black community. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Independent Fraternities and Sororities

Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... Gamma Sigma Sigma (ΓΣΣ) is a national service sorority. ... Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... Alpha Nu Omega Fraternity and Sorority Crest Alpha Nu Omega is a national Greek letter organization founded in 1988 that is comprised of both a fraternity and sorority under one Constitution. ... ΑΚΨ (Alpha Kappa Psi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity. ...

Notable Alumni

Brent Alexander (born July 10, 1971) was a free safety in the NFL. He was signed as a undrafted free-agent by the Arizona Cardinals in 1994. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Bennie Tyron Lamar Anderson (born February 17, 1977) is an American football guard. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Bill Anderson (born July 13, 1936) was a tight end in the NFL. In most of his career he played for the Washington Redskins. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Jimmy Blanton (1918 – July 30, 1942) was an American jazz double bassist. ... Ralph Harold Boston (b. ... Born: January 10, 1959 - Jacksonville, Florida Events 200 m - 21. ... Richard Dent (born December 13, 1960) is a former American football defensive end who played primarily for the Chicago Bears of the NFL. He was the MVP of Super Bowl XX. After playing 4 years at Tennessee State University, Dent was drafted in the eighth round by the Bears, with... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Cleveland Josephus Cleve Eaton II (b. ... Harold Eugene Ford, Sr. ... John N. Ford (born May 3, 1942) is a funeral director, insurance agent, and consultant in Memphis, Tennessee. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Howard Gentry, Jr. ... Joe Gilliam (1950-2000) was an American football player. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Thelma Harper is a Tennesseean politician and a member of the Tennessee Senate for the 19th district, which is composed of part of Davidson County. ... Claude Humphrey (born June 29, 1944) was a defensive lineman in the National Football League for 13 seasons spanning 1968-1974 & 1976-1981 with the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Harvey Johnson, Jr. ... Joe Johnson can be one of several persons: Joe Johnson, snooker player Joe Johnson, U.S democratic politician Joe Johnson, basketball player This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Edward Lee Too Tall Jones (born February 23, 1951 in Jackson, Tennessee) was an American football player. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Anthony George Douglas Mason (born December 14, 1966 in Miami, Florida) is a former NBA basketball player. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Edith Marie McGuire (born June 3, 1944), later known as Edith McGuire Duvall, is a former American sprinter. ... Loree Marlowe Moore (born May 21, 1983 in Carson, California) is a professional basketball player for the New York Liberty in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... The New York Liberty is a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in New York City. ... Lloyd Neal (born December 10, 1950 in Talbotton, Georgia) is an American former professional basketball player. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Carl Thomas Rowan (August 11, 1925 - September 23, 2000) was a nationally-syndicated African American op-ed columnist for the Washington Post and the Chicago Sun-Times. ... Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete and three time Olympic champion. ... Simon Shanks (October 16, 1971 - January 5, 2006) was a National Football League player for the Arizona Cardinals in 1995. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Amos Leon Thomas Jr (born 1937, died May 8, 1999) was an American avant garde jazz vocalist from East St. ... Rufus 1990 album for Alligator Records, That Woman Is Poison! Rufus Thomas (March 26, 1917 – December 15, 2001) was a rhythm and blues and soul singer from Memphis, Tennessee, who recorded on Sun Records in the 1950s and on Stax Records in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Wyomia Tyus (born August 29, 1945 in Griffin, Georgia) is an American athlete, and the first woman to retain the Olympic title in the 100 m. ... Tina Tyus-Shaw (born in Griffin, Georgia) is a television news anchor and journalist at WSAV-TV in Savannah, Georgia. ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ... Moses Gunn (October 2, 1929 – December 16, 1993) was an American actor. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tennessee State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (284 words)
Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912.
This university is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award 42 baccalaureate degrees, 21 master's degrees, as well as the two-year Associate of Science degree in nursing and dental hygiene, and doctoral degrees in public administration, administration and supervision, curriculum and instruction and psychology.
While preserving the rich heritage and tradition as a historically fl college, Tennessee State remains committed to the education of its student body and promotes diversity and access without regard to race, gender, religion, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status.
Middle Tennessee State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2593 words)
The university's main athletics building (which houses the basketball arena and athletic department offices and was built in 1973) is named in honor of Charles M. Murphy, standout MTSU athlete in the 1930s.
Though the official reason is not known, speculation centers on The University Of Tennessee's efforts to stop such a change, so "UMT" would not be confused as being a member of the UT system, the other higher education organization in Tennessee.
Floyd Stadium, the university's football field, is thought to be the geographic center of Tennessee, though the official marker sits approximately a half-mile (800 m) north of the stadium on Old Lascassas Pike.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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