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Encyclopedia > Tennessee General Assembly

The Tennessee General Assembly is the formal name of the legislature of the U.S. state of Tennessee. Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis (largest metropolitan area is Nashville) Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ...

Contents


Construction

According to the Tennessee State Constitution of 1870, the General Assembly is a bicameral legislature and consists of a Senate of thirty-three members and a House of Representatives of ninety-nine members. The representatives are elected to two-year terms; according to a 1966 constitutional amendment the senators are elected to four-year terms which are staggered, with the districts with even numbers being elected in the year of Presidential elections and the those in the districts with odd numbers being elected in the years of Tennessee gubernatorial elections. The Tennessee State Constitution defines the form, structure, activities, character, and fundamental rules (and means for changing them) of the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Tennessee State Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ...


Recent changes

The 1966 amendments also changed the regular sessions from being held biennially to annually, and implemented a salary for legislators, as opposed to expense money only, for the first time. (At that time, it was set at $1,800 per year, it has since been increased several times but is still only $16,500 per year.) To keep the legislature a part-time body, it is limited to ninety legislative days per two-year term, plus up to fifteen days for organizational purposes at the start of each term. If it remains in session longer than this, legislators cease to draw their expense money, currently set at $141 per legislative day. Legislators also receive an "office allowance" of $1000 per month, obstensibly for the maintenance of an office area devoted to their legislative work in their homes or elsewhere within their district. (Traditionally it has been easier politically to raise the per diem and office allowance than the salary.) The speaker of each house is entitled to a salary triple that of other members. Under a law enacted in 2004, in the future legislators will receive a raise equally to that given to state employees the previous year, if any. The governor may also call "extraordinary sessions", limited to the topic or topics outlined in the call, limited to another twenty days. Two-thirds of each house may also initiate such a call by petitioning for it. The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (i. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Work

The expense per diem money is a boon to legislators who live within a realistic commuting distance of Nashville, but is a limiting factor in the lifestyle of those who live farther away; many share apartments during the term. (The allowance, if claimed, is taxable income for federal income tax purposes for those legislators living within a 50-mile radius of Nashville, the state capital.) Generally speaking, "legislative days" are scheduled no more than three days a week during the session, Tuesdays through Thursday, with Monday used primarily for committee meetings and hearings rather than actual sessions. Sessions begin each year in January and usually end by May; during recent fiscal crises meetings have spilled on into July. The time limit on reimbursed working days and the fact that the Tennessee state government fiscal year is still on a July 1June 30 basis puts considerable time pressure on the General Assembly, especially with regard to the adoption of a budget. Per diem, or per day, is a specific amount of money an organization allows an individual to spend per day. ... Downtown Nashville at dusk, viewed from the Gateway Bridge Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... This article is about the month of May. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining, and the last day of June. ...


Membership in the legislature is best regarded as being a full-time job during the session and a part time job the rest of the year due to committee meetings and hearings (for which legislators are reimbursed their expenses and receive a mileage allowance). A few members are on enough committees to make something of a living from being legislators; most are independent business people and attorneys, although the latter group is perhaps no longer the absolute majority of members that it at one time comprised. An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ...


Lobbyists are not allowed to share meals with legislators on an individual basis, but are not forbidden from inviting the entire legislature or selected groups to events honoring them, which has become a primary means of lobbying. Members are also forbidden from holding campaign fundraising events for themselves during the time they are actually in session. Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ...


Each house sets its own rules and elects its own speaker; the Speaker of the Senate carries the additional title and office of Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee. For over three decades, both speakers have been from West Tennessee; this has caused considerable resentment in the eastern two-thirds of the state. Since 1971, Tennessee has had the same Lieutenant Governor, John Wilder. The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (i. ... The Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee is the Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate and first in line in the succession to the office of Governor of Tennessee in the event of the death, resignation, or removal from office through impeachment and conviction of the Governor. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... John Shelton Wilder (born 1921) has served as Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee since 1971. ...


