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Encyclopedia > Teleportation

Teleportation is the movement of objects or elementary particles from one place to another, more or less instantaneously, without traveling through space. Look up teleport in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the novel, see The Elementary Particles. ...


With present techniques, "exact" quantum teleportation is possible only with photons and atoms.[1] "Inexact" teleportation (where quantum states are not preserved), is possible by encoding information about an object, transmitting the information to another place, such as by radio or an electric signal, and creating a copy of the original object in the new location. Teleportation has also been proposed to explain various anomalous phenomena, and the concept has been widely used in science fiction. In quantum information, quantum teleportation, or entanglement-assisted teleportation, is a technique that transfers a quantum state to an arbitrarily distant location using a distributed entangled state and the transmission of some classical information. ... Anomalous phenomena are phenomena which are observed and for which there are no suitable explanations in the context of a specific body of scientific knowledge, e. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Similar is apport, an earlier word used to describe what today might be called teleportation; and bilocation, when something is said to occupy two places simultaneously. The word "teletransportation" (which simply expands Charles Fort's abbreviated term) was first employed by Derek Parfit as part of a thought exercise on identity. An apport is the transference of an article from an unknown source, to you, or another place by unknown means. ... Bilocation, sometimes multilocation, or astral projection is a term used to describe the ability/instances in which an individual or object is said to be, or appear to be, located in two distinct places at the same instant in time. ... This article is not about Charles Forte. ... Derek Parfit (born December 11, 1942) is a British philosopher who specializes in problems of personal identity, rationality and ethics, and the relations between them. ... In philosophy, the issue of personal identity concerns many numbers of loosely related issues, in particular persistence, change, time, and sameness. ...

Contents

Etymology

The word was coined in 1931[2] by American writer Charles Fort to describe the strange disappearances and appearances of anomalies, which he suggested may be connected. He joined the Greek prefix tele- (meaning "distant") to the Latin suffix portare (meaning "to carry"). Fort's first formal use of the word was in the second chapter of his 1931 book, Lo! "Mostly in this book I shall specialize upon indications that there exists a transportory force that I shall call Teleportation." Though, with his typical half-serious jokiness, Fort added, "I shall be accused of having assembled lies, yarns, hoaxes, and superstitions. To some degree I think so, myself. To some degree, I do not. I offer the data."[3] Fort suggested that teleportation might explain various allegedly paranormal phenomena, though, typically, it's sometimes difficult to tell if Fort took his own "theory" seriously, or instead used it to point out what he saw as the inadequacy of mainstream science to account for strange phenomena. This article is not about Charles Forte. ... An anomaly is something which deviates from the standard or expected. ... A prefix is the initial portion of some object or term (typically in text or speech) with a distinct and he base semantics for a word. ... For the character in Polynesian mythology, see Tele (mythology). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Look up Suffix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Data (disambiguation). ... Paranormal is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of reported anomalous phenomena. ...


Science

Although the use of teleportation has traditionally been found only in science fiction and fantasy, the theory and experimentation of quantum teleportation has been of interest to physicists. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... In quantum information, quantum teleportation, or entanglement-assisted teleportation, is a technique that transfers a quantum state to an arbitrarily distant location using a distributed entangled state and the transmission of some classical information. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ...


Recent developments

Until recently, scientists had been able to transport only light or single atoms over short distances (millimeters). However, it was reported in October 2006 in the weekly science magazine "Nature" [4] that Professor Eugene Polzik and his team at the Niels Bohr Institute at Copenhagen University in Denmark have made a breakthrough in the field.[5] [6] Their experiment involved the transportation of information from a weak light beam to a macroscopic atomic object containing thousands of billions of atoms, located half a meter away. The technique involved the use of quantum entanglement, quantum measurement and quantum feedback. It has been suggested that Quantum coherence be merged into this article or section. ... The framework of quantum mechanics requires a careful definition of measurement, and a thorough discussion of its practical and philosophical implications. ...


Teleportation scenarios

There are several hypothetical methods of transporting matter from place to place without physically travelling the distance. Some are seriously proposed and studied by scientists, while others exist mainly in fiction.


