FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Temple Mount
The Temple Mount
The Temple Mount
A reconstruction of Herod's Temple in Jerusalem. The mount draws its name from the Jewish Temple which once stood at the site
A reconstruction of Herod's Temple in Jerusalem. The mount draws its name from the Jewish Temple which once stood at the site

The Temple Mount (Hebrew: הַר הַבַּיִת‎, Har haBáyit), also known as the Noble Sanctuary (Arabic: الحرم القدسي الشريف, al-haram al-qudsī ash-sharīf) is a religious site in the Old City of Jerusalem. Due to its importance for Jews, Muslims, and some Christians, it is one of the most contested religious sites in the world. Download high resolution version (861x575, 165 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (861x575, 165 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... The Old City of Jerusalem is an approximately one square kilometer area of the modern day Israeli city of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


The Temple Mount is the holiest site for Judaism. The Jewish Temple in Jerusalem stood there: the First Temple (built c. 967 BC, destroyed c. 586 BC by the Babylonians), and the Second Temple (rebuilt c. 516 BC, destroyed in the siege of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70 AD). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... Solomons Temple was the first Jewish temple in Jerusalem which functioned as a religious focal point for worship and the sacrifices known as the korbanot in ancient Judaism. ... For other uses, see Babylonian captivity (disambiguation). ... A stone (2. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Judea Commanders Titus Flavius Vespasianus Simon Bar-Giora Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala) Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000 men 13,000 men, split among three factions Casualties Unknown 60,000–1,100,000 (mass civilian casualties) The Siege of Jerusalem in the... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


Known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, it is also the site of two major Muslim religious shrines, the Dome of the Rock (built c. 690) and Al-Aqsa Mosque (built c. 710). For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ...


Under the Jordanian rule of Eastern Jerusalem between 1948 and 1967, Jews and other non-Arab people were forbidden from entering the Old City. After the Israeli forces gained control of the Old City in the 1967 Six Day War, Jewish and non-Arab visits to the site resumed. Both Israel and the Palestinian Authority claim sovereignty over the site, which remains a key issue in the Arab-Israeli conflict. The Israeli government has granted management of the site to a Muslim Council (Waqf). Map of the West Bank today Rule of the West Bank and East Jerusalem by Jordan. ... Combatants Arab nations Israel Arab-Israeli conflict series History of the Arab-Israeli conflict Views of the Arab-Israeli conflict International law and the Arab-Israeli conflict Arab-Israeli conflict facts, figures, and statistics Participants Israeli-Palestinian conflict · Israel-Lebanon conflict · Arab League · Soviet Union / Russia · Israel, Palestine and the... Politics of Israel comprises of several interwoven components: Laws Israels governmental system is based on several basic laws enacted by its unicameral parliament, the Knesset. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ...

Contents

Current features of the site

Due to the extreme political sensitivity of the site, very little archaeological digging has been done on the Temple Mount itself. Protests commonly occur whenever archaeologists conduct projects on or near the Mount. Aside from visual observation of surface features, most other archaeological knowledge of the site comes from the 19th century survey carried out by Charles Wilson and Charles Warren. Several notable people are called Charles Wilson: Charles Wilson (politician) is a US Congressman Charles Wilson (physicist) was a 19th Century physicist Charles Wilson (historian) Charles Wilson (Montreal mayor) was the first elected mayor of Montreal in the 19th century Charles A. Charlie Wilson Jr. ... General Sir Charles Warren, GCMG, KCB, FRS, RE (7 February 1840–21 January 1927) was an officer in the British Royal Engineers, and in later life was Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, the head of the London Metropolitan Police, from 1886 to 1888, during the period of the Jack...


The Temple Mount is a large flat-topped construction built over a natural hill; the side walls of the Mount are hidden behind residential buildings on the northern side and northern portion of the western side. The southern portion of the western side is the Western Wall, only half visible above ground. On the southern and eastern sides the walls are visible almost to their full height. A northern portion of the Western Wall may be seen from within the Western Wall Tunnels, which were controversially excavated underneath the buildings in that location in the 20th century. The platform itself is separated from the rest of the Old City by the Tyropoeon Valley, though this once deep valley is now largely hidden beneath later deposits, and is imperceptible in places. The platform can be reached via Bridge Street — a street in the Arab quarter at the level of the platform, actually sitting on a monumental bridge; the bridge is no longer externally visible due to the change in ground level, but it may be seen (from beneath) via the Western Wall Tunnels. The Western Wall by night. ... Entrance to the Tunnels The Western Wall Tunnel (Hebrew: מנהרת הכותל, translit. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ...


An additional flat platform is built above the portion of the hill rising above the general level of the top of the Temple Mount, and this upper platform is the location of the Dome of the Rock; the rock in question is the bedrock at the peak of the hill, just breaching the floor level of the upper platform. Beneath the rock is a natural cave known as the Well of Souls, originally accessible only by a narrow hole in the rock itself, Crusaders hacked open an entrance to the cave from the south, by which it can now be entered. There is also a smaller domed building on the upper platform, slightly to the east of the Dome of the Rock, known as the Dome of the Chain — traditionally the location where a chain once rose to heaven. Several stairways rise to the upper platform from the lower; that at the northwest corner is believed by some archaeologists be part of a much wider monumental staircase, mostly hidden or destroyed, and dating from the Second Temple era. the Stone - south is towards the top of the image The Foundation Stone (Hebrew: אבן השתייה, translit. ... Well of Souls can mean several things: 1. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ...


The lower platform — that constituting most of the surface of the Temple Mount — has at its southern end the al-Aqsa Mosque, which takes up most of the width of the Mount. Gardens take up the eastern and most of the northern side of the platform; the far north of the platform houses an Islamic school.[1] The lower platform also houses a fountain (known as al-Kas), originally supplied with water via a long narrow aqueduct leading from pools at Bethlehem (colloquially known as Solomon's Pools), but now supplied from Jerusalem's water mains. There are several cisterns embedded in the lower platform, designed to collect rain water as a water supply. These have various forms and structures, seemingly built in different periods by different architects, ranging from vaulted chambers built in the gap between the bedrock and the platform, to chambers cut into the bedrock itself. Of these, the most notable are (numbering traditionally follows Wilson's scheme[2]): For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... Arabic بيت لحم Name Meaning House of Lambs Government City (from 1995) Also Spelled Beit Lahm (officially) Bayt Lahm (unofficially) Governorate Bethlehem Population 29,930 (2006) Jurisdiction 29,799 dunams (29. ... // Getting water out of a cistern A cistern (Middle English cisterne, from Latin cisterna, from cista, box, from Greek kistê, basket) is a receptacle for holding liquids, usually water. ...

  • Cistern 1 (located under the northern side of the upper platform). There is a speculation that it had a function connected with the altar of the Second Temple (and possibly of the earlier Temple),[3] or with the bronze sea.
  • Cistern 5 (located under the south eastern corner of the upper platform) — a long and narrow chamber, with a strange anti-clockwise curved section at its north western corner, and containing within it a doorway currently blocked by earth. The cistern's position and design is such that there has been speculation it had a function connected with the altar of the Second Temple (and possibly of the earlier Temple), or with the bronze sea. Charles Warren thought that the altar of burnt offerings was located at the north western end. [4]
  • Cistern 8 (located just north of the al-Aqsa Mosque) - known as the Great Sea, a large rock hewn cavern, the roof supported by pillars carved from the rock; the chamber is particularly cave-like and atmospheric [11], and its maximum water capacity is several hundred thousand gallons.
  • Cistern 9 (located just south of cistern 8, and directly under the al-Aqsa Mosque) - known as the Well of the Leaf due to its leaf-shaped plan, also rock hewn.
  • Cistern 11 (located east of cistern 9) - a set of vaulted rooms forming a plan shaped like the letter E. Probably the largest cistern, it has the potential to house over 700,000 gallons of water.
  • Cistern 16/17 (located at the centre of the far northern end of the Temple Mount). Despite the currently narrow entrances, this cistern (17 and 16 are the same cistern) is a large vaulted chamber, which Warren described as looking like the inside of the cathedral at Cordoba (which was previously a mosque). Warren believed that it was almost certainly built for some other purpose, and was only adapted into a cistern at a later date; he suggested that it might have been part of a general vault supporting the northern side of the platform, in which case substantially more of the chamber exists than is used for a cistern.
The Golden Gate
The Golden Gate

The walls of the platform contain several gateways, all currently blocked. In the east wall is the Golden Gate, through which legend states the Jewish Messiah would enter Jerusalem. On the southern face are the Hulda Gates — the triple gate (which has three arches) and the double gate (which has two arches, and is partly obscured by a Crusader building); these were the entrance and exit (respectively) to the Temple Mount from Ophel (the oldest part of Jerusalem), and the main access to the Mount for ordinary Jews. In the western face, near the southern corner, is the Barclay's Gate — only half visible due to a building on the northern side. Also in the western face, hidden by later construction but visible via the recent Western Wall Tunnels, and only rediscovered by Warren, is Warren's Gate; the function of these western gates is obscure, but many Jews view Warren's Gate as particularly holy, due to its location due west of the Dome of the Rock (traditional belief considers the Dome of the Rock to have earlier been the location at which the Holy of Holies was placed). Location Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2584x3532, 3508 KB) Jerusalem, Goldenes Tor, zwischen 1890 und 1900 Quelle: Bibliothek des US-Kongress http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2584x3532, 3508 KB) Jerusalem, Goldenes Tor, zwischen 1890 und 1900 Quelle: Bibliothek des US-Kongress http://hdl. ... The Golden Gate or Shaar Harachamim This article is about purple flying monkeys. ... In Judaism and Jewish eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during... The Huldah Gates are the two sets of now-blocked gates in the south wall of the Temple Mount, which is also one of Jerusalems Old City walls. ... Ophel - hill; mound, the long, narrow, rounded promontory on the southern slope of the temple hill in Jerusalem, between the Tyropoeon and the Kedron valley (2 Chr. ... Temple Mount cistern No. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ...


Warren was able to investigate the inside of these gates. Warren's Gate and the Golden Gate simply head towards the centre of the Mount, fairly quickly giving access to the surface by steps.[5] Barclay's Gate is similar, but abruptly turns south as it does so; the reason for this is currently unknown. The double and triple gates (the Huldah Gates) are more substantial; heading into the Mount for some distance they each finally have steps rising to the surface just north of the al-Aqsa Mosque.[6] The passageway for each is vaulted, and has two aisles (in the case of the triple gate, a third aisle exists for a brief distance beyond the gate); the eastern aisle of the double gates and western of the triple gates reach the surface, the other aisles terminating some way before the steps — Warren believed that one aisle of each original passage was extended when the al-Aqsa Mosque blocked the original surface exits.


East of and joined to the triple gate passageway is a large vaulted area, supporting the southeastern corner of the Temple Mount platform — which is substantially above the bedrock at this point — the vaulted chambers here are popularly referred to as King Solomon's Stables.[7] They were used as stables by the Crusaders, but were built by Herod the Great — along with the platform they were built to support. In the process of investigating Cistern 10, Warren discovered tunnels that lay under the Triple Gate passageway.[8] These passages lead in erratic directions, some leading beyond the southern edge of the Temple Mount (they are at a depth below the base of the walls); their purpose is currently unknown — as is whether they predate the Temple Mount — a situation not helped by the fact that apart from Warren's expedition no one else is known to have visited them. Solomons Stables is the common name of an area located directly underneath the south eastern corner of the Temple Mount, an area where the bedrock falls away steeply from the level of the Temple Mount platform. ...


Traditions relating to the site

The Foundation Stone
The Foundation Stone

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 407 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (482 × 709 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) El Sakhra (a. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 407 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (482 × 709 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) El Sakhra (a. ...

