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Encyclopedia > Temple (Latter Day Saints)
The Salt Lake Temple, operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the best-known Mormon temple. Located in Salt Lake City, Utah, it is the centerpiece of the 10 acre (40,000 m²) Temple Square.

In the Latter Day Saint movement (also known as Mormonism), a temple is a building dedicated to be a house of God and is reserved for special forms of worship. A temple differs from a church meetinghouse, which is used for weekly worship services. Temples have been a significant part of the Latter Day Saint movement since its inception. Today, temples are operated by several Latter Day Saint denominations. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints operates over 120 temples worldwide to perform Endowment ceremonies, marriages, and other rituals for both the living and by proxy in behalf of dead ancestors. The Community of Christ operates two temples in the United States, which are open to the public and are used for worship services, performances, and historical education. Some Latter Day Saint groups, like the Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite), do not use temples and only worship in church branches or missions. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2016x2264, 2534 KB) Salt Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Mormon, in Salt Lake City, Utah Photo by Ricardo630 - August 2006 Ricardo630 06:06, 14 August 2006 (UTC) Templo de La Iglesia de Jesucristo de... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2016x2264, 2534 KB) Salt Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Mormon, in Salt Lake City, Utah Photo by Ricardo630 - August 2006 Ricardo630 06:06, 14 August 2006 (UTC) Templo de La Iglesia de Jesucristo de... The Salt Lake Temple is the largest (of more than 120) and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... This photo of Temple Square, circa 1897, shows that the plot housed the tallest buildings in Salt Lake City at the time, namely the Salt Lake Temple, Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... For more general information about religious denominations that follow the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... In Mormonism, worship services include weekly services, held on Sundays (or Saturday when local custom or law prohibits Sunday worship), in neighborhood based religious units. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... A Latter Day Saint is an adherent of the Latter Day Saint movement, a group of denominations tracing their heritage to the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Endowment is a gift of power from on high that has several meanings in various contexts of Latter Day Saint theology. ... RLDS redirects here. ... The Church of Jesus Christs historic chapel in Monongahela, Pennsylvania. ...

Contents

History

The Latter Day Saint movement was conceived as a restoration of practices believed to have been lost in a Great Apostasy from the true gospel of Jesus Christ. Temple worship played a prominent role in the Bible's Old Testament, and in the Book of Mormon. The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Great Apostasy is... The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ...


On December 27, 1832 — two years after the organization of the Church of Jesus Christ — the movement's founder, Joseph Smith, Jr., reported receiving a revelation that called upon church members to restore the practice of temple worship. The Latter Day Saints in Kirtland, Ohio were commanded to: Joseph Smith redirects here. ... Kirtland is a city in Lake County, Ohio, USA. The population was 6,670 at the 2000 census. ...

"Establish a house, even a house of prayer, a house of fasting, a house of faith, a house of learning, a house of glory, a house of order, a house of God." (Doctrine and Covenants 1835 VII:36, LDS 88:119, RLDS 85:36b)

More importantly, Latter Day Saints see temples as the fulfillment of a prophecy found in Malachi 3:1 (KJV): Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ...

"Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me; and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the Lord of hosts."

This is believed to emphasize that when the Lord comes again, he will come "to his temple".

The Community of Christ's LDS Kirtland Temple was the first temple of the Latter Day Saint movement and the only temple completed in the lifetime of Joseph Smith, Jr.

As plans were drawn up to construct a temple in Kirtland, the decision was made to simultaneously begin work on a second temple at the church's colony in Jackson County Missouri. Surviving plans indicate that both temples would have the same dimensions and approximately the same appearance and both were to be at the "centerplaces" of cities designed according to Smith's plan for the City of Zion. File links The following pages link to this file: Temple (Mormonism) Categories: User-created public domain images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Temple (Mormonism) Categories: User-created public domain images ... RLDS redirects here. ... The Kirtland Temple is a registered National Historic Landmark in Kirtland, Ohio, USA, on the eastern edge of the Cleveland metropolitan area. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... The original plat of the City of Zion (Independence, Missouri). ...


Conflict in Missouri led to the expulsion of the Mormons from Jackson County, obviating any possibility of building a temple there, but work on the temple in Kirtland continued. At great cost and after great sacrifice, the Latter Day Saints finished the Kirtland Temple in early 1836. On March 17, they held a lengthy dedication ceremony and numerous spiritual experiences and visitations were reported. The Kirtland Temple is a registered National Historic Landmark in Kirtland, Ohio, USA, on the eastern edge of the Cleveland metropolitan area. ...