One proposed means of teleportation is the transmission of data which is used to precisely reconstruct an object or organism at its destination. The use of this form of teleportation as a means of transport for humans still has considerable unresolved technical and philosophical issues, such as exactly how to record the human body, particularly the brain, with sufficient accuracy and also be able to reconstruct it, and whether destroying a human in one place and recreating a copy elsewhere would provide a sufficient experience of continuity of existence. Believers in the supernatural might wonder if the soul is recopied or destroyed, and might even consider it murder. Likewise, someone with a material world view who considers the body synonymous with the self might also see the disintegration of a given corpus as the killing of a human being. The reassembled human might be considered a different sentience with the same memories as the original, as could be easily proved by constructing not just one, but several copies of the original and interrogating each as to the perceived uniqueness of each. Each copy constructed using merely descriptive data, but not matter, transmitted from the origin and new matter already at the destination point would consider itself to be the true continuation of the original and yet this could not logically be true; moreover, because each copy constructed via this data-only method would be made of new matter that already existed at the destination, there would be no way, even in principle, of distinguishing the original from among the copies. Many of the relevant questions are shared with the concept of mind transfer. For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... In transhumanism and science fiction, mind transfer (also referred to as mind uploading or mind downloading, depending on ones point of reference), whole body emulation, or electronic transcendence refers to the hypothetical transfer of a human mind to an artificial substrate. ...


It is not clear if duplication of a human would require reproduction of the exact quantum state, requiring quantum teleportation which necessarily destroys the original, or whether macroscopic measurements would suffice. In the non-destructive version, hypothetically a new copy of the individual is created with each teleportation, with only the copy subjectively experiencing the teleportation. Technology of this type would have many other applications, such as virtual medicine (manipulating the stored data to create a copy better, or perhaps radically different, than the original), a sort of suspended animation (by creating a copy many years after the information was stored), or backup copies (creating a copy from recently stored information if the original was involved in a mishap.) In quantum information, quantum teleportation, or entanglement-assisted teleportation, is a technique that transfers a quantum state to an arbitrarily distant location using a distributed entangled state and the transmission of some classical information. ... Macroscopic is commonly used to describe physical objects that are measurable and observable by the naked eye. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Suspended animation is the slowing of life processes by external means without termination. ...


Dimensional teleportation is a mechanism often shown in fictional works, particularly in fantasy and comic books. It involves the subject exiting one physical universe or plane of existence, then re-entering it at a different location. This method is rarely seriously considered by the scientific community, as the currently predominant theories about parallel universes assume that physical travel is not possible between them. For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For other uses of the word plane, see plane. ... For other uses, see Multiverse (disambiguation). ...


Another form of teleportation common in science fiction (and seen in The Culture and The Terminator series of films) sends the subject through a wormhole or similar phenomenon, allowing transit faster than light while avoiding the problems posed by the uncertainty principle and potential signal interference. In both of the examples above, this form of teleportation is known as "Displacement" or "Topological shortcut" (Scientific American). [citation needed] The Culture is a fictional anarchic, socialistic and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain Banks and described by him in several of his novels and shorter fictions. ... The Terminator (also known as Terminator in some early trailers and posters) is a 1984 science fiction/action film featuring former bodybuilder Arnold Schwarzenegger in what would become his best-known role, and also starred Linda Hamilton and Michael Biehn. ... For other uses, see Wormhole (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Faster than the speed of light (disambiguation). ... In quantum physics, the outcome of even an ideal measurement of a system is not deterministic, but instead is characterized by a probability distribution, and the larger the associated standard deviation is, the more uncertain we might say that that characteristic is for the system. ...


Displacement teleporters would eliminate many probable objections to teleportation on religious or philosophical grounds, as they preserve the original subject intact — and thus continuity of existence. For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For the philosophical movement, see Existentialism. ...


