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Encyclopedia > Tennessee
State of Tennessee
Flag of Tennessee State seal of Tennessee
Flag Seal
Nickname(s): Volunteer State
Motto(s): Agriculture and commerce
Official language(s) English
Capital Nashville
Largest city Memphis
Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area
Area  Ranked 36th
 - Total 42,169 sq mi
(109,247 km²)
 - Width 120 miles (195 km)
 - Length 440 miles (710 km)
 - % water 2.2
 - Latitude 34° 59′ N to 36° 41′ N
 - Longitude 81° 39′ W to 90° 19′ W
Population  Ranked 17th
 - Total 5,689,283
 - Density 138.0/sq mi 
53.29/km² (19th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Clingmans Dome[1]
6,643 ft  (2,026 m)
 - Mean 900 ft  (280 m)
 - Lowest point Mississippi River[1]
178 ft  (54 m)
Admission to Union  June 1, 1796 (16th)
Governor Phil Bredesen (D)
U.S. Senators Lamar Alexander (R)
Bob Corker (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zones  
 - East Tennessee Eastern: UTC-5/-4
 - Middle and West Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations TN Tenn. US-TN
Web site www.tennessee.gov

Tennessee (IPA: /ˌtɛnɨˈsiː/) is a state located in the Southern United States. In 1796, it became the sixteenth state to join the Union. Tennessee is known as the "Volunteer State", a nickname earned during the War of 1812 because of the prominent role played by volunteer soldiers from Tennessee, especially during the Battle of New Orleans.[2] The capital city is Nashville, and the largest city is Memphis. The term Tennessee can refer to: The state of Tennessee One of two Armies of Tennessee in the American Civil War The ship SS Republic, seized by the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War and rechristened the CSS Tennessee for use in the Confederate States Navy Two... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Tennesseestateseallrg. ... The flag of Tennessee The flag of Tennessee consists of three stars in a circle on a field of red, with a strip of blue on the fly. ... The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee An official Great Seal of Tennessee is provided for the in the Constitution of the State of Tennessee of 6 Febuary 1796. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_TN.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tennessee ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... The Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, TN is the 39th largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States[1] and the largest metropolitan area in the state of Tennessee, encompassing its north central section. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Clingmans Dome (or Clingmans Dome) is, at an elevation of 6,643 feet (2,025 metres), the highest point both in the state of Tennessee and on the Appalachian Trail. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Philip Norman Phil Bredesen (born November 21, 1943) is the 48th Governor of Tennessee, having served since 2003. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Tennessee to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Middle Tennessee is a distinct portion of the state of Tennessee, delineated according to law as well as custom. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 is the second part of the ISO 3166 standard. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Historic Southern United States. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Alexander Cochrane Sir Edward M. Pakenham† John Keane John Lambert Andrew Jackson William Carroll John Coffee Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Geography

Map of Tennessee - PDF
Map of Tennessee - PDF

Tennessee lies adjacent to eight other states: Kentucky and Virginia to the north; North Carolina to the east; Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi on the south; and Arkansas and Missouri on the Mississippi River to the west. Tennessee ties Missouri as the states bordering the most other states. The state is trisected by the Tennessee River. The highest point in the state is the peak of Clingmans Dome at 6,643 feet (2,025 m),[1] which lies on Tennessee's eastern border, and is the highest point on the Appalachian Trail. The lowest point is the Mississippi River at the Mississippi state line. The geographical center of the state is located in Murfreesboro on Old Lascassas Pike (just down the road from Middle Tennessee State University). It is marked by a roadside monument. Download high resolution version (801x621, 82 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Tennessee Categories: National Atlas images | Tennessee maps ... Download high resolution version (801x621, 82 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Tennessee Categories: National Atlas images | Tennessee maps ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... Clingmans Dome (or Clingmans Dome) is, at an elevation of 6,643 feet (2,025 metres), the highest point both in the state of Tennessee and on the Appalachian Trail. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply The A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... Middle Tennessee State University (founded September 11, 1911, and commonly abbreviated as MTSU) is an American university located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ...


The state of Tennessee is geographically and constitutionally divided into three Grand Divisions: East Tennessee, Middle Tennessee, and West Tennessee. The Grand Divisions are geographic, cultural, and legally recognized regions each compromising a third of the State of Tennessee. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... Middle Tennessee is a distinct portion of the state of Tennessee, delineated according to law as well as custom. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


Tennessee features six principal physiographic regions: the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Ridge and Valley Region, the Cumberland Plateau, the Highland Rim, the Nashville Basin, and the Gulf Coastal Plain. Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The Ridge-and-valley Appalachians are a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania and southward into Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. ... The Cumberland Plateau includes much of eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia in the United States. ... The Highland Rim is a geographic term for the area in Tennessee surrounding the Central Basin. ... The Nashville Basin is a geographic term used to describe the area surrounding Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Gulf Coastal Plain extends from the Florida Parishes of Louisiana over most of Mississippi, some of western Tennessee and Kentucky, the southwestern 2/3 of Alabama, and the western panhandle of Florida. ...


See also: List of counties in Tennessee List of Tennessee counties: Anderson County Bedford County Benton County Bledsoe County Blount County Bradley County Campbell County Cannon County Carroll County Carter County Cheatham County Chester County Clairborne County Clay County Cocke County Coffee County Crockett County Cumberland County Davidson County Decatur County DeKalb County Dickson County Dyer County...


East Tennessee

The Blue Ridge area lies on the eastern edge of Tennessee, bordering North Carolina. This region of Tennessee is characterized by high mountains, including the Great Smoky Mountains, the Chilhowee Mountains, the Unicoi Range, and the Iron Mountains range. The average elevation of the Blue Ridge area is 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. Clingman's Dome is located in this region. Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... The Unicoi Range is a southern mountain range of the Appalachian Mountains that runs from Tennessee and North Carolina into north Georgia. ... The Iron Mountains are a minor range of the Appalachian Mountains. ... Clingmans Dome (or Clingmans Dome) is, at an elevation of 6,643 feet or 2,025 meters, the highest point both in the state of Tennessee and on the Appalachian Trail. ...


Stretching west from the Blue Ridge for approximately 55 miles (88 km) is the Ridge and Valley region, in which numerous tributaries join to form the Tennessee River in the Tennessee Valley. This area of Tennessee is covered by fertile valleys separated by wooded ridges, such as Bays Mountain and Clinch Mountain. The western section of the Tennessee valley, where the depressions become broader and the ridges become lower, is called the Great Valley. In this valley are numerous towns and the region's two urban areas, Knoxville, and Chattanooga. “Miles” redirects here. ... The Tennessee Valley is the drainage basin of the Tennessee River and is largely within the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley In geology, a valley (also called a vale or dale) is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. ... Bays Mountain is a ridge of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, located in eastern Tennessee. ... Clinch Mountain is a ridge in the U.S. states of Tennessee and Virginia, lying in the ridge-and-valley Appalachians. ... The Great Valley, also called the Great Appalachian Valley or Great Valley Region, is one of the major landform features of eastern North America. ... Alternate uses: Knoxville (disambiguation) Knoxville is a city located in Knox County, Tennessee, United States. ... Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ...


Middle Tennessee

To the west of East Tennessee lies the Cumberland Plateau. This area is covered with flat-topped mountains separated by sharp valleys. The elevation of the Cumberland Plateau ranges from 1,500 to 1,800 feet (450 to 550 m) above sea level. The Cumberland Plateau includes much of eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia in the United States. ...


West of the Cumberland Plateau is the Highland Rim, an elevated plain that surrounds the Nashville Basin. The northern section of the Highland Rim, known for its high tobacco production, is sometimes called the Pennyroyal Plateau and is located in primarily in Southwestern Kentucky. The Nashville Basin is characterized by rich, fertile farm country and high natural wildlife diversity. The Highland Rim is a geographic term for the area in Tennessee surrounding the Central Basin. ... The Nashville Basin is a geographic term used to describe the area surrounding Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Pennyroyal Plateau, or, as its more commonly called in Kentucky, the Pennyrile, is a large area of the state that features rolling hills, caves, and karst topography in general. ...


