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Encyclopedia > Television
A Philips LCD TV (2006)

Television is a widely used telecommunication medium for broadcasting and receiving live, moving greyscale or color images with sound. The term may also be used to refer specifically to a television set, programming or television transmission. The word is derived from mixed Latin and Greek roots, meaning "far sight": Greek tele (τλε), far, and Latin vision, sight (from video, vis- to see, or to view in the first person). TV may stand for: Television Transvestite Tuvalu (ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code; see . ... Television, formed in New York City in 1973, is an American rock music band. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 18 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 18 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Braun in Kronberg   (German pronunciation brown, English pronunciation brawn) GmbH is a German consumer products company known for its clean industrial designs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2724 KB) // Deutsch: Der 3 dimensionale Eindruck des 3D-Filmes wird auf diesem 2 dimensionalen Photo Nicht sichtbar! English: The 3-dimensional effect of the 3D-film is NOT visible on this 2-dimensional photo! Deutsch: Das Bild wurde mit... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2724 KB) // Deutsch: Der 3 dimensionale Eindruck des 3D-Filmes wird auf diesem 2 dimensionalen Photo Nicht sichtbar! English: The 3-dimensional effect of the 3D-film is NOT visible on this 2-dimensional photo! Deutsch: Das Bild wurde mit... Copy of the original phone of Alexander Graham Bell at the Musée des Arts et Métiers in Paris Telecommunication is the assisted transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ... Television set may refer to: Television, a device to display television programs Television studio, an installation in which television or video productions take place Set construction, theatrical scenery This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... In telecommunications, transmission is the act of transmitting electrical messages (and the associated phenomena of radiant energy that passes through media). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...


Commercially available since the late 1930s, the television set has become a common household communications device in homes and institutions, particularly as a source of entertainment and news. Since the 1970s, video recordings on tape and later, digital playback systems such as DVDs, have enabled the television to be used to view recorded movies and other programs. The History of television technology can be divided along two lines: those developments that depended upon both mechanical and electronic principles, and those which are purely electronic. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... A video tape recorder (VTR), is a tape recorder that can record video material. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


A television system may be made up of multiple components, so a screen which lacks an internal tuner to receive the broadcast signals is called a monitor rather than a television. A television may be built to receive different broadcast or video formats, such as high-definition television, commonly referred to as HDTV. A tuner is a circuit module or free-standing equipment which detects radio-frequency (RF) signals usually of low amplitude and amplifies them and converts them to a form suitable for further processing. ... High-definition television (HDTV) means broadcast of television signals with a higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL) allow. ... High-definition television (HDTV) means broadcast of television signals with a higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL) allow. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of television

The origins of what would become today's television system can be traced back to the discovery of the photoconductivity of the element selenium by Willoughby Smith in 1873, the invention of a scanning disk by Paul Gottlieb Nipkow in 1884, and Philo Farnsworth's Image dissector in 1927. The History of television technology can be divided along two lines: those developments that depended upon both mechanical and electronic principles, and those which are purely electronic. ... Photoconductivity is an optical and electrical phenomenon in which a material becomes more conductive due to the absorption of electro-magnetic radiation such as visible light, ultraviolet light, or gamma radiation. ... For other uses, see Selenium (disambiguation). ... Willoughby Smith (April 6, 1828, Great Yarmouth, England — July 17, 1891, Eastbourne, England) was an electrical engineer who discovered the photoconductivity of the element selenium. ... A Nipkow disk is a mechanical, geometrically operating image scanning device (by itself, it performs neither image acquisition or reproduction), invented by Paul Gottlieb Nipkow, which was primarily used as a fundamental component in mechanical television. ... Paul Julius Gottlieb Nipkow (22 August 1860, Lauenburg, Pomerania - 24 August 1940, Berlin) was a German technician and inventor. ... Philo Taylor Farnsworth (August 19, 1906 – March 11, 1971) was an American inventor. ... In older video cameras, prior to the 1990s, a video camera tube or pickup tube was used instead of a charge-coupled device (CCD). ...