Conflict relating to the failure of the church's Kirtland Safety Society bank, caused the church presidency to leave Kirtland and move the church's headquarters to the Mormon settlement of Far West, Missouri. Far West was also platted along the lines of the City of Zion plan and in 1838 the church began construction of a new, larger temple in the center of the town. They may also have dedicated a temple site in the neighboring Mormon settlement of Adam-ondi-Ahman. The events of the 1838 Mormon War and the expulsion of the Mormons from Missouri left these attempts at temple-building no further progressed than excavating foundations. The Kirtland Safety Society (KSS) was a quasi-bank organized in 1836 (and reorganized on January 2, 1837) by leaders and followers of the Church of Christ (precursor to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints). ... Far West, Missouri, was a Latter Day Saint (Mormon) settlement in Caldwell County, Missouri. ... Adam-ondi-Ahman is a historic site along the east bank of the Grand River in Daviess County, Missouri. ... The Mormon War is a name sometimes given to the 1838 conflict which occurred between Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and their neighbors in the northwestern region of the U.S. state of Missouri. ...


In 1839, the Mormons regrouped at a new headquarters in Nauvoo, Illinois. They were again commanded to build a "House of the Lord" — this one even larger and greater than those that went before. Plans for the temple in Nauvoo followed the earlier models in Kirtland and Independence with lower and upper courts, but the scale was much increased. There is also a Nauvoo, Alabama, and a Nauvoo, Pennsylvania Nauvoo (נָאווּ to be beautiful, Sephardi Hebrew NÃ¥vu, Tiberian Hebrew Nâwû) is a city in Hancock County, Illinois, United States. ...


New conflicts arose that caused Joseph Smith, the Prophet and President of the Church, to be murdered, along with his brother Hyrum the Patriarch, at Carthage Jail on June 27,1844. The Nauvoo Temple stood only half finished. Eventually, this temple was finished and dedicated. Some temple ordinances were performed before most of the saints followed Brigham Young west across the Mississippi River. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and Latter Day Saint movement, a patriarch is the Melchizedek Priesthood office that is called evangelist in the New Testament. ... See also: Nauvoo Illinois Temple for the article on the temple rebuilt on the site with the same external look. ...


Joseph Smith's martyrdom resulted in a succession crisis which divided the movement into different sects. The concept of temple worship evolved separately in many of these sects and only the LDS church continued to build temples until April 1990 when the Community of Christ, then known as the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (RLDS), began to construct their first temple, which was officially dedicated in 1994. The Community of Christ still owns the Kirtland Temple, which is open to visitors and is used for worship services or special events by various Latter Day Saint denominations. The Succession Crisis in the Latter Day Saint movement occurred after the violent death of the movements founder, Joseph Smith, Jr. ... RLDS redirects here. ...


Purposes

Temples have held numerous purposes in the Latter Day Saint movement, both historically and their differing expressions today. These purposes include:

  • A House of the Lord — Joseph Smith, Jr. reported a revelation in 1836 explaining that the recently-dedicated Kirtland Temple was built "that the Son of Man might have a place to manifest himself to his people." (Doctrine and Covenants LDS 109:5). All Latter Day Saint denominations with temples still consider temples to be special houses of the Lord.
  • A House of Learning — The Kirtland Temple housed the "School of the Prophets."
  • Center of the City of Zion — Latter Day Saints often view temples as central to the establishment of Zionic communities. Examples include: the Kirtland Temple, the original (unfinished) Independence Temple, the (unfinished) Far West Temple, the (unfinished) Adam-ondi-Ahman Temple, the original Nauvoo Temple, the Salt Lake Temple, the St. George Utah Temple, the Mesa Arizona Temple, the Lā‘ie Hawai‘i Temple, and others.
  • Headquarters of the church — the Kirtland Temple served as the headquarters of the early church from its completion in 1836 through the end of 1837.
  • Sacred spaces for special ordinances — Beginning in Nauvoo, temples were spaces in which to perform special ordinances such as the endowment and baptism for the deadsee Ordinance (Mormonism).