Middle Tennessee was a common destination of settlers crossing the Appalachians in the late 1700s and early 1800s. An important trading route called the Natchez Trace, first used by Native Americans, connected Middle Tennessee to the lower Mississippi River town of Natchez. Today the route of the Natchez Trace is a scenic highway called the Natchez Trace Parkway. The Natchez Trace was a 440-mile-long path extending from Natchez, Mississippi to Nashville, Tennessee, linking the Cumberland, the Tennessee and Mississippi rivers. ... Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444 mile (715 km) long parkway, in the form of a limited-access two-lane road, in the southeastern United States. ...


Many biologists study the area's salamander species because the diversity is greater there than anywhere else in the U.S. This is thought to be because of the clean Appalachian foothill springs that abound in the area. The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ...


Some of the last remaining large American Chestnut trees still grow in this region and are being used to help breed blight resistant trees. Binomial name (Marsh. ... Blight is the name for any of a number of diseases affecting many species of plants. ...


West Tennessee

West of the Highland Rim and Nashville Basin is the Gulf Coastal Plain, which includes the Mississippi embayment. The Gulf Coastal Plain is, in terms of area, the predominant land region in Tennessee. It is part of the large geographic land area that begins at the Gulf of Mexico and extends north into southern Illinois. In Tennessee, the Gulf Coastal Plain is divided into three sections that extend from the Tennessee River in the east to the Mississippi River in the west. The easternmost section, about 10 miles (16 km) in width, consists of hilly land that runs along the western bank of the Tennessee River. To the west of this narrow strip of land is a wide area of rolling hills and streams that stretches all the way to Memphis; this area is called the Tennessee Bottoms or bottom land. In Memphis, the Tennessee Bottoms end in steep bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River. To the west of the Tennessee Bottoms is the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, less than 300 feet (90 m) above sea level. This area of lowlands, flood plains, and swamp land is sometimes referred to as The Delta region. The Gulf Coastal Plain extends from the Florida Parishes of Louisiana over most of Mississippi, some of western Tennessee and Kentucky, the southwestern 2/3 of Alabama, and the western panhandle of Florida. ... This article may be too technical for most readers to understand. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... The Mississippi River Alluvial Plain, the largest ecoregion in Louisiana, covers some 12,350 square miles (31,990 square kilometres) of the state. ... The shared flood plain of the Yazoo and Mississippi Rivers The Mississippi Delta is the distinct northwest section of the state of Mississippi that lies between the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers. ...


Most of West Tennessee remained Indian land until the Chickasaw Cession of 1818, when the Chickasaw ceded their land between the Tennessee River and the Mississippi River. The portion of the Chickasaw Cession that lies in Kentucky is known today as the Jackson Purchase. For other uses, see Chickasaw (disambiguation). ... The Jackson Purchase is a region in the state of Kentucky bounded by the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers. ...


Public lands

Areas under the control and management of the National Park Service include: The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

Fifty-four state parks, covering some 132,000 acres (534 km²) as well as parts of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Cherokee National Forest, and Cumberland Gap National Historical Park are in Tennessee. Sportsmen and visitors are attracted to Reelfoot Lake, originally formed by an earthquake; stumps and other remains of a once dense forest, together with the lotus bed covering the shallow waters, give the lake an eerie beauty. Andrew Johnson National Historic Site is a National Historic Site in Greeneville, Tennessee maintained by the National Park Service. ... Greeneville is a town in Greene County, Tennessee, United States. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail, is a 2,174 mile (3500 km) marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, running from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mt. ... The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area preserves the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River in northern Tennessee and southern Kentucky. ... Fort Donelson National Battlefield preserves Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign, in which Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Admiral Andrew Hull Foote captured three forts, opened two rivers, and received national recognition for victories in February 1862, the... Fort Donelson National Battlefield is a unit of the National Park Service in Dover, Tennessee. ... Dover is a city located in Stewart County, Tennessee. ... Cades Cove panorama The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a United States National Park that straddles the ridgeline of the Great Smoky Mountains, part of the Blue Ridge Mountains which are a division of the larger Appalachian Mountain chain. ... The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444 mile (715 km) long parkway, in the form of a limited-access two-lane road, in the southeastern United States. ... The Obed River is a stream draining a part of the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. ... Wartburg is a city located in Morgan County, Tennessee. ... The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail (OVHT) is part of the U.S. National Trails System. ... Shiloh National Cemetery Shiloh National Military Park is a unit of the National Park Service in the town of Shiloh, about 9 miles (14 km) south of Savannah, Tennessee. ... This battlefield monument, Passing of Honor, by artist G. L. Sanders was unveiled by the state of Tennessee in 2005, the largest such monument added to the park in 88 years. ... Shiloh is the name of six places in the State of Tennessee in the United States of America: Shiloh, Bedford County, Tennessee Shiloh, Carroll County, Tennessee Shiloh, Hardin County, Tennessee Shiloh, Hawkins County, Tennessee Shiloh, Montgomery County, Tennessee Shiloh, Rutherford County, Tennessee This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Stones River National Battlefield is a unit of the National Park Service at 3501 Old Nashville Highway in Murfreesboro, Tennessee along the Stones River. ... Stones River National Battlefield is a unit of the National Park Service at 3501 Old Nashville Highway in Murfreesboro, Tennessee along the Stones River. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... The Trail of Tears refers to the forced removal of the Cherokee American Indian tribe by the U.S. federal government, which resulted in the deaths of thousands of Cherokee Indians. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Cherokee National Forest is a large National Forest operated by the U.S. Forest Service. ... Established on June 11, 1940, Cumberland Gap National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located in southeastern Kentucky. ... Reelfoot Lake is a shallow natural lake located in the extreme northwest portion of Tennessee, United States of America, just south of the Kentucky line. ... The New Madrid Earthquake, the largest earthquake ever recorded in the contiguous United States, occurred on February 7, 1812. ...


See also: List of Tennessee state parks This is a list of state parks in the U.S. state of Tennessee, organized by administrative region: West Region Big Cypress Tree State Park (Natural Area) Big Hill Pond State Park Chickasaw State Park Fort Pillow State Park (Historic Park) Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park Nathan Bedford Forest State...


Climate

Most of the state has a humid subtropical climate, with the exception of the higher mountains, which have a humid continental climate. The Gulf of Mexico is the dominant factor in the climate of Tennessee, with winds from the south being responsible for most of the state's annual precipitation. Generally, the state has hot summers and mild to cool winters with generous precipitation throughout the year. On average the state receives 50 inches (130 cm) of precipitation annually. Snowfall ranges from 5 inches (13 cm) in West Tennessee to over 16 inches (41 cm) in the higher mountains in East Tennessee.[3] The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


Summers in the state are generally hot, with most of the state averaging a high of around 90 °F (32 °C) during the summer months. Summer nights tend to be cooler in East Tennessee. Winters tend to be mild to cool, increasing in coolness at higher elevations and in the east. Generally, for areas outside the highest mountains, the average overnight lows are near freezing for most of the state.