On March 25, 1925, Scottish inventor John Logie Baird gave a demonstration of televised silhouette images in motion at Selfridge's Department Store in London. In 1927, Baird transmitted a signal over 438 miles (705 km) of telephone line between London and Glasgow. In 1928, Baird's company (Baird Television Development Company / Cinema Television) broadcast the first transatlantic television signal, between London and New York, and the first shore-to-ship transmission. He also demonstrated an electromechanical color, infrared (dubbed "Noctovision"), and stereoscopic television, using additional lenses, disks and filters. In parallel, Baird developed a video disk recording system dubbed "Phonovision"; a number of the Phonovision recordings, dating back to 1927, still exist.[1] In 1929, he became involved in the first experimental electromechanical television service in Germany. In November 1929, Baird and Bernard Natan of Pathe established France's first television company, Télévision-Baird-Natan. In 1931, he made the first live transmission, of the Epsom Derby. In 1932, he demonstrated ultra-short wave television. Baird's electromechanical system reached a peak of 240 lines of resolution on BBC television broadcasts in 1936, before being discontinued in favor of a 405-line all-electronic system developed by Marconi-EMI. is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ... For other persons named John Baird, see John Baird (disambiguation). ... Selfridges in Birmingham. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Infrared (disambiguation). ... Stereo card image modified for crossed eye viewing. ... Phonovision, an experimental process for recording a television signal on phonograph records, was developed in the late 1920s in England by British television pioneer John Logie Baird. ... Bernard Natan on trial (filmed against his wishes) Bernard Natan (1886-1942) (born Natan Tannenzaft) was a Romanian Jew who moved to France after World War I and became a French citizen (in 1921), changing his name to the less Jewish-sounding Bernard Natan in the process. ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... For other persons named John Baird, see John Baird (disambiguation). ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ...


Herbert E. Ives of Bell Labs gave a dramatic demonstration of television on April 7, 1927, when he field tested reflected-light television systems using small-scale (2 by 2.5 inches) and large-scale (24 by 30 inches) viewing screens over a wire link from Washington to New York City, and over-the-air broadcast from Whippany, New Jersey. The subjects, who included Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover, were illuminated by a flying-spot scanner beam that was scanned by a 50-aperture disk at 16 pictures per minute. Dr. Herbert Eugene Ives (1882–1953) was a scientist and engineer who headed the development of facsimile and television systems at AT&T in the first half of the twentieth century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a mining engineer and author. ... The parts of a flying spot scanner: (A) Cathode-ray tube (CRT); (B) photon beam; (C) & (D) dichroic mirrors; (E), (F) & (G) red-, green- and blue-sensitive photomultipliers. ...


Geographical usage

Television introduction by country.      1930 to 1939      1940 to 1949      1950 to 1959      1960 to 1969      1970 to 1979      1980 to 1989      1990 to 1999      No data
Television introduction by country.      1930 to 1939      1940 to 1949      1950 to 1959      1960 to 1969      1970 to 1979      1980 to 1989      1990 to 1999      No data

This film, television, or video-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Geographical usage of television is a description of where and how television is to be found. ...

Content

Programming

See also: Category:Television genres

Getting TV programming shown to the public can happen in many different ways. After production the next step is to market and deliver the product to whatever markets are open to using it. This typically happens on two levels:

  1. Original Run or First Run – a producer creates a program of one or multiple episodes and shows it on a station or network which has either paid for the production itself or to which a license has been granted by the producers to do the same.
  2. Syndication – this is the terminology rather broadly used to describe secondary programming usages (beyond original run). It includes secondary runs in the country of first issue, but also international usage which may or may not be managed by the originating producer. In many cases other companies, TV stations or individuals are engaged to do the syndication work, in other words to sell the product into the markets they are allowed to sell into by contract from the copyright holders, in most cases the producers.

First run programming is increasing on subscription services outside the U.S., but few domestically produced programs are syndicated on domestic FTA elsewhere. This practice is increasing however, generally on digital-only FTA channels, or with subscriber-only first run material appearing on FTA. In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... A television station is a type of radio station that broadcasts both audio and video to television receivers in a particular area. ... Free-to-air is a phrase used to describe television and radio broadcasts which are available without subscription and without decryption (pay-TV). ...


Unlike the U.S., repeat FTA screenings of a FTA network program almost only occur on that network. Also, Affiliates rarely buy or produce non-network programming that is not centred around local events. An affiliate is a commercial entity with a relationship with a peer or a larger entity. ...


