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Encyclopedia > Tennessee Performing Arts Center
The revamped façade of the Tennessee Performing Arts Center in Nashville opened in 2003.
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The revamped façade of the Tennessee Performing Arts Center in Nashville opened in 2003.

The Tennessee Performing Arts Center, or TPAC, is located in the James K. Polk Cultural Center at 505 Deaderick Street in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, occupying an entire city block between 5th and 6th Avenues North and Deaderick and Union Streets. Also housing the Tennessee State Museum, the cultural center adjoins the 18 story James K. Polk Office Tower. For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... Nickname: Music City Official website: http://www. ...


The idea for a large-scale performing arts facility developed in 1972 when Martha Rivers Ingram was appointed to the advisory board of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC. She proposed a similar center for her home city of Nashville. Ingram's proposal involved a public-private partnership that would operate within a state-owned facility. Her idea met with considerable resistance, but she persevered—for eight years and during the terms of three governors. The result was the Tennessee Performing Arts Center, or TPAC, a three-theater facility located beneath a state office building across the street from the Tennessee State Capitol. [1] In 1981, TPAC opened as the state's premier theater venue. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1972 calendar). ... Martha Robinson Rivers Ingram (born 20 August 1936) is the widow of Erskine Bronson Ingram, who inherited his fathers petroleum and barge empire in 1963. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The Tennessee State Capitol, located in Nashville, Tennessee, is the home of the Tennessee legislature. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The performance venues are named for the three Presidents of the United States who hailed from Tennessee: Andrew Jackson Hall (2,472 seats), James K. Polk Theater (1,075 seats) and the Andrew Johnson Theater (256 seats). TPAC also governs the War Memorial Auditorium (1,661 seats), a historic building that anchors War Memorial Plaza across 6th Avenue North from the Center. The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 195 km 710 km 2. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... For other people named Andrew Johnson, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Among its many operations, TPAC presents a series of touring Broadway shows and special engagements, and administers a comprehensive education program. Martha Rivers Ingram and her supporters also raised an endowment to defray operating losses and to fund a program that grooms future audiences for TPAC performances. The endowment goal was $3.5 million, and they surpassed it, raising $5 million. Today, the endowment has grown to $20 million. Each year, more than 100,000 students, from kindergarten through 12th grade, are brought to Nashville for performances by Nashville Ballet, the Nashville Opera, the Nashville Symphony and the Tennessee Repertory Theatre, which are all resident performing arts groups of TPAC and provide year-round programming. Other companies also use TPAC's facilities for plays, dance performances, concerts and other cultural programs.


TPAC also hosted the Tennessee Bicentennial Arts and Entertainment Festival in 1996. In 2003, a major renovation brought some embarrassment and controversy because artwork inlaid into the new lobby floor featured a number of misspelled words. [2] 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Tennessee Performing Arts Center Management Corporation is governed by a 20-member Board of Directors. Eight of these directors are appointed by the Tennessee Performing Arts Foundation (the Foundation that led the efforts for TPAC and raised an endowment to support TPAC operations). Four Directors are named by the Tennessee Arts Commission and four directors are named by the Governor of Tennessee (one of the Governor's appointees must be the Commissioner of Education of the State of Tennessee (or his/her designate). The TPAC Board itself may elect up to four members. Directors serve for a term of three years. The board usually meets four times each year in Nashville. Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nashville Hotels: Tennessee Performing Arts Center (151 words)
Tennessee Performing Arts Center has many hotels located within 5 miles.
The Tennessee Performing Arts Center offers a variety of entertainment, from funk to symphony.
The building also houses the Tennessee State Museum, the cultural center adjoins the 18 story James K. Polk Office Tower.
Jackson-Crockett's Nashville Guide: Fun & Games (1490 words)
The Tennessee Performing Arts Center is busting at the seams and scheduled for a major renovation in 2002, and a new symphony hall seems imminent.
The Tennessee Performing Arts Center's three halls are typically booked nearly 365 nights per year with music such as the Nashville Symphony, plays by the Tennessee Repertory Theater, dance, touring Broadway companies and others and all manner of other performances.
The Tennessee Volunteers have plenty of partisans in Nashville, though the University of Tennessee is in Knoxville.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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