The Kirtland Temple is a registered National Historic Landmark in Kirtland, Ohio, USA, on the eastern edge of the Cleveland metropolitan area. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... Far West, Missouri, was a Latter Day Saint (Mormon) settlement in Caldwell County, Missouri. ... Adam-ondi-Ahman is a historic site along the east bank of the Grand River in Daviess County, Missouri. ... The Salt Lake Temple is the largest (of more than 120) and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The St. ... LDS temple in Mesa at night, showing the distinctive spireless design. ... Lā‘ie Hawai‘i Temple is the fifth oldest Mormon temple in the world. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Endowment is a gift of power from on high that has several meanings in various contexts of Latter Day Saint theology. ... Baptism for the dead is an ordinance performed today in temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for those who have died without having been baptized by one having authority. ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ...

Temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

LDS Temple construction reached an all-time high during the late 1990s. There are now over 120 operating temples.
Map of the world showing the geographic location of each LDS temple.
See also: List of temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also called the LDS Church) is by far the most prolific builder of temples. Currently there are 124 operating temples, 9 under construction, and 4 announced (not yet under construction). Additionally the LDS Church uses temples for special purposes, rather than for Sunday worship services which are held in meetinghouses. Instead, temples are special houses of worship where ordinances and sealings (most frequently thought of as marriages) are performed. Occasionally meetings are held within temples (such as the weekly meeting of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles), but not all temples have facilities for such meetings. Temples and their associated ordinances are a vital part of the theology of the LDS church. Their importance is often emphasized in weekly meetings, and regular participation in temple work is strongly encouraged of all Latter-day Saints (LDS). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (911x623, 83 KB) Volume of LDS Temples in operation from 1838 through end of 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (911x623, 83 KB) Volume of LDS Temples in operation from 1838 through end of 2005. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 352 pixelsFull resolution (1427 × 628 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 352 pixelsFull resolution (1427 × 628 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Temples of the LDS Church. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ... The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ...


History

The first Latter-day Saint temple ceremonies were performed in Kirtland, Ohio, but differed significantly from the endowment performed on the second floor of Joseph Smith’s Red Brick Store in Nauvoo, Illinois and the Nauvoo Temple. Kirtland ordinances included washings and anointings (differing in many ways from the modern portion) and the washing of the feet ordinance. For nearly four years beginning in 1842, the prophet’s modest mercantile functioned as a de facto temple—the site of the first washings, anointings, endowments, and sealings. In contrast, the grand edifice known as the Nauvoo Temple was in operation for only two months before the Saints left Illinois for the West. The rebuilt Red Brick Store in Nauvoo, Illinois The Red Brick Store in Nauvoo, Illinois, was a building that was constructed and owned by Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Preparations to initiate the first members of Joseph Smith’s Quorum of the Anointed,[1] or Holy Order, as it was also known, were made on May 3, 1842. The walls of the second level of the Red Brick Store were painted with garden-themed murals, the rooms fitted with carpets, potted plants, and a veil hung from the ceiling. All the while, the ground level continued to operate as Joseph Smith’s general mercantile.


After the early events of the succession crisis, Brigham Young assumed control of the church's headquarters at Nauvoo, Illinois. While he and the rest of the Quorum of the Twelve made contingency plans for abandoning the city, he may have hoped that it would not prove necessary. For example, in early 1845 he held a conference at the Norwegian colony at Norway, Illinois and announced a plan to build a Latter-day Saint town there with a temple for the use of the Norwegian Saints. The Succession Crisis in the Latter Day Saint movement occurred after the violent death of the movements founder, Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... In Mormonism, the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (also known as the Quorum of the Twelve, the Council of the Twelve, or the Twelve) is one of the governing bodies of the church hierarchy in many Latter Day Saint denominations, members of which are considered to be Apostles, and special...


