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Encyclopedia > Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv

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Tel Aviv
Hebrew תֵּל־אָבִיב-יָפוֹ
Arabic تَلْ أَبِيبْ يَافَا
Name Meaning Spring Hill
Founded in 1909
Government City
District Tel Aviv
Population 384,600[1]
Metropolitan Area: 3,150,800 (2006)
Jurisdiction 51,788 dunams (51.8 km²)
Mayor Ron Huldai
Website www.tel-aviv.gov.il

Tel Aviv-Yafo (Hebrew: תֵּל־אָבִיב-יָפוֹ[2]; Arabic: تَلْ أَبِيبْ يَافَا), usually referred to as Tel Aviv, is the second most populous city in Israel, with a population of 384,600. Tel Aviv is located on Israel's Mediterranean coastline over an area covering 51.8 km². It is the main city of the largest and most populous metropolitan area in Israel, Gush Dan (Dan Bloc), whose population numbers 3.15 million as of 2007.[3] Tel Aviv is recognised as a strong candidate global city, and has been named the most expensive Middle Eastern city to live in.[4] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 297 pixelsFull resolution (1705 × 632 pixel, file size: 297 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Tel Aviv coat of arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... “Arabic” redirects here. ... Jerusalem Tel Aviv-Jaffa Haifa Rishon LeZion Ashdod Beersheba Petah Tikva Netanya Holon Bnei Brak Bat Yam Ramat Gan Ashkelon Rehovot The following list of cities in Israel is based on the current index of the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). ... Map of the districts of Israel Population density by geographic region, sub-district and district (thicker border indicates higher tier). ... The Tel-Aviv District, highlighted. ... A dunam or dönüm, dunum, donum is a unit of area. ... Ron Huldai speaking at the opening of the American Corner in Jaffa. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 609 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1710 × 1683 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 609 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1710 × 1683 pixel, file size: 2. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... “Arabic” redirects here. ... The Israeli Coastal Plain (Hebrew: , Mishor HaHof) is a name to the flat and low-lying narrow strip around the Mediterranean Sea. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gush Dan (Hebrew: גּוּשׁ דָּן, Standard Hebrew GuÅ¡ Dan) is the name of the Tel Aviv metropolitan area including areas from both the Tel Aviv District and the Central District of Israel on the Mediterranean coast. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “World city” redirects here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


The City of Tel Aviv was originally founded in 1909 by Jewish immigrants as an alternative to expensive housing in the neighbouring historic port city of Jaffa (Hebrew: יפו‎, Yafo; Arabic: يافا, Yafa). Tel Aviv's extensive growth eventually overtook its Arab-majority neighbour, and the two towns were united into the municipality of Tel Aviv-Yafo in 1950, two years after the establishment of the State of Israel. Tel Aviv is today considered the center of Israel's globally oriented economy, and is the anchor of the area popularly known as "Silicon Wadi". It is also considered Israel's cultural capital due to its vibrant, modern, cosmopolitan character.[5] The city's Bauhaus architectured White City was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003.[6] Jaffa port Jaffa ( Hebrew: יָפוֹ, Yafo Arabic: يَافَا  ; also Japho, Joppa; also, ~1350 B.C.E. Amarna Letters: Yapu; ), is an ancient port city located in south Tel Aviv, Israel on the Mediterranean Sea. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... “Arabic” redirects here. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism Arab woman from Ramallah wearing traditional dress in 1915. ... David Ben Gurion (First Prime Minister of Israel) publicly pronouncing the Declaration of the State of Israel, May 14, 1948. ... Silicon Wadi is the area of Israel which contains a high concentration of high-tech industry, similar to Silicon Valley in California. ... For the British gothic rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ... The White City (Hebrew: העיר הלבנה, ha-Ê¿ir ha-levana) is the name given to Tel Aviv, Israel, because of the large number of white, or light-colored buildings built there between the 1920s and the 1950s in the Bauhaus or International style. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Contents

Etymology

Tel Aviv's coastline

In Hebrew, the name Tel Aviv translates as "Hill (tel) of Spring (aviv)". This is the title given by Nahum Sokolow to his Hebrew translation of Theodor Herzl's book Altneuland (German: "The Old New Land"). There is an account that Sokolow came up with the Hebrew title "Tel Aviv" to allude to the destruction of the ancient Jewish state and its hoped-for restoration: aviv = "spring" to symbolize renewal, and tel to symbolize the destruction of the ancient state, following not the usual Hebrew meaning of the word "tel" but its use in archaeology, meaning "mound of accumulated ruins".[7] Sokolow took the name from the Book of Ezekiel 3:15 : "Then I came to them of the captivity at Tel Aviv, that lived by the river Chebar, and to where they lived; and I sat there overwhelmed among them seven days." (The spelling in the King James Version of the Bible is Telabib.[8]) The Aviv referred to is possibly an indirect reference to a Mesopotamian god or goddess believed to bring forth the season of spring. Image File history File linksMetadata 800px-Tel_Aviv_Beachs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 800px-Tel_Aviv_Beachs. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Tell Mar Elias, North Jordan in 2005 Tell or tall (Arabic: ‎, tall, and Hebrew: , tel), meaning hill or mound, is an archaeological site in the form of an earthen mound that results from the accumulation and subsequent erosion of material deposited by human occupation over long periods of time. ... For other uses, see Spring. ... Nahum Sokolow (1859-1936) was a Zionist leader, author, translator, and a pioneer of Hebrew journalism. ... Theodor Herzl, in his middle age. ... The Old New Land (or Altneuland in the original German) is a utopian novel published by Theodor Herzl, the founder of political Zionism, in 1902. ... For the magazine about archaeology, see Archaeology (magazine). ... Book Of Ezekiel is rapper Freekey Zekeys debut album and debut on Diplomat Records/Asylum. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... Abib, also spelled Aviv, has three meanings in Hebrew: The stage in the growth of grain when the seeds have reached full size and are filling with starch, but have not dried yet. ... Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Iraq. ...


Jaffa in Hebrew is Yafo, which may be derived from yafah/yofi, meaning "beautiful". Tradition holds that Jaffa was founded by and named after Japheth, son of Noah. The city is also mentioned in the book of Jonah, and, by the name of "Japo", on an ancient Egyptian tax register clay tablet found at Tel el-Amarna.[9][10] Japheth (Hebrew. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Jonah is the fifth book in a series of books called the Minor Prophets (itself a subsection of the Nevi’im or Prophets). ... Amarna The site of Amarna (commonly known as el-Amarna or incorrectly as Tel el-Amarna; see below) (Arabic: العمارنة al-‘amārnä) is located on the east bank of the Nile River in the modern Egyptian province of al-Minya, some 58 km (38 miles) south of the city of...