Funding

Television sets per 1000 people of the world.
Television sets per 1000 people of the world.

Around the globe, broadcast television is financed by either advertising, tv licencing (a form of tax) or by subscription or any combination of all three. To protect revenues, subscription TV channels are usually encrypted to ensure that only subscription payers receive the decryption codes to see the signal. Non-encrypted channels are known as Free to Air or FTA.


Advertising


Advertising attempts to influence people's behaviour and beliefs and television is therefore a powerful and attractive medium for advertisers to use. TV stations sell air time to advertisers in order to fund their programming.

  • United States

Since inception in the U.S. in 1940, TV commercials have become one of the most effective, persuasive, and popular method of selling products of many sorts, especially consumer goods. U.S. advertising rates are determined primarily by Nielsen Ratings. The time of the day and popularity of the channel determine how much a television commercial can cost. For example, the highly popular American Idol can cost approximately $750,000 for a thirty second block of commercial time; while the same amount of time for the World Cup and the Super Bowl can cost several million dollars. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... // Advert redirects here. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... American Idol is an American reality-competition show airing on Fox. ... This article is about world cups in general. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ...


In recent years, the paid program or infomercial has become common, usually in lengths of 30 minutes or one hour. Some drug companies and other businesses have even created "news" items for broadcast, known in the industry as video news releases, paying program directors to use them.[2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A video news release (VNR) is a video segment created by a PR firm, advertising agency, marketing firm, corporation, or government agency and provided to television news stations for the purpose of informing, shaping public opinion, or to promote and publicize individuals, commercial products and services, or other interests. ... The program director (spelt programme director in many countries) is the person who decides what will be aired on a television or radio station. ...


Some TV programs also weave advertisements into their shows, a practice begun in film and known as product placement. For example, a character could be drinking a certain kind of soda, going to a particular chain restaurant, or driving a certain make of car. (This is sometimes very subtle, where shows have vehicles provided by manufacturers for low cost, rather than wrangling them.) Sometimes a specific brand or trade mark, or music from a certain artist or group, is used. (This excludes guest appearances by artists, who perform on the show.) Wikibooks [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject: Marketing Product placement advertisements are promotional ads placed by marketers using real commercial products and services in media, where the presence of a particular brand is the result of an economic exchange. ...

  • United Kingdom

The TV regulator oversees TV advertising in the United Kingdom. Its restrictions have applied since the early days of commercially funded TV. Despite this, an early TV mogul, Lew Grade, likened the broadcasting licence as a being a "licence to print money". Restrictions mean that the big three national commercial TV channels, ITV, Channel 4, and Five can show an average of only seven minutes of advertising per hour (eight minutes in the peak period). Other broadcasters must average no more than nine minutes (twelve in the peak). This means that many imported TV shows from the US have un-natural breaks where the UK company has edited out the breaks intended for US advertising. Advertisements must not be inserted in the course of any broadcast of a news or current affairs program of less than half an hour scheduled duration, or in a documentary of less than half an hour scheduled duration, or in a program for children of less than half an hour scheduled duration. Nor may advertisements be carried in a program designed and broadcast for reception in schools or in any religious service or other devotional program, or during a formal Royal ceremony or occasion. There also must be clear demarcations in time between the programs and the advertisements. Lew Grade, Baron Grade (birth name Louis Winogradsky) (December 25, 1906 - December 13, 1998) was an influential showbusiness impresario and television company executive in the United Kingdom. ...


The BBC, being strictly non-commercial is not allowed to show advertisements on television. The majority of its budget comes from TV licencing (see below) and the sale of content to other broadcasters. BBC content delivered outside of the UK such may contain advertising because those ouside the UK do not pay the licence fee. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Taxation or TV License


Television services in some countries may be funded by a television licence, a form of taxation which means advertising plays a lesser role or no role at all. For example, some channels may carry no advertising at all and some very little. This article is about a licence that is required to own or operate a television or radio. ...

