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Encyclopedia > Telamon
Architectural telamon on the Wayne County, Ohio courthouse.
Architectural telamon on the Wayne County, Ohio courthouse.

In Greek mythology, Telamon (in Greek, Τελαμών), son of the king Aeacus, of Aegina, and Endeis and brother of Peleus, accompanied Jason as one his Argonauts, and was present at the hunt for the Calydonian Boar. He also participated in the Trojan War on the side of the Greeks, along with his son, Ajax. He and Peleus were also close friends with Heracles, assisting him on his expeditions against the Amazons and against Troy (see below). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1667x2500, 1217 KB) Summary Telamon on the Wayne County, Ohio courthouse in Wooster. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1667x2500, 1217 KB) Summary Telamon on the Wayne County, Ohio courthouse in Wooster. ... Wayne County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, Aeacus (Greek: Aiakos, bewailing or earth borne) was king in the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf. ... Aegina (Greek: Αίγινα (Egina)) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 31 miles (50 km) from Athens. ... In Greek mythology, Endeis was the wife of Aeacus and mother of Telamon and Peleus. ... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ... The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ... The Calydonian Hunt shown on a Roman frieze (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) The Calydonian Boar is one of a genre of chthonic monsters in Greek mythology, each set in a specific locale, which must be overcome by heroes of the Olympian age. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Ajax Ajax or Aias (ancient Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and king of Salamis. ... Alcides redirects here. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ...


After killing their half-brother, Phocus, Telamon and Peleus had to leave Aegina. King Cychreus of Salamis welcomed Telamon and befriended him. Telamon married his daughter Periboea, who gave birth to Ajax. Later, Cychreus gave Telamon his kingdom. In other versions of the myth Cychreus' daughter is named Glauce, and Periboea is Telamon's second wife, and the daughter of Alcathous. Telamon also figures in both versions of Heracles' sacking of Troy, which was ruled by King Laomedon (or Tros in the alternate versions). Before the Trojan War, Poseidon sent a sea monster to attack Troy. In Greek mythology, two different people bore the name Phocus. ... In Greek mythology, Cychreus was the King of Salamis and father of Periboea. ... Salamis (Greek, Modern: Σαλαμίνα Salamína, Ancient/Katharevousa: Σαλαμίς Salamís) is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus. ... In Greek mythology, five people shared the name Periboea. ... In Greek mythology, Glauce refers to two different people: Daughter of Creon, Glauce married Jason. ... In Greek mythology, Alcathous was a son of Pelops and Hippodamia. ... Alcides redirects here. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione. ... In Greek mythology, King Tros of Dardania, son of Erichthonius from whom he inherited the throne and the father of three named sons: Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymedes. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ...


In the King Tros version, Heracles (along with Telamon and Oicles) agreed to kill the monster if Tros would give him the horses he received from Zeus as compensation for Zeus' kidnapping Ganymede, Tros' son. Tros agreed; Heracles succeeded and Telamon married Hesione, Tros' daughter, giving birth to Teucer by her. In the King Laomedon version, Laomedon planned on sacrificing his daughter Hesione to Poseidon in the hope of appeasing him. Heracles rescued her at the last minute and killed both the monster and Laomedon and Laomedon's sons, except for Ganymede, who was on Mt. Olympus, and Podarge, who saved his own life by giving Heracles a golden veil Hesione had made. Telamon took Hesione as a war prize and married her, and she gave birth to Teucer by him. Alcides redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, Oicles (also Oikleiês, Oecles, or Oecleus) was an Argive king, father of Amphiaraus, son of Mantius and grandson of Melampus. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Ganymede (Greek: Γανυμήδης, Ganumêdês)) was a divine hero whose homeland was the Troad. ... In Greek mythology, the most prominent Hesione was a Trojan princess, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy, sister of Priam and second wife of King Telamon of Salamis. ... In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris from Greek Τεύκρος, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his second wife Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, the most prominent Hesione was a Trojan princess, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy, sister of Priam and second wife of King Telamon of Salamis. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris from Greek Τεύκρος, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his second wife Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. ...


Other uses

  • In architecture, a telamon (plural telamones or telamons) is a sculpted support or column in the form of a man, the male equivalent of a caryatid. Such a sculptural support is better known as an atlas (plural atlantes).

This article is about building architecture. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... For other uses, see Column (disambiguation). ... A caryatid (also spelt Karyatid), is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head. ... Atlantes in eclectic style, Kanałowa Str. ... Combatants Roman Republic Gauls Commanders Atilius Regulus †, Aemilius Papus Concolitanus, Aneroëstes † Strength 70,000 infantry, 5,400 cavalry 50,000 infantry, 20,000 cavalry Casualties Unknown 40,000 killed, 10,000 captured The Battle of Telamon was fought between the Roman Republic and an alliance of Gauls in 225... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Gallia (in English Gaul) is the Latin name for the region of western Europe occupied by present-day France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 229 BC 228 BC 227 BC 226 BC 225 BC - 224 BC - 223 BC 222 BC... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Robert Jordan, see Robert Jordan (disambiguation). ... This article is about a fantasy series. ... Lews Therin Telamon is a fictional character in Robert Jordans The Wheel of Time fantasy series. ... Salamis (Greek, Modern: Σαλαμίνα Salamína, Ancient/Katharevousa: Σαλαμίς Salamís) is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus. ...

Sources

Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Apollonius of Rhodes (Apollonius Rhodius), librarian at Alexandria, was a poet, the author of Argonautica, a literary epic retelling of ancient material concerning Jason and the Argonauts quest for the Golden Fleece in the mythic land of Colchis. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Telamon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (308 words)
In Greek mythology, Telamon, son of Aeacus, King of Aegina, and Endeis and brother of Peleus, accompanied Jason as one his Argonauts, and was present at the hunt for the Calydonian Boar.
Telamon also figures into both versions of Heracles' sacking of Troy, which was ruled by King Laomedon or Tros in the alternate versions.
Telamon took Hesione as a war prize and married her, and she gave birth to Teucer by him.
Telamon (139 words)
Telamon was the son of Aeacus, King of Aegina.
Telamon married Periboea, and had a son, Ajax, by her.
Telamon received Laomedon's daughter, Hesione, as a battle-prize; by her he had another son, Teucer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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