While the state is far enough from the coast to avoid any direct impact from a hurricane, the location of the state makes it likely to be impacted from the remnants of tropical cyclones which weaken over land and can cause significant rainfall. The state averages around 50 days of thunderstorms per year, some of which can be quite severe. Tornadoes are possible throughout the state, with West Tennessee slightly more vulnerable.[4] On average, the state has 15 tornadoes per year.[5] Tornadoes in Tennessee can be severe, and Tennessee leads the nation in the percentage of total tornadoes which have fatalities.[6] Winter storms are an occasional problem—made worse by a lack of snow removal equipment and a population which might not be accustomed or equipped to travel in snow—although ice storms are a more likely occurrence. Fog is a persistent problem in parts of the state, especially in much of the Smoky Mountains. This article is about weather phenomena. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Tennessee Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Chattanooga 49/30 54/33 63/40 72/47 79/56 86/65 90/69 89/68 82/62 72/48 61/40 52/33
Knoxville 46/29 52/32 60/39 69/47 76/56 84/64 87/68 86/67 81/61 70/48 59/39 50/32
Memphis 49/31 54/36 63/44 72/52 80/61 88/69 92/73 91/71 85/64 75/52 62/43 52/34
Nashville 46/28 51/31 61/39 70/47 78/57 85/65 89/70 88/68 82/61 71/49 59/40 49/32
Oak Ridge 46/27 52/30 61/37 70/44 78/53 85/62 88/66 87/65 81/59 71/46 59/36 49/30
[2]

History

Main article: History of Tennessee

The area now known as Tennessee was first settled by Paleo-Indians nearly 11,000 years ago. The names of the cultural groups that inhabited the area between first settlement and the time of European contact are unknown, but several distinct cultural phases have been named by archaeologists, including Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian, whose chiefdoms were the cultural predecessors of the Muscogee people who inhabited the Tennessee River Valley prior to Cherokee migration into the river's headwaters. The Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville has been the sight of much of the States history. ... Paleo-Indians is an English term used to refer to the ancient peoples of America who were present at the end of the last Ice Age. ... The name Archaic Period is given by archaeologists to the earliest periods of a culture. ... The Woodland period of North American pre-Columbian cultures lasted roughly from 1000 BCE to 1000 CE. The term Woodland was coined in the 1930s and refers to prehistoric sites between the Archaic period and the Mississippian cultures. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... The Creek are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ...


When Spanish explorers first visited the area, led by Hernando de Soto in 1539–43, it was inhabited by tribes of Muscogee and Yuchi people. Possibly because of European diseases devastating the Native tribes, which would have left a population vacuum, and also from expanding European settlement in the north, the Cherokee moved south from the area now called Virginia. As European colonists spread into the area, the native populations were forcibly displaced to the south and west, including all Muscogee and Yuchi peoples, the Chickasaw, and Choctaw. A Conquistador (Spanish: []) (English: Conqueror) was a Spanish soldier, explorer and adventurer who took part in the gradual invasion and conquering of much of the Americas and Asia Pacific, bringing them under Spanish colonial rule between the 15th and 19th centuries. ... For the Peruvian economist, see Hernando de Soto (economist). ... The Creek are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... Original territory of the Yuchi Tribe The Yuchi, also spelled Euchee and Uchee, are a Native American Indian tribe previously living in the eastern Tennessee River valley in Tennessee, northern Georgia and northern Alabama who now primarily live in the northeastern Oklahoma area. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chickasaw (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ...


Early during the American Revolutionary War, Fort Watauga at Sycamore Shoals (in present day Elizabethton) was attacked in 1776 by Dragging Canoe and his warring faction of Cherokee (also referred to by settlers as the Chickamauga) opposed to the Transylvania Purchase and aligned with the British Loyalists. The lives of many settlers were spared through the warnings of Dragging Canoe's cousin Nancy Ward. The frontier fort on the banks of the Watauga River later served as a 1780 staging area for the Overmountain Men in preparation to trek over the Great Smoky Mountains, to engage, and to later defeat the British Army at the Battle of Kings Mountain in North Carolina. The Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War became the central area of operations on land after France entered the war on the side of the United States. ... Sycamore Shoals is a stretch of the Watauga River near present-day Elizabethton, Tennessee, USA, offering a ford crossing of the river. ... Elizabethton is the county seat of Carter County, Tennessee. ... Dragging Canoe (1730? – 1792) was an American Indian war leader who led a dissident band of young Cherokees against the United States in the American Revolutionary War. ... Chickamauga is several things: Chikamaka Cherokees of the Old South a People in Transition by Henry Thompson Malone, The University of Georgia Press Athens Chickamauga (people), a Native American nation Chickamauga, Georgia The American Civil War Battle of Chickamauga The Rock of Chickamauga a nickname for Gen. ... Transylvania was a short-lived colony primarily in what is now the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Drawing of Nancy Ward by George Catlin Nanye-hi (One Who Goes About), known in English as Nancy Ward (c. ... The Watauga River rises in Watauga County, North Carolina, a mountainous county in western North Carolina along the Tennessee state line. ... // Americans settlers of largely Scotch-Irish descent settled over the Smokies into the west so therefore became known as the Over Mountain Men. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... Combatants Patriot militia Loyalist militia Commanders William Campbell, John Sevier, Frederick Hambright, Joseph McDowell, Benjamin Cleveland, James Williams†, Isaac Shelby Patrick Ferguson† Strength 900 (+500 nearby) 1,100 (+200 nearby) Casualties 28 killed (including James Williams), 62 wounded 157 killed, 163 wounded, 698 captured (nine of the captured were later... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Eight counties of western North Carolina (and now part of Tennessee) broke off from that state in the late 1780s and formed the abortive State of Franklin. Efforts to obtain admission to the Union failed, and the counties had re-joined North Carolina by 1790. North Carolina ceded the area to the federal government in 1790, after which it was organized into the Southwest Territory. In an effort to encourage settlers to move west into the new territory of Tennessee, in 1787 the mother state of North Carolina ordered a road to be cut to take settlers into the Cumberland Settlements—from the south end of Clinch Mountain (in East Tennessee) to French Lick (Nashville). The Trace was called the “North Carolina Road” or “Avery’s Trace,” and sometimes “The Wilderness Road”. It should not be confused with Daniel Boone's road through Cumberland Gap. Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... The State of Franklin The State of Franklin was an autonomous, secessionist territory of the United States created, not long after the end of the American Revolution, from territory that had been ceded by North Carolina to the federal government. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ... Clinch Mountain is a ridge in the U.S. states of Tennessee and Virginia, lying in the ridge-and-valley Appalachians. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... Averys Trace was the principal road used by settlers to reach Tennessee from 1788 to the mid-1830s. ... Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52) Cumberland Gap (el. ...


Tennessee was admitted to the Union in 1796 as the 16th state. The state boundaries, according to the Constitution of the State of Tennessee, Article I, Section 31, stated that the beginning point for identifying the boundary was the extreme height of the Stone Mountain, at the place where the line of Virginia intersects it, and basically ran the extreme heights of mountain chains through the Appalachian Mountains separating North Carolina from Tennessee past the Indian towns of Cowee and Old Chota, thence along the main ridge of the said mountain (Unicoi Mountain) to the southern boundary of the state; all the territory, lands and waters lying west of said line are included in the boundaries and limits of the newly formed state of Tennessee. Part of the provision also stated that the limits and jurisdiction of the state would include future land acquisition, referencing possible land trade with other states, or the acquisition of territory from west of the Mississippi River.


The word Tennessee comes from the Cherokee town Tanasi, which along with its neighbor town Chota was one of the most important Cherokee towns and often referred to as the capital city of the Overhill Cherokee. The meaning of the word "tanasi" is lost (Mooney, 1900). Some believe that Tanasi may mean "River with a big bend," referring to the Tennessee River, or that the word Tanasi may have meant "gathering place", as a reference to government or worship for the Native American tribes pre-existent to the pioneer era. Tanasi was the informal capital of the Cherokee nation in the 18th century. ... Chota was a Cherokee town on the outskirts of Tanasi near present-day Vonore, Tennessee. ... The Little Tennessee River, looking south from the Tellico Blockhouse The term Overhill Cherokee refers to the former Cherokee settlements located in what is now Tennessee in the Southeastern United States. ...


During the administration of U.S. President Martin Van Buren, nearly 17,000 Cherokees were uprooted from their homes between 1838 and 1839 and were forced by the U.S. military to march from "emigration depots" in Eastern Tennessee (such as Fort Cass) toward the more distant Indian Territory west of Arkansas. During this relocation an estimated 4,000 Cherokees died along the way west.[7] In the Cherokee language, the event is called Nunna daul Isunyi—"the Trail Where We Cried." The Cherokees were not the only Native Americans forced to emigrate as a result of the Indian Removal efforts of the United States, and so the phrase "Trail of Tears" is sometimes used to refer to similar events endured by other Native American peoples, especially among the "Five Civilized Tribes." The phrase originated as a description of the earlier emigration of the Choctaw nation. Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Fort Cass, established in 1835, was an important site during the Cherokee removal known as the Trail of Tears. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... Original distribution of the Cherokee language Cherokee (; Tsalagi) is an Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee people which uses a unique syllabary writing system. ... Indian Removal was a nineteenth century policy of the government of the United States that sought to relocate Native American tribes living east of the Mississippi River to lands west of the river. ... The Five Civilized Tribes is the term applied to five Native American nations, the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole, considered civilized by white Anais because they had adopted many of the colonists customs (including the ownership of plantations and black slaves) and had generally good relations with their neighbors. ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ...