The BBC carries no advertising and is funded by an annual licence paid by all households owning a television. This licence fee is set by government, but the BBC is not answerable to or controlled by government and is therefore genuinely independent. The fee also funds radio channels, transmitters and the BBC web sites. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Sveriges Television (SVT) is a national publicly-funded television broadcaster based in Sweden. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The two main BBC TV channels are watched by almost 90 percent of the population each week and overall have 27 per cent share of total viewing. [3] This in spite of the fact that 85% of homes are multichannel, with 42% of these having access to 200 free to air channels via satellite and another 43% having access to 30 or more channels via Freeview[4]. The licence that funds the seven advertising-free BBC TV channels costs less than £136 a year (about US$270) irrespective of the number of TV sets owned. When the same sporting event has been presented on both BBC and commercial channels, the BBC always attracts the lion's share of the audience, indicating viewers prefer to watch TV uninterrupted by advertising.


The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) carries no advertising (except for the ABC shop) as it is banned under lawABC Act 1983. The ABC receives its funding from the Australian Government every three years. In the 2006/07 Federal Budget the ABC received Au$822.67 Million [1] this covers most of the ABC funding commitments. The ABC also receives funds from its many ABC Shops in Australia. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ...


Subscription


Some TV channels are partly funded from subscriptions and therefore the signals are encrypted before broadcast to ensure that only paying subscribers have access to the decryption codes. Most subscription services are also funded by advertising.


Television genres

Television genres include a broad range of programming types that entertain, inform, and educate viewers. The most expensive entertainment genres to produce are usually drama and dramatic miniseries. However, other genres, such as historical Western genres, may also have high production costs. For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ...


Popular entertainment genres include action-oriented shows such as police, crime, detective dramas, horror or thriller shows. As well, there are also other variants of the drama genre, such as medical dramas and daytime soap operas. Science fiction shows can fall into either the drama or action category, depending on whether they emphasize philosophical questions or high adventure. Comedy is a popular genre which includes situation comedy (sitcom) and animated shows for the adult demographic such as South Park". This article is about a genre of comedy. ... This article is about the TV series. ...


The least expensive forms of entertainment programming are game shows, talk shows, variety shows, and reality TV. Game shows show contestants answering questions and solving puzzles to win prizes. Talk shows feature interviews with film, television and music celebrities and public figures. Variety shows feature a range of musical performers and other entertainers such as comedians and magicians introduced by a host or Master of Ceremonies. There is some crossover between some talk shows and variety shows, because leading talk shows often feature performances by bands, singers, comedians, and other performers in between the interview segments. Reality TV shows "regular" people (i.e., not actors) who are facing unusual challenges or experiences, ranging from arrest by police officers (COPS) to weight loss (The Biggest Loser). A variant version of reality shows depicts celebrities doing mundane activities such as going about their everyday life (The Osbournes) or doing manual labour (Simple Life). The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Look up cop in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the current American season, see The Biggest Loser: Couples. ... The Osbournes was an Emmy Award-winning American reality television program broadcast by MTV in the U.S., by CTV in Canada, Channel 4 in the UK and MTV UK and Ireland in Ireland and the UK, RTÉ Two in Ireland, Network Ten, MTV Australia in Australia and TV2 in... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Social aspects

Main article: Social aspects of television

Television has played a pivotal role in the socialization of the 20th and 21st centuries. There are many social aspects of television that can be addressed, including: The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ...

  • Positive effects
  • Negative effects
  • Gender and television
  • Politics and television
  • Socializing children
  • Technology trends
  • Suitability for audience
  • Alleged dangers
  • Propaganda delivery
  • Educational advantages

The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ... The social aspects of television are the influences media has had on society since its inception. ...

Environmental aspects

With high lead content in CRTs, and the rapid diffusion of new, flat-panel display technologies, some of which (LCDs) use lamps containing mercury, there is growing concern about electronic waste from discarded televisions. Related occupational health concerns exist, as well, for disassemblers removing copper wiring and other materials from CRTs. Further environmental concerns related to television design and use relate to the devices' increasing electrical energy requirements.[5] General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... LCD redirects here. ... This article is about the element. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ... Electrical energy can refer to several closely related things. ...