The General Assembly districts of both houses are supposed to be reapportioned based on population as determined by the U.S. federal census on a deciennial basis; in practice this was not done between 1902 and 1962, a fact resulting in the United States Supreme Court decision in Baker v. Carr (369 US 186) required this action to be taken and subjected it to judicial review. Aftwerwards, there have been other lawsuits, including one which resulted in an order for the body to create a black-majority district in West Tennessee in the House in the late 1990s. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Baker v. ... Judicial review is the power of a court to review a law or an official act of a government employee or agent; for example, although the basis is different in different countries, as unconstitutional or violating of basic principles of justice. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but keeping the same mind-set. ...


Powers

Appointments

The General Assembly also selects the members of the State Election Commission. It selects three members from the majority party (the one controlling the majority of the 132 total seats). In theory, they then select the members of the 95 county election commissions; in practice the General Assembly members tell which members of their party from their districts should be elected and the parties themselves select the members from the party which is not represented in that county by either a state senator or a state representative. Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ...


According to the state constitution, the Secretary of State, State Treasurer, and the Comptroller of the Treasury, who serves many of the functions of an auditor, are selected by the General Assembly in joint convention, where each member of the General Assembly is accorded a single vote and the office is awarded to the first candidate to receive a majority of the votes (67 of 132). A contested gubernatorial election is also to be decided by a joint convention of the General Assembly according to statuory law; the General Assembly is also to decide the election by joint convention according to the constitution in the event of an exact tie in the popular vote, an extremely unlikely proposition. In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Audit can refer to: Telecommunication audit Financial audit Performance audit Completion of a course of study for which no assessment is completed or grade awarded; especially audit is awarded to those who have elected not to receive a letter grade for a course in which letter grades typically awarded. ... In U.S. politics, a joint convention is a meeting of both houses of a bicameral legislature in one place, generally for a specific purpose. ...


Amending the State Constitution

The General Assembly can propos amendments to the state constitution, but only through one of two time-consuming processes: ...


For the legislature to propose amendments to the state constitution directly, an amendment must first be passed by an absolute majority of the membership of each house during one term of the Assembly. Then, during the next General Assembly term, each house must pass the amendment again, this time by a two-thirds majority. The amendment must then be put on the statewide ballot, but only at a time when an election for governor is also being held. The amendment to be passed must receive over half of the total votes cast in the gubernatorial election in order to be ratified and come into effect. The 1870 constitution of Tennessee had never been amended in this manner until 1998, when the "Victims' Rights Amendment" was added; a similar process was used in 2002 to enact the state lottery. In 2005 the "Defense of Marriage Amendment" was approved for submission to the voters in 2006. Ratification is the process of adopting an international treaty, or a constitution or other nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple subnational entities. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A lottery is a popular form of gambling which involves the drawing of lots for a prize. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Defense of marriage amendments are U.S. state constitutional amendments that have been proposed, and in some instances adopted, to prevent the legalization of gay marriage. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The more usual method of amending the state constitution, and the one used in the past (all amendments prior to 1998), is for the General Assembly to put on the ballot the question of whether a limited constitutional convention should be called for the purpose of considering amendments to certain specified provisions of the constitution. If the voters approve this in a statewide election they then, at the next statewide election, elect delegates to this convention. This body then meets (in the House chamber of the State Capitol) and makes its recommendations. These recommendations can be voted on in any election, either one specially called or in conjunction with other statewide elections, and need only pass by a majority of those casting votes. This method can not be employed more often than once every six years.


See the article on the Tennessee State Constitution for more information. The Tennessee State Constitution defines the form, structure, activities, character, and fundamental rules (and means for changing them) of the U.S. State of Tennessee. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tennessee General Assembly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1171 words)
The Tennessee General Assembly is the formal name of the legislature of the U.S. state of Tennessee.
According to the Tennessee State Constitution of 1870, the General Assembly is a bicameral legislature and consists of a Senate of thirty-three members and a House of Representatives of ninety-nine members.
The General Assembly districts of both houses are supposed to be reapportioned based on population as determined by the U.S. federal census on a deciennial basis; in practice this was not done between 1902 and 1962, a fact resulting in the United States Supreme Court decision in Baker v.
General assembly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (170 words)
The General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, representing Unitarian churches in the United Kingdom.
The general assembly or landsgemeinde of all citizens used as an institution of direct democracy in some Swiss cantons.
Generally, an official session of the members, or representative members, of a union, church, association, or similar organization.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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