Many major battles of the American Civil War were fought in Tennessee—most of them Union victories. It was the last border state to secede from the Union when it joined the Confederate States of America on June 8, 1861. Ulysses S. Grant and the U.S. Navy captured control of the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers in February 1862. They held off the Confederate counterattack at Shiloh in April. Memphis fell to the Union in June, following a naval battle on the Mississippi River in front of the city. Capture of Memphis and Nashville gave the Union control of the western and middle sections; this control was confirmed at the battle of Murfreesboro in early January 1863. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Shiloh may be: A name mentioned in the Bible: Shiloh (Biblical), meaning peace or: // Shiloh (river), stream in the Samarian mountains, originating at Biblical Shiloh. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Charles Henry Davis Charles Ellet, Jr. ...


The Confederates held East Tennessee despite the strength of Unionist sentiment there, with the exception of extremely pro-Confederate Sullivan County. The Confederates besieged Chattanooga in early fall 1863, but were driven off by Grant in November. Many of the Confederate defeats can be attributed to the poor strategic vision of General Braxton Bragg, who led the Army of Tennessee from Perryville, KY to Confederate defeat at Chattanooga. Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Braxton Bragg Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... The Army of Tennessee can refer to either of two American Civil War armies: Army of Tennessee, the Confederate army named after the state of Tennessee. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Don Carlos Buell Braxton Bragg Strength Army of the Ohio Army of Mississippi Casualties 4,211 3,196 The Battle of Perryville, also known as Battle at Perryville and Battle of Chaplin Hills, was an important but largely neglected encounter...


The last major battles came when the Confederates invaded Middle Tennessee in November 1864 and were checked at Franklin, then totally destroyed by George Thomas at Nashville, in December. Meanwhile Andrew Johnson, a civilian, was appointed military governor by President Abraham Lincoln. Battle of Franklin II Conflict American Civil War Date November 30, 1864 Place Williamson County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Franklin was a major engagement of the American Civil War fought at Franklin, Tennessee on November 30, 1864. ... General George H. Thomas George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 – March 28, 1870), the Rock of Chickamauga, was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general during the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Tennessee was already mostly held by Union forces when the Emancipation Proclamation was announced, hence it was not among the states enumerated in the Proclamation, and the Proclamation did not free any slaves there. Tennessee's legislature approved an amendment to the state constitution prohibiting slavery on February 22, 1865.[8] Voters in the state approved the amendment in March.[9] It also ratified the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (abolishing slavery in every state) on April 7, 1865. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Emancipation Proclamation Reproduction of the Emancipation Proclamation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two documents issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Amendment XIII in the National Archives The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution officially abolished, and continues to prohibit slavery and, with limited exceptions (those convicted of a crime), prohibits involuntary servitude. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Andrew Johnson (a War Democrat from Tennessee) had been elected Vice President with Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and became President after Lincoln's assassination in 1865. Under Johnson's lenient re-admission policy, Tennessee was the first of the seceding states to have its elected members readmitted to the U.S. Congress, on July 24, 1866. Because Tennessee had ratified the Fourteenth Amendment, it was the only one of the formerly seceded states that did not have a military governor during the Reconstruction period. is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


In 1897, the state celebrated its centennial of statehood (though one year late of the 1896 anniversary) with a great exposition in Nashville. A full scale replica of the Parthenon was constructed for the celebration, located in what is now Nashville's Centennial Park. The Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition was a Worlds Fair staged between May 1 and October 31 of 1897 in Nashville. ... The Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee is a full-scale replica of the original Parthenon in Athens. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... Centennial Park (Nashville) is a large urban park located approximately two miles (three km) west of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, across West End Avenue (U.S. Highway 70S) from the campus of Vanderbilt University and adjacent to the headquarters campus of the Hospital Corporation of America. ...


On August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the thirty-sixth and final state necessary to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provided women the right to vote. is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Amendment XIX in the National Archives Amendment XIX (the Nineteenth Amendment) allowed women the right to vote under official constitutional protection. ...


The need to create work for the unemployed during the Great Depression, a desire for rural electrification, the need to control annual spring floodings and improve shipping capacity on the Tennessee River were all factors that drove the Federal creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1933. Through the power of the TVA projects, Tennessee quickly became the nation's largest public utility supplier. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


During World War II, the availability of abundant TVA electrical power led the Manhattan Project to locate one of the principal sites for production and isolation of weapons-grade fissile material in East Tennessee. The planned community of Oak Ridge was built from scratch to provide accommodations for the facilities and workers. These sites are now Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 National Security Complex, and the East Tennessee Technology Park. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... This article or section should include material from Fissile material In nuclear engineering, a fissile material is one that is capable of sustaining a chain reaction of nuclear fission. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... Oak Ridge is an incorporated city in Anderson and Roane Counties in East Tennessee, about 25 miles northwest of Knoxville. ... A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ... Y-12 National Security Complex Operated by BWX Technologies Y‑12 for the National Nuclear Security Administration, Y‑12 plays a vital role in the U.S. Department of Energys Nuclear Weapons Complex. ...


Tennessee celebrated its bicentennial in 1996. With a yearlong statewide celebration entitled "Tennessee 200", it opened a new state park (Bicentennial Mall) at the foot of Capitol Hill in Nashville. Bicentennial Mall State Park is a state park is located in the shadow of the State Capitol in downtown Nashville, TN. The 19-acre park is designed to complement the Tennessee Capitol Building, give visitors a taste of Tennessees history and natural wonder, and to serve as a lasting... “Nashville” redirects here. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 35,691
1810 261,727
1820 422,823 61.6%
1830 681,904 61.3%
1840 829,210 21.6%
1870 1,258,520
1880 1,542,359 22.6%
1900 2,020,616
1910 2,184,789 8.1%
1920 2,337,885 7.0%
1930 2,616,556 11.9%
1940 2,915,841 11.4%
1950 3,291,718 12.9%
1960 3,567,089 8.4%
1970 3,923,687 10.0%
1980 4,591,120 17.0%
1990 4,877,185 6.2%
2000 5,689,283 16.7%

The center of population of Tennessee is located in Rutherford County, in the city of Murfreesboro [3]. The United States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Rutherford County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ...


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2006, Tennessee has an estimated population of 6,038,803, which is an increase of 83,058, or 1.4%, from the prior year and an increase of 349,541, or 6.1%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 142,266 people (that is 493,881 births minus 351,615 deaths) and an increase from net migration of 219,551 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 59,385 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 160,166 people.

Demographics of Tennessee (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native   -   NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 82.08% 16.81% 0.69% 1.22% 0.08%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.99% 0.14% 0.05% 0.03% 0.02%
2005 (total population) 81.53% 17.22% 0.69% 1.47% 0.09%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.81% 0.17% 0.06% 0.03% 0.02%
Growth 2000-2005 (total population) 4.11% 7.37% 3.86% 26.24% 12.40%
Growth 2000-2005 (non-Hispanic only) 3.02% 7.23% 2.41% 26.26% 12.66%
Growth 2000-2005 (Hispanic only) 48.16% 24.52% 22.34% 25.23% 11.23%
Tennessee Population Density Map
Tennessee Population Density Map

In 2000, the five most common self-reported ethnic groups in the state were: American (17.3%), African American (16.4%), Irish (9.3%), English (9.1%), and German (8.3%).[4] It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Tennessee_population_map. ... Image File history File links Tennessee_population_map. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


The state's African-American population is concentrated mainly in rural West and Middle Tennessee and the cities of Memphis, Nashville, Clarksville, Chattanooga, and Knoxville. Memphis has the largest percentage of African-American residents for any metropolitan area in the U.S. For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Clarksville (disambiguation). ... “Chattanooga” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ...