In numismatics

The 50 years of Television commemorative coin
The 50 years of Television commemorative coin

Television has had such an impact in today's life, that it has been the main motif for numerous collectors' coins and medals. One of the most recent ones is the Austrian 50 years of Television commemorative coin minted in March 9, 2005. The obverse of the coin shows a "test pattern", while the reverse shows several milestones in the history of television. is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ Restoring Baird's TV Recordings
  2. ^ Jon Stewart of "The Daily Show" was mock-outraged at this, saying, "That's what we do!", and calling it a new form of television, "infoganda".
  3. ^ http://www.barb.co.uk/viewingsummary/weekreports.cfm?report=multichannel&requesttimeout=500&flag=viewingsummary viewing statistics in UK
  4. ^ http://www.ofcom.org.uk/research/tv/reports/dtv/dtv_2007_q3/dtvq307.pdf OFCOM quarterly survey
  5. ^ The Rise of the Machines: A Review of Energy Using Products in the Home from the 1970s to Today (PDF). Energy Saving Trust (July 3, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-31.

Not to be confused with John Stewart, John Stuart or Jonathan Stewart. ... The Daily Show is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Internet television (or Internet TV) is television distributed via the Internet. ...

Further reading

Find more about Television on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • Albert Abramson, The History of Television, 1942 to 2000, Jefferson, NC, and London, McFarland, 2003, ISBN 0786412208.
  • Pierre Bourdieu, On Television, The New Press, 2001.
  • Tim Brooks and Earle March, The Complete Guide to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows, 8th ed., Ballantine, 2002.
  • Jacques Derrida and Bernard Stiegler, Echographies of Television, Polity Press, 2002.
  • David E. Fisher and Marshall J. Fisher, Tube: the Invention of Television, Counterpoint, Washington, DC, 1996, ISBN 1887178171.
  • Steven Johnson, Everything Bad is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter, New York, Riverhead (Penguin), 2005, 2006, ISBN 1594481946.
  • Jerry Mander, Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television, Perennial, 1978.
  • Jerry Mander, In the Absence of the Sacred, Sierra Club Books, 1992, ISBN 0871565099.
  • Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business, New York, Penguin US, 1985, ISBN 0670804541.
  • Evan I. Schwartz, The Last Lone Inventor: A Tale of Genius, Deceit, and the Birth of Television, New York, Harper Paperbacks, 2003, ISBN 0060935596.
  • Beretta E. Smith-Shomade, Shaded Lives: African-American Women and Television, Rutgers University Press, 2002.
  • Alan Taylor, We, the Media: Pedagogic Intrusions into US Mainstream Film and Television News Broadcasting Rhetoric, Peter Lang, 2005, ISBN 3631518528.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Pierre Bourdieu (August 1, 1930 â€“ January 23, 2002) was an acclaimed French sociologist whose work employed methods drawn from a wide range of disciplines: from philosophy and literary theory to sociology and anthropology. ... Jacques Derrida (IPA: in French [1], in English ) (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Steven Berlin Johnson Steven Berlin Johnson (born June 6, 1968) is an American popular science author. ... Jerry Mander is an American activist best known for his book Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television (1977), and for his contribution to a book on an unrelated topic, The Great International Paper Airplane Book (1971). ... Jerry Mander is an American activist best known for his book Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television (1977), and for his contribution to a book on an unrelated topic, The Great International Paper Airplane Book (1971). ... Neil Postman (March 8, 1931 - October 5, 2003) was an American professor, media theorist, and cultural critic who is best known by the general public for his 1985 book about television, Amusing Ourselves to Death. ... Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business (1985), is a controversial book by Neil Postman in which he argued that mediums of communication inherently influence the conversations carried out over them, that television is the primary means of communication for our culture, that television has...

