FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Telemachus" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Telemachus
Slaughter of the suitors by Odysseus and Telemachus, Campanian red-figure bell-krater, ca. 330 BC, Louvre (CA 7124)
Slaughter of the suitors by Odysseus and Telemachus, Campanian red-figure bell-krater, ca. 330 BC, Louvre (CA 7124)
Telemachus and Mentor
Telemachus departing from Nestor, painting by Henry Howard (1769–1847)
This article is about the figure in greek mythology. For the Christian saint, see Saint Telemachus, and for the South African cricketer, see Roger Telemachus.

Telemachus (also transliterated as Telemachos or Telémakhos; literally, "far-away fighter")[1] is a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Odysseus and Penelope. He is a central character in Homer's Odyssey The first four books in particular focus on Telemachus' journeys in search of news about his father. Hence, these opening books together are traditionally called the Telemachy. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 745 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2274 × 1830 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 745 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2274 × 1830 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... A krater (Greek κρατηρ, from the Greek verb κεραννυμι, to mix. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC - 330s BC - 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 335 BC 334 BC 333 BC 332 BC 331 BC - 330 BC - 329 BC 328 BC 327... This article is about the museum. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... It has been suggested that Maître à penser be merged into this article or section. ... Download high resolution version (1113x1569, 740 KB)Telemachus departing from Nestor - by Henry Howard (1769-1847), Painter - from Project Gutenberg eText 13725 - http://www. ... Download high resolution version (1113x1569, 740 KB)Telemachus departing from Nestor - by Henry Howard (1769-1847), Painter - from Project Gutenberg eText 13725 - http://www. ... Saint Telemachus, a fifth-century monk who lived in a monastery in Asia or modern day Turkey, who is said to have felt God calling him to Rome. ... The South African cricket team, also known as The Proteas, is a national cricket team representing South Africa. ... Roger Telemachus (b. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... The Vatican Penelope: a Roman marble copy of an Early Classical 6th-century Greek work (Vatican Museums) For other uses, see Penelope (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Beginning of the Odyssey For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... The Telemachy is a term traditionally applied to the first four books of Homers epic poem the Odyssey. ...


He was born on the day when Odysseus was called to fight in the Trojan War. Attempting to renege on his oath to defend Helen, Odysseus sowed salt into his fields in feigned madness. The emissary Palamedes, who was sent to call Odysseus to battle, placed the infant Telemachus before the plow. Odysseus stopped, proving his sanity and obliging himself to go to the war. The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, Palamedes was the son of Nauplius and Clymene. ...

Contents

In the Odyssey

After his father has been gone for nearly 20 years, young Telemachus is met by Athena, who takes the male disguise of Mentor and accompanies him on a journey in search of news of his father. They travel to Pylos and Sparta. Their rulers, Nestor and Menelaus, are friendly, having held Odysseus in high regard, but do not know what has become of him. Telemachus forms a close friendship with Nestor's son Pisistratus, who accompanies him on the search for his father. However, the two are only able to find out that Odysseus is being held captive by Calypso. When Telemachus returns to Ithaca, Athena in another disguise prompts him to visit the swineherd Eumaeus, instead of returning to his home. At the pigkeeper's cottage he discovers that a beggar staying with Eumaeus is his father, recently returned from Calypso's island. He helps his father plan and carry out the killing of Penelope's suitors and the servants who conspired with them. For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Maître à penser be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the Greek geographical feature and town. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia (Greek: Νέστωρ) was the son of Neleus and Chloris, and the King of Pylos. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... Peisistratus or Peisistratos or Pisistratus (Ancient Greek: )[1] was a figure in Greek mythology, the youngest son of Nestor and became an intimate friend of Telemachus the son of Odysseus on their first meeting. ... Now hes left to pine on an island, wracked with grief (Odyssey V): Calypso and Odysseus, by Arnold Böcklin, 1883 Calypso (Greek: Καλυψώ, I will conceal, also transliterated as Kalypsó or Kālypsō), was a naiad, daughter of Atlas who lived on the island of Gozo in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Eumaeus, or Eumaios, was Odysseus swineherd and friend before he left for the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Eumaeus, or Eumaios, was Odysseus swineherd and friend before he left for the Trojan War. ... The Vatican Penelope: a Roman marble copy of an Early Classical 6th-century Greek work (Vatican Museums) For other uses, see Penelope (disambiguation). ...