Jewish

According to an Aggada in the Talmud, the world was created from the Foundation Stone on the Temple Mount[9] According to the Bible, the place where Abraham fulfilled God's test to see if he would be willing to sacrifice his son Isaac was Mount Moriah, which the Talmud says was another name for the Temple Mount.[citation needed] Aggadah ( Aramaic אגדה: tales, lore; pl. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... the Stone - south is towards the top of the image For the foundation-stone of a building, see Cornerstone. ... Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ...


The Bible recounts that Jacob dreamt about angels ascending and descending a ladder while sleeping on a stone. The Talmud says that this took place on the Temple Mount. Rashi also identifies the site as the place where Isaac and Rebekah prayed, asking God to grant them children.[10] This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... A 16th-century depiction of Rashi Note: For the astrological concept, see Rashi - the signs. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (רִבְקָה Captivating, Enchantingly Beautiful, Noose or Snare, Standard Hebrew Rivqa, Tiberian Hebrew Riḇqāh) is the wife of Isaac. ...


According to the Bible, King David purchased a threshing floor owned by Aravnah the Jebusite[11] overlooking Jerusalem upon the cessation of a plague, to erect an altar. He wanted to construct a permanent temple there, but as his hands were "bloodied", he was forbidden to do so himself, so this task was left to his son Solomon, who completed the task c. 950 BCE. This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... Meanings of Jebus (יבוס, Standard Hebrew Yəvus, Tiberian Hebrew Yəḇûs): Jebus (fortress) a fortress on the hill of Zion captured by King David (died circa 965 BCE). ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Centuries: 11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC Decades: 1000s BC 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC - 950s BC - 940s BC 930s BC 920s BC 910s BC 900s BC Events and Trends 959 BC - Psusennes II succeeds Siamun as king of Egypt. ...


The Western Wall, also known as The Kotel, is a part of the Temple Mount that survived the destruction of the Second Temple and remains standing. The Western Wall is holy due to its proximity to the location on the Temple Mount of the Holy of Holies of the Temple, the Most Holy Place in Judaism. Due to Jewish religious restrictions on entering the most sacred areas of the Temple Mount, the Western Wall has become, for practical purposes, the holiest generally accessible site for Jews to pray. Many Jews often leave written prayers addressed to God in the cracks of the wall. The Western Wall by night. ... Western Wall by night Wailing Wall redirects here. ... A stone (2. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy of Holies. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


According to a commonly held belief in Judaism, the Temple Mount is to be the site of the final Third Temple, to be rebuilt with the coming of the Jewish Messiah. A drawing of Ezekiels Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47 Since the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, religious Jews have prayed that God will allow for the rebuilding of a Third Temple. ... In Judaism and Jewish eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during...


Jewish religious law concerning entry to the site

1978 sign at entrance to Temple Mount
1978 sign at entrance to Temple Mount

Christian sources from the Byzantine period recorded that when Jews were allowed to visit the Temple ruins, they would anoint the rock. According to Islamic tradition, immediately after its construction, five Jewish families from Jerusalem were employed to clean the Dome of the Rock and to prepare wicks for its lamps.[12] The earliest known mention of a rabbinic prohibition on Jews entering the Temple Mount appears in a letter[13] from Jerusalem by Rabbi Obadia da Bartinoro to his father in 1488, i.e., during the Mamluk period. Download high resolution version (4085x2613, 651 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (4085x2613, 651 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Mamluk Flag Eastern Mediterranean 1450 Capital Cairo Language(s) Arabic, Kipchak Turkic[1] Religion Islam Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Mamluk Sultanate, 1250]] History  - As-Salih Ayyubs death 1250  - Battle of Ridanieh 1517 Today part of  Egypt  Saudi Arabia  Syria  Palestine  Israel  Lebanon  Jordan  Turkey  Libya A Mamluk cavalryman...


Rabbinical consensus in both the Religious Zionist and the Haredi streams of Orthodox holds that it is forbidden for Jews to enter the Temple Mount. Many rabbis have issued prohibitions against entering the Temple Mount because of the danger of entering the area of the Temple courtyard and the impossibility of fulfilling the ritual requirement of cleansing oneself with the ashes of a red heifer (see Numbers 19), and declared it punishable with karet, death by heavenly decree.[14] The boundaries of the areas which are completely forbidden, while having large portions in common, are delineated differently by various rabbinic authorities. Some rabbis, primarily belonging to right-wing Religious Zionism, disagree with the majority position and maintain that it is permitted and even commendable to visit those parts of the Temple Mount which according to most medieval rabbinic authorities do not lead to any controversy, even though rabbinical consensus nowadays maintains that the entire Temple Mount including those areas is off-limits to Jews. Religious Zionism, or the Religious Zionist Movement, a branch of which is also called Mizrachi, is an ideology that claims to combine Zionism and Judaism, to base Zionism on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ... Haredi Judaism, also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Judaism. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... COW is an acronym for a number of things: Can of worms The COW programming language, an esoteric programming language. ... The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ... Religious Zionism, or the Religious Zionist Movement, a branch of which is also called Mizrachi, is an ideology that claims to combine Zionism and Judaism, to base Zionism on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ...


In May 2007, a group of right-wing Religious Zionist rabbis entered the Temple Mount.[15] This elicited widespread criticism from other religious Jews and from secular Israelis, accusing the rabbis of provoking the Arabs. An editorial in the newspaper Haaretz accused the rabbis of 'knowingly and irresponsibly bringing a burning torch closer to the most flammable hill in the Middle East,' and noted that rabbinical consensus in both the Haredi and the Religious Zionist worlds forbids Jews from entering the Temple Mount.[16] On May 16, Rabbi Avraham Shapiro, former Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi of Israel and rosh yeshiva of the Mercaz HaRav yeshiva, reiterated that it is forbidden for Jews to enter the Temple Mount.[17] The Litvish Haredi newspaper Yated Ne'eman, which is controlled by leading Litvish Haredi rabbis including Rabbi Yosef Sholom Eliashiv and Rabbi Nissim Karelitz, accused the rabbis of transgressing a decree punishable by 'death through the hands of heaven,' an issur koreis in (Ashkenazi) Hebrew.[18] Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... Rabbi Avraham Elkanah Kahana Shapira is a prominent figure in the Religious Zionist world. ... Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... Yeshivat Mercaz haRav is a religious Zionist yeshiva situated in Jerusalem. ... This article is about the Jewish male educational system. ... Yated Neeman (Hebrew: יתד נאמן) is a Hebrew language daily newspaper published in Israel. ... Rabbi Y.S. Eliashiv Yosef Sholom Eliashiv (יוסף שלום אלישיב) (b. ... Rabbi Nissim Karelitz is the av beis din (head of the rabbinical court) of the beis din tzedek (rabbinical court) of Bnei Brak. ...

Those who forbid Jews from entering the Temple Mount
The position of the Chief Rabbinate on whether people should be allowed to be on the Mount, which some from both religions do not follow.
The position of the Chief Rabbinate on whether people should be allowed to be on the Mount, which some from both religions do not follow.

In August 1967, the Chief Rabbis of Israel, Isser Yehuda Unterman and Yitzhak Nissim, in concert with other leading rabbis, asserted that "For generations we have warned against and refrained from entering any part of the Temple Mount." Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (724x926, 259 KB) Sign near entrance to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem warning Jews against entering. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (724x926, 259 KB) Sign near entrance to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem warning Jews against entering. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Unterman, Isser Yehuda Isser Yehuda Unterman, Israels second Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi, was born in 1886 in Brest-Litovsk (Brisk), where his father was a teacher. ... Yitzhak Nissim (1896 - 1981) (Hebrew:יצחק נסים), was a former Sephardic chief rabbi of Israel. ...

2005 declaration

When in January 2005 a large group of leading rabbis from the national-religious (Zionist) stream of Orthodox Judaism signed a declaration confirming that the 1967 decision of Chief Rabbis Unterman and Nissim was still valid, declaring that it is absolutely forbidden for Jews to ascend on the Temple Mount until Moshiach, the Jewish Messiah comes, the Temple Institute responded furiously. Rabbis who signed on to the declaration were:[19] Religious Zionism, or the Religious Zionist Movement, a branch of which is also called Mizrachi, is an ideology that claims to combine Zionism and Judaism, to base Zionism on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... The concept of the messiah in Judaism is briefly discussed in the Jewish eschatology entry. ...

Other rabbis who forbid Jews from entering the Temple Mount

Religious Zionist rabbis: Rabbi Yona Metzger Yona Metzger (יונה מצגר) (born 1953) is the current Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi of Israel, appointed in 2003. ... Rabbi Shlomo Amar Rabbi Shlomo Amar (1948 - ) is the current Sephardi Chief Rabbi of Israel, appointed in 2003. ... Rabbi Ovadia Yosef (Hebrew: עובדיה יוסף) (b. ... Shas (Hebrew: ) is an political party in Israel, primarily representing Ultra-orthodox Sephardi and Mizrahi Judaism. ... Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron (b. ... The Western Wall by night. ... Rabbi Avraham Elkanah Kahana Shapira is a prominent figure in the Religious Zionist world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... Ateret Cohanim is a religious Zionist Yeshiva situated in the Old City of Jerusalem. ... This article is about the Jewish male educational system. ... Rabbi Israel Meir Lau (born 1937 in Piotrków, Poland) is a former Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi (1993–2003) of the state of Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ...

Ashkenazi Haredi rabbis: Mordechai Eliyahu (born: 1929, Jerusalem) was a former Sephardi Chief Rabbi of Israel. ... Rabbi Zalman Baruch Melamed is the rosh yeshiva of the Beit El yeshiva in the town of Beit El in Samaria. ... The Beit El Yeshiva is a Religious Zionist Yeshiva situated in the Israeli settlement of Bet El near Ramallah, in the Binyamin region of the West Bank. ... Rabbi Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg (b. ... Abraham Isaac Kook (1864 - 1935) was the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of the British Mandate for Palestine, the founder of the (now) Religious Zionist Yeshiva Merkaz HaRav, and a renowned Torah scholar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Old City is a 0. ...

Ashkenazi Haredi rabbis generally do not publish any prohibitions against Jews going on the Temple Mount, since this is seen as such a natural thing that their followers do not need to prohibited from doing so to prevent them from going on the Temple Mount, similar to the fact that one will have trouble finding a recent halachic decision by an Ashkenazi Haredi rabbi stating that Jews may not eat pork. Rabbi Yaakov Yisrael Kanievsky Rabbi Yaakov Yisrael Kanievsky, known as the Steipler Gaon (1899–1985), was a world-renowned Posek and Talmudic scholar. ... Rabbi Y.S. Eliashiv Yosef Sholom Eliashiv (יוסף שלום אלישיב) (b. ... Rabbi Avraham Yeshayahu Karelitz, The Chazon Ish Avraham Yeshayahu Karelitz (אברהם ישעיה קרליץ) (also Yishayahu, Yeshayah, Yeshayah, Yishaya - in English Abraham Isaiah Karelitz) (1878-1953) known by his pen name as the Chazon Ish (חזון איש) (Vision [of] Man), was a Belarusian born Orthodox rabbi who became leader of Haredi Judaism in Israel. ... Rabbi Yitzchak Zev Soloveitchik (יצחק זאב סולובייציק) ( Velvel Soloveitchik, 1886-1959) also referred to as the Brisker Rav, was a son of Rabbi Chaim Soloveitchik of Brest, Belarus (known amongst the Jews of the area as Brisk). He is also commonly known as the GRYZ, an acronym for Gaon Rabbi Yitzchak Zev (genius... Grand Rabbi Joel Teitelbaum of Satmar Grand Rabbi Joel (Yoel) Teitelbaum, (1887-1979), known variously as Reb Yoelish and the Satmar Rav (or Rebbe) (יואל טייטלבוים), was a prominent Hungarian Hasidic rebbe and Talmudic scholar. ... Rabbi Yosef Chaim Sonnenfeld Rabbi Yosef Chaim Sonnenfeld (1849 - 1932) was the Chief Rabbi of the Ashkenazi Haredi Jewish community of Jerusalem during the years of the British mandate and co-founder of the Edah HaChareidis. ... The Edah HaCharedis (Hebrew: העדה החרדית HaEdah HaCharedis), also written Edah Haredit, is a prominent Haredi rabbinical body in present-day Jerusalem. ...