6.6% of Tennessee's population were reported as under 5 years of age, 24.6% under 18, and 12.4% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51.3% of the population.


Religion

The religious affiliations of the people of Tennessee are:

Source: American Religious Identification Survey (2001). 5% of the people surveyed refused to answer. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Alternate meanings: see Church of Christ (disambiguation). ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a large number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Church of God is a name used by numerous, mostly unrelated bodies, most of which descend from either Pentecostal/Holiness or Adventist traditions. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ...


Tennessee is home to several Protestant denominations, such as the Church of God in Christ, the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee), and the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The Southern Baptist Convention maintains its general headquarters in Nashville, where its Sunday School Board, along with publishing houses of several other denominations, is also located, along with publishing houses of several other denominations. For other uses, see Church of God. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Church of God (Cleveland) is... Replica of the log house in Dickson County, Tenn. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings...


The state's small Roman Catholic and Jewish communities are mainly centered in the metropolitan areas of Memphis, Nashville, and Knoxville. A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ...


Economy

According to U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2005 Tennessee's gross state product was $226.502 billion, making Tennessee the 18th largest economy in the nation. In 2003, the per capita personal income was $28,641, 36th in the nation, and 91% of the national per capita personal income of $31,472. In 2004, the median household income was $38,550, 41st in the nation, and 87% of the national median of $44,472. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ...


Major outputs for the state include textiles, cotton, cattle, and electrical power. As proof of interest in beef production, Tennessee has over 82,000 farms, and beef cattle are found in roughly 59 percent of the farms in the state. [5] Although cotton was an early crop in Tennessee, large-scale cultivation of the fiber did not begin until the 1820s with the opening of the land between the Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers. The upper wedge of the Mississippi Delta extends into southwestern Tennessee, and it was in this fertile section that cotton took hold. Currently West Tennessee is also heavily planted in soybeans, focusing on the northwest corner of the state.[10] Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ...


Major corporations with headquarters in Tennessee include FedEx Corporation, AutoZone Incorporated and International Paper, all based in Memphis. FedEx (NYSE: FDX), properly FedEx Corporation, is a company that offers overnight courier, ground, heavy freight, document copying and logistics services. ... AutoZone is major corporation based in Memphis, Tennessee which is engaged primarily in the business of the retail sale of automotive parts and accessories. ... International Paper (NYSE: IP) is an American pulp and paper company, the largest pulp and paper company in the world and the largest private owner of timberland in the United States. ...


The Tennessee income tax does not apply to salaries and wages, but most income from stocks, bonds and notes receivable is taxable. All taxable dividends and interest which exceed the $1,250 single exemption or the $2,500 joint exemption are taxable at the rate of 6%. The state's sales and use tax rate for most items is 7%. Food is taxed at a lower rate of 6%, but candy, dietary supplements and prepared food are taxed at the full 7% rate. Local sales taxes are collected in most jurisdictions, at rates varying from 1.5% to 2.75%, bringing the total sales tax to between 8.5% and 9.75%, one of the highest levels in the nation. Intangible property is assessed on the shares of stock of stockholders of any loan company, investment company, insurance company or for-profit cemetery companies. The assessment ratio is 40% of the value multiplied by the tax rate for the jurisdiction. Tennessee imposes an inheritance tax on decedents' estates that exceed maximum single exemption limits ($1,000,000 for deaths 2006 and after; [6]). Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States. ... Intangible property, also known as incorporeal property, describes something which a person or corporation can have ownership of and can transfer ownership of to another person or corporation, but has no physical substance. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Tennessee is a right to work state, as are most of its Southern neighbors. Unionization has historically been low and continues to decline as in most of the U.S. generally. Right-to-work laws are statutes enforced in twenty-two U.S. States, allowed under provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act, which prohibit trade unions from making membership or payment of dues or fees a condition of employment, either before or after hire. ...


Transportation

Interstate highways

Interstate 40 crosses the state in an east-west orientation. Its branch interstate highways include I-240 in Memphis; I-440 and I-840 in Nashville; and I-140 and I-640 in Knoxville. I-26, although technically an east-west interstate, runs from the North Carolina border below Johnson City to its terminus at Kingsport. I-24 is the other east-west interstate crossing Tennessee. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 40 Interstate 40 (abbreviated I-40) is a major west-east interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 240 is an Interstate highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Interstate 440 in Tennessee is an 8-mile-(13-km)-long loop connecting Interstate 40 and Interstate 24, bypassing downtown Nashville to the south. ... State Route 840 is a state highway built around Nashville, Tennessee. ... Interstate 140 is a spur route of Interstate 40 near Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Interstate 640 (abbreviated I-640) is a bypass of Interstate 40 running north of Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Interstate 26 (abbreviated I-26) is an east-west main route of the Interstate Highway System in the Southeastern United States. ... Johnson City is a city in Washington County, Tennessee; however a small part of the city is located within Sullivan County, Tennessee, to the northeast and Carter County, Tennessee, to the southeast. ... Kingsport is a city located primarily in Sullivan County, and also partially in Hawkins County, Tennessee, United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ...


In a north-south orientation are highways I-55, I-65, I-75, and I-81. Interstate 65 crosses the state through Nashville, while Interstate 75 serves Knoxville and Interstate 55 serves Memphis. Interstate 81 enters the state at Bristol and terminates at its junction with I-40 near Jefferson City. I-155 is a branch highway from I-55. Interstate 55 is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Interstate 65 is an interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 75 is an interstate highway in the midwest and southeastern United States. ... Interstate 81 is an interstate highway in the eastern part of the United States. ... Jefferson City is a city located in Jefferson County, Tennessee. ... Interstate 155 (abbreviated I-155) is an east-west spur beginning in far southeast Missouri. ...


Airports

Major airports within the state include Nashville International Airport (BNA), Memphis International Airport (MEM), McGhee Tyson Airport (TYS) in Knoxville, Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport (CHA), and Tri-Cities Regional Airport (TRI). Because Memphis International Airport is the major hub for FedEx Corporation, it is the world's largest air cargo operation. Nashville International Airport (IATA: BNA, ICAO: KBNA) is an airport in southeastern Nashville, Tennessee. ... Memphis International Airport (IATA: MEM, ICAO: KMEM) is a public airport located 3 miles (5 km) south of the city of Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee, USA. Northwest Airlines operates its third-largest passenger hub in Memphis, with routes to a number of destinations in North America, as well as... McGhee Tyson Airport (IATA: TYS, ICAO: KTYS) is an airport located in Alcoa, Tennessee, approximately 12 miles (19 km) south of downtown Knoxville. ... Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport (IATA: CHA, ICAO: KCHA), also known as Lovell Field, is a public airport operated by the Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport Authority, located in the city of Chattanooga in Hamilton County, Tennessee, USA. Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport has a single concourse. ... Tri-Cities Regional Airport (IATA: TRI, ICAO: KTRI) is a public airport serving the Tri-Cities area of Tennessee, located between the 3 cities comprising the area: Bristol, Johnson City, and Kingsport. ... FedEx (NYSE: FDX), properly FedEx Corporation, is a company that offers overnight courier, ground, heavy freight, document copying and logistics services. ... Worlds busiest airport is a claim that is fiercely fought over by the owners of the worlds largest airports. ...


Railroads

Memphis is served by the famed Amtrak train, the City of New Orleans on its run between Chicago, Illinois and New Orleans, Louisiana. The City of New Orleans also stops near Dyersburg, Tennessee. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Amtraks City of New Orleans stops at the Memphis, Tennessee station in 2005. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee Coordinates: Cities in Tennessee Tennessee Mayor John Holden Area    - City 39. ...


Law and government

Welcome sign entering Memphis, Tennessee on the Hernando De Soto Bridge over the Mississippi River leaving from Arkansas.
Welcome sign entering Memphis, Tennessee on the Hernando De Soto Bridge over the Mississippi River leaving from Arkansas.