Teleportation by means of the mind or innate personal abilities are sometimes referred to as p-Teleportation, "psychoportation", or "jaunting"; named after the fictional scientist (Jaunte) who discovered it in The Stars My Destination (originally titled Tiger! Tiger!), a science fiction novel by Alfred Bester. This method could hypothetically work through any of the mechanisms proposed above, but are usually portrayed in fiction as displacement-type or dimensional teleportation to simplify its use in the story. Galaxy magazine cover from October 1956 The Stars My Destination (also called Tiger! Tiger!) is a science fiction novel by Alfred Bester, first published in Galaxy magazine in October 1956. ... Alfred Bester Alfred Bester (born December 18, 1913 in New York City, died September 30, 1987) was a science fiction author and the winner of the first Hugo Award in 1953 for his novel The Demolished Man. ...


In religious, occult, and esoteric literature, teleportation is the instantaneous movement of a person or object from one place to another, by miraculous, supernatural or psychic means rather than technological ones. For instance, in Acts 8:39-40, after Philip evangelized an Ethiopian official: "When they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord suddenly took Philip away, and the eunuch did not see him again, but went on his way rejoicing. Philip, however, appeared at Azotus and traveled about, preaching the gospel in all the towns until he reached Caesarea." Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ...


Teleportation lab experiments

In June 2002 the Ph.D. project of Dr. Warwick Bowen led by Dr. Ping Koy Lam, Prof. Hans Bachor and Dr. Timothy Ralph of the Australian National University achieved (quantum) teleportation of a laser beam.[7]


It was a successful quantum teleportation experiment involving the use of entangled photons. A target photon was successfully 'scanned', its properties 'copied' onto a transition photon, and finally the photon was recreated at another location of arbitrary distance, proving in essence the theorems proposed by Einstein to explain his 'strange action at a distance'. It has been suggested that Quantum coherence be merged into this article or section. ... Einstein redirects here. ... In physics, action at a distance is the interaction of two objects which are separated in space with no known mediator of the interaction. ...


Teams of scientists from the University of Innsbruck and the U. S. National Institute of Standards and Technology worked independently to teleport ions of calcium and beryllium, respectively, in 2004. The two groups used different techniques to achieve similar results under the same basic protocol.[1] The Leopold-Franzens-Universität, more often simply called University of Innsbruck, is one of the major Austrian universities, offering a broad range of subjects. ... NIST logo The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly known as The National Bureau of Standards) is a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number beryllium, Be, 4 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 2, s Appearance white-gray metallic Standard atomic weight 9. ...


In October 2006, Eugene Polzik and his team at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark conducted a teleportation experiment involving a microscopic atomic object containing trillions of atoms. They teleported the information a distance of half a metre. "For the first time, it involves teleportation between light and matter, two different objects." The Niels Bohr Institute is part of the Niels Bohr Institute for Astronomy, Physics and Geophysics of the University of Copenhagen. ... Main campus on Frue Plads. ...


In June 2007, Ashton Bradley's team at the Australian Research Council Center of Excellence for Quantum Atom Optics in Brisbane, Australia, proposed a technique that avoids quantum entanglement entirely. "We're talking about a beam of about 5000 particles disappearing from one place and appearing somewhere else", says Bradley. "We feel that our scheme is closer in spirit to the original fictional concept", he adds. While the technique can also transmit quantum information in the beam, the technique itself does not rely on the quantum properties of particles, so the team have dubbed the new method "classical teleportation". John Close, an expert on atomic laser physics at the Australian National University in Canberra, is impressed. "Using entangled atomic states looks pretty tough in comparison." Close wants to set up an experiment to test the system, but estimates it will take at least four years. [8]


Historical, mythical and religious accounts

Religious traditions

Accounts of miraculous teleportation occur in a number of religious traditions, such as Tay al-Ard ("folding of the earth") in Islam; Kefitzat Haderech ("the shortening of the way") in Judaism. Teleportation is also known in Tibetan Buddhism. A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... // Tay al-Ard (طی الارض or طيّ الارض or طیّ الارض - literally folding up of the earth) is the name for thaumaturgical teleportation in the Islamic religious and philosophical tradition. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Kefitzat Haderech Hebrew (קְפִיצַת הַדֶּרֶךְ, possibly originally Tiberian Hebrew Qəp̄îṣáṯ hadDéreḵ, Standard Hebrew Qəfiẓat haDéreḫ, commonly Kfitzat haDérech) and means, verbatim, jumping of the path/road/way, a Hebrew equivalent of the English expression short cut. In Torah study and Jewish folklore, kefitzat haderech is the... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tibetan Buddhism is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet, the Himalayan region (including northern Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim and Ladakh), Mongolia, Buryatia, Tuva and Kalmykia (Russia), and northeastern China (Manchuria: Heilongjiang, Jilin). ...