Meanwhile Young urged the Latter-day Saints in Nauvoo to redouble their efforts to finish the temple. By the end of 1845, the building was sufficiently finished to allow temple ordinances to be performed. Ordinances continued to be performed in early 1846 as the Mormons were forced to abandon the city. A small crew remained in the city and continued to work on the temple until April 30, 1846, when it was finally abandoned. In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Upon reaching the Great Basin, Brigham Young began to build settlements based on the City of Zion plan and designated four of these to contain temples: Salt Lake City (1847), St. George (1871), Manti (1875), and Logan (1877). The St. George Temple was the first to be completed in 1877, followed by Logan (1884) and Manti (1888). The Salt Lake Temple took 40 years to complete because of various setbacks and delays. It was dedicated in 1893. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 703 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Temple (Mormonism) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 703 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Temple (Mormonism) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Frankfurt Germany Temple The Frankfurt Germany Temple is the 43rd constructed and 41st operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) The Great Basin is a large, arid region of the western United States. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... Nickname: Settled 1861 Incorporated 1862 Government  - Mayor Dan McArthur  - City Manager Gary Esplin Area  - City  64. ... Manti is a city located in Sanpete County, Utah, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,040. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The St. ... Logan Temple The Logan Utah Temple is the 4th constructed and 2nd operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ... Manti Utah Temple The Manti Utah Temple is the fifth constructed temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ... The Salt Lake Temple is the largest (of more than 120) and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...


Latter-day Saint temple building halted until the presidency of Joseph F. Smith who announced two additional temples: Cardston, Alberta (1913) and Lā‘ie, Hawai‘i (1915). Cardston became the first Latter-day Saint temple dedicated outside of the United States. Smith broke with the previous tradition (established since Kirtland) of building temples with upper and lower courts. Temples previously had been ever larger, but the Laie, Hawaii temple was smaller than the Nauvoo Temple had been. Joseph Fielding Smith, Sr. ... The Cardston Alberta Temple (formerly the Alberta Temple) is the eighth constructed and sixth operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as the Mormon or LDS Church. ... Lā‘ie Hawai‘i Temple is the fifth oldest Mormon temple in the world. ...


Both Cardston and Laie were dedicated under church president Heber J. Grant as was a temple in Mesa, Arizona. George Albert Smith dedicated the next temple in Idaho Falls, Idaho. David O. McKay dedicated five additional temples including one in Bern, Switzerland — which was the first temple dedicated in Europe and the first temple to use film recording of the endowment rather than live actors. Joseph Fielding Smith dedicated a temple in Ogden, Utah and Harold B. Lee dedicated its twin in Provo, Utah. Heber Jeddy Grant (November 22, 1856 – May 14, 1945) was the seventh President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ... LDS temple in Mesa at night, showing the distinctive spireless design. ... George Albert Smith (April 4, 1870 – April 4, 1951) was an influential religious leader and the eighth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Idaho Falls Idaho Temple is the tenth constructed and eighth operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ... For other persons of the same name, see David McKay. ... Bern Temple in 1981 The Bern Switzerland Temple is a Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Joseph Fielding Smith (July 19, 1876 – July 2, 1972) was the tenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1970 to 1972. ... The Ogden Utah Temple is the 16th constructed and 14th operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ... Harold Bingham Lee (March 28, 1899 – December 26, 1973) was born in Clifton, Idaho but spent the great bulk of his life in Utah where he rose to head The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Provo Utah Temple is the 17th constructed and 15th operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ...

Spencer W. Kimball began a plan to build many more smaller temples according to standardized plans. Twenty-one temples were dedicated during his presidency, including the tiny Papeete Tahiti Temple — which was less than 10,000 square feet (900 m²). This trend has continued. Nine additional temples were dedicated in the presidency of Ezra Taft Benson and two in the brief presidency of Howard W. Hunter. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1109, 691 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Temple (Mormonism) ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1109, 691 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Temple (Mormonism) ... Logan Temple The Logan Utah Temple is the 4th constructed and 2nd operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ... Spencer Woolley Kimball (March 28, 1895 – November 5, 1985) was the twelfth President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1973-1985). ... The Papeete Tahiti Temple is the 27th constructed and 25th operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Ezra Taft Benson (August 4, 1899 – May 30, 1994) was President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1985 until his death. ... Howard William Hunter (November 14, 1907 – March 3, 1995) was the fourteenth President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1994-1995), and served the shortest amount of time of any Church president to date (nine months). ...


The current church president, Gordon B. Hinckley, has built over seventy temples since coming into office. Most of these are according to smaller, standard plans, but one particularly noteworthy achievement was the rebuilding of a temple in Nauvoo, Illinois, known as the Nauvoo Illinois Temple. Currently there are 124 operating temples, 9 under construction, and 4 announced (not yet under construction). Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the fifteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... There is also a Nauvoo, Alabama, and a Nauvoo, Pennsylvania Nauvoo (נָאווּ to be beautiful, Sephardi Hebrew Nåvu, Tiberian Hebrew Nâwû) is a city in Hancock County, Illinois, United States. ... See also: Nauvoo Temple for a historical overview of the original structure on the same site. ...