Those who permit Jews to enter the Temple Mount

Some rabbis who permitted Jews to enter the Temple Mount include:

During Maimonides' residence in Jerusalem, a synagogue stood on the Temple Mount alongside other structures; Maimonides prayed there. The Rambam (Maimonides) specifically states that there are areas on the Temple Mount that Jews are permitted to enter today even when all Jews are ritually unclean. He writes that in 1165 he visited Jerusalem and went up on to the Temple Mount and prayed in the "great, holy house" (probably the Al-Aqsa mosque).[23] Shlomo Goren (1917-1994), was a former Orthodox Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi of Israel. ... Dov Lior (‎, born 1933) is the Chief Rabbi of Hebron and Kiryat Arba in the southern West Bank. ... Street at Kiryat Arba Kiryat Arba or Qiryat Arba is an Israeli settlement adjoining the city of Hebron. ... Rabbi Yisrael Ariel is the Rabbi of the Israeli city of Ramat Gan. ... Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... Hesder (in Hebrew: arrangement; or Yeshivat Hesder ישיבת הסדר) is an Israeli yeshiva program which combines advanced Talmudic studies with military service in the Israel Defense Forces. ... The Coat of Arms of Petah-Tikva Petah-Tikva (Hebrew פֶּתַח-תִּקְוָה opening of hope, Standard Hebrew Pétaḥ-Tiqva, also transliterated as Petach Tikva, Petah Tikvah, Petach Tikvah, Petaḥ Tiqwa or Petach Tiqwa) and nicknamed as Mother of Cities, is a city in the west of the Center District of Israel... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... A synagogue (from , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; beit knesset, house of assembly; or beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ...

Maimonides established a yearly holiday for himself and his sons, the 6th of Cheshvan, commemorating the day he went up to pray on the Temple Mount
Maimonides established a yearly holiday for himself and his sons, the 6th of Cheshvan, commemorating the day he went up to pray on the Temple Mount

In 1267 Nahmanides wrote a letter to his son. It contained the following references to the land and the Temple: Image File history File links Maimonides-2. ... Image File history File links Maimonides-2. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Cheshvan (חֶשְׁוָן, Standard Hebrew Ḥešvan, Tiberian Hebrew Ḫešwān, Ḥešwān, short for מַרְחֶשְׁוָן, Standard Hebrew Marḥešvan, Tiberian Hebrew Marḫešwān, Marḥešwān: from Akkadian waraḫsamnu, literally eighth month) is the second month of the ecclesiastical year and the eighth month of... Nahmanides (1194 - c. ...

People regularly come to Jerusalem, men and women from Damascus and from Aleppo and from all parts of the country, to see the Temple and weep over it. And may He who deemed us worthy to see Jerusalem in her ruins, grant us to see her rebuilt and restored, and the honor of the Divine Presence returned.

It appears that Rabbi David ben Solomon ibn Abi Zimra (Radbaz) also ascended to a portion of the Temple Mount and gave advice to others how to do this. He permits entry from all the gates and into the 135 x 135 cubits of the Women's Courtyard in the East since the Torah prohibition only applies to the 187 x 135 cubits of the Temple in the West. [24] Rabbi David ben Solomon ibn Abi Zimra, also called Radbaz, was a Spanish Talmudist and cabalist. ...


Authorities who permit ascending the Temple Mount generally advise observing the elements of the laws of ritual purity that are possible in the absence of the ancient Temple rites. These include cleansing following seminal emissions and menstrual discharges. Although laws relating to ritual impurity through male seminal emissions, which were a significant aspect of the laws of ritual purity in Talmudic times, have gradually disappeared from Orthodox Judaism since the Middle Ages, they still apply in full force to contemporary Orthodox Jewish law concerning ascending the Temple Mount. Following a seminal emission, even one resulting from marital intercourse, Orthodox men immerse in a mikvah (ritual bath) for ritual cleansing prior to ascending the Mount. Women likewise do not ascend during the period of niddah (during and immediately after menstruation) and, following receiving a seminal emission (intercourse), and immerse in a mikvah to attain ritual purity prior to ascending. Because the rules involved are complex and may be unfamiliar since many are not applicable to circumstances other than the Temple Mount, some authorities advise always immersing in a mikvah as a precaution prior to ascending.[25] Tevilah (immersion) refers to ceremonies of ritual purity performed by religious Jews (Ablution in Judaism). ... Mikvah (or mikveh) (Hebrew: מִקְוָה, Standard Tiberian  ; plural: mikvaot or mikvot) is a specially constructed pool of water used for total immersion in a purification ceremony within Judaism. ... Niddah (or nidah, nidda, nida; Hebrew:נִדָּה) is a Hebrew term which literally means separation, generally considered to refer to separation from ritual impurity[1]; Ibn Ezra argues that it is related to the term menaddekem, meaning cast you out[2]. The term niddah appears in the biblical description of the...


The law committee of the Masorti movement (Conservative Judaism in Israel) has issued two responsa on the subject, both holding that Jews may visit the permitted sections of the Temple Mount. One responsa allows such visits, another encourages them. Masorti means traditional in Hebrew. ... This article is about Conservative (Masorti) Judaism in the United States. ... Note: This is based on an entry from the 1906 public domain Jewish Encyclopedia The responsa literature, known in Hebrew as Sheelot U-teshuvot (questions and answers), is the body of written decisions and rulings given by rabbis to questions addressed to them. ...


According to Rabbi Shlomo Goren, it's possible that Jews are even allowed to enter the heart of the Dome of the Rock, the probable location of the Holy of Holies, according to Jewish Law of Conquest.[26] A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ...

See also: Jerusalem in Judaism

Main article: Religious significance of Jerusalem Jerusalem has been the holiest city in Judaism and the spiritual homeland of the Jewish people since the 10th century BCE.[1] Jerusalem has long been embedded into Jewish religious consciousness. ...

Muslim

The Temple Mount is traditionally regarded by Muslims as the third most important Islamic holy site, after Mecca and Medina.[27][28] The primary reason for its importance is because both Kings David and Solomon are regarded as Prophets, and the Temple is (mentioned in Qur'an 17:7, and described in much more detail in the noncanonical Qisas al-Anbiya) as one of the earliest and most noteworthy places of worship of God. (The Kaaba's sanctity has a similar basis in the Islamic tradition that it was built, or rebuilt, by Abraham.) In fact, Muslims faced the Temple Mount during prayer until Muhammad was later commanded to change the direction of prayer toward the Kaaba. In addition to this, the "farthest Mosque" (al-masjid al-Aqsa) in verse (17:1) of the Qur'an is traditionally interpreted by Muslims as referring to the site at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem on which the mosque of that name now stands. References to Jerusalem and events there have been made mostly in various states of ambiguity, in the Quran, and many times in the Hadith.[29] While the Al-Aqsa mosque is by and large considered the third holiest site by Muslims, this view is not universal[citation needed]. Other Muslim sites put forward as the third holiest include: // [edit] Imam Ali Mosque, Iraq It is commonly reported in the worlds media that the Imam Ali... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Surat Al-Isra (Arabic: سورة الإسراء ) (ie The Night Journey) is the 17th sura of the Quran . ... The Qisas al-anbiya (قصص الأنبياء) or Stories of the Prophets refers to various collections of tales adapted from the Quran. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ; IPA: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. ... Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Surat Al-Isra or Bani Israil (ie The Night Journey or The Children of Israel) is the 17th sura of the Quran. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ...



Another reason for its importance in Islam is because it is believed that in 621, Muhammad arrived there after a miraculous nocturnal journey aboard the winged steed named Buraq, to take a brief tour of heaven with the Archangel Gabriel. This happened during Muhammad's time in Mecca, years before Muslims conquered Jerusalem (638). Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Isra is an Arabic word referring to what Muslims regard as Muhammads miraculous night journey from Mecca to Jerusalem - specifically, to the site of Masjid al-Aqsa - alluded to in Surat Al-Isra 1: سبحان الذي أسرى ب&#1593... Buraq from a 17th-century Mughal miniature The Buraq (Arabic: البُراق al-buraaq, meaning lightning, also means the element boron; Turkish: Burak), is according to Islamic tradition a creature from the heavens that carried Muhammad from earth to heaven and back during the Isra and Miraj (Night Journey). ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ...


Christian

The Temple is mentioned many times in the New Testament (for example, Mark 11:11) in addition to the Old Testament. In these scriptures, Jesus prays there (Mark 11:25-26) and chases away money changers and other merchants from the courtyard, turning over their tables and accusing them of desecrating a sacred place with secular ways (see Jesus and the Money Changers). Jesus also predicts the destruction of the Second Temple (Matthew 24:2) and allegorically compares his body to a temple that will be torn down and raised up again in three days. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The narrative of Jesus and the Money Changers occurs in both the Synoptic Gospels and in the Gospel of John, although it occurs close to the end of the Synoptic Gospels (at Mark 11:15-19, 11:27-33, Matthew 21:12-17, 21:23-27 and Luke 19:45...


Though some Christians believe that the temple will be reconstructed before, or concurrent with, the "second coming" of Christ, the Temple Mount is largely unimportant to the beliefs and worship of most Christians. To wit, the New Testament recounts a story of a Samaritan woman asking Jesus about the appropriate place to worship, Jerusalem or the Samaritan holy place at Mt. Gerazim, to which Jesus replies, "neither in this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father... But an hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth." Thus, the Christian concept of worship is entirely spiritual, and not based on any particular physical location, specifically including the Temple Mount.


History

While the point at which the Temple Mount enters history may be disputed (see the religious traditions mentioned above), history records that there was a First Temple that stood for 410 years, being built by the Israelites in 996 BCE and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon in 586 BCE. Solomons Temple was the first Jewish temple in Jerusalem which functioned as a religious focal point for worship and the sacrifices known as the korbanot in ancient Judaism. ... Nebuchadnezzar (or Nebudchadrezzar) II (ca. ... 589 BC - Apries succeeds Psammetichus II as king of Egypt. ...

A stone (2.43x1 m) with Hebrew inscription "To the Trumpeting Place" excavated by Benjamin Mazar at the southern foot of the Temple Mount is believed to be a part of the Second Temple

Construction of the Second Temple began under Cyrus in 538 BCE, and was completed on the sixth year of Darius the Great in 516 BCE, 70 years after the exile to Babylonia. A stone (2. ... A stone (2. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Benjamin Mazar (June 28, 1906 - September 9, 1995) was a pioneering Israeli archaeologist who shared the national passion for the archaeology of Israel that also attracts considerable international interest due to the regions Biblical links. ... A stone (2. ... The name Cyrus (or Kourosh in Persian) may refer to: [[Cyrus I of Anshan]], King of Persia around 650 BC [[Cyrus II of Persia | Cyrus the Great]], King of Persia 559 BC - 529 BC — See also Cyrus in the Judeo-Christian tradition Cyrus the Younger, brother to the Persian king... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC Events and trends 538 BC - Babylon occupied by Cyrus the Great 537 BC - Jews transported to Babylon... Seal of Darius I, showing the king hunting on his chariot, and the symbol of Ahuramazda Darius the Great (Pers. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 519 BC - Zhou Jing Wang becomes King of the Zhou Dynasty of China. ... For other uses, see Babylonian captivity (disambiguation). ...

