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Encyclopedia > Temple of Zeus
A 1908 illustration of the temple as it might have looked in the 5th century BCE
Ruins of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Greece
Metope showing Hercules and the Cretan Bull

The Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Greece was built between 470 BCE and completed by 456 BCE to commemorate the Elean defeat of the Pisatans in 470 BC and it was designed by Libon of Elis.[1]. It housed one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World — the monumental statue of Zeus by Phidias, which was added to the temple around 435 BC. The temple was destroyed by earthquake in the 5th century CE.[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixelsFull resolution (1620 × 1033 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Restored view of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Greece. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixelsFull resolution (1620 × 1033 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Restored view of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Greece. ... (6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Demotic becomes the dominant script of ancient Egypt Persians invade Greece twice (Persian Wars) Battle of Marathon (490) Battle of Salamis (480) Athenian empire formed and falls Peloponnesian War... Image File history File links Ruins of Temple of Zeus in Olympia, Greece My aunt and/or uncle made this photograph when they went on vacation to Greece. ... Image File history File links Ruins of Temple of Zeus in Olympia, Greece My aunt and/or uncle made this photograph when they went on vacation to Greece. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 781 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3190 × 2450 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 781 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3190 × 2450 pixel, file size: 4. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... BCE is a TLA that may stand for: Before the Common Era, date notation equivalent to BC (e. ... Libon was a 5th century BC Greek architect. ... For other uses, see Wonders of the World (disambiguation). ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Phidias (or Pheidias) (in ancient Greek, ) (c. ... “BCE” redirects here. ...


The temple was built from limestone and covered with stucco built on a raised rectangular platform of approximately 64 by 28 metres, with thirteen 10-metre columns on each side and six at either end.[1] The temple was divided into three sections: the pronaos, naos and opisthodomos.[1] The Statue of Zeus was located towards the back of the naos.[1] For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Stucco is a material made of an aggregate, a binder, and water which is applied wet, and hardens when it dries. ... Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... A cella, in Ancient Greek and Roman temples was the central room that housed cult statues. ... The porch at the rear of a cella which often served as a back entrance. ...


It was constructed in the doric order, with carved metopes and triglyph frieze, topped by pediments filled with sculptures in the Severe Style now attributed to the Olympia Master and his studio. The Doric order was one of the orginal pokersthree orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... In classical architecture, a metope is the rectangular blank spaces on the surface between two triglyphs on a Doric frieze which were often decorated with carvings. ... Triglyph centered over the last column in the Doric order of the Ancient Romans Triglyph is an architectural term for the vertically channeled tablets of the Doric frieze, so called because of the angular channels in them, two perfect and one divided, the two chamfered angles or hemiglyphs being reckoned... A pediment is a classical architectural element consisting of a triangular section or gable found above the horizontal superstructure (entablature) which lies immediately upon the columns. ... Herakles at lake Stymphalos, metope from the temple of Zeus, Olympia, Louvre The Olympia Master is the name given to the anonymous sculptor responsible for the external sculpture of the Temple of Zeus, Olympia[1]. From what Pausanias tells us of the dates of the Temple, the Master and his...


The east pediment, erroneously attributed to Paeonius by Pausanias, depicted the myth of the chariot race between Pelops and Oenomaus, with Zeus stood in the centre. The west pediment depicted a fight between the Centaurs and the Lapiths. Apollo stands in the centre, flanked by Peirithoos and Theseus.[2] Paeonius (or Paionios) of Mende in Thrace was a Greek sculptor of the late 5th century BC. The only work that can be definitely attributed to him is the statue of Nike (circa 420 BC) discovered at Olympia. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... In Greek mythology, Pelops (Greek Πέλοψ, from pelios: dark; and ops: face, eye) was venerated at Olympia, where his cult developed into the founding myth of the Olympic Games, the most important expression of unity, not only for the Peloponnesus, land of Pelops, but for all Hellenes. ... In Greek mythology, King Oenomaus of Pisa was the son of Ares by Harpina (daughter of Phliasian Asopus) and father of Hippodamia. ... In Greek mythology, the Centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race of creatures composed of part human and part horse. ... In Greek mythology, the Lapiths were a semi-legenday, semi-historical race, whose home was in Thessaly in the valley of the Peneus. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Pirithous (also transliterated as Perithoos or Peirithoos) was the King of the Lapiths and husband of Hippodamia. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ...


A sequence of twelve metopes – six over the pronaos and six over the opithodomos – showed the 12 labours of Herakles. Like the pediments, they were carved from Parian marble.[1] Hercules and the hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours (Greek: dodekathlos) of Heracles (Latin: Hercules) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... Parian marble is a fine-grained semitranslucent pure-white marble quarried during the classical era on the Greek island of Paros. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Temple of Zeus at Archaeopaedia, Stanford University
  2. ^ Pediments of the temple of Zeus, 470 - 456 BC at www.sikyon.com

“Stanford” redirects here. ...

See also

  • Collection of images related to the Temple of Zeus at Wikimedia Commons

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Temple of Zeus at Olympia
  • Collection of images of the building layout and sculptures of the temple of Zeus

Coordinates: 37°38′16″N, 21°37′48″E Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

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