History

Tel Aviv was founded on land purchased from Bedouins, north of the existing city of Jaffa. This photograph is of 1909 auction of the first lots.
Early Tel Aviv
Early Tel Aviv
Further information: Jaffa's history

The gulf of Jaffa has been the site of a fortified port town for at least 4000 years, and as such is the oldest port in the world. During the 19th century, the town’s population grew from about 2,500 in 1806 to 17,000 in 1886. The old city walls could no longer contain the population, and they were destroyed in the 1870s, allowing for newer, more spacious neighborhoods to be constructed.[11] Image File history File links Public domain photo of auction ceremony for lots at founding of Tel Aviv, 1909. ... Image File history File links Public domain photo of auction ceremony for lots at founding of Tel Aviv, 1909. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jaffa port Jaffa ( Hebrew: יָפוֹ, Yafo Arabic: يَافَا  ; also Japho, Joppa; also, ~1350 B.C.E. Amarna Letters: Yapu; ), is an ancient port city located in south Tel Aviv, Israel on the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Settlement in the area of modern southern Tel Aviv (the neighbourhoods of Neve Tzedek and Neve Shalom) began in the 1880s as a substitute for the relatively expensive Arab neighbourhoods of Jaffa by some of the town's distinguished Jewish residents.[11] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1908 the Ahuzat Bayit (אחוזת בית) homebuilders association bought land north of Jaffa. Building commenced in 1909, and the association admitted members of two suburbs established nearby.[12] In 1910, the common name of Tel Aviv was adopted.[13] At its founding, Tel Aviv was intended only to be a bedroom community of Jaffa. The founders envisaged a European-style garden suburb with wide streets and boulevards.[14] Commuters waiting for the morning train in Maplewood, New Jersey A bedroom community, dormitory town, or commuter town is a community that is primarily residential in character, with most of its workers commuting to a nearby town or city to earn their livelihood. ... Ebenezer Howards 3 magnets diagram which addressed the question Where will the people go?, the choices being Town, Country or Town-Country The garden city movement is an approach to urban planning that was founded in 1898 by Ebenezer Howard in England. ...


Tel Aviv's growth was halted in 1914 when the Ottoman authorities expelled its inhabitants. However, its residents returned and resumed development following the British conquest. The period of British administration saw increasing political friction between Jews and Arabs throughout Palestine, and in May 1921, dozens of Jews were killed by an Arab mob in the Jaffa riots. Soon after, thousands of the 16,000 Jews of Jaffa moved north to Tel Aviv. Following the violence, the inhabitants of Tel Aviv created a new central business district. The master plan for development of the city, based on a framework of central routes and boulevards, was designed in 1925 by Patrick Geddes and adopted by the city council under Meir Dizengoff. Owing to its proximity to the port of Jaffa, and its status as the first Jewish community that immigrants saw when coming into the country, Tel Aviv quickly grew to become the centre of Israeli urban life, which it remains to this day. Due to the 1936-1939 Arab rioting, a local port was opened in 1938, which was an important milestone marking its independence from Jaffa. “Ottoman” redirects here. ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... On May 1, 1921, a scuffle began in Tel Aviv-Jaffa between rival groups of Jewish Bolsheviks, carrying Yiddish banners demanding Soviet Palestine, and Socialists parading on May Day. ... The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... The Champs Elysees in Paris, France. ... Sir Patrick Geddes (1854 - 1932) was Scottish biologist and botanist, known also as an innovative thinker in the fields of urban planning and education He was responsible for introducing the concept of region to architecture and planning. ... Meir Dizengoff (Hebrew: מאיר דיזנגוף, Russian: Меер Янкелевич Дизенгоф, Meyer Yankelevich Dizengof; 1861, Akimovichi, Bessarabia - 1936, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli politician and mayor of Tel Aviv. ... The 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine was an uprising during the British mandate by Palestinian Arabs in Palestine which lasted from 1936 to 1939. ...


According to the 1947 UN Partition Plan, Palestine was to be partitioned into Jewish and Arab states. Tel Aviv was to be part of the Jewish state, while Jaffa, was to become an enclave belonging to the Arab state. The plan was rejected by the Arabs, and violence erupted immediately. During an offensive on Jaffa that started in April 1948, many of its Arab residents fled through the harbor. When Jaffa was taken on May 14, only about 4,100 out of its 70,000 Arab residents remained.[14] Map showing the UN Partition Plan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Palestinian refugees in 1948 The Palestinian exodus (Arabic: الهجرة الفلسطينية al-Hijra al-Filasteeniya) refers to the refugee flight of Palestinian Arabs during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Israel's Declaration of Independence took place in Tel Aviv on May 14, 1948, and it served as Israel's provisional capital throughout the 1948 Arab-Israeli War due to the Arab blockade of Jerusalem, which was proclaimed capital in December 1949. Due to the international dispute over the status of Jerusalem, most embassies stayed in the Tel Aviv area. Thirteen more returned there in the early eighties as part of the UN's punitive measures responding to Israel's 1980 Jerusalem Law.[15] [16] Today all but two of the international embassies to Israel are in Tel Aviv or the surrounding district.[17] In April, 1949, Tel Aviv and Jaffa were united in the single municipality Tel Aviv-Yafo, and the lands of neighboring villages such as al-Shaykh Muwannis, Jammasin and Sumail, which were depopulated during the war, were incorporated into the united municipality.[18] Tel Aviv thus grew to 42 square kilometres (16.2 sq mi). David Ben Gurion (First Prime Minister of Israel) publicly pronouncing the Declaration of the State of Israel, May 14, 1948. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising... Combatants Israel, Jewish militias: (Haganah, Irgun, Lehi) British officers with the Israeli force Transjordan Army of the Holy War Other Palestinian militias British officers seconded to Transjordan Egypt Commanders David Shaltiel Sir Alan Cunningham Mohammad Amin al-Husayni Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni Anwar Nusseiba , General Sir John Bagot Glubb... United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 declared that the 1980 Knesset law (the Jerusalem Law) declaring Jerusalem as Israels eternal and indivisible capital was null and void and must be rescinded forthwith. This resolution, not taken under chapter VI or VII of the charter (the binding chapters), advised member... The Jerusalem Law is a common name of Basic Law: Jerusalem, Capital of Israel passed by the Israeli Knesset on July 30, 1980 (17th Av, 5740). ... Al-Shaykh Muwannis was an Arab town in the British Mandate of Palestine. ...