A drawing of Ezekiel's Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47[citation needed]
A drawing of Ezekiel's Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47[citation needed]

Around 19 BCE, Herod the Great expanded the Temple Mount and rebuilt the Temple (see Herod's Temple). In the course of the First Jewish-Roman War it was destroyed by Titus in 70 CE. The Romans did not topple the Western Wall. Upon the destruction of the Temple, the Rabbis revised prayers, and introduced new ones to request the speedy rebuilding of the Temple and the city of Jerusalem. They also instituted the saying of the portions of the Torah commanding the bringing of the sacrifices in place of the sacrifices themselves. Image File history File linksMetadata Secondtempleplan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Secondtempleplan. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... A drawing of Ezekiels Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47 Since the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, religious Jews have prayed that God will allow for the rebuilding of a Third Temple. ... (Redirected from 19 BCE) Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC... Herod the Great. ... Model of Herods Temple - currently in the Israel Museum View from east to west of the model of Herods Temple Herods Temple in Jerusalem was a massive expansion of the Second Temple along with renovations of the entire Temple Mount. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first... For other uses, see Titus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 70. ... The Western Wall by night. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ...


During the time of the Byzantine Empire, it is believed that Constantine's mother, St. Helena, built a small church on the Mount in the 4th century, calling it the Church of St. Cyrus and St. John, later on enlarged and called the Church of the Holy Wisdom. The church was later destroyed and on its ruins the Dome of the Rock was built.[30] Byzantine redirects here. ... Look up Constantine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ...


In 363, Emperor Julian II, on his way to engage Persia, stopped at the ruins of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. In keeping with his effort to foster religions other than Christianity, Julian ordered the Temple rebuilt. A personal friend of his, Ammianus Marcellinus, wrote this about the effort: Events Perisapora is destroyed by Emperor Julian. ... Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... The Western Wall by night. ... A stone (2. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Ammianus Marcellinus (325/330-after 391) was a fourth-century Greek historian [1][2]. His is the last major historical account of the late Roman empire which survives today: his work chronicled the history of Rome from 96 to 378, although only the sections covering the period 353 - 378 are...

"Julian thought to rebuild at an extravagant expense the proud Temple once at Jerusalem, and committed this task to Alypius of Antioch. Alypius set vigorously to work, and was seconded by the governor of the province; when fearful balls of fire, breaking out near the foundations, continued their attacks, till the workmen, after repeated scorchings, could approach no more: and he gave up the attempt." Alypius of Antioch was a geographer of the 4th century who was sent by the emperor Britain as first prefect. ... A Roman governor was an official either elected or appointed to be the chief adminstator of Roman law throughout one or more of Ancient Romes many provinces. ...

The failure to rebuild the Temple has been ascribed to an earthquake, common in the region, and to the Jews' ambivalence about the project. Sabotage is a possibility, as is an accidental fire. Divine intervention was the common view among Christian historians of the time.[31]


After the Muslim conquest of this region, Islamic tradition holds that when Muslims first entered the city of Jerusalem under the leadership of Caliph Umar ibn al-Khattab in 637, the ruins of the Temple were being used as a rubbish dump by the Christian inhabitants, perhaps in order to humiliate the Jews and try to fulfill Jesus' prophecy that not a stone would be left standing on another there (Matthew 24:1-2); Caliph Omar (a contemporary of Muhammad, who had died a few years earlier), ordered it cleaned and performed prayer there. However, He refrained from building a mosque at the site but ordered a mosque to be constructed at the South East corner facing Mecca, near which the Al-Aqsa Mosque was built 78 years later. For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ... For other uses of the name, see Umar (disambiguation). ... Events Arabs take Jerusalem Arabs take Aleppo Battle of al-Qadisiyah: Arabs defeat Persian army, take Persian capital of Ctesiphon Battle of Mag Rath: Dalriada influence in Ulster greatly reduced Births Deaths Categories: 637 ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ...


In 691 an octagonal Muslim building topped by a dome was built by the Caliph Abd al Malik around the rock, for political reasons, in violation of the Caliph Omar's teachings. The shrine became known as the Dome of the Rock (Qubbat as-Sakhra قبة الصخرة). In 715 the Umayyads led by the Caliph al-Walid I, rebuilt the Temple's nearby Chanuyos into a mosque (see illustrations and detailed drawing) which they named al-Masjid al-Aqsa المسجد الأقصى, the Al-Aqsa Mosque or in translation "the furthest mosque", corresponding to the Muslim belief of Muhammad's miraculous nocturnal journey as recounted in the Quran and hadith. The term al-Haram al-Sharif الحرم الشريف (the Noble Sanctuary) refers to the whole area that surrounds that Rock as was called later by the Mamluks and Ottomans[32] Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ... Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (646-705) (Arabic: عبد الملك بن مروان ) was an Umayyad caliph. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... The Arab Empire in its greatest extent. ... On the Temple Mount in Jerusalem a great room was built along the Southern Wall. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... A 16th century Persian miniature painting celebrating Muhammads ascent into the Heavens, a journey known as the Miraj. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29...


The structures have been ruined or destroyed several times in earthquakes[citation needed]; the current version dates from the first half of the 11th century. For Muslims, the importance of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque make Jerusalem the third-holiest city after Mecca and Medina. The mosque and shrine are currently administered by a Waqf (an Islamic trust). As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... While the Al-Aqsa mosque is by and large considered the third holiest site by Muslims, this view is not universal[citation needed]. Other Muslim sites put forward as the third holiest include: // [edit] Imam Ali Mosque, Iraq It is commonly reported in the worlds media that the Imam Ali... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ...


In 1867, a team from the Royal Engineers, led by Lieutenant Charles Warren (later the London police commissioner of Jack the Ripper fame) and financed by the Palestine Exploration Fund (P.E.F.), discovered a series of tunnels beneath Jerusalem and the Temple Mount, some of which were directly underneath the headquarters of the Knights Templar. Various small artifacts were found which indicated that Templars had used some of the tunnels, though it is unclear who exactly first dug them. Some of the ruins which Warren discovered came from centuries earlier, and other tunnels which his team discovered had evidently been used for a water system, as they led to a series of cisterns.[33][34] The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... General Sir Charles Warren, GCMG, KCB, FRS, RE (7 February 1840–21 January 1927) was an officer in the British Royal Engineers, and in later life was Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, the head of the London Metropolitan Police, from 1886 to 1888, during the period of the Jack... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ... The Palestine Exploration Fund is a British society founded in 1865 by a group of Biblical archaeologists. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ...


1969 Al-Aqsa arson and other conflicts and complaints

On August 21, 1969, an Australian, Michael Dennis Rohan, set the Al-Aqsa mosque on fire. Rohan was a reader of The Plain Truth magazine published by the Worldwide Church of God headed by Herbert W. Armstrong, which was best known for its radio and television programs called The World Tomorrow featuring his son Garner Ted Armstrong. Rohan had read an editorial in the June 1967 edition by Herbert W. Armstrong, concerning rebuilding of the Temple on Temple Mount. The article implied that the present structures would have to be removed and then when a new Temple had been built a series of events would take place resulting in the return of Jesus as the Messiah. This interpretation of prophetic events is now common within Fundamentalist Christianity, but was almost exclusive to the Worldwide Church of God at that time.[citation needed] Herbert W. Armstrong claimed that Rohan was not a member of the church, only a subscriber to the magazine. The incident made worldwide news and The Daily Telegraph newspaper in London pictured Rohan on its front page with a folded copy of The Plain Truth sticking out of his outside jacket pocket. is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Michael Dennis Rohan is an Australian citizen who gained worldwide infamy on August 21, 1969, when he attempted to set fire to the Al-Aqsa mosque, located atop the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. ... The Plain Truth is a U.S.-based magazine founded by Herbert W. Armstrong who also founded the Radio Church of God (later renamed the Worldwide Church of God), Ambassador College and The World Tomorrow radio and television programs. ... The Worldwide Church of God (WCG), formerly the Radio Church of God, is a Christian church currently based in Glendora, California, USA. Founded in 1933 by Herbert Armstrong as a radio ministry, the WCG under Armstrong had a significant, and often controversial, influence on 20th century religious broadcasting and publishing... Herbert W. Armstrong (July 31, 1892) – January 16, 1986 (aged 93) was the founder of the Worldwide Church of God and an early pioneer of radio evangelism, taking to the airwaves in the 1930s from Eugene, Oregon. ... The World Tomorrow is a now-defunct radio and television half-hour program which had been sponsored by the Radio Church of God (later renamed Worldwide Church of God while under the direction of Herbert W. Armstrong. ... Garner Ted Armstrong (February 9, 1930 - September 15, 2003) was an American evangelist and the son of Herbert W. Armstrong, founder of the Worldwide Church of God, at the time a Sabbatarian organization that taught strict observance of a seventh-day sabbath, holy days typically associated with the Jewish faith... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... Fundamentalist Christianity, or Christian fundamentalism, is a movement that arose mainly within British and American Protestantism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by conservative evangelical Christians, who, in a reaction to modernism, actively affirmed a fundamental set of Christian beliefs: the inerrancy of the Bible, Sola Scriptura, the... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The Arab world and the USSR (see role of the Soviet Union) blamed Israel for the incident and Yassar Arafat constantly used it as the foundation of his attacks on Israel. Several Arab and Islamic media agencies, including the Jordanian News Agency,[citation needed] IslamOnline,[35] and Palestine Chronicle,[citation needed] incorrectly reported that Rohan was Jewish. However, Herbert W. Armstrong was not a stranger to King Hussein and he had been working with Jordanian government to put his daily radio program called The World Tomorrow on their AM and shortwave stations that broadcast from the Jordanian West Bank. That contract had been negated due to the Six Day War and the sudden capture of the Jordanian radio stations by Israel. Michael Dennis Rohan is an Australian citizen who gained worldwide infamy on August 21, 1969, when he attempted to set fire to the Al-Aqsa mosque, located atop the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Hussein bin Talal (Arabic: حسين بن طلال) (November 14, 1935 - February 7, 1999) was the King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan from 1952 to 1999. ... The World Tomorrow is a now-defunct radio and television half-hour program which had been sponsored by the Radio Church of God (later renamed Worldwide Church of God while under the direction of Herbert W. Armstrong. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ...


Israeli sources claim that Israeli firemen attempting to extinguish the blaze were hampered by Arabs who mistakenly believed that the fire hoses contained petrol rather than water;[36]


On February 1, 1981, an article "Islam Reborn" written by Don A. Schanche appeared in the opinion section of The Los Angeles Times. It related the following information: is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ...

The Islamic conference, for example, was born in a worldwide surge of Muslim outrage over the August, 1969, burning of Jerusalem's Al Aksa mosque, third holiest shrine in Islam after Mecca and Medina, by a deranged Australian Jew, who many Muslims believed was a pawn in a Zionist plot. The call to gather in Rabat, Morocco, to unify and do something to redress the outrage drew only 25 of the more than 40 nations in the world with Muslim majorities. With only one cause to unite them, the kings and presidents talked for only a day and issued a call for the restoration of Arab sovereignty over Jerusalem and other territories occupied by Israel in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. Then they adjourned. The meeting and the newly founded organization were all but ignored by the rest of the world.... Last week, with its membership now grown to 42, but attendance weakened by the suspension of Egypt and Soviet-occupied Afghanistan and the pointed absence of Iran and Libya, the Islamic conference went a long way toward achieving its long-sought goal of power in unity. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem is not to be confused with the Dome of the Rock The Al-Aqsa Mosque (Arabic: المسجد الاقصى, Masjid Al-Aqsa, literally farthest mosque) is part of the complex of religious buildings in Jerusalem... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ... Mausoleum of Mohammed V through mosque ruins NASA image of Rabat Rabat (Arabic الرباط, transliterated ar-Rabāṭ or ar-Ribāṭ), population 1. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... ... Afghanistan (Pashtu/Dari-Persian: Afğānistān افغانستان) is a country in Central Asia. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ...