Tennessee's governor holds office for a four-year term and may serve a maximum of two terms. The governor is the only official who is elected statewide, making him one of the more powerful chief executives in the nation. The state does not elect the lieutenant-governor directly, contrary to most other states; the Tennessee Senate elects its Speaker who serves as lieutenant governor. File links The following pages link to this file: Tennessee Categories: User-created public domain images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Tennessee Categories: User-created public domain images ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... The Hernando de Soto Bridge is an arch bridge carrying Interstate 40 across the Mississippi River between Memphis, Tennessee and West Memphis, Arkansas. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... A Lieutenant Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


The Tennessee General Assembly, the state legislature, consists of the 33-member Senate and the 99-member House of Representatives. Senators serve four-year terms, and House members serve two-year terms. Each chamber chooses its own speaker. The speaker of the state Senate also holds the title of lieutenant-governor. Most executive officials are elected by the legislature. The Tennessee General Assembly is the formal name of the legislature of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Tennessee State Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ...


The highest court in Tennessee is the state Supreme Court. It has a chief justice and four associate justices. No more than two justices can be from the same Grand Division. The Court of Appeals has 12 judges. The Court of Criminal Appeals has nine judges.


Tennessee's current state constitution was adopted in 1870. The state had two earlier constitutions. The first was adopted in 1796, the year Tennessee joined the union, and the second was adopted in 1834. The Tennessee Constitution outlaws martial law within its jurisdiction. This may be a result of the experience of Tennessee residents and other Southerners during the period of military control by Union (Northern) forces of the U.S. government after the American Civil War. The Tennessee State Constitution defines the form, structure, activities, character, and fundamental rules (and means for changing them) of the U.S. State of Tennessee. ...


Lethal injection ban

On September 20, 2007, United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee Judge Aleta Trauger ruled that prisoners were not properly anesthetized before lethal injection administration. She banned this execution as a form of cruel and unusual punishment. Tennessee is among 11 states which has delayed executions because of controversy over injections.[11] is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee is the federal trial court for most of Middle Tennessee. ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... “Cruel And Unusual” redirects here. ... The term state may refer to: a sovereign political entity, see state unitary state nation state a non-sovereign political entity, see state (non-sovereign). ... For the Wikipedia policy regarding controversial issues in articles, see Wikipedia:Guidelines for controversial articles. ... Injection has multiple meanings: In mathematics, the term injection refers to an injective function. ...


Politics

Tennessee politics, like that of most U.S. states, is dominated by the Democratic and Republican Parties. Like practically all Southern states, Tennessee tends to be politically conservative and currently tilts towards the Republican Party. However, it has often prided itself on its more moderate attitudes about matters of economics and race than some states of the Deep South. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ... For other uses, see Deep South (disambiguation). ...


While the Republicans control slightly more than half of the state, Democrats have strong support in the cities of Memphis and Nashville and in parts of Middle Tennessee (although declining, due to the growth of suburban Nashville) and West Tennessee north of Memphis, where a large rural African-American population resides. The Republicans historically had their greatest strength in East Tennessee, one of the few areas of the South with a Republican voting history that predates the 1960s. Such voting habits were a legacy from the region's support for the Union during the Civil War; much of East Tennessee has not elected a Democrat to Congress since then. In contrast, the Democrats generally dominated politics in the rest of the state until the 1960s; the GOP was essentially a sectional party. In the decades following the Civil Rights Movement and a concomitant revulsion against cultural liberalism, the Republicans have gained strength in the conservative suburbs of Memphis and Nashville and increasing support among rural voters elsewhere in West and Middle Tennessee (especially the former Grand Division). These patterns are largely in keeping with the South generally and do not generally reflect local idiosyncrasies. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Historically, various popular movements struggling for social justice and democratic rights since the Second World War were known as civil rights movement, most famously the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, which struggled for equal rights for African-Americans. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ...


In the 2000 Presidential Election, the majority of Tennessee voters voted for Republican George W. Bush rather than Vice President Al Gore, a former U.S. Senator from Tennessee. Tennessee support for Bush increased in 2004, with his margin of victory in the state increasing from 4% in 2000 to 14% in 2004. This occurred quite possibly because the nominee, John Kerry, was a Northerner; Southern nominees (e.g., Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton) usually fare better for the Democrats in Tennessee, especially among split-ticket voters outside the metropolitan areas. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Tennessee sends nine members to the US House of Representatives, currently consisting of five Democrats and four Republicans. The Baker v. Carr decision of the US Supreme Court (1962), which established the principle of one man, one vote was based on a lawsuit over rural-biased malapportionment in the Tennessee legislature. The ruling led to an increased prominence in state politics by urban and, eventually, suburban, legislators and statewide officeholders. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Holding The reapportionment of state legislative districts is not a political question, and is justiciable by the federal courts. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... One man, one vote, is a slogan used in pointing out a perceived imbalance in a given voting system. ...


See also: List of Tennessee Governors, U.S. Congressional Delegations from Tennessee Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Tennessee to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ...


Law enforcement

The State of Tennessee maintains two dedicated law enforcement entities, the Tennessee Highway Patrol and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, as well as the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Tennessee State Parks department. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. ... Official TWRA Seal; also appears as uniform shoulder badge and vehicle insignia. ... The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, or TBI is the criminal investigative arm of the state of Tennessee. ...


The Highway Patrol is the primary law enforcement entity that concentrates on highway safety regulations and general non-game state law enforcement and is under the jurisdiction of the Tennessee Department of Safety. The TWRA is an independent agency tasked with enforcing all wild game and fisheries regulations outside of state parks. The TBI maintains state-of-the-art investigative facilities and is the primary state-level criminal investigative department. Tennessee State Park Rangers are responsible for all activities and law enforcement inside the Tennessee State Parks system. NPS director Mary Bomar in her park ranger uniform A park ranger is a person charged with protecting and preserving protected parklands, forests (then called a forest ranger), wilderness areas, as well as other natural resources and protected cultural resources. ...


Important cities and towns

See also: List of cities and towns in Tennessee

The capital is Nashville, though Knoxville, Kingston, and Murfreesboro have all served as state capitals in the past. Memphis has the largest population of any city in the state, but Nashville has had the state's largest metropolitan area since circa 1990; Memphis formerly held that title. Chattanooga and Knoxville, both in the eastern part of the state near the Great Smoky Mountains, each has approximately a third of the population of Memphis or Nashville. The city of Clarksville is the fifth significant population center, some 45 miles (70 km) northwest of Nashville. There are approximately 348 incorporated municipalities in the state of Tennessee. ... Download high resolution version (1200x540, 100 KB)The skyline of Nashville, Tennessee at dusk. ... Download high resolution version (1200x540, 100 KB)The skyline of Nashville, Tennessee at dusk. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Memphis, Tennessee Categories: GFDL images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Memphis, Tennessee Categories: GFDL images ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... Kingston is a city located in Roane County, Tennessee. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... This is a list of the currant state capitals: Alabama: Alabama City Alaska: Alaska City Arizona:Arizona City Arkansas: Arkansas City California: California City Colorado:Colarado City Connecticut: Connecticut City Delaware:Delaware City Florida: Gator City Georgia:Georgia City Hawaii:Hawaii City Idaho: Idaho City Illinois: Illinois City Indiana: Indiana... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Chattanooga” redirects here. ... Alternate uses: Knoxville (disambiguation) Knoxville is a city located in Knox County, Tennessee, United States. ... For other uses, see Clarksville (disambiguation). ...

Major cities

Secondary cities “Chattanooga” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Clarksville (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... “Nashville” redirects here. ...

Bartlett is a city located in Shelby County, Tennessee. ... State Street separates Virginia (left) and Tennessee (right). ... Cleveland is a city in Bradley County, Tennessee, United States. ... Collierville is a city in Shelby County, Tennessee and a suburb of the Memphis metropolitan area. ... Nickname: Cookevegas, Cookieville Location in Putnam County and the state of Tennessee. ... Franklin is the county seat of Williamson County, Tennessee, USA. The population was 41,842 at the 2000 census. ... Germantown is a city in Shelby County, Tennessee, United States. ... Hendersonville is a large town in Sumner County, Tennessee, USA, on Old Hickory Lake. ... Jackson is a city in Madison County, Tennessee, United States. ... Johnson City is a city in Washington County, Tennessee; however a small part of the city is located within Sullivan County, Tennessee, to the northeast and Carter County, Tennessee, to the southeast. ... Kingsport is a city located primarily in Sullivan County, and also partially in Hawkins County, Tennessee, United States. ... Morristown is a city in Tennessee, United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... Oak Ridge is an incorporated city in Anderson and Roane Counties in East Tennessee, about 25 miles northwest of Knoxville. ...