Tel Aviv has suffered violence and terrorism at the hands of Palestinian militant groups over the course of several decades. The first suicide attack in Tel Aviv occurred on October 19, 1994, when a suicide bomber exploded on the Line 5 bus killing himself and 21 civilians, as part of a Hamas suicide campaign. This was followed, on March 4, 1996, when another suicide bomber exploded nearby at an ATM during Purim holiday festivities and killed 18 civilians. Оn June 1, 2001, during the Second Intifada, a suicide bomber exploded in a line for a discotheque and 32 were killed and more than 100 were injured. On January 25, 2002, 20 were killed in a suicide attack near the old Central Bus Station, and on January 5, 2003, in two nearly simultaneous attacks, 23 were killed. On 17 April 2006, 10 people were killed and dozens wounded in another suicide attack in the same location, with many of the victims in these attacks being foreign labourers.[19] A suicide attack is an attack on a military or civilian target, in which an attacker intends to kill others, and knows that they will either certainly or most likely die in the process (see suicide). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Tel Aviv bus 5 massacre was a 1994 Hamas suicide attack against Israel. ... Hamas (Arabic: ; acronym: Arabic: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Sunni Muslim militant organization. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Purim (Hebrew: פורים Pûrîm lots, from Akkadian pÅ«ru) is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance from Hamans plot to annihilate all the Jews of the Persian Empire, who had survived the Babylonian captivity, after Persia had conquered Babylonia who in turn had destroyed the First Temple... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... The Dolphinarium Massacre was a suicide bombing carried out by a Hamas militant in a discotheque near the dolphinarium in Tel-Aviv, Israel on June 1, 2001. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Tel Aviv Central Bus Station is the primary bus station in Tel Aviv, Israel. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Geography

Topography and climate

Tel Aviv is located around 32°5′N, 34°48′E on the Israeli Mediterranean Coastal Plain, the historic land bridge between Europe, Africa, and Asia. Immediately north of Jaffa, Tel Aviv is situated on land which used to be sand dunes, and as such has relatively poor soil fertility. It is now on flat land with no notable gradients. As such, its most notable geographical feature are the bluffs above the Mediterranean coastline and the Yarkon River's mouth. In modern times, due to the expansion of Tel Aviv and the Gush Dan region in general, absolute borders between Tel Aviv and Jaffa, and between the city's neighbourhoods do not exist. The city is located some 60 kilometers (37 mi) northwest of Jerusalem, Israel's capital city, and some 90 kilometres (55.9 mi) south of the northern port city of Haifa. The Israeli Coastal Plain (Hebrew: , Mishor HaHof) is a name to the flat and low-lying narrow strip around the Mediterranean Sea. ... Via Maris is an ancient trading route dating from the Early Bronze Age which linked Egypt with the northern empires of Syria, Anatolia and Mesopotamia - modern day Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Hebrew חֵיפָה Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ...


Tel Aviv has a mediterranean climate with hot summers, pleasant springs and autumns, and cool, rainy winters. Humidity tends to be high all year round, and rain usually occurs between October to May. In winter, temperatures seldom drop below 5 °C and are more likely to be in the region of 10° to 15 °C, while in summer the average is 26 °C. The average annual rainfall is 530 millimetres (20.9 in).[20] Tel Aviv boasts on average over 300 sunny days a year. The autumn and spring periods are short, and with climate change appear to be shrinking. Many see the best time of year in Tel Aviv as April when the sun is bright, temperatures are moderate, humidity is down, and the flowers are in bloom.[21]  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ...

Weather averages for Tel Aviv
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 17.5 (63.5) 17.7 (63.7) 19.2 (66.6) 22.8 (73.0) 24.9 (76.8) 27.5 (81.5) 29.4 (84.9) 30.2 (86.4) 29.4 (84.9) 27.3 (81.1) 23.4 (74.1) 19.2 (66.6) 24.0 (75.2)
Average low °C (°F) 9.6 (49.3) 9.8 (49.6) 11.5 (52.7) 14.4 (57.9) 17.3 (63.1) 20.6 (69.1) 23.0 (73.4) 23.7 (74.7) 22.5 (72.5) 19.1 (66.4) 14.6 (58.3) 11.2 (52.2) 16.4 (61.5)
Precipitation mm (inch) 222.3 (8.8) 128.2 (5.0) 22.0 (0.9) 1.5 (0.1) 7.5 (0.3) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 2.4 (0.1) 64.1 (2.5) 98.3 (3.9) 546.3 (21.5)
Source: Israel Central Bureau of Statistics [22][23]

Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ...

Districts

Further information: Neighborhoods of Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv is made up of a large number of districts which have formed naturally over the city's short history. The most notable of these is Jaffa, the ancient port city which Tel Aviv grew out of. This area is traditionally made up demographically of a greater percentage of Arabs, but recent gentrification is finding them replaced by a yuppie population. Similar processes are occurring in nearby Neve Tzedek, the original Jewish neighborhood outside of Jaffa. Ramat Aviv, a neighborhood in the northern part of the city largely made up of luxury apartments, is currently undergoing extensive expansion and is set to absorb the beachfront property of Sde Dov Airport after its decommissioning.[24] // Ramat Aviv (רמת אביב) Spring Heights Ramat Aviv Gimmel (רמת אביב ×’) Spring Heights C Ramat Aviv Hachadasha (רמת אביב החדשה) New Spring Heights Maoz Aviv (מעוז אביב) Fortress of Spring Neve Avivim (נוה אביבים) Home of Springs Ezurei Chen (אזורי חן) The Grace Areas Lamed Neighborhood (תוכנית ל) Kochav haTzafon (כוכב הצפון) Northern Star Neve Sharet (נוה שרת) haMeeshtaleh (המשתלה) The Nursery Ramat haChail (רמת החיל) Army Heights Kiryat Atidim (קריית עתידים) Campus of... Jaffa port Jaffa ( Hebrew: יָפוֹ, Yafo Arabic: يَافَا  ; also Japho, Joppa; also, ~1350 B.C.E. Amarna Letters: Yapu; ), is an ancient port city located in south Tel Aviv, Israel on the Mediterranean Sea. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Yuppies (young urban professionals, or less commonly young upwardly-mobile professionals[1]) is a market segment whose consumers are characterized as self-reliant, financially secure individualists. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ramat Aviv is the name of several neighbourhoods which are located in the north and the northwestern parts of Tel Aviv, north of the Yarkon River. ... Sde Dov Airport (IATA: SDV, ICAO: LLSD) is a municipal airport located in Tel Aviv, Israel. ...