On April 11, 1981, an American-born Israeli Jewish soldier, Alan Harry Goodman, entered the Al-Aqsa Mosque and started firing randomly, killing two Palestinians. is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


In recent years many complaints have been voiced by Israelis about Muslim construction and excavation on and underneath the Temple Mount, and by Muslims about Israeli excavations, two under the Temple Mount, the rest around it.[citation needed] Ironically, for a time Ambassador College — the liberal arts educational institution of the Worldwide Church of God — regularly provided students and money during summer breaks to assist with these excavations. Ambassador College was originally established as an unaccredited liberal arts institution in 1947 at Pasadena, California by the Radio Church of God, a religious organization incorporated in the State of California by Herbert W. Armstrong to promote the beliefs of the Church of God. ... The Worldwide Church of God (WCG), formerly the Radio Church of God, is a Christian church currently based in Glendora, California, USA. Founded in 1933 by Herbert Armstrong as a radio ministry, the WCG under Armstrong had a significant, and often controversial, influence on 20th century religious broadcasting and publishing...


Some claim that this will lead to the destabilization of the retaining walls of the Temple Mount, of which the Western Wall is one, and/or the al-Aqsa Mosque, and allege that one side is doing so deliberately to cause the collapse of the sacred sites of the other. Israelis allege that Palestinians are deliberately removing significant amounts of archaeological evidence about the Jewish past of the site and claim to have found significant artifacts in the fill removed by bulldozers and trucks from the Temple Mount. Muslims allege that the Israelis are deliberately damaging the remains of Islamic-era buildings found in their excavations.[37] The Western Wall by night. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ...


Since the Waqf is granted almost full autonomy on the Islamic holy sites, Israeli archaeologists have been prevented from inspecting the area; they have, however, conducted several excavations around the Temple Mount. This article is about the religious endowment. ...


Damage to existing structures

In 1968-69, Israeli archeologists carried out excavations at the foot of the Temple Mount, immediately south of the al-Aqsa mosque and opened two ancient Second Temple period tunnels there that penetrate beneath Al-Aqsa Mosque in the area of the Hulda and Single gates, penetrating five meters into one and 30 meters into another. "At the Temple Mount's south wall digging took place to uncover the Arabic Umayyad palaces and Crusader remains." [12]


Over the period 1970-1988, the Israeli authorities excavated a tunnel passing immediately to the west of the Temple Mount, northwards from the Western Wall, that became known as the Western Wall Tunnel. They sometimes used mechanical excavators under the supervision of archeologists. Palestinians claim that both of these have caused cracks and structural weakening of the buildings in the Muslim Quarter of the city above. Israelis confirmed this danger: The Western Wall by night. ... The Western Wall Tunnel (Hebrew: מנהרת הכותל, translit. ...

"The Moslem authorities were concerned about the ministry tunnel along the Temple Mount wall, and not without cause. Two incidents during the Mazar dig along the southern wall had sounded alarm bells. Technion engineers had already measured a slight movement in part of the southern wall during the excavations...There was no penetration of the Mount itself or danger to holy places, but midway in the tunnel's progress large cracks appeared in one of the residential buildings in the Moslem Quarter, 12 meters above the excavation. The dig was halted until steel buttresses secured the building." - Abraham Rabinovitch, The Jerusalem Post, September 27, 1996[13]

In 1981, Yehuda Meir Getz, rabbi of the Western Wall, had workmen open the ancient Warren's Gate, accessing the innards of the Temple Mount itself from the Western Wall Tunnel. Arabs on the Mount heard excavation noises from one of the more than two dozen cisterns on the Mount. Israeli Government officials, upon being notified of the unauthorized tunneling, immediately ordered the Warren's Gate resealed. The 2000-year-old stone gate was filled with cement, and remains cement-shut today.[14] The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology (הטכניון - מכון טכנולוגי לישראל) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Western Wall by night. ... Temple Mount cistern No. ...


In 1996, Israel opened up an exit to the tunnel, which led to riots.


Archeologist Leon Pressouyre, a UNESCO envoy who visited the site in 1998 and claims to have been prevented from meeting Israeli officials (in his own words, "Mr Avi Shoket, Israel's permanent delegate to UNESCO, had repeatedly opposed my mission and, when I expressed the wish to meet with his successor, Uri Gabay, I was denied an appointment"[15]), accuses the Israeli government of culpably neglecting to protect the Islamic period buildings uncovered in Israeli excavations. More recently, Prof. Oleg Grabar of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University has replaced Leon Pressouyre as the UNESCO envoy to investigate the Israeli allegations that antiquities are being destroyed by the Waqf on the Temple Mount.[16] Initially, Grabar was denied access to the buildings by Israel for over a year, allegedly due to the threat of violence resulting from the al-Aqsa Intifada. His eventual conclusion was that the monuments are deteriorating largely because of conflicts over who is responsible for them, the Jordanian government, the local Palestinian Authority or the Israeli government. UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Fuld Hall The Institute for Advanced Study, located in Princeton, New Jersey, United States, is one of the world’s leading centers for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ...


In autumn 2002, a bulge of about 700 mm was reported in the southern retaining wall part of the Temple Mount. It was feared that that part of the wall might seriously deteriorate or even collapse. The Waqf would not permit detailed Israeli inspection but came to an agreement with Israel that led to a team of Jordanian engineers inspecting the wall in October. They recommended repair work that involved replacing or resetting most of the stones in the affected area which covers 2,000 square feet (200 m²) and is located 25 feet (8 m) from the top of the wall. [17] Repairs were completed before January 2004. The restoration of 250 square meters of wall cost 100,000 Jordanian dinars ($140,000).[18]


On February 11, 2004, the eastern wall of the Temple Mount was damaged by an earthquake. The damage threatens to topple sections of the wall into the area known as Solomon's Stables. [19] is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On February 16, 2004, a few days after the earthquake, a portion of a stone retaining wall, supporting the ramp that leads from the Western Wall plaza to the Gate of the Moors on the Temple Mount, collapsed. [20] is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Temple Mount located in Jerusalem can be accessed through eleven gates, and contains a further six sealed gates. ...


Damage to adjoining areas

The southern wall of Temple Mount
The southern wall of Temple Mount

In 1967, after the Six Day War, Israel razed the Moroccan Quarter (Harat al-Magharbah) of the Old City, immediately adjacent to the Temple Mount. Before the demolition the only way to access the Western Wall was through a blind alley in the quarter. This had long been an area of tension between the residents of the neighborhood and the Jewish Pilgrims. A plaza was built in front of the Western Wall. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (8256x2015, 4853 KB) South Temple Mount I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (8256x2015, 4853 KB) South Temple Mount I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... The Moroccan Quarter (Arabic حارة المغاربة Harat al-Maghariba) was a neighborhood in the southeast corner of the Old City of Jerusalem, bordering on the western wall of the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the east (including the Western Wall), the Old City walls on the south (including the Dung Gate), the Jewish... The Moroccan Quarter or Mughrabi Quarter (Arabic حارة المغاربة Harat al-Maghariba) was a neighborhood in the southeast corner of the Old City of Jerusalem, bordering on the western wall of the Temple Mount on the east (including the Western Wall), the Old City walls on the south (including the Dung Gate...


Damage to antiquities

In 1996 the Waqf began construction in the structures known since Crusader times as Solomon's Stables, and in the Eastern Hulda Gate passageway, allowed the area to be (re)opened as a mosque called the Marwani Musalla (claimed by Israel to be new, by Palestinians to be restored from pre-Crusader times, having been built by a calif named Marwani, and the Crusaders having turned it into stables) capable of accommodating 7,000 individuals. Many Israelis regard this as a radical change of the status quo under which the site had been administered since the Six-Day War which should not have been undertaken without consulting the Israeli government; Palestinians regard these objections as irrelevant. Though the building was built at the same time as the Al-Aqsa Mosque, whether the building had been a mosque before Crusader times or not is open to discussion. A group of ancient stables was discovered in 1996 on the southeastern corner of the Temple Mount. ... The Huldah Gates are the two sets of now-blocked gates in the south wall of the Temple Mount, which is also one of Jerusalems Old City walls. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ...

The ongoing construction work taking place atop the Temple Mount.
The ongoing construction work taking place atop the Temple Mount.
Tractor on the Temple Mount, December 2006
Tractor on the Temple Mount, December 2006

In 1997, the Western Hulda Gate passageway was converted into another mosque. In November 1999, a buried Crusader-era door was reopened as an emergency exit for the Mosque located within the Solomon's Stables area, opening an excavation claimed by Israel to be 18,000 square feet (1,700 m²) in size and up to 36 feet (11 m) deep. According to The New York Times, an emergency exit had been urged upon the Waqf by the Israeli police, and its necessity was acknowledged by the Israel Antiquities Authority[21]. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 565 pixel Image in higher resolution (1602 × 1132 pixel, file size: 321 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Construction works taking place on the Ssouthern tip of the Temple Mount. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 565 pixel Image in higher resolution (1602 × 1132 pixel, file size: 321 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Construction works taking place on the Ssouthern tip of the Temple Mount. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 627 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Huldah Gates are the two sets of now-blocked gates in the south wall of the Temple Mount, which is also one of Jerusalems Old City walls. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) (before 1990, the Israel Department of Antiquities) is an independent Israeli governmental authority responsible for enforcing the 1978 Law of Antiquities by regulating excavation and conservation, and by promoting research. ...


In early 2001, Israeli police said they observed bulldozers destroying an ancient arched structure located adjacent to the eastern wall of the Temple Mount in the course of construction during which 6,000 square meters of the Temple Mount were dug up by tractors, paved, and declared to be open air mosques, which is assumed to have intermixed the underlying strata. Some of the earth and rubble removed was dumped in the El-Azaria and in the Kidron Valleys, and some of it (as of September 2004) remained in mounds on the site. The excavation and removal of earth with minimal archaeological supervision became an issue of controversy, with some scholars such as Jon Seligman, Hershel Shanks and Eilat Mazar claiming that valuable history material is being destroyed and others, such as Dan Bahat and Meir Ben-Dov, disputing this assessment. The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) inspected the material and declared it of no archaeological value[citation needed], but a group called the Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount campaigned against this position and in September 2004 obtained a temporary injunction against the IAA and the Muslim Waqf preventing them from removing the material which still lies in mounds on the site. Both sides accuse the other of having political motivation. Hershel Shanks (born March 8, 1930, Sharon, Pennsylvania) is the founder of the Bible Archaeology Society and the editor of the Biblical Archaeology Review and has written and edited works on the Dead Sea Scrolls. ... Dr. Eilat Mazar Eilat Mazar is a third-generation Israeli archaeologist, specializing in Jerusalem and Phoenician archaeology. ... The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) (before 1990, the Israel Department of Antiquities) is an independent Israeli governmental authority responsible for enforcing the 1978 Law of Antiquities by regulating excavation and conservation, and by promoting research. ... Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount is composed of archeologists, scholars, and other prominent individuals. ...


The Ir David Foundation is currently funding the Israel Antiquities Authority sifting of the rubble [22] and a sampling of its finds of archaeologically significant items are available on the internet.[23] The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) (before 1990, the Israel Department of Antiquities) is an independent Israeli governmental authority responsible for enforcing the 1978 Law of Antiquities by regulating excavation and conservation, and by promoting research. ...

Robinson's arch on the south western side: A staircase built by Herod led to this arch and to an old Gate to the Temple Mount
Robinson's arch on the south western side: A staircase built by Herod led to this arch and to an old Gate to the Temple Mount

Image File history File links Robinson_arch. ... Image File history File links Robinson_arch. ... Herod the Great. ...

Vandalism to the southern wall

On March 30, 2005, the southern wall of the Temple Mount was found to have been the target of vandals. The word "Allah" in approximately a foot tall Arabic script was found newly carved into the ancient stones. The vandalism was attributed to a team of Jordanian engineers and Palestinian laborers in charge of strengthening that section of the wall. The discovery caused outrage among Israeli archaeologists and many Jews were angered by the graffiti at Judaism’s holiest site. [38] Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ...