Purposes

Temples have a different purpose from LDS meetinghouses. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints today, temples serve two main purposes: (1) Temples are locations in which worthy Latter-day Saints can perform sacred ordinances on behalf of themselves, their deceased ancestors, or unrelated deceased persons whose names are compiled from historical records through the church's Family Record Extraction Program. (2) Temples are considered to be a Houses of Holiness where members can go to commune with God. For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Ezra Taft Benson, a former president of the Church, taught: Ezra Taft Benson (August 4, 1899 – May 30, 1994) was President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1985 until his death. ...

"When I have been weighed down by a problem or a difficulty, I have gone to the House of the Lord with a prayer in my heart for answers. These answers have come in clear and unmistakable ways." (Ensign, August 1985, page 8).

Such personal revelation can be received as needed, but many feel that it is easier to receive such revelation when one is in a place as peaceful and apart from the world as temples are. This article is about the year. ...


Nearly everything in the temple is symbolic, from the clothing worn (those who attend the temple dress in white, a symbol of purity), to the building and rooms, to the ceremonies themselves.


Symbolism in temple architecture

Main article: Temple architecture (Latter-day Saints)

Latter-day Saint temples are constructed with several symbolic elements meant to represent their religious theology. Each temple has the words "Holiness to the Lord" inscribed on it, representing the same inscription on the Old Testament Temple of Solomon. Most temples are built facing East, pointing the direction from which Jesus Christ is prophesied to return. The spires and towers on the East side of the temple are elevated higher than spires and towers on the West side for this same reason, and to represent the Melchizedek, or Higher Priesthood. Some temples, like Salt Lake, Chicago, and Washington D.C. have triple spires on each side of the temple representing The Father, The Son, and the Holy Ghost. Stones carved with sun, moon, and earth or star designs are placed in ascending order around the temple facade to represent the Latter-day Saint belief in a Celestial, Terrestrial, and Telestial Kingdom, or Three Degrees of Glory in the afterlife. The statue of the Angel Moroni, placed on most temples built after the Salt Lake Temple, was designed in 1891 by Cyrus Dallin. The statue design represents the Latter-day Saint belief that Moroni was the angel spoken of in Revelations 14.[2] // On December 27, 1832 — two years after the organization of the Church of Jesus Christ — the movements founder, Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Temple ordinances

Lā‘ie Hawai‘i Temple is the fifth oldest Latter-day Saint temple, and the first built outside the North American continent. It is also one of only three temples designed to look like Solomon's Temple in scripture and one of the few temples without spires.

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints make covenants and perform special rituals and ordinances within temples. Some of these include: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (956x693, 81 KB) Summary Photo taken by User:Jiang on December 24, 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (956x693, 81 KB) Summary Photo taken by User:Jiang on December 24, 2005. ... Lā‘ie Hawai‘i Temple is the fifth oldest Mormon temple in the world. ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ...

These ordinances may be performed either on behalf of the participant or by "proxy" on behalf of the dead. Some of these ordinances are normally performed outside of temples for the living, but when performed on behalf of the dead they are performed exclusively in temples. This includes baptism, confirmation, and ordination to the priesthood. The ordinances of Washing and anointing, the Endowment and the ceremony of Eternal marriage are performed only within a temple. Baptism for the dead is an ordinance performed today in temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for those who have died without having been baptized by one having authority. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... One of ten full-size tubs used for washings and anointings in the Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints circa 1912. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Endowment is a gift of power from on high that has several meanings in various contexts of Latter Day Saint theology. ... In Mormonism, a sealing is an ordinance (ritual), performed in temples by a person holding the sealing power. ... Baptism for the dead is an ordinance performed today in temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for those who have died without having been baptized by one having authority. ... Confirmation is a rite used in many Christian Churches. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is considered to be the power and authority of God, including the authority to act as a leader in the church and to perform ordinances (sacraments), and the apostolic power to perform miracles. ... One of ten full-size tubs used for washings and anointings in the Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints circa 1912. ...