Architecture

The pagoda house in central Tel Aviv
Central Tel Aviv Panorama

Modern Tel Aviv is notable for two of its architectural styles. Of greatest international notability is the White City which was designated by UNESCO in July 2003 as a World Heritage Site due to its 2500 structures constructed in the Bauhaus, or International Style.[25] These buildings were built largely between the 1930s and 1950s as the modernist art movement reached its apogee in Europe by many Jewish architects who had trained in the style in pre-Nazi era Germany. Tel Aviv now boasts the largest collection of such buildings anywhere in the world,[26] which tie in with its Garden City styling and the city's many wide-boulevards. Image File history File links 86cj. ... Image File history File links 86cj. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4173x685, 970 KB) Central Tel Aviv Panorama Beivushtang 15:27, 28 November 2006 (UTC) http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4173x685, 970 KB) Central Tel Aviv Panorama Beivushtang 15:27, 28 November 2006 (UTC) http://www. ... The White City (Hebrew: העיר הלבנה, ha-ʿir ha-levana) is the name given to Tel Aviv, Israel, because of the large number of white, or light-colored buildings built there between the 1920s and the 1950s in the Bauhaus or International style. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... For the British gothic rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Garden City is the name of several places around the world. ...


More recently, Tel Aviv has become a hub of modern high-rise architecture due to astronomically high land values and the concurrent deterioration of many low-quality buildings constructed in the 1960s to cope with Israel's mass-immigration. The Shalom Tower, Moshe Aviv Tower, Azrieli Center, and the YOO Towers, designed by Phillipe Stark and currently under construction, are among the city's most internationally significant skyscrapers.[27] High-rise is a 1975 novel by J. G. Ballard. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shalom Meir Tower is an office tower in Tel-Aviv and contains a small commercial center. ... City Gate is the tall building on the right Moshe Aviv Tower (commonly known as the City Gate), is a skyscraper located in the demarcated area of the bursa (diamond stock exchange) at 7 Jabotinsky in northern Ramat Gan, Israel. ... The two Azriel Center towers. ... The YOO Towers are two residential skyscrapers under construction in Tel Aviv, Israel, set to be completed in 2007. ... A book about Starck by Taschen alarm clock Telefunken ca. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ...

Panorama of Tel Aviv from the University

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (7901x493, 825 KB) Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan Panorama at sunset, from north Beivushtang 13:23, 29 November 2006 (UTC) http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (7901x493, 825 KB) Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan Panorama at sunset, from north Beivushtang 13:23, 29 November 2006 (UTC) http://www. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ...

Demographics

The city itself has a population of 384,600 over an area covering 50,553 dunams (50.6 square kilometres (19.5 sq mi)) giving a population density of 7,445 people per km². According to the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), as of June 2006, Tel Aviv's population is growing at an annual rate of 0.9%. It consists of 91.8% Jews, 4.2% Arabs and 4.0% "other".[28] According to some estimates, about 50,000 unregistered foreign workers live in Tel Aviv.[29] A dunam or dönüm, dunum, donum is a unit of area. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism Arab woman from Ramallah wearing traditional dress in 1915. ... Foreign farm worker, New York A foreign worker is a person who works in a country other than the one of which he or she is a citizen. ...


According to December 2001 statistics, Tel Aviv's socio-economic status was classified as high (8 out of 10) and 63.1% percent of twelfth grade students received graduation certificates in 2000. In 2000, the average monthly wage stood at 6,773 NIS, which is roughly equal to the national average. In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% aged under 20, 18.5% aged 20-29, 24% aged 30-44, and 16.2% aged between 45 and 59. 19.1% of the city's population is aged over 60.


Religion

Whilst Jerusalem is regarded as Israel's religious hub, Tel Aviv is perceived as a secular, culturally open coastal city. Despite this, Tel Aviv still has about 500 synagogues, of which some 350 are active. Tel Aviv, especially in Jaffa, has a sizable Muslim population and contains a number of mosques. Furthermore, in part due to the many embassies and foreign diplomatic staff located in the Tel Aviv-Yafo area, the Christian Arab population of Yafo and the increasing number of foreign workers from Eastern Europe, South America, Africa and Southeast Asia, a number of churches have been established in and around the city.[30] A synagogue (from ancient Greek: , transliterated synagogē, assembly; ‎ beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: or Template:Lanh-he beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; Ladino: , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ...


Culture

Arts and theatre

One of the Tel Aviv performing arts centre entrances

Many see Tel Aviv as Israel's cultural capital.[5] Cultural centers in Tel Aviv include the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Centre, which serves as the home of the Israeli Opera House where Plácido Domingo was the house tenor between 1962 and 1965, and of the Cameri Theater. The Culture Hall, is a 3,000 seat theatre, making it the biggest theatre in the city. The Israeli National Theater, Habima Theater ("The Stage"), is the most recognized of its many theatre companies and theatre halls. Others include the Jaffa-based Gesher Theater, and Beit Lessin Theater. Tzavta and Tmuna are smaller theaters used mainly for musical and fringe productions. In Jaffa, the Simta and Notzar theaters specialize in fringe. Also, the city hosts the most international live performances of all the main cities in the region. Image File history File links Mishkan. ... Image File history File links Mishkan. ... Plácido Domingo José Plácido Domingo Embil KBE (born January 21, 1941)[1] better known as Plácido Domingo, is a world-renowned operatic tenor. ... Established over 60 years ago, as Israel’s first Hebrew-language repertory theater, the Cameri has been dubbed the “theater of social responsibility. ... Habima Theater (Hebrew: the stage) in Tel Aviv is Israels national theater and it is one of the first Hebrew theaters. ...


Museums

Israel has the highest number of museums per capita of any country, three of the largest of which are located in Tel Aviv.[31][32] Among the most notable are the Eretz Israel Museum which is known for its rich collection of archaeology and history exhibits dealing with the Land of Israel, and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art which is one of the major art museums in Israel. Housed on the campus of Tel Aviv University is the Beth Hatefutsoth, a museum of the international Jewish diaspora. Containing both historical documents and art, the museum tells the story of Jewish prosperity and persecution throughout the centuries of exile. Batey Haosef Museum is a showcase of the Israel Defense Forces' military history, containing rare exhibits and authentic pieces from Israel's history as well as a wide variety of firearms and pictures. Meanwhile, the Palmach Museum near Tel Aviv University gives visitors a multimedia experience of the history of the Palmach, as well as vast archives, depicting the lives of young self-trained Jewish soldiers who eventually became the first defenders of Israel. Near Charles Clore's garden in north Jaffa is a small museum of the Etzel Jewish militant organization, one of whose achievements was conquering Jaffa for Israel in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. The Tel Aviv Exhibition Centre which is located in the northern side of the city, hosts over 60 major events every year. Many offbeat museums and galleries are located in the city's artsy southern areas including the Tel Aviv Raw Art contemporary art gallery. The Eretz Israel Museum was established in 1953 in Ramat Aviv. ... Kingdom of Israel: Early ancient historical Israel — land in pink is the approximate area under direct central royal administration during the United Monarchy. ... The Tel Aviv Museum of Art was established in 1932 in Tel Aviv, in the home of Tel Avivs first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. ... The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ... The Museum for Jewish Diaspora, Tel Aviv University. ... The Jewish diaspora (Hebrew: Tefutzah, scattered, or Galut גלות, exile, Yiddish: tfutses) is the expulsion of the Jewish people out of the Roman province of Judea. ... Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... Military history is composed of the events in the history of humanity that fall within the category of conflict. ... The Palmach (Hebrew: פלמח, an acronym for Plugot Mahatz (Hebrew: פלוגות מחץ), Strike Companies) was the regular fighting force of the Haganah, the unofficial army of the Yishuv (Jewish community) during the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Sir Charles Clore (1904-1979) was a British financier, retail and property magnate and philanthropist. ... Irgun emblem. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising... The Tel Aviv Exhibition Centre (a. ...