Plans for a synagogue

During the Sukkot festival in 2006 Uri Ariel, a member of the Knesset from the National Union party (a right wing opposition party) ascended to the mount, [24] and said that he is preparing a plan where a synagogue will be built on the mount. His suggested synagogue would not be built instead of the mosques but in a separate area in accordance with rulings of 'prominent rabbis.' He said he believed that this will be correcting a historical injustice and that it is an opportunity for the Muslim world to prove that it is tolerant to all faiths. Sukkot (Hebrew:  ; booths. ... Uri Ariel (Hebrew: ; born December 22, 1952) is a member of the Israeli Knesset. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ... The National Union (‎, HaIkhud HaLeumi) is a right wing political party in Israel and consists of an alliance of Moledet, Tkuma and the Renewed Religious National Zionist Party. ...


Plans for a new minaret

October 14, 2006, it was reported in The Times[39] that there are plans to build a new minaret, the first of its kind for 600 years, on the Temple Mount. King Abdullah II of Jordan announced a competition to design a fifth minaret for the walls of the Temple Mount complex, imprinting his Hashemite dynasty on the site. The new addition would, the King said, “reflect the Islamic significance and sanctity of the mosque”. The scheme is likely to cost £200,000. The plans are for a seven-sided tower — after the seven-pointed Hashemite star — and at 42 metres (130 ft), it would be 3.5 metres (11 ft) taller than the next-largest minaret. The minaret will be constructed on the eastern wall of the Temple Mount near the Golden Gate. is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... as-Sayyid Abdullah II bin al-Hussein al Hashimi, King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan (Arabic: ) (born January 30, 1962, in Amman, Jordan), has been the King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan since February 7, 1999. ... Hashemite is the Anglicised version of the Arabic: هاشمي (transliteration: Hashemi) and traditionally refers to those belonging to the Banu Hashim, or clan of Hashem, a clan within the larger Quraish tribe. ... The Golden Gate or Shaar Harachamim This article is about purple flying monkeys. ...


Although Israel has not objected and plans are on track for construction to begin early 2007,[40] a leading Israeli archeologist lambasted the plan. "I am against any change in the status quo on the Temple Mount", said Bar-Ilan University's Dr. Gabi Barkai, a member of the Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount. "If the status quo is being changed, then it should not just be the addition of Muslim structures at the site”. Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, Israel. ... Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount is composed of archeologists, scholars, and other prominent individuals. ...


The existing four minarets include three near the Western Wall and one near the northern wall. The first minaret was constructed on the southwest corner of the Temple Mount in 1278. The second was built in 1297 by order of a Mameluk king, the third by a governor of Jerusalem in 1329, and the last in 1367. The Western Wall by night. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for...


Mugrabi Gate ramp reconstruction

A view overlooking the Temple Mount. To the right of the Western Wall, or the Kotel, in the center of the picture, is the wooden, temporary bridge connecting the Western Wall Plaza to the Mugrabi Gate.
A view overlooking the Temple Mount. To the right of the Western Wall, or the Kotel, in the center of the picture, is the wooden, temporary bridge connecting the Western Wall Plaza to the Mugrabi Gate.

During February 2007 the Israel Antiquities Authority started work on the construction of a new pedestrian pathway to the Temple Mount. The existing wooden structure was built as a temporary measure after a landslide in 2005 made the earthen ramp leading to the Mugrabi Gate unsafe and in danger of collapse.[41] The works sparked condemnation from Arab leaders with a Syrian Foreign Ministry official stating that "Syria strongly condemns these violations, and considers them a blatant affront to Muslim waqfs and the feelings of Muslims worldwide." Similar views were made by Jordan's King Abdullah.[42] However Jerusalem District Police Chief Ilan Franko said that the works were coordinated in advance with the Muslim Waqf that oversees the Temple Mount. A recent UNESCO ruling on the incident cleared Israel of wrongdoing, saying that they had acted with professionalism, but nonetheless advised the continued cessation of construction until more concerned parties could be consulted, so that negative sentiments would not be inflamed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 478 KB) By User:Eric1985 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 478 KB) By User:Eric1985 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Western Wall by night. ... The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) (before 1990, the Israel Department of Antiquities) is an independent Israeli governmental authority responsible for enforcing the 1978 Law of Antiquities by regulating excavation and conservation, and by promoting research. ... The Temple Mount located in Jerusalem can be accessed through eleven gates, and contains a further six sealed gates. ... A foreign minister is a cabinet minister that helps to form foreign policy for sovereign nations. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ... as-Sayyid Abdullah II bin al-Hussein al Hashimi, King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan (Arabic: ) (born January 30, 1962, in Amman, Jordan), has been the King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan since February 7, 1999. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ...


External links:


Temple Mount cable replacement controversy

Main article: Temple Mount cable replacement controversy

In July 2007, the Waqf Muslim religious trust began digging a ditch from the northern side of the Temple Mount compound to the Dome of the Rock as a prelude to infrastructure work in the area. Although the dig was approved by the police, it generated protests from archaeologists. The Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount criticized the use of a tractor for excavation at the Temple Mount "without real, professional and careful archaeological supervision involving meticulous documentation". [43] Digging for the cable replacement has occurred along this pathway The Temple Mount cable replacement controversy began in July 2007 when the Waqf Muslim religious trust which administers the Temple Mount began digging a 400-metre-long, 1. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ... Ditches at the Ouse Washes nature reserve. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount is composed of archeologists, scholars, and other prominent individuals. ...


Management of the site

A Muslim Waqf has managed the Temple Mount/Haram al-Sharif continuously since the Muslim reconquest of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Since taking control of the area in the Six-Day War, Israel has permitted the Waqf to retain internal administration of the site. Under this arrangement Jews and Christians are permitted to visit the site. As a security measure to prevent Intifada-related riots from destroying the site, however, the Israeli government has agreed to enforce a ban on non-Muslim prayer on the site. Non-Muslims who are observed praying on the site are subject to expulsion by the police [25] This article is about the religious endowment. ... The kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in the context of the Near East in 1135. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ...


On 7 June 1967, immediately after the fighting had died down in Jerusalem, the then Prime Minister, Levi Eshkol, convened the spiritual leaders of all the communities in Jerusalem and assured them that "no harm whatsoever shall come to the places sacred to all religions", and that contacts should be maintained in order to make certain that spiritual activities of the religious leaders in the Old City may continue. He also mentioned that upon his request the Minister of Religious Affairs had issued instructions according to which arrangements in connection with the Western Wall, Muslim Holy Places and Christian Holy Places should be determined by the Chief Rabbis of Israel, a council of Muslim clerics and a council of Christian clergy respectively. Together with the extension of Israeli jurisdiction and administration over east Jerusalem, the Knesset passed the Preservation of the Holy Places Law, 1967, [26] ensuring protection of the Holy Places against desecration, as well as freedom of access thereto.—Jerusalem–The Legal and Political Background Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Israel [27] is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... â–¶(?) (Hebrew לֵוִי אֶשְׁכּוֹל ) (Born Levi Skolnick) (Hebrew לֵוִי שְׁקוֹלְנִיק) (October 25, 1895 - February 26, 1969), was the third Prime Minister of Israel from 1963 until his death of a heart attack in 1969. ...


According to a posthumously-published interview with Haaretz, General Uzi Narkiss reported that on June 7, 1967, a few hours after East Jerusalem fell into Israeli hands, Rabbi Shlomo Goren had told him "Now is the time to put 100 kilograms of explosives into the Mosque of Omar so that we may rid ourselves of it once and for all." His request was denied; according to Goren's aide Menahem Hacohen, he had not suggested blowing up the mosque, but had merely stated that "if, during the course of the war a bomb had fallen on the mosque and it would have - you know - disappeared - that would have been a good thing." Later that year, in a speech to a military convention, he added: "Certainly we should have blown it up. It is a tragedy for generations that we did not do so. ... I myself would have gone up there and wiped it off the ground completely so that there was no trace that there was ever a Mosque of Omar there."[28] Shlomo Goren also entered the Dome of the Rock with a Torah book and the shofar. [29] Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... Uzi Narkiss (Jerusalem, 1925 - Jerusalem, 1997), was an Israeli soldier and general, who served as commander of the Israel Defense Forces units in the Central Region during the Six Day War. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Shlomo Goren (1917-1994), was a former Orthodox Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi of Israel. ... Dome of the Rock in center of Temple Mount The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: قبة الصخرة Qubbat As-Sakhrah) is a famous Islamic shrine in Jerusalem. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... A shofar made from the horn of a kudu, in the Yemenite Jewish style. ...


Claims of exclusivity

Jewish claims

  • Jews claim that the Temple Mount is one of the sites that was legally purchased by their ancestors and therefore remains the legitimate property of the Jewish people only.[44] They cite the midrash which states that “There are three places regarding which the nations of the world cannot taunt Israel and say ‘you have stolen them.’ They are: The Cave of the Patriarchs, the Temple Mount and the burial site of Joseph", for it is recorded in the Bible that each of these places was purchased "for its full price" by Abraham, David and Jacob respectively.[45]
  • Jews point to the edict of Cyrus the Great[citation needed] (see chapter 1 and 6 of the book of Ezra in the Bible), (538 BCE), ruler of the Persian Empire, who gave permission and encouraged the exiled Jews of the time to return to Jerusalem and rebuild the Temple. A few years later when the authorities in Jerusalem asked the Jews what right they had to build a Temple, they referred to the decree of Cyrus. Darius, who was then reigning, organised a search for this alleged decree. When it was found in the archives at Ecbatana ('Achmetha.' Ezra 6:2), Darius reaffirmed the decree and the work proceeded. This edict, fully reproduced in the Book of Ezra, confirms non-Jewish recognition of the Jewish rights to the site.
  • In another non-Jewish acknowledgment of the Jewish rights to the site, a letter written by Julian, the Roman Emperor between 361-363 (and a notable pagan in an era when Christianity was gaining popularity in the Empire), tells of how he told the Jews that he would rebuild the sacred city of Jerusalem for them, (closed to the Jews since Hadrian in 135), ”...which for so many years you have longed to see inhabited, ... and together with you, glorify the Most High God therein”. A personal friend of his, Ammianus Marcellinus, wrote about the effort to rebuild the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, as did Sozomen (c400-c450) in his Historia Ecclesiastica.[46]
  • Most Israelis and Jews acquiesce to the continued Arab presence on the Temple Mount. However, traditional Judaism believes that the Temple Mount area will eventually come under Jewish control, and a Temple will be rebuilt. Some Israelis and Jews hold secular or liberal views and regard the sacrificial cult as an earlier primitivism. They see no need for a future Temple, although concur that the site holds immense cultural significance in Judaism. Former Prime Minister Ehud Barak did not give up Israeli sovereignty of the Temple Mount and its retaining walls during negotiations at the Camp David 2000 Summit. Religiously Orthodox Jews eagerly await the building of the third and final Temple with most religious authorities viewing this event as occurring by Divine Providence at the hand of a future Jewish Messiah.
  • A minority view, following the influential view of Maimonides, holds that when possible, Jews should attempt to rebuild the Temple on their own as a necessary step in bringing about the Messianic age.[citation needed]
  • Another view is to establish not the Temple but a synagogue on the Mount. During the Camp David 2000 Summit, the then Prime Minister Ehud Barak raised the possibility of building a synagogue on the mount[47] while more recently MK Uri Ariel has called for the construction of a synagogue on the mount.[48]
  • A very small minority, notably the Temple Mount and Eretz Yisrael Faithful Movement and The Temple Institute, advocate as a political platform the immediate removal of the Dome of the Rock and the Al Aqsa mosques, which they deem signs of "Islamic conquest and domination", suggesting that they be "rebuilt at Mecca" and claiming "God ... expects Israel to re-liberate the Temple Mount from the pagan Arab worshippers."
  • While the Temple Mount and Eretz Yisrael Faithful Movement has had very little success in persuading the Israeli government to forcibly remove the area's mosques, it has had greater success in its efforts to lift restrictions on Jewish worship at the Temple Mount. The group has had growing (although still limited) support in Israel in its political campaign in support of permitting Jews to worship at Judaism's holiest site. Currently, Jews and other non-Muslims[citation needed] are permitted to enter the Temple Mount under tight police observation, but are prohibited from bringing ritual objects or praying there.

Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... The Enclosure of the Cave of the Patriarchs The Cave of the Patriarchs is a religious compound located in the ancient city of Hebron (which lies in the southwest part of the West Bank, in the heart of ancient Judea), and is generally considered by Jews, Christians, and Muslims, to... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ώ // ---- Insert non-formatted text here]] For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... Persia redirects here. ... Darius (in Persian داريوش (Dah-rii-yoosh)) is a common Persian male name. ... Golden Rhyton from Irans Achaemenid period. ... The Book of Ezra is a book of the Bible in the Old Testament and Hebrew Tanakh. ... Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... Events Emperor Ai succeeds Emperor Mu as emperor of China. ... Events Perisapora is destroyed by Emperor Julian. ... Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... For other uses, see number 135. ... Ammianus Marcellinus (325/330-after 391) was a fourth-century Greek historian [1][2]. His is the last major historical account of the late Roman empire which survives today: his work chronicled the history of Rome from 96 to 378, although only the sections covering the period 353 - 378 are... Salminius Hermias Sozomen (c. ... Events First invasion of Italy by Alaric (probable date). ... Events August 25 - Marcian proclaimed Eastern Roman Emperor by Aspar and Pulcheria. ... A drawing of Ezekiels Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47 Since the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, religious Jews have prayed that God will allow for the rebuilding of a Third Temple. ... Ehud Barak (Hebrew: אֵהוּד בָּרָק) (born Ehud Brog on February 12, 1942) is an Israeli politician, former Prime Minster, and current Minister of Defense and leader of Israels Labor Party. ... The Middle East Peace Summit at Camp David of July 2000 took place between United States President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, and Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... In theology, Divine Providence, or simply Providence, is the sovereignty, superintendence, or agency of God over events in peoples lives and throughout history. ... In Judaism and Jewish eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Messianic Age is a theological term referring to a future time of peace and brotherhood on the earth, without crime, war and poverty. ... The Middle East Peace Summit at Camp David of July 2000 took place between United States President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, and Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat. ... Ehud Barak (Hebrew: אֵהוּד בָּרָק) (born Ehud Brog on February 12, 1942) is an Israeli politician, former Prime Minster, and current Minister of Defense and leader of Israels Labor Party. ... Uri Ariel (Hebrew: ; born December 22, 1952) is a member of the Israeli Knesset. ... The Temple Mount and Eretz Yisrael (Land of Israel) Faithful Movement (followers are called the Temple Mount Faithful) is an Orthodox Jewish movement based in Israel that wishes to re-establish the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem and re-institute the practice of ritual sacrifice. ... The Temple Institute, known in Hebrew as Machon HaMikdash (Hebrew: מכון המקדש), is a controversial organization in Israel focusing on the study of Temple construction and ritual with the aim of building the third Jewish temple on the Temple Mount, on the space which is currently occupied by the Dome of the...

Muslim claims

Starting in the 1990s some Muslims, including Sheikh Ekrima Sa'id Sabri, chairman of the Palestinian Higher Islamic Commission and Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, who was appointed by the PA, have denied that the site is connected with Solomon or that it had any history involving the Jews. Sheikh Ekrima Said Sabri is the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and Palestine, appointed by Yasser Arafat. ... The title Grand Mufti of Jerusalem is predominantly used to refer to Mohammad Amin al-Husayni. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ...


In recent years it has become normative for Muslim clerics, politicians, schoolbooks and even secular, university-based scholars of Muslim origin to engage in "Temple Denial," asserting that the ancient Jewish Temples never existed. This article deals with the actual or alleged denial of historical facts by either Israelis or Palestinians. ...

  • Sheikh Raed Salah - head of the Islamic Movement in Israel has stated: "We remind, for the 1,000th time, that the entire Al-Aqsa mosque, including all of its area and alleys above the ground and under it, is exclusive and absolute Muslim property, and no one else has any rights to even one grain of earth in it."[49][50]
  • In a Makor Rishon interview, published on May 22, 1998, the Imam of al-Aqsa Mosque and the PA’s Jerusalem Mufti Akrem Tzabari announced that “Jews have no right to the Temple Mount.”[51]
  • "The archaeology of Jerusalem is diverse - excavations in the Old City and the areas surrounding it revealed Umayyad Islamic palaces, Roman ruins, Armenian ruins and others. Outside of what is mentioned written in the Old and New Testaments, there is no tangible evidence of any Jewish traces remains in the old city of Jerusalem and its immediate vicinity."—Palestinian Authority Information Ministry Press Release, December 10, 1997
  • During the Camp David 2000 Summit, Dennis Ross, the US envoy, reported that Yasser Arafat "never offered any substantive ideas, not once" at the talks. However, "He did offer one new idea, which was that the Temple didn't exist in Jerusalem, that it was in Nablus." [30]
  • "The claims being made by the rulers of Israel and its rabbis about the alleged Temple are pure fabrications without any base or foundation."—Statement by the Higher Islamic Authority of Palestine Al-Quds (PA), December 28, 2001 (Translation by BBC Worldwide Monitoring)

Raed Salah is the leader of the northern branch of the Islamic Movement inside Israel. ... Makor Rishon is an Israeli weekly newspaper, identified with conservative national and religious values. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Middle East Peace Summit at Camp David of July 2000 took place between United States President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, and Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat. ... Ambassador Dennis Ross speaking at Emory University Dennis B. Ross is an American author and political figure who served as the director for policy planning in the State Department under President George H.W. Bush and special Middle East coordinator under President Bill Clinton. ... Not to be confused with Yasir Arafat (cricketer). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Map of the West Bank, with Nablus in the center north. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...

Acknowledgments of the basis for its holiness to other religions

Israel

The Government of Israel recognizes that Muslims regard the site as holy based upon their beliefs, and respect the rights of Muslims to hold such beliefs and to pray there in their fashion. Clause 3 of Israel's Basic Law: Jerusalem, Capital of Israel (July 1980) states: "The Holy Places shall be protected from desecration and any other violation and from anything likely to violate the freedom of access of the members of the different religions to the places sacred to them or their feelings towards those places." [52] However, the State of Israel only allows Muslims freedom of worship on the Temple Mount. Some Zionist leaders have also articulated recognition for the holiness of Jerusalem to other religions.[53]


Muslim

Muslims have traditionally acknowledged that the Temple Mount is holy to the Jews, the main reason being that the Temple Mount was the site of the Temple of Solomon.[54] A Brief Guide to al-Haram al-Sharif, a booklet published in 1930 by the "Supreme Moslem Council", a body established by the British government to administer waqfs and headed by Hajj Amin al-Husayni during the British Mandate period, states on page 3: This article is about the religious endowment. ... Mohammad Amin al-Husayni Mohammad Amin al-Husayni (ca. ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ...

"The site is one of the oldest in the world. Its sanctity dates from the earliest (perhaps from pre-historic) times. Its identity with the site of Solomon's Temple is beyond dispute. This, too, is the spot, according to universal belief, on which David built there an altar unto the Lord, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings." (A subsequent footnote refers the reader to 2 Samuel 26:25)

Imam Al-Qurtubi quotes the earlier commentator Imam Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari who related the Prophet Muhammad's response to a follower's query about the ruins of the fabled Jewish Temple. Qurtubi sets out in writing Tabari's words about the destruction of the Temple, which tally in every detail with biblical accounts of the Temple's destruction by the Babylonians, reconstruction, and final destruction by the Romans.[55] Shaykh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi suggests that the Quran expressly recognizes that Temple Mount in Jerusalem plays for Jews the same role that Mecca does for Muslims:[56] Imam Abu Abdullah Al-Qurtubi (Arabic: ) was a famous classical Sunni Maliki scholar. ... Balamis 14th century Persian version of Universal History by al-Tabari Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari 838–923 (father of Jafar, named Muhammad, son of Jarir from the province of Tabaristan, Arabic الطبري), was an author from Persia, one of the earliest, most prominent and famous Persian... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Jewish temple: Jewish temple or The Jewish Temple, may refer to the original two ancient Jewish Temples in Jerusalem. ... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Abdul Hadi Palazzi (Arabic: ) is the leader of Italian Muslim Assembly and a co-founder and a co-chairman of the Islam-Israel Fellowship, based on what Shaykh Palazzi believes are the authentic teachings of Muhammad as expressed in the Quran and the Hadith. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:Temple Mount

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Temple Mount located in Jerusalem can be accessed through eleven gates, and contains a further six sealed gates. ... Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount is composed of archeologists, scholars, and other prominent individuals. ...