External links

Television Portal
Image File history File links Television_icon. ... The Museum of Broadcast Communications is located in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Canada Science and Technology Museum (French: Musée des sciences et de la technologie du Canada) is located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on St. ... There are several video formats in use worldwide: Analogue NTSC PAL SECAM Digital ATSC DVB ISDB These are strictly the format of the video itself, and not for the modulation used for transmission. ... Analog television (or analogue television) encodes television and transports the picture and sound information as an analog signal, that is, by varying the amplitude and/or frequencies of the broadcast signal. ... In video, lines are a measurement of display resolution or image resolution. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in the United States, Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and some other countries (see map). ... NTSC-J is a videogame region which covers Japan. ... PAL-M is the TV system used in Brazil. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... PALplus is an extension of the PAL analogue broadcasting system for transmitting 16:9 programs without sacrificing vertical resolution. ... SECAM, also written SÉCAM (Séquentiel couleur à mémoire, French for Sequential Color with Memory), is an analog color television system first used in France. ... Symbol for 5. ... Multichannel television sound, better known as MTS (often still as BTSC, for the Broadcast Television Systems Committee that created it), is the method of encoding three additional channels of audio into an NTSC-format audio carrier. ... NICAM (known also as NICAM 728, after the 728 kbit/s bitstream it is sent over), Near Instantaneous Companded Audio Multiplex, is a format for digital sound on analogue television transmissions. ... Zweikanalton (two channel sound) is a television sound transmission system used in Germany and other countries. ... Bilingual and stereo sound television programs started being broadcast in Japan in October 1978 using a system developed by NHK Technical Research Labs. ... A commonly-used symbol indicating that a program or movie is closed-captioned. ... A BBC Ceefax page from January 9, 2007. ... CGMS-A (Copy Generation Management System Analogue) is a copy protection mechanism for analog television signals. ... Ghost-canceling reference, or GCR, is a special sub-signal on a television channel that receivers can use to attenuate the ghosting effect of a television signal split into multiple paths between transmitter and receiver. ... This article is about PDC/StarText teletext programme listings. ... The vertical blanking interval (VBI), also known as the vertical interval or VBLANK, is the time difference between the last line of one frame or field of a raster display, and the beginning of the next. ... Video Encoded Invisible Light (VEIL) is a technology for encoding low-bandwidth digital data bitstream in video signal, developed by VEfL Interactive Technologies. ... Vertical interval timecode (VITC, pronounced vitsee or sometimes vits) is a form of SMPTE timecode embedded as black-and-white bars in a pair of the normally unseen vertical interval lines in a television signal. ... In television technology, widescreen signaling (WSS) is a digital stream embedded in the TV signal describing qualities of the broadcast, in particular the intended aspect ratio of the image. ... Extended Data Services (now XDS, previously EDS), is an American standard classified under Electronic Industries Alliance standard EIA-766 for the delivery of any ancillary data (metadata) to be sent with an analog television program, or any other NTSC video signal. ... A number of experimental and broadcast pre World War II television systems were tested. ... Historically the term high-definition television was first used to refer to television standards developed in the 1930s to replace early experimental systems with as few as 12 lines. ... This schematic shows the circular paths traced by the holes in a Nipkow disk. ... Multiplexed Analogue Components (MAC) is a high-definition television transmission standard, originally proposed in 1995 for European HDTV. MAC transmits luminance and chrominance data separately in time rather than separately in frequency (as other analog television formats do, such as composite video). ... Japan had the earliest working HDTV system, with design efforts going back to 1979. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new... Interlace is a technique of improving the picture quality of a video signal without consuming any extra bandwidth. ... Standard-definition television or SDTV refers to television systems that have a lower resolution than HDTV systems. ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... 1080i is a shorthand name for a category of video modes. ... Progressive scan Progressive or noninterlaced scanning is any method for displaying, storing or transmitting moving images in which the lines of each frame are drawn in sequence. ... Low-definition television or LDTV refers to television systems that have a lower resolution than Standard Definition Television systems. ... ... ... Official 1seg logo 1seg (Katakana: ワンセグ) is a mobile terrestrial digital audio/video and data broadcasting service in Japan. ... Enhanced-definition television, extended-definition television, or EDTV is a CEA marketing shorthand term for certain digital television (DTV) formats. ... 480p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... 576p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... JOHN HERMAN SUCKS FAT DICK ... 