Tourism and recreation

Tel Aviv is a major tourist destination, combining a Mediterranean feel with culture and complexity. The city has several public parks and gardens, the largest being The Yarkon Park. Gan Meir, named after the first mayor, Meir Dizengoff, is on King George Street. Tel Aviv hosts the largest Gay Pride Parade in Israel, drawing upwards of 100,000 people.[33] Tel Aviv is known for its openness as well as its thriving night life.[34] It holds many malls, such as Dizengoff Center (Israel's first mall) and the Azrieli Center. The city has many hotels, such as the Crowne Plaza, Sheraton, Four Seasons, Dan, and Hilton. There is also a mall inside the Opera Tower. The city is known in Israel as the city that never sleeps.[34] The Yarkon Park (Hebrew: , Park HaYarkon) is Tel Avivs largest public urban park (3. ... Meir Dizengoff (Hebrew: מאיר דיזנגוף, Russian: Меер Янкелевич Дизенгоф, Meyer Yankelevich Dizengof; 1861, Akimovichi, Bessarabia - 1936, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli politician and mayor of Tel Aviv. ... Baton twirlers perform in the 2002 Divers/Cité pride parade in downtown Montreal A pride parade is part of a festival or ceremony held by the LGBT community of a city to commemorate the struggle for gay liberation, gay rights, and gay pride. ...


Tel Aviv is also known for its lively nightlife and around the clock culture. Its beachfront promenades are especially a focal point of that atmosphere due to its myriad nightclubs and bars. For other uses, see Nightlife (disambiguation). ... A Promenade is a seaside walkway constructed so that people can enjoy walking near the sea without getting their clothes wet and dirty. ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Education

The Engineering Faculty Boulevard in Tel Aviv University
Tel Aviv's Nokia Arena
Tel Aviv's Nokia Arena
The Azrieli Towers, a major part in the city's skyline.
The Azrieli Towers, a major part in the city's skyline.

Home to a large number of schools, colleges, and universities, Tel Aviv is a center for education in Israel with two universities, Tel Aviv University, and Bar-Ilan University (with its campus in neighbouring Ramat Gan). These two universities give a combined student population of Tel Aviv reaching well over 50,000, of whom a sizeable number are international students.[35][36] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 402 KB) Summary Photographed by Ido Perelmutter (Ido50). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 402 KB) Summary Photographed by Ido Perelmutter (Ido50). ... The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1527 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tel Aviv Maccabi Tel Aviv (basketball) Nokia Arena Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1527 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tel Aviv Maccabi Tel Aviv (basketball) Nokia Arena Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... The Nokia Arena is a basketball arena, in Tel Aviv, Israel. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Great Synagogue of Tel Aviv is located on Allenby Street, Tel Aviv, just east of the Shalom Tower. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Azrieli_towers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Azrieli_towers. ... The Azrieli Center is a complex of three skyscrapers in Tel Aviv. ... The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ... Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, Israel. ... Ramat Gan (רמת-גן) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, just east of Tel Aviv, and part of the metropolis known as Gush Dan, in the Tel Aviv District. ...


Tel Aviv University was founded in 1953 and is now the largest university in Israel with an excellent reputation internationally, especially for its physics, computer science, chemistry and linguistics departments, and is located in the Ramat Aviv neighbourhood. Bar-Ilan University was founded in 1955 and is located in the suburb of Ramat Gan. It is Israel's largest academic community. The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... Ramat Aviv is the name of several neighbourhoods which are located in the north and the northwestern parts of Tel Aviv, north of the Yarkon River. ... Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, Israel. ... Ramat Gan (רמת-גן) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, just east of Tel Aviv, and part of the metropolis known as Gush Dan, in the Tel Aviv District. ...


Sports

Tel Aviv is home to some of the top sports teams in Israel, including a world-class basketball team. Tel Aviv is the only city with three teams in the Israeli football premier league. Maccabi Tel Aviv Sports Club was founded in 1906 and competes in over ten sports including Maccabi Tel Aviv Basketball Club which has forty-seven Israeli titles, won thirty-six editions of the Israel cup, and has five European Championships and Maccabi Tel Aviv F.C. which has eighteen Israeli league titles, won twenty-two editions of the Israel cup, two Israel Toto cup and two Asia cups. Maccabi's Judo club athlete Yael Arad won a silver medal in the 1992 Olympic Games.[37] Israeli football is everything related to Association football (soccer) in Israel. ... Maccabi Tel Aviv is a sport association in Israel, and part of the Maccabi association. ... Maccabi “Elite” Tel Aviv (Hebrew: מכבי ”עלית“ תל אביב) is a basketball team based in Tel Aviv, Israel. ... Maccabi Tel Aviv F.C. is an Israeli football (soccer) club, part of the Maccabi Tel Aviv sports club. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


Hapoel Tel Aviv Sports Club was founded in 1923, and over the years has included over eleven sports,[38] including the Hapoel Tel Aviv Basketball Club (five Israeli championships, four Israeli cups) and the Hapoel Tel Aviv Football Club (thirteen Israeli championships, eleven Israeli cups, one Toto cup and once Asia champion), kayaking Club, women's basketball club and more that have always been amongst the top Israeli clubs. Hapoel Tel Aviv Sports Club is a sports club founded in 1923, and over the years has included over 11 sports, including Hapoel Tel Aviv Basketball Club (5 Israeli championships, 4 Israeli cups) and Hapoel Tel Aviv Football Club (13 Israeli championships, 11 Israeli cups, one Toto cup and one... Hapoel Tel Aviv is an Israeli basketball club. ... Hapoel Tel Aviv (‎) is an Israeli football club that competes in Ligat haAl, the primary Israeli football league. ...


Bnei Yehuda Tel Aviv's football club (once Israeli champion, twice Israeli cup holder and twice Israeli Toto cup holder) is the only Israeli football team in the top division (Ligat Ha'al) that represents a neighbourhood - Shechunat Hatikva ("The Hope Neighbourhood") in Tel Aviv - and not a city. Bnei Yehuda Tel Aviv F.C. (‎, Moadon Kaduregel Bnei Yehuda Tel Aviv), commonly known as just Bnei Yehuda, is an Israeli football club from the Tikvah Quarter (Hebrew: שכונת התקוה, Shkhunat HaTikva), Tel Avivs most notorious slum. ...