Gil Perez

There have been many alleged accounts of teleportation. One of the best known is said to have occurred on the evening of October 24, 1593, to Gil Perez. is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... Gil Perez, is a soldier who suddenly appeared on October 24, 1593 in a confused state in the Plaza Mayor ,the principal square, of Mexico City, in his uniform of the Guardia Civil, a Palace guard in the Philippines where moments before , he had been on active duty at Malacanang...


A Guardia Civil, Gil Perez, is said to have appeared suddenly in a confused state in the Plaza Mayor of Mexico City, wearing the uniform of a Philippine regiment. He claimed that moments before finding himself in Mexico he had been on sentry duty in Manila at the governor’s palace. He admitted that while he was aware that he was no longer in the Philippines, he had no idea where he was or how he came to be there. He said the governor, Don Gomez Perez Dasmariñas, had been assassinated. Río Nervión patrol boat, in Bilbao. ... Plaza is a Spanish word related to field which describes an open urban public space, such as a city square. ... Nickname: Motto: Capital en movimiento Location of Mexico City in south central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... For other meanings of the word, see Manila (disambiguation). ... Dasmariñas (often shortened to Dasma) is a 1st class municipality in the province of Cavite, Philippines. ...


When it was explained to him that he was now in Mexico City, Perez refused to believe it saying that he had received his orders on the morning of October 23 in Manila and that it was therefore impossible for him to be in Mexico City on the evening of the 24th. The authorities placed Perez in jail, as a deserter and for the possibility that he may have been in the service of Satan. The Most Holy Tribunal of the Inquisition questioned the soldier, but all he could say in his defense was that he had traveled from Manila to Mexico "in less time than it takes a cock to crow". is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Two months later, news from the Philippines arrived by Manila Galleon, confirming the fact of the literal axing on October 23 of Dasmariñas in a mutiny of Chinese rowers, as well as other points of the mysterious soldier’s fantastic story. Witnesses confirmed that Gil Perez had indeed been on duty in Manila just before arriving in Mexico. Furthermore, one of the passengers on the ship recognized Perez and swore that he had seen him in the Philippines on October 23. Gil Perez eventually returned to the Philippines and took up his former position as a palace guard, living thenceforth an apparently uneventful life. The Manila Galleons were Spanish galleons that sailed once or twice per year across the Pacific Ocean between Manila in the Philippines and Acapulco in New Spain (now Mexico). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


This account has received wide circulation, but historian Mike Dash notes [9] that there are some problems with the story which call its accuracy into question. Perhaps most importantly, he notes that the earliest extant accounts of Perez's mysterious disappearance date from more than a century after the supposed events. Though Perez was supposedly held for some time on suspicion of witchcraft, no records of his imprisonment or interrogation have been found. Mike Dash (b. ... “Witch” redirects here. ...


Teleportation in fiction

Teleportation, the instantaneous movement of objects from one location to another without traveling through space, is featured prominently in many works of fiction. ...