It is universally held in Homeric scholarship that the Telemachy depicts Telemachus' necessary transition from boyhood to manhood. Thus, while the boy Telemachus in Book 1 demands but cannot force the departure of Penelope's suitors, in Books 19 and 22 the young man Telemachus is able to help his father plan and carry out his revenge on the suitors.


In the Telegony

The Telegony was a short 2-book epic poem recounting the life and death of Odysseus after the events of the Odyssey. In this mythological postscript, Odysseus is murdered by Telegonus, his unknown son by the goddess Circe. After Odysseus' death Telemachus returns to Aeaea with Telegonus and Penelope, and there marries Circe. The Telegony (Greek: Τηλεγόνεια, Telegoneia; Latin: Telegonia) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... In Greek mythology, Telegonus (born afar) was the youngest son of Circe and Odysseus. ... Circe, a painting by John William Waterhouse. ... In Greek mythology, Aeaea (sometimes Aiaia) was the home of the sorcerer Joesph. ...


In later classical authors

  • In The Contest of Homer and Hesiod, it is alleged that the Roman Emperor Hadrian asked the Delphic Oracle about Homer's birthplace and parentage. The Oracle replied that Homer came from Ithaca, and that Telemachus was his father by Epicasta, daughter of Nestor. [1]

Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... The word Sibyl comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. ... In Greek mythology, Epicaste (or Epicasta) is the name of four women. ... The word may have one of the following meanings. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Dictys Cretensis, (Dictys of Crete), alleged to have been of Knossus in Crete, was the legendary companion of Idomeneus during the Trojan War, and the purported author of a diary of its events, that deployed some of the same materials worked up by Homer for the Iliad. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä — by Charles Gleyre In ancient Greek literature, Nausicaa (often rendered Nausicaä; Greek: Ναυσικάα[1]), burner of ships, a daughter of King Alcinous (Alkínoös) of the Phaeacians and Queen Arete, appears in Homers Odyssey (Odysseía). ...

Other appearances

  • In the French-Japanese anime Ulysse 31, which adapts Homer's Odyssey in a futuristic setting, Telemachus appears as a 12 year old boy, son of Ulysses. He is always followed by his robot-friend Nono and an alien girl called Themis (renamed Yumi in the English dub).

François de Salignac de la Mothe, more commonly known as François Fénelon (1651 - 1715), was a French Roman Catholic theologian, poet and writer. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... Stephen Dedalus was James Joyces early pen name and the name of the main character of his early novel Stephen Hero. ... Robert Joseph Shea (1933 - March 10, 1994) was the co-author (with Robert Anton Wilson) of The Illuminatus! Trilogy. ... Robert Anton Wilson Robert Anton Wilson or RAW (January 18, 1932 – January 11, 2007) was a prolific American novelist, essayist, philosopher, psychologist, futurologist, anarchist, and conspiracy theory researcher. ... “Illuminatus” redirects here. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher,[1] known for creating a philosophy she named Objectivism and for writing the novels We the Living, The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and the... For the film, see Atlas Shrugged (film). ... Ulysses 31 (宇宙伝説ユリシーズ31) is a Japanese-French anime series (1981) which updates the Greek and Roman mythology of Odysseus to the thirty-first century. ...

Notes

  1. ^ So named because his father Odysseus was a famously skilled archer.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Telemachus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (534 words)
Telemachus (also transliterated as Telemachos or Telémakhos; literally, "far-away fighter") is a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Odysseus and Penelope.
Telemachus however does not achieve manhood in accordance with the Greek tradition of hospitality, and it's debatable whether or not he is a "man" by the end of the epic.
Telemachus is the subject of François Fénelon's The Adventures of Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699), a scathing attack on the monarchy of France.
Telemachus (226 words)
Telemachus was the son of Odysseus and Penelope.
Palamedes placed Telemachus in front of his father's plow, and Odysseus revealed his sanity by swerving to avoid injuring the child.
By the time Telemachus got back to Ithaca, he was a much more self-confident and assertive young man. He got to prove his newly acquired maturity when he joined Odysseus in slaughtering the suitors and then standing up to their outraged relatives in the final scene of the Odyssey.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m