Other football clubs which used to play in the top division were Shimshon Tel Aviv and Beitar Tel Aviv, which are now merged into one team (Beitar/Shimshon Tel Aviv that plays in the third division (Liga Artzit). Maccabi Jaffa is another former 1st division team that currently plays in the lower divisions. Shimshon Tel Aviv F.C. (Hebrew: , Moadon Kaduregel Shimshon Tel Aviv) was an Israeli football club based at the Bloomfield Stadium in Jaffa. ... Beitar Tel Aviv Football Club (Hebrew: מועדון כדורגל ביתר תל אביב) was an Israeli football club based at Bloomfield, Jaffa. ... Beitar/Shimshon Tel Aviv F.C. (Hebrew: ) is an Israeli football club. ... The Liga Artzit (Hebrew: ליגה ארצית) is the third-highest division overall in the Israeli football league system after Ligat haAl (Premier League) and the Liga Leumit (National League). ... Maccabi Jaffa F.C. (Hebrew: , Moadon Kaduregel Maccabi Yaffo), is an historic Israeli football club based in the city of Jaffa. ...


Tel Aviv is also the home of many other sports. Two rowing clubs operate in Tel Aviv. The Tel Aviv Rowing Club, which was established as early as 1935 on the banks of the Yarkon River, is the biggest rowing club in Israel.[39] Meanwhile, the beaches of Tel Aviv provide arguably the most vibrant Matkot scene in the world.[40] A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... -1...


The Israel Baseball League begins it's inaugural season in June, with the Tel Aviv Lightning representing the city. The Israel Baseball League (IBL) (Hebrew: ליגת הבייסבול הישראלית) is a new professional baseball league in Israel. ... The Tel Aviv Lightning (Hebrew: ) is an Israeli baseball team from Tel Aviv. ...


Economy

The economy of Tel Aviv has developed dramatically over the past decades, and as well as being Israel's economic capital, the bustling city has now been described as a flourishing technological center by Newsweek and a "miniature Los Angeles" by The Economist.[41][42] Many computer scientists now live and work in Tel Aviv. Their numbers increased as a result of immigration from the former Soviet Union since the early 1990s. The city is considered by Newsweek to be one of the top ten most technologically influential cities in the world. Actually, it is the metropolitan area (including suburbs such as Herzlia and Petah Tikva) that contains much of Israel's high-tech muscle which has become known as Silicon Wadi.[41] The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Herzliyya (הרצליה; also spelled Herzliyyah or Herzlia or Herzliya) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip in the south of the Sharon region, just north of Tel-Aviv (about 15 minutes drive), and part of the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area in the Tel-Aviv District. ... The Coat of Arms of Petah-Tikva Petah-Tikva (Hebrew פֶּתַח-תִּקְוָה opening of hope, Standard Hebrew Pétaḥ-Tiqva, also transliterated as Petach Tikva, Petah Tikvah, Petach Tikvah, Petaḥ Tiqwa or Petach Tiqwa) and nicknamed as Mother of Cities, is a city in the west of the Center District of Israel... Silicon Wadi is the area of Israel which contains a high concentration of high-tech industry, similar to Silicon Valley in California. ...


Historically, Tel Aviv struggled to find a niche economic position. The city's location on sand dunes was not suited for agricultural usage, and its sea shore poorly suited for a seaport, a role assumed by nearby Haifa and Ashdod. Slowly, the city developed a reputation as a centre for scientific and technical research. In 1974, Intel opened its first overseas research and development operation in Israel, and Tel Aviv finally emerged in the high-tech map in the 1990s following an economic boom.[42] Hebrew חֵיפָה Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Hebrew Founded in 1956 Government City (from 1968) District South Population 204,400 (2005) Jurisdiction 60,000 dunams (60 km²) Mayor Zvi Zilker Ashdod (Hebrew: ‎; Arabic: , Isdud), located in the Southern District of Israel towards the south of the Israeli Coastal Plain, is a city of over 200,000 people... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ...


Tel Aviv is home to the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, (TASE), Israel's only stock exchange, which in recent times has reached record heights,[43] as well as many international headquarters of venture-capital firms, scientific research institutes, and high-tech companies. Having said this, there is some industry in the Tel Aviv area, and goods such as chemicals, textiles and food are exported from factories here.[42] Also important to the Tel Aviv economy is tourism, and people travel from around the world to this city not only because of the plethora of cultural sites which Israel can offer, but also because of its legendary nightlife, atmosphere, and architecture.[44] Logo The Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE), in Tel Aviv, is Israels only stock exchange. ...


The Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network (GaWC) at Loughborough University constructed an inventory of world cities based upon their level of advanced producer services. The inventory includes Tel Aviv as having "strong evidence" of world city formation—the highest ranking for a Middle Eastern city with the exception of partly-European Istanbul.[45] Loughborough University is located in the market town of Loughborough, Leicestershire in the East Midlands of England. ... London New York City Paris Tokyo For a city spanning an entire planet, see Ecumenopolis A global city (also known as a world city or world-class city) is a city which has a direct and tangible impact on global affairs through socioeconomic, cultural, and/or political means. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ...


Seven out of the nine Israeli billionaires reside in Israel; of them, at least four live in Tel Aviv or its suburbs (according to Forbes).[46][47] According to Mercer, as of 2007, Tel Aviv is considered the most expensive city in the Middle East to live, and seventeenth most in the world. It falls just short of New York City and Dublin and right ahead of Rome and Vienna.[48][49] A billionaire is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of currency, such as United States Dollars (USD), Pounds or Euros. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // The Mercer name first appeared in Canada in 1945, when William Manson Mercer founded the benefits consulting firm of William M. Mercer, Limited. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ...


Transportation

Multimodal traffic in Tel Aviv: pedestrians, private vehicles, buses, trucks and taxis (and accessible from the other side of the building shown is also a train station).
Multimodal traffic in Tel Aviv: pedestrians, private vehicles, buses, trucks and taxis (and accessible from the other side of the building shown is also a train station).
Ben Gurion International Airport is a destination served by many international airlines as well as Israeli carriers who fly from here to destinations across the world
Ben Gurion International Airport is a destination served by many international airlines as well as Israeli carriers who fly from here to destinations across the world

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1905x1498, 461 KB) Summary The bridge between the Azrieli towers & mall and the Kirya military base, over the Menahem Begin road, Tel Aviv, Israel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1905x1498, 461 KB) Summary The bridge between the Azrieli towers & mall and the Kirya military base, over the Menahem Begin road, Tel Aviv, Israel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 582 pixel Image in higher resolution (1247 × 907 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Concourse B - Ben Gurion Intl Airport File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 582 pixel Image in higher resolution (1247 × 907 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Concourse B - Ben Gurion Intl Airport File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... Ben Gurion International Airport or Ben Gurion Airport (‎, Namal HaTeÅ«fa Ben GÅ«ryōn, Arabic: , maṭār Ben Ghuryon ad-dawlÄ«) (IATA: TLV, ICAO: LLBG), historically known as Lydda Airport and sometimes referred to today by its Hebrew acronym Natbag (‎), is the largest international airport in Israel. ...