Latter-day Saints perform these proxy ordinances because they believe deceased non-Mormons are in a condition commonly referred to as "spirit prison." They believe that Christ went to the righteous spirits and organized a great missionary force to teach the gospel to others of the dead who, in turn, may be baptized by proxy in a temple. It is believed that the dead may accept or reject the other ordinances done by proxy on their behalf prior to the Final judgment. Spirit Prison is believed by Latter-Day Saints to be the place where people who have not accepted their gospel on earth will be able to receive it in the afterlife, preceding the second coming of Jesus Christ. ... In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgment or Judgement Day is the ethical-judicial trial, judgment, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven or to hell) by a divine tribunal at the end of time, following the destruction of humans present earthly existence. ...


In addition, the Endowment is considered sacred and highly individualistic, although the presentation is the same to all who attend. Church leaders have taught that those who attend the temple should get something different out of the experience each time they attend.[citation needed]


Requirements for entering LDS Church temples

Porto Alegre Brazil Temple in southern Brazil is the 102nd Mormon temple. The temple follows the recent LDS pattern of building numerous temples that are much smaller than previous temples.

An LDS Church manual called Preparing to Enter the Holy Temple explains that Latter-day Saints "do not discuss the temple ordinances outside the temples." Further, the manual states: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1152x768, 685 KB) Summary Jason George took this photograph in January 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1152x768, 685 KB) Summary Jason George took this photograph in January 2005. ... The Porto Alegre Brazil Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints The Porto Alegre Brazil Temple is the 102nd operating Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...

"It was never intended that knowledge of these temple ceremonies would be limited to a select few who would be obliged to ensure that others never learn of them. It is quite the opposite, in fact. With great effort the church urges every soul to qualify and prepare for the temple experience."

However, to experience the temple firsthand, one needs to convert to the faith, and then (after a year's membership) obtain a temple recommend to enter. The recommend is obtained from and signed by the member's bishop after passing a one-on-one worthiness interview, in which one's commitment to the gospel is reviewed. The recommend is also signed by the member's stake president after a second one-on-one worthiness interview, and finally by the member themselves. By signing his or her own recommend, the member acknowledges their responsibility to ensure that they remain worthy to hold the recommend. Once issued a recommend remains valid for a period of two years. In Mormonism, the Bishop is the leader of a local congregation and an office of the Aaronic Priesthood. ... A stake is an administrative unit composed of multiple congregrations in sects of the Latter Day Saint movement. ...


A limited-use recommend can be obtained by those who just want to act as proxy in temple baptism and confirmation ceremonies. A member of the church must be twelve years of age (and hold the priesthood if male) and pass a worthiness interview with the member's bishop. Unlike the temple recommend, a limited-use recommend does not require a year's membership nor an interview with a stake president. A limited-use recommend is also not valid for participation in temple ceremonies beyond proxy baptism and confirmation.


To qualify for a temple recommend, one must faithfully affirm a series of questions examining what the church believes are the most important factors indicating one's spiritual worthiness. These questions seek to ensure that the interviewee has a basic belief in key church doctrines, and obeys the most significant church rules, such as the following:

The Washington D.C. Temple is the 16th Latter-day Saint temple
  • a belief in God the Father, Jesus as the Savior and redeemer of mankind, and the Holy Spirit;
  • belief in the role of Jesus as the Savior;
  • belief in the Restoration;
  • support for the President of the Church and other general authorities and local church leaders;
  • obedience to the "Law of Chastity" (strict celibacy outside of a marriage that is legally recognized by the local government, and that is both monogamous and heterosexual);
  • refraining from the abuse of family members;
  • no affiliation or agreement with polygamists or other people whom the church considers apostates;
  • making a good faith effort to attend church meetings and obey other church rules;
  • honesty in dealings with others;
  • payment of tithing;
  • following the church's interpretation of the Word of Wisdom;
  • payment of child support (if applicable);
  • keeping the solemn oaths one has previously made in the temple;
  • wearing the temple garment "night and day"; and
  • confession of all serious sins to Church leaders.

