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Encyclopedia > Telecom Reform Act

On January 3, 1996, the 104th Congress of the United States amended or repealed sections of the the Communications Act of 1934 with the new Telecommunications Act of 1996. It was the first major overhaul of American telecommunications policy in nearly 62 years. It as signed into law by United States President Bill Clinton on February 8, 1996.

Contents

Telecommunications Act of 1996

Summary of regulated communications

On January 3, 1996, the 104th Congress of the United States amended or repealed sections of the the Communications Act of 1934 with the new Telecommunications Act of 1996 to regulate:

Deregulation of phone services

The general intention of the Act was deregulation and promotion of competition. The Act removed barriers which had previously prevented telecoms from competing head-to-head and thus the Act has fostered competition. However, degregulation was also intended to offer consumers a choice in local phone service. By 1999, 98% of homes had no choice in local service. The only alternative being cell phones, which are gradually becoming the primary choice for more Americans.


Mergers

Passage of the Act resulted in several major mergers:

Controversial Child Protection Section

Title V was the Communications Decency Act, aimed at regulating online pornography but was later defeated in the courts by on constitutional grounds by advocates of free speech.


References

  • A Legislative History of the Communications Act of 1934, by Paglin, Max D. - Oxford University Press, New York. 1989.
  • Brinkley Act - Section 325(b) of the Communications Act of 1934 that was written into law in an attempt to halt live broadcasting from radio studios in the United States linked via telephone land lines to superpower border-blaster transmitters located along the Mexican side of the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo), international boder. This provision was carried through into the Telecommunications Act of 1996 by incorporation of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended to Section 325(c).

External sources

Communications Act of 1934, as Amended by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (http://www.fcc.gov/Reports/1934new.pdf)
Telecommunications Act of 1996 (http://www.fcc.gov/Reports/tcom1996.pdf)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Telecommunications Act of 1996 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (331 words)
The Telecommunications Act of 1996 was the first major overhaul of United States telecommunications policy in nearly 62 years, modifying earlier legislation, primarily the Communications Act of 1934.
The general intention of the Act was deregulation and promotion of competition.
Brinkley Act - Section 325(b) of the Communications Act of 1934 that was written into law in an attempt to halt live broadcasting from radio studios in the United States linked via telephone land lines to superpower border-blaster transmitters located along the Mexican side of the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo), international boder.
Telecom Reform Act - encyclopedia article about Telecom Reform Act. (1632 words)
The Telecommunications Act of 1996 was the first major overhaul of United States United States of America—also referred to as 'the United States', 'the US', 'the USA', 'America' (more loosely), 'the States' (colloquially), and 'Columbia' (poetically)—is a federal republic of 50 states, located primarily in central North America.
Title V was the Communications Decency Act The Communications Decency Act (CDA) was Title V of the United States' Telecommunications Act of 1996.
Brinkley Act The Brinkley Act is the popular name given to Section 325(b) of The Communications Act of 1934; United States Public Law 416, 73d Congress, June 19, 1934.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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