Road

The main road access route to Tel Aviv is the Ayalon Highway (a.k.a. Highway 20), which runs along the eastern side of the city from north to south along the Ayalon River riverbed, dividing for the most part, Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan. Driving south on the Ayalon gives access to Highway 1, leading to Ben Gurion International Airport and Jerusalem. Within the city, the main routes are King George Street, Allenby Street, Ibn Gabirol Street, Dizengoff Street, Rothschild Boulevard and in Jaffa, Jerusalem Boulevard. Other access routes include Namir Road (which connects to Highway 2, and provides access from the North) and Begin/Jabotinsky Road (which provides access from the east, through Ramat Gan, Bnei Brak and Petah Tiqva). Arlozorov Interchange La Guardia Interchange Near HaShalom Interchange Near Rokach Interchange Heavy Afternoon Traffic Near HaShalom Railway Station Highway 20, usually referred to as the Ayalon Highway (‎, Netivey Ayalon) is a major intracity freeway in Gush Dan, Israel. ... Ramat Gan (רמת-גן) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, just east of Tel Aviv, and part of the metropolis known as Gush Dan, in the Tel Aviv District. ... Ben Gurion International Airport or Ben Gurion Airport (‎, Namal HaTeÅ«fa Ben GÅ«ryōn, Arabic: , maṭār Ben Ghuryon ad-dawlÄ«) (IATA: TLV, ICAO: LLBG), historically known as Lydda Airport and sometimes referred to today by its Hebrew acronym Natbag (‎), is the largest international airport in Israel. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... View of Kikar Magen David Allenby Street is a main traffic arterial in Tel Aviv, Israel. ... Ibn Gabirol Street is a major thoroughfare in Tel Aviv, Israel, named after Solomon ibn Gabirol, an important Hebrew poet and Jewish philosopher. ... Dizengoff Street is a major street in central Tel Aviv, named after Tel Avivs first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. ... Rothschild Boulevard is a long boulevard in Tel Aviv which was built in 1910. ... Jaffa port Jaffa ( Hebrew: יָפוֹ, Yafo Arabic: يَافَا  ; also Japho, Joppa; also, ~1350 B.C.E. Amarna Letters: Yapu; ), is an ancient port city located in south Tel Aviv, Israel on the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Rail

Tel Aviv has four train stations all located along the Ayalon Highway. The stops are from north to south: Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Merkaz (Tel Aviv Central Train Station), Tel Aviv Hashalom (near Azrieli Center shopping mall) and Tel Aviv Hahaganah (near the Tel Aviv Central Bus Station). It is estimated that over a million people use the train from the surrounding cities to Tel Aviv each month. Israel Railways Logo Israel Railways (Hebrew: רכבת ישראל Rakévet Yisraél) is Israels government-owned national railway company and is responsible for all inter-city and suburban railway passenger and freight traffic in the country. ... The Azrieli Towers in Tel Aviv, one of his premier projects in Israel. ... The Tel Aviv Central Bus Station is the primary bus station in Tel Aviv, Israel. ...


Furthermore, the first phase of the Tel Aviv Subway is planned to be completed by 2012, which is expected to improve public transportation in the city dramatically.[50] The Tel Aviv Subway is an as-yet-unbuilt light rail/metro system long planned for Israels largest metropolitan area. ...


Bus

The Tel Aviv Central Bus Station, a large central bus station, is located in the south of the city. The main bus network in Tel Aviv is operated by Dan Bus Company whilst the Egged Bus Cooperative, the world's second-largest bus company, provides intercity transportation.[51] The Tel Aviv Central Bus Station is the primary bus station in Tel Aviv, Israel. ... For other uses, see Bus (disambiguation). ... Dan bus in Tel Aviv. ... Egged A bendy city bus in Israel. ...


Air

Tel Aviv's airport is Dov Hoz Airport Sde Dov (code: SDV) which is located in the northwestern side of the city and serves as a major airport for domestic flights. Sde Dov is, however, slated to close, as the land it is constructed on is prime-coastal real estate in the upscale Ramat Aviv neighbourhood.[52] As such, sometime in the near future, all services to Sde Dov will transfer to Ben Gurion International Airport (code: TLV), Israel's main international airport, which is located 15 km 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) southeast of Tel Aviv, close to the city of Lod. Because of its proximity to Tel Aviv and its location within the metropolitan area of Tel Aviv, Ben Gurion International Airport is often referred to as Tel Aviv International Airport despite the fact that the airport is not included in any municipal jurisdiction. Sde Dov Airport (IATA: SDV, ICAO: LLSD) is a municipal airport located in Tel Aviv, Israel. ... Ramat Aviv is the name of several neighbourhoods which are located in the north and the northwestern parts of Tel Aviv, north of the Yarkon River. ... Ben Gurion International Airport or Ben Gurion Airport (‎, Namal HaTeÅ«fa Ben GÅ«ryōn, Arabic: , maṭār Ben Ghuryon ad-dawlÄ«) (IATA: TLV, ICAO: LLBG), historically known as Lydda Airport and sometimes referred to today by its Hebrew acronym Natbag (‎), is the largest international airport in Israel. ... Downtown area of Lod Lod (Hebrew לוֹד; Arabic اَلْلُدّْ al-Ludd, Greco-Latin Lydda, Tiberian Hebrew לֹד Lōḏ) is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ...