Image File history File links DCTemple. ... Image File history File links DCTemple. ... The Washington D.C. Temple (formerly the Washington Temple) is the 18th constructed and 16th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In Mormonism, the Restoration was a period in its early history during which a number of events occurred that were understood to be necessary to restore the early Christian church as demonstrated in the New Testament, and to prepare the earth for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a general authority is a member of a select body of approximately 100 men with administrative and ecclesiastical authority in the church. ... The Law of Chastity is a part of the Mormon (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) belief structure. ... Polygamy has been a feature of human culture since earliest history. ... Apostasy (Greek απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is the formal renunciation of ones religion. ... A tithe (from Old English teogotha tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a religious organization. ... The Word of Wisdom is the common name of a section of the Doctrine and Covenants,[1] a book that consists of what many churches within the Latter Day Saint movement consider to be revelations from God. ... In many countries, child support or child maintenance is the ongoing obligation for a periodic payment made by a non-custodial parent to a custodial parent, caregiver or guardian, for the care and support of children of a relationship or marriage that has been terminated. ... In some denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement, the temple garment (or the Garment of the Holy Priesthood, or informally, the garment or garments) is a set of sacred underclothing worn by adult adherents who have taken part in a ritual ceremony known as washing and anointing ordinance, usually... This article is about the practice of confession in the Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ...

Controversy

Exclusive temple weddings

Temples are often a sore spot for non-LDS family members of Mormons who marry in them. No individual is allowed into the temple without a temple recommend regardless of church membership - which excludes all non-Mormons from attending temple weddings. When a couple chooses to marry in the temple where a parent does not possess a temple recommend, the parent may feel resentment and pain.[3] Additionally, the practice of holding a traditional wedding ceremony for the benefit of the non-Mormon friends and family is contrary to established Church policy,[4][5] although receptions after the ceremony, held at local churches or other public venues, are common and often quite elaborate. For those couples who prefer a non-temple marriage first, the couple is required to wait at least one year to be sealed.[6]


The church specifies that the sacred nature of the temple ceremony and a desire not to promote any confusion between it and a non-temple marriage[7] as reasoning for this policy. Critics[Who?] claim that this is simply an intrusive and divisive way to put pressure on non-Mormons to convert.[8] Critics[Who?] also note that the practice of discouraging traditional ceremonies is an act of man-made policy rather than an immutable commandment of God,[citation needed] noting that the measure is not imposed upon European Mormons, who by law must have a civil ceremony in a designated public place outside the temple for the marriage to be legally valid, or in the case where a home country does not recognize a marriage performed within a temple located in another country.[9] (Note, however, that in such countries, a temple sealing must closely follow the civil ceremony, within the space of a few days at most, otherwise the one-year wait is again necessary.) When a marriage ceremony outside of the temple is required by local law, the church also instructs that this ceremony is to be performed before the temple ceremony, to reinforce the idea of the temple marriage being the "final" ceremony, not a pre-amble to the one required by secular law.


Other groups with temples

Community of Christ Temple (separate from the Latter-day Saints) in Independence, Missouri, USA. Dedicated 1994

Although the most prolific builder of temples within the Latter-day Saint movement is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, several other denominations have built or attempted to build temples. Original photo by John Hamer File links The following pages link to this file: Community of Christ Categories: GFDL 1. ...


The Community of Christ (formerly The Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) maintains two temples. Unlike those of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, however, these temples are open to the public, and do not involve sacred ordinances, except at certain times for Communion and a daily prayer for peace. The oldest temple maintained by the church is in Kirtland, Ohio. This temple was the first temple built by Latter Day Saints. In its 1994 World Conference, the Community of Christ dedicated a temple in Independence, Missouri. RLDS redirects here. ... In Mormonism, the Sacrament is the Lords Supper, in which participants eat bread and drink wine (or water, in the case of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since the late 1800s). ... A Latter Day Saint is an adherent of the Latter Day Saint movement, a group of denominations tracing their heritage to the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... RLDS redirects here. ... Independence is a city in Missouri, in the Kansas City metropolitan area. ...


During the life of Joseph Smith, Jr., he dedicated a location in Independence, Missouri for the building of a special temple, which was to be the center of a New Jerusalem. The lot for this temple is owned and maintained by the Church of Christ (Temple Lot). Although the church planned to build a temple on the site in the early 20th century, and even excavated a foundation, efforts were abandoned during the economic woes of the Great Depression and due to a schism which resulted in the establishment of the Church of Christ with the Elijah Message. Today, the Church of Christ (Temple Lot) has no plans to construct a temple of its own. Instead, the church believes it is the steward of the location until the various sects of the Latter Day Saint movement re-unite into a single organization before the Second Coming of Jesus. A view of the Temple Lot with the Community of Christs Auditorium in the background. ... The headquarters building of the Church of Christ as seen from the original temple site designated by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The Church of Christ with the Elijah Message in Independence, Missouri. ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ...