Education

Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... Vanderbilt University Kirkland Hall - oldest building on the campus File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Vanderbilt University Kirkland Hall - oldest building on the campus File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ...

Colleges and universities

American Baptist College (also known as American Baptist Theological Seminary or ABTS) is a small, predominantly African American liberal arts college located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by name and a shared Catholic affiliation, to other institutions of the same or similar names. ... The Art Institute of Tennessee- Nashville – one of 32 Art Institutes nationwide, accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, is an applied arts college, providing bachelor’s degrees, associate’s degrees and diplomas in the creative fields. ... This article is about the public university in Clarksville, Tennessee. ... Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences is a private, coeducational, specialized college in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Belmont University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts university located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... For other institutions of this name, see the Bethel College disambiguation page. ... Bryan College is a private co-educational Christian college located in Dayton, Tennessee. ... Carson-Newman College is a historically Baptist liberal arts college located in Jefferson City, Tennessee, northeast of Knoxville. ... Christian Brothers University is the oldest college in the city of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Facts Founded: 1966 Dedicated: March 15, 1967 by Lady Bird and Lyndon B. Johnson Mascot: Chargers President: O. Rebecca Hawkins Service Area Giles County HickmanCounty Lawrence County Lewis County Marshall County Maury County Perry County Wayne County Williamson County Accredited Columbia State Community College is accredited by the Commission on... Crichton College is a private Christian college located in Memphis, Tennessee. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by similarity of name, to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky. ... East Tennessee State University (abbreviated ETSU) was founded on October 2, 1911. ... {{THESE FOOLS GOT OWNED Hermosa, Herman and Jefferson Sts. ... Freed-Hardeman University is primarily an undergraduate university in Henderson, Tennessee in the United States of America. ... Johnson Bible College is a private college located six miles southeast of Knoxville, Tennessee. ... King College was established in 1867. ... Knoxville College is a historically black college in Knoxville, Tennessee, founded in 1875 by the United Presbyterian Church of North America. ... Lambuth University is a small, co-educational, liberal arts university located in Jackson, Tennessee. ... Lane College is a four-year, accredited historically black college located in Jackson, Tennessee, just east of the downtown area. ... Lee University Lee University is a private coeducational university located in Cleveland, Tennessee. ... LeMoyne-Owen College is an accredited, four-year historically black college which has operated continuously in Memphis, Tennessee since 1873. ... Lincoln Memorial University is a private, fully-accredited four-year co-educational liberal arts college located in Harrogate, Tennessee. ... Lipscomb University is a Church of Christ-affiliated liberal arts university in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ... Martin Methodist College Martin Methodist College is an accredited, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Pulaski, Tennessee, and affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... Maryville College is a private four-year liberal arts college in Maryville, Tennessee, near Knoxville. ... Meharry Medical College was founded in 1876 in Nashville, Tennessee to provide health sciences education. ... The Memphis College of Art, known as the Memphis Academy of Arts before the 1980s, is a small, private art college in Memphis, Tennessees Overton Park. ... Middle Tennessee State University (founded September 11, 1911, and commonly abbreviated as MTSU) is an American university located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ... Milligan College is a church-related liberal arts college founded in 1866 located in Milligan College, Tennessee. ... Motlow State Community College is a Tennessee Board of Regents-operated community college located in Moore County, TN. Motlow State is named in honor of the Motlow family, who gave the land for the campus, and were heirs to the Jack Daniels whiskey fortune. ... The Nashville School of Law is an independent, night law school specializing in legal education for non-traditional and part-time students. ... Nashville State Community College is a junior college in Nashville, Tennessee operated by the Tennessee Board of Regents. ... O’More College of Design, founded as OMore School of Interior Architecture and Design in 1970, is located in Franklin, Tennessee. ... Pellisippi State Technical Community College is a community college operated by the Tennessee Board of Regents and located in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Rhodes College is a four-year, private liberal arts college located in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Roane State Community College is a two-year college located in eastern Tennessee, authorized by the Tennessee General Assembly in 1969 along with two other community colleges. ... Southern Adventist University is a liberal arts university located in Collegedale, Tennessee. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ... Tennessee Technological University, popularly known as Tennessee Tech, is an accredited public university located in Cookeville, Tennessee, a small city approximately seventy miles (110 km) east of Nashville. ... Tennessee Temple University is a four-year private Christian university located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... Tennessee Wesleyan College is a small liberal arts college founded in 1857 in the East Tennessee town of Athens. ... Trevecca Nazarene University is a liberal arts university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Tusculum College is a private four-year college affiliated with the Presbyterian Church located in Tusculum, Tennessee, a suburb of Greeneville, Tennessee. ... This article is about the Union University in Tennessee. ... The University of Memphis is a public American research university located in Memphis, Tennessee, United States, and is the flagship public research university of the Tennessee Board of Regents system. ... The University of Tennessee system is the statewide land-grant academic institution within the U.S. state of Tennessee, established by the Morrill Act of 1890. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in Memphis is part of the statewide, multi-campus University of Tennessee system, a subdivion of the Knoxville-based University of Tennessee proper. ... The University of Tennessee Space Institute is a campus of the University of Tennessee located near Tullahoma, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Volunteer State Community College is a publicly-supported two-year community college located in Gallatin, Tennessee and operated under the auspices of the Tennessee Board of Regents. ... Watkins College of Art and Design is a four year art and design college located in Nashville, Tennessee. ...

Sports

Professional teams

Club Sport League
Memphis Grizzlies Basketball National Basketball Association
Tennessee Titans Football National Football League
Nashville Predators Ice hockey National Hockey League
Nashville Kats Football Arena Football League
Knoxville Ice Bears Ice hockey Southern Professional Hockey League
Chattanooga Lookouts Baseball Minor League Baseball (AA)
Elizabethton Twins Baseball Minor League Baseball (Rookie)
Greeneville Astros Baseball Minor League Baseball (Rookie)
Johnson City Cardinals Baseball Minor League Baseball (Rookie)
Kingsport Mets Baseball Minor League Baseball (Rookie)
Memphis Redbirds Baseball Minor League Baseball (AAA)
Nashville Sounds Baseball Minor League Baseball (AAA)
Tennessee Smokies Baseball Minor League Baseball (AA)
West Tenn Diamond Jaxx Baseball Minor League Baseball (AA)
Chattanooga Steamers Basketball American Basketball Association
Cleveland Majic Basketball World Basketball Association
Memphis Express Soccer USL Premier Development League
Nashville Metros Soccer USL Premier Development League
Tennessee River Sharks Football Indoor Football League