References

  1. ^ Photograph of the northern wall area
  2. ^ Wilson's map of the features under the Temple Mount
  3. ^ Kaufman, Asher. "The Temple Site" (Abstract), The Jerusalem Post, May 23, 1991, pp. 13. Retrieved on 2007-03-04. "The most important findings of the superposition of the Second Temple on the Temple area are that the Dome of the Rock was not built on the site of the Temple, and that the Temple was taper-shaped on the western side, a form hitherto unknown to the scholars." 
  4. ^ Researcher says found location of the Holy Temple. Ynetnews (February 09, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-04. “Archaeology Professor Joseph Patrich uncovered a large water cistern that points, in his opinion, to the exact location of the altar and sanctuary on the Temple Mount. According to his findings, the rock on which the Dome of the Rock is built is outside the confines of the Temple.”
  5. ^ Photograph of the inside of the Golden Gate
  6. ^ image of the double gate passage
  7. ^ Photograph of King Solomon's Stables
  8. ^ Photograph of one of the chambers under the Triple Gate passageway
  9. ^ Babylonian Talmud Yoma 54b
  10. ^ Toledot 25:21
  11. ^ 2 Samuel 24:18-25
  12. ^ Moshe Sharon. "Islam on the Temple Mount" Biblical Archaeology Review July/August 2006. p. 36-47, 68.
  13. ^ Avraham Ya'ari, Igrot Eretz Yisrael (Tel Aviv, 1950) p. 134.
  14. ^ [1], [http://chareidi.shemayisrael.com/aharbaybmd67.htm Yated Ne'eman
  15. ^ Ynetnews
  16. ^ Haaretz
  17. ^ Ynetnews
  18. ^ Yated Ne'eman article
  19. ^ [2]
  20. ^ Sela, Neta (May 16, 2007). Rabbi Shapira forbids visiting temple Mount. Ynet. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  21. ^ [3]
  22. ^ [4]
  23. ^ Sefer HaCharedim Mitzvat Tshuva Chapter 3
  24. ^ Shaarey Teshuvah, Orach Chaim 561:1; cf. Teshuvoth Radbaz 691
  25. ^ Sheyibaneh Beit HaMikdash: More on Tum'ah and Tahorah
  26. ^ [5]
  27. ^ [6]
  28. ^ [7]
  29. ^ el-Khatib, Abdallah (May 1, 2001). "Jerusalem in the Qur'ān" (Abstract). British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 28 (1): 25–53. doi:10.1080/13530190120034549. Retrieved on 2006-11-17. 
  30. ^ Wilkinson, Jerusalem Pilgrims Before the Crusades, p. 204
  31. ^ See "Julian and the Jews 361-363 CE" and "Julian the Apostate and the Holy Temple".
  32. ^ Oleg Grabar, THE HARAM AL-SHARIF: AN ESSAY IN INTERPRETATION, BRIIFS vol. 2 no 2 (Autumn 2000)[8]
  33. ^ [9]
  34. ^ [10]
  35. ^ IslamOnline.net: "Anniversary of Aqsa Mosque Arson Highlighted"
  36. ^ PalestineFacts.org: "Who was responsible for the al-Aqsa Mosque fire in 1969?"
  37. ^ Al-Ahram: "Revoking the death warrant"
  38. ^ Arabs Vandalize Judaism's Holiest Site. Arutz Sheva (March 31, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  39. ^ The Times, October 14 2006
  40. ^ Jerusalem Post, October 11 2006
  41. ^ Fendel, Hillel (February 7, 2007). Jerusalem Arabs Riot, Kassams Fired, After Old City Excavations. Arutz Sheva. Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
  42. ^ Weiss, Efrat (February 7, 2007). Syria slams Jerusalem works. Yedioth Ahronoth. Retrieved on 2007-02-07. “Israeli excavation works near the al-Aqsa mosque in the holy city of Jerusalem have led to a dangerous rise in Middle East tensions and could derail revival of Arab-Israeli peace talks...what Israel is doing in its practices and attacks against our sacred Muslim sites in Jerusalem and al-Aqsa is a blatant violation that is not acceptable under any pretext”
  43. ^ Rapoport, Meron (July 7, 2007). Waqf Temple Mount excavation raises archaeologists' protests. Haaretz. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  44. ^ Kook, Abraham Issac, Moadei Hare'iya, pp. 413-415.
  45. ^ Genesis Rabba 79.7: "And he bought the parcel of ground, where he had spread his tent...for a hundred pieces of money." Rav Yudan son of Shimon said: ‘This is one of the three places where the non-Jews cannot deceive the Jewish People by saying that they stole it from them, and these are the places: Ma’arat HaMachpela, the Temple and Joseph’s burial place. Ma’arat HaMachpela because it is written: ‘And Abraham hearkened unto Ephron; and Abraham weighed to Ephron the silver,’ (Genesis, 23:16); the Temple because it is written: ‘So David gave to Ornan for the place,’ (I Chronicles, 21:26); and Joseph’s burial place because it is written: ‘And he bought the parcel of ground...Jacob bought Shechem.’ (Genesis, 33:19)."
  46. ^ See"Julian and the Jews 361-363 CE"
  47. ^ Shragai, Nadav (November 6, 2006). Higher than the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Haaretz. Retrieved on 2006-11-27. “Nearly 25 years ago, Rami Zayit, a scribe from Kiryat Arba, and Jerusalem architect Gideon Harlap, drew up the plan, "Mivneh Negev." The plan was to open the triple gate in the southern part of the Temple Mount (the Hulda Gates) and to transform the subterranean spaces of Solomon's Stables in the southeastern part of the Temple Mount into a prayer area for Jews”
  48. ^ HaLevi, Ezra (October 10, 2006). Synagogue Planned For Temple Mount, Hashemites to Add Minaret. Arutz Sheva. Retrieved on 2006-11-27. “The synagogue would be build upon the Temple Mount, but in an area that is indisputably not within the areas that require immersion and other preparations, according to Jewish law”
  49. ^ Fendel, Hillel (November 6, 2006). Israeli Sheikh: Temple Mount is Entirely Islamic. Arutz Sheva. Retrieved on 2006-11-12.
  50. ^ Sheikh Salah: Western Wall belongs to Muslims, February 18, 2007
  51. ^ Temple Mount Preservation Act of 2001. The House of Representatives (July 19, 2001). Retrieved on 2006-11-27.
  52. ^ Government of Israel (July 30, 1980). Basic Law: Jerusalem, Capital of Israel. Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  53. ^ Weizmann, Chaim (December 1, 1948). Israel Claims Jerusalem. Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved on 2007-07-12. “"To the followers of the two other great monotheistic religions, Jerusalem is a site of sacred associations and holy memories."”
  54. ^ Muslim acknowledgement of existence of the Temple:
    • "The Rock was in the time of Solomon the son of David 12 cubits high and there was a dome over it...It is written in the Tawrat [Bible]: 'Be happy Jerusalem,' which is Bayt al-Maqdis and the Rock which is called Haykal." al-Wasati, Fada'il al Bayt al-Muqaddas, ed. Izhak Hasson (Jerusalem, 1979) pp. 72ff.
    • "The Farthest Mosque must refer to the site of the Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem on the hill of Moriah, at or near which stands the Dome of the Rock… it was a sacred place to both Jews and Christians… The chief dates in connection with the Temple in Jerusalem are: It was finished by Solomon about 1004 BCE; destroyed by the Babylonians under Nebuchadnezzar about 586 BCE; rebuilt under Ezra and Nehemiah about 515 BCE; turned into a heathen idol temple by one of Alexander the Great's successors, Antiochus Epiphanes, 167 BCE; restored by Herod, 17 BCE to 29; and completely razed to the ground by the Emperor Titus in 70. These ups and downs are among the greater signs in religious history." (Yusuf Ali, Commentary on the Koran, 2168.)
    • "The city of Jerusalem was chosen at the command of Allah by Prophet David in the tenth century BC. After him his son Prophet Solomon built a mosque in Jerusalem according to the revelation that he received from Allah. For several centuries this mosque was used for the worship of Allah by many Prophets and Messengers of Allah. It was destroyed by the Babylonians in the year 586 BC., but it was soon rebuilt and was rededicated to the worship of Allah in 516 BC. It continued afterwards for several centuries until the time of Prophet Jesus. After he departed this world, it was destroyed by the Romans in the year 70 CE." (Siddiqi, Dr. Muzammil. Status of Al-Aqsa Mosque, IslamOnline, May 21, 2007. Retrieved July 12, 2007.)
    • "Early Muslims regarded the building and destruction of the Temple of Solomon as a major historical and religious event, and accounts of the Temple are offered by many of the early Muslim historians and geographers (including Ibn Qutayba, Ibn al-Faqih, Mas'udi, Muhallabi, and Biruni). Fantastic tales of Solomon's construction of the Temple also appear in the Qisas al-anbiya', the medieval compendia of Muslim legends about the pre-Islamic prophets." (Kramer, Martin. The Temples of Jerusalem in Islam, Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs, September 18, 2000. Retrieved November 21, 2007.)
    • "While there is no scientific evidence that Solomon's Temple existed, all believers in any of the Abrahamic faiths perforce must accept that it did." (Khalidi, Rashid. Transforming the Face of the Holy City: Political Messages in the Built Topography of Jerusalem, Bir Zeit University, November 12, 1998.)
  55. ^ Radoszkowicz, Abigail (February 14, 2001). For Allah's sake. Jerusalem Post. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  56. ^ Palazzi, Shaykh Prof. Abdul Hadi. What the Qur'an Really Says. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.

The May 16, 1948 Palestine Post headline announcing the creation of the state of Israel The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli daily English language broadsheet newspaper, originally founded on December 1, 1932, by American journalist-turned-newspaper-editor Gershon Agron as the The Palestine Post. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ynetnews is an English language Israel news and content website operated by Yedioth Ahronoth, Israel’s most-read newspaper, and the Hebrew Israel news portal, Ynet. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The first page of the Talmud, in the standard Vilna edition. ... Moed (Festivals) is the second Order of the Mishnah (also the Tosefta and Talmud), Of the six orders of the Mishna, Moed is the third shortest. ... Toledot, Toldot, or Toldoth (תּוֹלְדֹת — Hebrew for “line” or “story,” the second word and the first distinctive word in the parshah) is the sixth weekly parshah or portion in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading. ... The Books of Samuel, also referred to as [The Book of] Samuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל), are (two) books in the Hebrew Bible (Judaisms Tanakh and originally writtten in Hebrew) and the Old Testament of Christianity. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Yedioth Ahronoth (Hebrew: ידיעות אחרונות, meaning latest news) is a major Hebrew newspaper published in Israel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Arutz Sheva Israel National Radio is a right wing Israeli radio station. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Arutz Sheva Israel National Radio is a right wing Israeli radio station. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Yedioth Ahronoth (Hebrew: ידיעות אחרונות, meaning latest news) is a major daily Israeli newspaper, written in Hebrew. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Abraham Isaac Kook (1865–1935) was the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of the British Mandate for Palestine, the founder of the Religious Zionist Yeshiva Merkaz HaRav, Jewish thinker, statesman, diplomat, mediator and a renowned Torah scholar. ... Genesis Rabba, (Breshit Rabba in Hebrew), is a religious text holy to classical Judaism. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arutz Sheva Israel National Radio is a right wing Israeli radio station. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arutz Sheva Israel National Radio is a right wing Israeli radio station. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chaim Azriel Weizmann (Hebrew: חיים עזריאל ויצמן) November 27, 1874 – November 9, 1952) was a chemist, statesman, President of the World Zionist Organization, first President of Israel (elected February 1, 1949, served 1949 - 1952) and founder of a research institute in Israel that eventually became the Weizmann Institute of Science. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Solomons Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Beit HaMikdash), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Bible, the first Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional date) 1002 BC - Death... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Nebuchadnezzar has several meanings: Nebuchadnezzar (also Nebuchadrezzar), the name of several kings of Babylonia: Nebuchadnezzar I of Babylon Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon, the best known of these kings, who conquered Aram and Israel. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC Events and Trends 589 BC - Apries succeeds Psammetichus II as king of Egypt 588 BC _ Nebuchadnezzar II of... For other uses, see Ezra (disambiguation). ... Nehemiah or Nechemya (נְחֶמְיָה Comforted of/is the LORD (YHWH), Standard Hebrew Nəḥemya, Tiberian Hebrew Nəḥemyāh, ) is a major figure in the post-exile history of the Jews as recorded in the Bible, and is believed to be the primary author of the Book of Nehemiah. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC Events and Trends Establishment of the Roman Republic March 12, 515 BC - Construction is completed on the... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Coin of Antiochus IV Epiphanes (reigned 175 - 163 BC). ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC - 160s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 172 BC 171 BC 170 BC 169 BC 168 BC - 167 BC - 166 BC 165 BC 164... Herod was the name of several members of the Herodian Dynasty of Roman Iudaea Province: Herod the Great (c. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC... 29 is my favourite colour!!!!!!!! Events Romans captured Sofia. ... For other uses, see Titus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 70. ... Abdullah Yusuf Ali (1872-1952) was born in Bombay, India, to a wealthy merchant family. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Birzeit University is a Palestinian university situated in the town of Bir Zeit near Ramallah. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

General
Archeological controversy


Coordinates: 31°46′43″N, 35°14′5″E Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Committee for the Prevention of Destruction of Antiquities on the Temple Mount is composed of archeologists, scholars, and other prominent individuals. ... Martin Kramer (b. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Temple Mount - the Haram-esh-Sharif (732 words)
The Temple Mount (Heb., Har Habayit; Arabic, Haram esh-Sharif, the Noble Sanctuary),is identified in both Jewish and Islamic tradition as the area of Mount Moriah where Abraham offered up his son in sacrifice (Genesis 22:1-18; the Koran, Sura Al-Saffat 37:102-110).
Following the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in the year 70, the area of the Temple was deliberately left in ruins (first by the Romans, then by the Byzantines).
The interior glass mosaics in the drum and dome contain representations of Byzantine imperial jewelry, and one of the ornate inscriptions affirms that God is One and not three; and that Jesus was an apostle of God and His Word, and not His son.
Temple Mount - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4963 words)
Ariel Sharon's controversial September 28, 2000, visit to the Temple Mount is cited by some people as the event that precipitated the Second Intifada, although others, including Palestinian representatives,[1] dismiss this and instead feel that the catalyst for the violence was the breakdown of the Camp David negotiations on July 25, 2000.
The Talmud says that this took place on the Temple Mount, and Jewish tradition has it that the rock in the Dome of the Rock was the one on which he slept.
On February 11, 2004, the eastern wall of the Temple Mount was damaged by an earthquake.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m