The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite) began to construct a temple at their headquarters in Voree, Wisconsin in the mid-1840s. Another temple may have been planned for Beaver Island in Lake Michigan, prior to their expulsion. The church has made no attempt to build temples since the death of their prophet, James J. Strang. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite) is a denomination of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Voree, Wisconsin is a former settlement and a historic site on the outskirts of present-day Burlington, Wisconsin. ... A view of Iron Ore Bay on the southern end of Beaver Island. ... 1856 daguerreotype of James Strang, taken on Beaver Island, Lake Michigan, by J. Atkyn, one of his assassins. ...


The Apostolic United Brethren has had a temple in Ozumba, Mexico at least by the 1990s, as well as an Endowment house in Utah since sometime in the 1980s. The Apostolic United Brethren (hereafter AUB) is a polygamous fundamentalist sect not affiliated with the well-known The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...


The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) made news in 2004 by embarking on the construction of a temple at their new settlement near Eldorado, Texas. The foundation of the FLDS temple roughly matches that of the original Nauvoo Temple. This is the second time any of the polygamous Mormon fundamentalists sects have attempted to build a temple of their own. The FLDS Temple near Eldorado, Texas The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS Church) is the largest Mormon fundamentalist denomination[1] and one of Americas largest practitioners of plural marriage. ... Eldorado is a city located in Schleicher County, Texas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mormon fundamentalism. ...


The True and Living Church of Jesus Christ of Saints of the Last Days reportedly believe that when the end time arrives, they will enter the Manti Utah Temple (owned by the LDS church) and assume control of it. At that time all of the wicked outside of the temple will be destroyed and only the righteous, inside the temple will survive. The Red Brick Store in Manti, Utah. ... Manti Utah Temple The Manti Utah Temple is the fifth constructed temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. ...


See also

Upon the construction of Salt Lake City’s first public building, the Council House, the Mormons used its top floor for administering temple rituals in 1852. ... The Salt Lake Temple contains a Holy of Holies. ... In Mormonism, the oath of vengeance (or law of vengeance) was an oath that was made by participants in the Endowment ritual of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints between the 1850s and the 1920s. ... In temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, an Ordinance room is a room where a portion of a ceremony known as the endowment is held. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Joseph Smith's Quorum of the Anointed, 1842-1846: A Documentary History
  2. ^ "The House of the Lord" - James Talmage
  3. ^ http://www.lds-mormon.com/exitletter2.shtml
  4. ^ Church Handbook of Instructions, p.70, 1998, "No other marriage ceremony should be performed following a temple marriage"
  5. ^ Church Handbook of Instruction, p.73, 1998, "A husband and wife who were married outside a temple may be sealed after one full year... Only the First Presidency may grant exceptions to the preceding policies"
  6. ^ http://www.utlm.org/newsletters/no104.htm
  7. ^ Church Handbook of Instruction, pp.69-70
  8. ^ http://www.lds-mormon.com/exitletter2.shtml
  9. ^ Church Handbook of Instruction, p.71, 1998, "Some areas require..."

Church Handbook of Instructions (formerly the General Handbook of Instructions) is a two-volume book of instructions and policies for leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...

References

Acting President Boyd K. Packer Boyd Kenneth Packer (born September 10, 1924) is the current Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Intellectual Reserve, Inc. ... James Edward Talmage (September 21, 1862–July 27, 1933) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1911 until his death in 1933. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Latter-day Saints Portal

  Results from FactBites:
 
Latter-day Saint Temples in Canada (297 words)
The temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are separate and distinct from their meetinghouses.
Small temples are in Halifax, Nova Scotia; Regina, Saskatchewan; Edmonton, Alberta and Montreal, Quebec.
Provinces or territories with very small populations and even smaller Latter-day Saint populations, such as Nanavut, Yukon, and Northwest Territories, are unlikely to become the locations of temples in the forseeable future.
Latter Day Saint - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1185 words)
A Latter Day Saint is a person who is with the Latter Day Saint religion, a number of denominations that believe in a restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ through the prophet Joseph Smith, Jr.
The British spelling "Latter-day Saint" with the hyphen originated in 1852 when the LDS Church was incorporated in Salt Lake City, Utah, but a similar term, "Latter Day Saint," was used in reference to members of the church from its conception in 1830.
Latter Day Saints are sometimes also referred to as Mormons (a nickname taken from the title of the Book of Mormon).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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