1080p is the shorthand name for a category of display resolutions. ... MPEG-2 is a standard for the generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information [1]. It is widely used around the world to specify the format of the digital television signals that are broadcast by terrestrial (over-the-air), cable, and direct broadcast satellite TV systems. ... ATSC redirects here. ... DVB, short for Digital Video Broadcasting, is a suite of internationally accepted, open standards for digital television maintained by the DVB Project, an industry consortium with more than 300 members, and published by a Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC... Integrated Services Digital Broadcasting (ISDB) is the digital television (DTV) and digital radio format that Japan has created to allow radio and television stations there to convert to digital. ... DMB-T/H or DTMB (GB 20600-2006) is the Peoples Republic of Chinas (PRC) terrestrial digital television standard and will cover fixed and mobile terminals. ... H.264 is a standard for video compression. ... DMB-T/H or DTMB (GB 20600-2006) is the Peoples Republic of Chinas (PRC) terrestrial digital television standard and will cover fixed and mobile terminals. ... DVB, short for Digital Video Broadcasting, is a suite of internationally accepted, open standards for digital television maintained by the DVB Project, an industry consortium with more than 300 members, and published by a Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Integrated Services Digital Broadcasting (ISDB) is the digital television (DTV) and digital radio format that Japan has created to allow radio and television stations there to convert to digital. ... Official 1seg logo 1seg (Katakana: ワンセグ) is a mobile terrestrial digital audio/video and data broadcasting service in Japan. ... Symbol for 5. ... Dolby Digital is the marketing name for a series of lossy audio compression technologies by Dolby Laboratories. ... Multichannel audio is the name for a variety of techniques for expanding and enriching the sound of audio playback by recording additional sound channels that can be reproduced on additional speakers. ... MPEG Multichannel is the multichannel Extension to the MPEG-2 Audio Specification it is backwards compatible to the MPEG-1 Multichannel Extension. ... PCM redirects here. ... Linear Pulse Code Modulation used in communications (or LPCM) is a format that is a popular choice in music production. ... Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. ... A commonly-used symbol indicating that a program or movie is closed-captioned. ... A BBC Ceefax page from January 9, 2007. ... This is the Content Protection and Copy Management standard being developed by the DVB Project (http://www. ... A broadcast flag is a set of status bits (or flags) sent in the data stream of a digital television program that indicates whether or not it can be recorded, or if there are any restrictions on recorded content. ... In television technology, Active Format Descriptor or Active Format Description (AFD) is a signal that broadcasters will transmit with the picture to enable 4:3 and 16:9 television sets to display picture in the intended aspect ratio. ... The Sky Digital EPG in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about digital presentation. ... Super Hi-Vision, also known as Ultra High Definition Video or UHDV is a digital video format, currently proposed by NHK of Japan. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Super Hi-Vision, also known as Ultra High Definition Video or UHDV and UHD is a digital video format, currently proposed by NHK of Japan. ... Digital Cinema Initiatives or DCI is a consortium of studios and vendors formed to establish a standard architecture for Digital Cinema systems. ... Multiple MPEG programs are combined then sent to a transmitting antenna. ... Reverse Standards Conversion or RSC is a process developed by the BBC for the restoration of video recordings which have already been converted between different video standards using early conversion techniques. ... Converting between a different numbers of pixels and different frame rates in video pictures is a complex technical problem. ... Video processing techniques are used in video codecs, video players and other devices. ... Video on demand (VOD) systems allow users to select and watch video and clip content over a network as part of an interactive television system. ... HDTV Blur is a common term used to describe a number of different artifacts on consumer modern high definition television sets: Pixel response time on LCD displays (blur in the color response of the active pixel) Slower camera Shutter speeds common in hollywood production films (blur in the HDV content...

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Television Shopping and Price comparison (896 words)
Television / 40" BRAVIA LCD TV - widescreen - 1080p (FullHD) - HD ready 1080p - fl - 40" Full HD D3500 LCD Sony Bravia TV features stunning 6.2 mega pixel resolution, Bravia Engine picture enhancement technology, 24p True Cinema to create a realistic cinema experience at home and...
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How TV Affects Your Child (2323 words)
Of course, television, in moderation, can be a good thing: Preschoolers can get help learning the alphabet on public television, grade schoolers can learn about wildlife on nature shows, and parents can keep up with current events on the evening news.
That's why it's so important for you to monitor the content of TV programming and set viewing limits to ensure that your child doesn't spend time watching TV that should be spent on other activities, such as playing with friends, exercising, and reading.
Even though children are taught by their parents that it's not right to hit, television says it's OK to bite, hit, or kick if you're the good guy.
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