Tennessee is also home to Bristol Motor Speedway which features NASCAR Nextel Cup racing two weekends a year, routinely selling out more than 160,000 seats both times. This is an article about the National Basketball Association team; for the defunct World Football League team, see Memphis Southmen. ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... City Nashville, Tennessee Team colors Navy, Titan Blue, White, and Red Head Coach Jeff Fisher Owner Bud Adams General manager Mike Reinfeldt Mascot T-Rac League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Eastern Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC Central (1970... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Nashville Predators are a professional ice hockey team based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL redirects here. ... Conference American Division Central Year founded 1997 Home arena Sommet Center City, State Nashville, Tennessee Head Coach Pat Sperduto ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles 2: 1997, 2001 Wild Card berths 4: 1998, 1999, 2000, 2006 This page is for the current Nashville Kats, which began play in... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The Knoxville Ice Bears are a professional ice hockey team. ... The Southern Professional Hockey League (SPHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams located in the southeastern United States. ... The Chattanooga Lookouts are a minor league baseball team based near Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. They are named for nearby Lookout Mountain. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... Minnesota Twins American League AAA Rochester Red Wings AA New Britain Rock Cats A Fort Myers Miracle Beloit Snappers R Elizabethton Twins Gulf Coast League Twins The Elizabethton Twins are a minor league baseball team in Elizabethton, Tennessee, USA. They are a Class R team in the Appalachian League, and... The Greeneville Astros are a minor league baseball team in Greeneville, Tennessee, USA. They compete at Rookie League level in the Appalachian League, and have been a farm team of the Houston Astros since 1974. ... The Johnson City Cardinals are a rookie league team based out of Johnson City, Tennessee. ... The Kingsport Mets are a minor league baseball team based in Kingsport, Tennessee. ... League Pacific Coast League Division American Conference Year founded 1998 Major League affiliation St. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1985-present) Double-A (1978-1984) Minor League affiliations Pacific Coast League (1998-present) American Conference - North Division American Association (1985-1997) Southern League (1978-1984) Major League affiliations Milwaukee Brewers (2005-present) Pittsburgh Pirates (1998-2004) Chicago White Sox (1993-1997) Cincinnati Reds (1987-1992... League Southern League Division North Division Year founded 2000 Major League affiliation Chicago Cubs Home ballpark Smokies Park Previous home ballparks Bill Meyer Stadium City Kodak, Tennessee Current uniform colors red, navy Previous uniform colors navy blue, green Logo design The Smokies wordmark in silver outlined in navy blue. ... Class-Level Double-A (1998-Present) Minor League affiliations Southern League (1998-Present) North Division -  Major League affiliation Seattle Mariners (2007-Present) Chicago Cubs (1998-2006) Current uniform Name West Tenn Diamond Jaxx (1998-Present) Ballpark Pringles Park (1998-Present) Minor League titles League titles 2000 Division titles 1999, 2000... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Cleveland Majic are a Cleveland, Tennessee based team in the World Basketball Association, entering their second season of play. ... The World Basketball Association is a professional basketball league entering its third year of play. ... The Memphis Express is a USL Premier Development League soccer team that is based in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada, forming part of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... Nashville Metros are an American soccer team, founded in 1989. ... The Tennessee River Sharks are a professional arena football team based out of East Ridge, Tennessee, a suburb of Chattanooga. ... The Indoor Football League began in 1999 as an offshoot of the troubled Professional Indoor Football League. ... Grandstand in 2007 Scoring pilon in August 2007 Sign proclaiming the track the Worlds Fastest Half-Mile in 2007 Bristol Motor Speedway, originally known as Bristol International Raceway and Bristol Raceway is a NASCAR short track located in Bristol, Tennessee. ... The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ...


Name origin

The earliest variant of the name that became Tennessee was recorded by Captain Juan Pardo, the Spanish explorer, when he and his men passed through a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in 1567 while traveling inland from South Carolina. European settlers later encountered a Cherokee town named Tanasi (or "Tanase") in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee. The town was located on a river of the same name (now known as the Little Tennessee River). It is not known whether this was the same town as the one encountered by Juan Pardo. Juan Pardo may refer to:Paris Hilton Juan Pardo (explorer), a Spanish explorer and conquistador; Juan Pardo (singer), a Spanish musician and singer; Category: ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Tanasi was the informal capital of the Cherokee nation in the 18th century. ... Monroe County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... The Little Tennessee River is a tributary of the Tennessee River, approximately 135 miles (217 km) long, in the Appalachian Mountains in the southeastern United States. ...


The meaning and origin of the word are uncertain. Some accounts suggest it is a Cherokee modification of an earlier Yuchi word. It has been said to mean "meeting place", "winding river", or "river of the great bend".[7][8] According to James Mooney, the name "can not be analyzed" and its meaning is lost (Mooney, pg. 534). James Mooney (1861-1921) was a notable anthropologist who lived for several years among the Cherokee. ...


The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to James Glen, the governor of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", the third county to be established in what is now Middle Tennessee. (Tennessee County was the predecessor to current-day Montgomery County and Robertson County). When a constitutional convention met in 1796 to organize a new state out of the Southwest Territory, it adopted "Tennessee" as the name of the state. Tennessee County was a subdivision of the territory of North Carolina that later became the state of Tennessee. ... Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Robertson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... hi:Alternative meaning: Constitutional convention (political custom) A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ...


See also

East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... Middle Tennessee is a distinct portion of the state of Tennessee, delineated according to law as well as custom. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... It has been suggested that Poverty in Appalachia be merged into this article or section. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... // Roy Acuff Charlie Adams James Agee Lamar Alexander William R. Anderson Chet Atkins DeFord Bailey Howard Baker Ida Wells-Barnett Kathy Bates Kate Batts (a. ... The story of Tennessees contribution to American music is essentially the story of three cities: Nashville, Memphis, and Bristol. ... Scouting in Tennessee has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ... The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee An official Great Seal of Tennessee is provided for the in the Constitution of the State of Tennessee of 6 Febuary 1796. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 6 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 10 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 20 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of Tennessee. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. ... The flag of Tennessee consists of three stars in a circle on a field of red, with a strip of blue on the right side. ... ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  2. ^ Brief History of Tennessee in the War of 1812 from the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Retrieved April 30, 2006. Other sources differ on the origin of the state nickname; according to the Columbia Encyclopedia, the name refers to volunteers for the Mexican-American War.
  3. ^ A look at Tennessee Agriculture. Agclassroom.org. Last accessed November 1, 2006.
  4. ^ US Thunderstorm distribution. src.noaa.gov. Last accessed November 1, 2006.
  5. ^ Mean Annual Annual Average Number of Tornadoes 1953-2004. ncdc.noaa.gov. Accessed November 1, 2006.
  6. ^ Top ten list. tornadoproject.com. Accessed November 1, 2006.
  7. ^ Satz, Ronald. Tennessee's Indian Peoples. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1979. ISBN 0-87049-285-3
  8. ^ http://www.history.umd.edu/Freedmen/chronol.htm
  9. ^ http://www.state.tn.us/tsla/exhibits/blackhistory/timelines/timeline_1861-1865.htm
  10. ^ [1] USDA 2002 Census of Agriculture, Maps and Cartographic Resources.
  11. ^ BBC NEWS, Tennessee bans lethal injection

is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000...

Further reading

  • Bergeron, Paul H. Antebellum Politics in Tennessee. University of Kentucky Press, 1982.
  • Bontemps, Arna. William C. Handy: Father of the Blues: An Autobiography. Macmillan Company: New York, 1941.
  • Brownlow, W. G. Sketches of the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Secession: With a Narrative of Personal Adventures among the Rebels (1862)
  • Cartwright, Joseph H. The Triumph of Jim Crow: Tennessee’s Race Relations in the 1880s. University of Tennessee Press, 1976.
  • Cimprich, John. Slavery's End in Tennessee, 1861-1865 University of Alabama, 1985.
  • Finger, John R. "Tennessee Frontiers: Three Regions in Transition". Indiana University Press, 2001.
  • Honey, Michael K. Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: Organizing Memphis Workers. University of Illinois Press, 1993.
  • Lamon, Lester C. Blacks in Tennessee, 1791-1970. University of Tennessee Press, 1980.
  • Mooney, James. "Myths of the Cherokee". 1900, reprinted Dover: New York, 1995.
  • Norton, Herman. Religion in Tennessee, 1777-1945. University of Tennessee Press, 1981.
  • Schaefer, Richard T. "Sociology Matters". New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2006. ISBN 0-07-299775-3
  • Van West, Carroll. Tennessee history: the land, the people, and the culture University of Tennessee Press, 1998.
  • Van West, Carroll, ed. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. 1998.

External links

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Preceded by
Kentucky
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Admitted on June 1, 1796 (16th)
Succeeded by
Ohio

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This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Largest metro area Boise metropolitan area Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44° 21′ N to 49° N  - Longitude 104° 2′ W to 116° 3′ W Population  Ranked... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem Gi Talo Gi Halom Tase(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifico(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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