Mayors of Tel Aviv

Meir Dizengoff (Hebrew: מאיר דיזנגוף, Russian: Меер Янкелевич Дизенгоф, Meyer Yankelevich Dizengof; 1861, Akimovichi, Bessarabia - 1936, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli politician and mayor of Tel Aviv. ... Meir Dizengoff (Hebrew: מאיר דיזנגוף, Russian: Меер Янкелевич Дизенгоф, Meyer Yankelevich Dizengof; 1861, Akimovichi, Bessarabia - 1936, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli politician and mayor of Tel Aviv. ... Mordechai Namir (Hebrew: , February 23, 1897 – February 22, 1975) was an Israeli politician, who served as the mayor of Tel Aviv, a Knesset member and government minister, as well as being one of the heads of the Labour Zionist movement. ... Shlomo Lahat (also known as Tchitch) was the 8th mayor of Tel Aviv in Israel. ... Roni Milo (born 1949) is an Israeli politician who has held several ministerial positions and was mayor of Tel Aviv. ... Ron Huldai speaking at the opening of the American Corner in Jaffa. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine in the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Essen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... This article is about the capital of Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Cannes - receding storm Cannes, as seen from a ferry speeding towards lÃŽle Saint-Honorat Cannes (pronounced ) (Provençal Occitan: Canas in classical norm or Cano in Mistralian norm) is a city and commune in southern France, located on the Riviera, in the Alpes-Maritimes département and the r... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Motto: Ex navicula navis (From a boat, a ship) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Łódź Powiat city county Gmina Łódź City Rights 1423 Government  - Mayor Jerzy Kropiwnicki Area  - City 293. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of the greek province of Macedonia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... “Peking” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... 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Footnotes

  1. ^ Israel Central Bureau of Statistics estimate as of the end of 2006-06-01 (2005-07-01). TABLE 3.- POPULATION(1) OF LOCALITIES NUMBERING ABOVE 1,000 RESIDENTS (Excel). CBS.
  2. ^ Tel Aviv is commonly written in Hebrew without the maqaf (hyphen) (תל אביב).
  3. ^ Localities, Population and Density per sq. km., by Metropolitan Area and Selected Localities. Statistical Abstract of Israel 2006. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (2006-12-31). Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  4. ^ Worldwide Cost of Living Survey 2007 – city rankings. Mercer Human Resource Consulting (2007-06-18). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  5. ^ a b B.A. Kipnis (2001-10-08). [http://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/rb/rb57.html Tel Aviv, Israel - A World City in Evolution: Urban Development at a Deadend of the Global Economy]. Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network at Loughborough University. Retrieved on 2007-07-17.
  6. ^ Unesco celebrates Tel Aviv. BBC News (2004-06-08). Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  7. ^ Tel Aviv. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  8. ^ The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel. King James Bible. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  9. ^ Cities & Towns:Israel Today. Retrieved on 2007-07-18. “The name Yafo comes from the name of Noah's son Japheth, or Yafet”
  10. ^ What does Joppa mean?. Joppa Design. “Joppa, meaning beautiful in Greek, was the word that seemed to fit.”
  11. ^ a b Tel Aviv History. Yahoo UK Travel. Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  12. ^ Lexicon of Zionism - Ahuzat Bayit. Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  13. ^ Akhlah: Cities & Sites in Israel. Retrieved on 2007-07-19. “"In 1910, the name was changed to Tel Aviv”
  14. ^ a b Tel Aviv-Yafo. Britannica Concise Encyclopedia.
  15. ^ Vijfentwintig jaar Ambassade Wonderen. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  16. ^ Foreign Ministry reaction to the transfer of the Dutch embassy from Jerusalem to Tel Aviv. Israel's Foreign Relations: Selected Documents. Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs (1980-08-26). Retrieved on 2007-06-03.
  17. ^ Embassies and Consulates in Israel. Israel Science and Technology Homepage. Israel Science and Technology. Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  18. ^ "Tel Aviv-Jaffa". Encyclopaedia Judaica. (2007). Thomson Gale. 
  19. ^ Major Terrorist Attacks in Israel. Anti-Defamation League. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  20. ^ Tel Aviv Climate and Weather. World Travels. Retrieved on 2007-07-10.
  21. ^ Tel Aviv, Israel. Retrieved on 2007-07-10.
  22. ^ Monthly Average of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature (PDF). Statistical Abstract of Israel 2006. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics.
  23. ^ Precipitation (PDF). Statistical Abstract of Israel 2006. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics.
  24. ^ Ofer Petersburg (2007-07-03). Tel Aviv airport to make way for luxury project. Retrieved on 2007-07-03.
  25. ^ White City of Tel Aviv. UNESCO. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  26. ^ tel aviv bahaus. Gems in Israel. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  27. ^ Tel Aviv-Yaffo Buildings. Emporis. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  28. ^ Tel Aviv Ethnic Breakdown. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (2005-12-31). Retrieved on 2007-07-07."Others" refers to non-Arab Christians and unclassified.
  29. ^ Migration News. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  30. ^ Holy Tel Aviv tours. www.dailyjews.com. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  31. ^ Science & Technology. Consulate General of Israel in Los Angeles. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  32. ^ Museums and Galleries. www.visit-tlv.co.il. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  33. ^ Thousands join Tel Aviv gay pride parade. Jerusalem Post (2007-06-08). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  34. ^ a b bars in Tel Aviv. Tel Aviv Insider. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  35. ^ Tel Aviv University. QS Top Universities. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  36. ^ Higher Education. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  37. ^ Yael Arad. Olympic Database. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  38. ^ Hapoel Tel Aviv. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  39. ^ Rowers Almanac. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  40. ^ Sports in the Tel-Aviv. Tel Aviv Insider. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  41. ^ a b Levy, Stephen & Matt Rees, "Focus on Technology: The Hot New Tech Cities"; Newsweek, 1998-11-09
  42. ^ a b c Tel Aviv City Guide. The Economist. Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  43. ^ Sandler, Neal (2007-06-21). Israel: A Hotbed of...Investment. BusinessWeek. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  44. ^ Tel Aviv. Thomsonfly. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  45. ^ Inventory of World Cities. Loughborough University. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  46. ^ The World's Billionaires. Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  47. ^ Boaz Bin-Nun (2006-12-09). Israel's 40 Richest. Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  48. ^ Sahadi, Jeanne (2007-06-18). World's most expensive cities. CNNMoney. Retrieved on 2007-06-18.
  49. ^ Worldwide Cost of Living Survey 2007 – city rankings. Mercer HR Consulting (2007-06-18). Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  50. ^ Tel Aviv Subway (Planned). Subways.net. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  51. ^ Solomon, Shoshanna (2001-11-01). Facets of the Israeli Economy – Transportation. Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved on 2007-07-17.
  52. ^ Bar-Eli, Avi. "Sde Dov to be vacated, state gets half of Big Bloc", Haaretz, 2006-11-30. Retrieved on 2007-07-17. 

Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Mercer name first appeared in Canada in 1945, when William Manson Mercer founded the benefits consulting firm of William M. Mercer, Limited. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Loughborough University is located in the market town of Loughborough, Leicestershire in the East Midlands of England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopaedia Judaica is a 26-volume English-language encyclopedia of the Jewish people and their faith, Judaism. ... Thomson Gale is a part of the Thomson Learning division of the Thomson Corporation, and is based in Farmington Hills, Michigan, in the western suburbs of Detroit. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The White City is the name given to Tel Aviv, Israel, because of the large number of white, or light-colored buildings built there between the 1920s and the 1950s in the Bauhaus or International style. ... The Eretz Israel Museum was established in 1953 in Ramat Aviv. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tel Aviv-Yaffo

Institutions Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Coordinates: 32°5′0″N, 34°48′0″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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