See also

  • Astral projection — a controversial interpretation of out-of-body experiences.
  • Interstellar teleporter — a hypothetical technology appearing in science fiction
  • Psychokinesis — The production or control of motion, especially in inanimate and remote objects, purportedly by the exercise of psychic powers.
  • Jumpgate — a portal for interstellar transportation of spaceships.
  • Linking room — a collection of portals conveniently gathered together in one location; sometimes visualized as a vast, sometimes infinite, hallway with doors running the entire length.
  • Paranormal vanishing — an inexplicable disappearance of objects
  • Philadelphia Experiment — a supposed secret experiment conducted by the U.S. Navy at the Philadelphia Naval Yards.
  • Portal (fiction) — a magical or technological doorway that connects two distant locations.
  • Reality shift — sudden, abrupt changes in reality.
  • Stargate — fictional ancient high-technology portal.
    • Atlantis teleporters — a technology used by the Ancients for transposing the contents of two teleporter rooms on Atlantis.
    • Beaming device — a technology used by the Asgard for orbital ship to planetary surface or closer transport.
    • Ring Transporter — a technology used by the Ancients, Ori, Goa'uld, and Tok'ra for orbital ship to planetary surface or closer transpositioning via a set of rings that pop out of the ground or ceiling to surround the subjects at both ends.
    • Stargate — a fictional portal for interstellar transportation to another stargate through a wormhole created between the gates.
    • Thor's Hammer — an automated teleportation device set up by the Asgard on one planet near the stargate to protect the planet's population from the Goa'uld.
    • Wraith transporter — a technology used by the Wraith for transporting from a planetary surface to a memory storage device within their Dart (low-altitude raiding) ships.
  • Telefragging — a technique used in many video games, particularly first-person shooters, where a player teleports to the exact position of another, usually causing the death of the latter.
  • Transporter (Star Trek) — a fictional technology that transports matter from one location to another with an intermediate state of the matter as energy.
  • Tay al-Ard — the concept of Teleportation in Islamic philosophy.
  • Wormhole — a hypothetical topological feature of spacetime that is essentially a 'shortcut' through space and time.
  • Hole teleportation - a hypothetical teleportation of objects throughout our universe by using the geometrical properties of spacetime. If an object is sent “out of the universe”, then the object can appear at random at any spacetime point in the universe.

This article is about the paranormal concept. ... An out-of-body experience (OBE or sometimes OOBE), is an experience that typically involves a sensation of floating outside of ones body and, in some cases, perceiving ones physical body from a place outside ones body (autoscopy). ... An interstellar teleporter is a hypothetical technology appearing in science fiction, typically in hard sci-fi, which moves people and/or other objects over interstellar distances instantaneously. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The term psychokinesis (from the Greek ψυχή, psyche, meaning mind, soul, or breath; and κίνησις, kinesis, meaning motion; literally movement from the mind)[1][2] or PK, also known as telekinesis[3] (Greek + , literally distant-movement referring to telekinesis) or TK, denotes the paranormal ability of the mind to influence matter, time... In science fiction, Jumpgate (or jump gate) refers to a device that allows fast travel between two points in space. ... A linking room is a concept in multiverse and metafiction stories. ... Paranormal vanishing is the expression for the unexplainable disappearance of things, animals or human beings without a trace. ... USS Eldridge (DE-173) ca. ... USN redirects here. ... A portal in fiction is a magical or technological doorway that connects two distant locations. ... Reality shift is a term used by proponents of anomalous phenomena to describe what they feel are enigmatic changes in physical, spatial, or temporal reality. ... An activated Stargate, the central object of the fictional Stargate universe, here depicted in the SG-1 television series. ... Throughout the fictional universe in the television shows Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis, a number of technologically advanced races and societies that have produced a variety of highly advanced weapons, tools, and spacecraft. ... The Ancients, also known as the Alterans and Lanteans, sometimes calling themselves Anqueetas in their language, are a humanoid race in the fictional Stargate universe. ... Throughout the fictional universe in the television shows Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis, a number of technologically advanced races and societies that have produced a variety of highly advanced weapons, tools, and spacecraft. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Ring Transporter is a fictional device from the sci-fi television show Stargate SG-1 and the Stargate movie. ... Stargate universe, see Ancient (Stargate). ... Ori may refer to: Ori (genetics), the origin of replication signal for DNA replication (Genetics). ... The Goauld (pronounced go-ah-OOLD , commonly GOOLD, or go-OOLD) are a fictional parasitic alien race in the science fiction television series Stargate SG-1 universe. ... The Tokra are a fictional race on the television series Stargate SG-1. ... A typical depiction of a Milky Way Stargate Stargate is one name for a class of fictional devices which allow instantaneous travel between places. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Thors Hammer scans SG-1. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Goauld (pronounced go-ah-OOLD , commonly GOOLD, or go-OOLD) are a fictional parasitic alien race in the science fiction television series Stargate SG-1 universe. ... Throughout the fictional universe in the television shows Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis, a number of technologically advanced races and societies that have produced a variety of highly advanced weapons, tools, and spacecraft. ... In the science fiction television series Stargate Atlantis, the Wraith are the original antagonistic alien species, first introduced in the pilot episode Rising. In the early seasons of the show they dominated the Pegasus Galaxy, the shows setting, and were an almost unstoppable and fatal threat. ... A telefrag, also known as a Teleportation Frag, in many first-person shooter games featuring teleporters, occurs when one entity teleports into space already occupied by another; the latter is instantly fragged (often gibbed) and the former is said to have telefragged it. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... This article is about video games. ... USS Enterprise-Ds transporter A transporter is a fictional teleportation machine used in the Star Trek universe. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... // Tay al-Ard (طی الارض or طيّ الارض or طیّ الارض - literally folding up of the earth) is the name for thaumaturgical teleportation in the Islamic religious and philosophical tradition. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... For other uses, see Wormhole (disambiguation). ... A Möbius strip, an object with only one surface and one edge; such shapes are an object of study in topology. ... For other uses of this term, see Spacetime (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ a b Rincon, Paul. "Teleportation breakthrough made." BBC News. June 16, 2004. Retrieved on October 4, 2006.
  2. ^ Unexplained Phenomena: A Rough Guide Special, by Bob Rickard and John Michell, p3 ISBN 1858285895
  3. ^ Fort, Charles. "Lo!" Published by CosimoBooks. May 14, 2004. Retrieved on October 4, 2006.
  4. ^ "Nature vol.443, 557" Quantum teleportation between light and matter.
  5. ^ Staff Writer. "Scientists teleport two different objects." CNN (via Reuters. October 4, 2006. Retrieved on October 4, 2006.
  6. ^ http://www.futurist.com/2006/10/07/teleportation/
  7. ^ Staff Writer. "[http://archives.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/asiapcf/auspac/06/17/aust.startrek/ 'Star Trek' teleporter nearer reality]." CNN. June 17, 2002. Retrieved on October 4, 2006.
  8. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/news/science/illogical-jim/2006/10/06/1159641528539.html
  9. ^ Dash, Mike Borderlands: The Ultimate Exploration of the Unknown; Overlook Press, 2000 ISBN 0-87951-724-7

BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Darling, David (2005). Teleportation: The Impossible Leap. Wiley. ISBN 0-471-47095-3. 
  • Dash, Mike (2000). Borderlands: The Ultimate Exploration of the Unknown. Overlook Press. ISBN 0-87951-724-7. 
  • Davis, Eric W. (August 2004). Teleportation Physics Study. Edwards Air Force Base, CA: Air Force Research Laboratory. Accession Number: ADA425545 [1]. 
  • Fort, Charles (1941). The Books of Charles Fort. Henry Holt and Company. 
  • Graham, Danielle (2006, January 20). Experimental data demonstrating augmentation of ambient gravitational and geomagnetic fields. American Institute of Physics Conference Proceedings, 813, 1256-1263.

David Darling (born March 4, 1941) is a cellist and composer. ... Mike Dash (b. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • United States Patent Application: 0060071122, application for a patent for a 'Full body Teleportation System'
  • Article on teleportation

  Results from FactBites:
 
Teleport lifts quantum computing TRN 071404 (1060 words)
Teleportation is based on the strange phenomenon of entanglement, which links the traits of particles like atoms and photons regardless of the distance between the particles.
Teleporting the state of a particle is akin to faxing a document and in the process destroying the original.
The third particle is teleported when the sender brings it into contact with her half of the entangled pair and measures both particles, which transfers the quantum information of the third particle to the entangled particle and in the process destroys the original.
Quantum Teleportation (532 words)
In quantum teleportation, an unknown quantum state is faithfully transferred from a sender (Alice) to a receiver (Bob).
We have implemented quantum teleportation with light beams serving as both the entangled pair and the input (and output) state.
The quantum nature of the teleportation achieved in this case is demonstrated by the experimentally determined fidelity of F=0.58, greater than the classical limit of 0.5 for coherent states.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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