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Encyclopedia > Teen Titans (comic series)
Teen Titans


Teen Titans: "One Year Later".
Cover to Teen Titans (vol. 3) #41 (2006).
Art by Tony Daniel Image File history File links Tt41. ... Checklist X-Force Annual #2 X-Force #28, 30-36, 38-41, 43 Gambit & the X-ternals #1-2 Shattered Image #1, 4 Spawn #38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48 Spawn: Bloodfeud #1, 2, 3, 4 Tales of the Witchblade: #9 Witchblade #78, 79 F5 #1-4, preview, origin Silke...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance The Brave & the Bold (vol. 1) #54
Created by Bob Haney
Bruno Premiani
Base(s) of operations Titans Tower:
New York City (1980–91, 1999–02)
San Francisco (2003–Present)
Other:
Solar Tower, Metropolis (1997–98), USS Argus, Earth Orbit (1994–95), Titans Liberty Island Base, New Jersey (1991–94), Gabriel's Horn, Farmingdale, Long Island (1976), Titans' Lair, Gotham City (1966–76)
Roster
Cyborg
Jericho
Kid Devil
Miss Martian
Ravager
Raven
Robin
Wonder Girl
See: List of Titans members
"Teen Titans" redirects here. For the animated television series based on this comic book team, see Teen Titans (TV series). For the segments in the The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure, please check that article.

The Teen Titans, also known as simply The Titans, is a DC Comics superhero team that first appeared in The Brave and the Bold #54 (July 1964). DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... Robert Haney (1926 - November 25, 2004) was a comic book writer. ... Bruno Premiani(1924-1984?) was an illustrator known for his work for several comic book publishers, particularly DC Comics. ... Current Titans Tower, San Francisco. ... Nickname: Big Apple; City that never Sleeps; Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Metropolis as depicted in the Superman Returns video game For other uses, see Metropolis (disambiguation). ... Earth (IPA: , often referred to as the Earth, Terra, the World or Planet Earth) is the third planet in the solar system in terms of distance from the Sun, and the fifth largest. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Gotham Citys skyline, as it appears in the 1989 Batman movie. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... Jericho (Joseph William Wilson) is a fictional character, a superhero who was a member of the Teen Titans in the acclaimed 1980s period of New Teen Titans by Marv Wolfman and George Perez, published by DC Comics. ... Kid Devil (Edward Bloomberg) is a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Miss Martian is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe who was first mentioned in Teen Titans #34 and first appeared in Teen Titans #37. ... Rose Wilson is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Raven is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Cassandra Sandsmark is the current Wonder Girl, a superheroine from DC Comics. ... The Titans (often Teen Titans) is a team of comic book superheroes, as published by DC Comics. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Teen Titans is an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami and produced by Warner Bros. ... Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


As the group's name suggests, its membership is usually composed of teenaged superheroes. In its early adventures, the team is a junior Justice League of sorts, featuring Robin, Kid Flash, and Aqualad, the sidekicks of Leaguers Batman, The Flash, and Aquaman, respectively. The team has branched out to include Wonder Woman's protégé Wonder Girl and characters not connected with adult heroes, notably Cyborg, Starfire, and Raven. A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... Richard John Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... DC Comics has featured two superheroes with the name Tempest. ... Sidekicks is a 1992 movie about a kid called Barry Gabrewski who has asthma. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Barry Allen is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ... Aquaman is a DC Comics superhero. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... Donna Troy is a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Raven is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ...


While very well received in its original 1960s run, The Teen Titans comics reached new heights of popularity in the 1980s when writer Marv Wolfman and artist George Pérez began work on the series The New Teen Titans. Since then, the concept has fluctuated in terms of success as creative teams have come and gone. The Teen Titans franchise attained a higher profile through animation twice since it's inception, once in 1967 and again in 2003. Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... New Teen Titans #1. ...

Contents

Silver Age

Teen Titans


The original Teen Titans. teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: Teen Titans ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Ongoing
Publication dates (vol. 1): 1966 - 1976
(vol. 2): 1996 - 1998
(vol. 3): 2003 -
Number of issues (vol. 1): 53
(vol. 2): 24
(vol. 3): -
Creative team
Writer(s) various
Artist(s) various
Creator(s) (vol. 1):
Bob Haney
Nick Cardy
(vol. 2):
Dan Jurgens
(vol. 3):
Geoff Johns
Mike McKone

Robin, Kid Flash, and Aqualad first teamed together in The Brave and the Bold #54 (July 1964). DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Robert Haney (1926 - November 25, 2004) was a comic book writer. ... Nick Cardy (born Nicholas Viscardi, circa 1921), a. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Geoff Johns in an interview about the Batman character. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ...


In Showcase #59, Wonder Girl joined, and the term "Teen Titans" was first used. The story portrays the characters as a junior Justice League, joining together as had their mentors: Batman, Flash, Aquaman and Wonder Woman. A showcase is a performance or exhibit highlighting the work of a performer or group of performers, a particular culture or ethnic group, or of a nationality. ... Donna Troy is a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Barry Allen is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ... Aquaman is a DC Comics superhero. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ...

  • Despite Wonder Girl's history as a teenaged version of Wonder Woman, an editorial error presented her as a separate entity, a sidekick to the adult character. This error was finally addressed in the 1980s, as well as by John Byrne and the writers of Infinite Crisis.

After the Showcase #59 appearance The Teen Titans were popular enough to be awarded their own series with issue #1, cover-dated February 1966. Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... John Byrne. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics. ... A showcase is a performance or exhibit highlighting the work of a performer or group of performers, a particular culture or ethnic group, or of a nationality. ...


The series' original premise was the Teen Titans helped teenagers, answering calls from around the world. Their first stories included saving a town from a band of teen rockers turned criminals, helping a teenager's burgler brother reform, investigating international teen tension at the Japanese Olympics, and vindicating a teenager who claims interdimensional aliens were infiltrating his high school.[citation needed] Green Arrow's sidekick Speedy also soon joined[1], but some future inductees would be created from scratch, notably Lilith Clay[2] and Mal Duncan[3]. Other existing heroes such as Hawk and Dove[4], a duo of teenaged superpowered brothers, and Beast Boy of the Doom Patrol were added to the team. Honorary members included Aquagirl[5]and Gnaark [6] Green Arrow is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... Lilith Clay is a young superheroine who occasionally appears in DC Comics Teen Titans titles. ... Mal Duncan, currently known as Vox, is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... Beast Boy (Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a member of the Doom Patrol and former member of the Teen Titans. ... The Doom Patrol is an idiosyncratic DC Comics superhero team that has been through several incarnations. ... Aquagirl is the name of several fictional characters who were superheros from DC Comics. ... Gnaark is a fictional caveman who has been a member of various versions of the Teen Titans in the comic books in the early 1980s. ...


The series's tone shifted from the freewheeling fun of the 1960s to the darker side of the modern world, particularly the Vietnam War and its related protests. One storyline beginning in issue #25 (February 1970) saw the Titans deal with the accidental death of a peace activist, leading them to reconsider their methods. As a result, the Teen Titans briefly abandon their identities to work as unpowered civilians, but the change brought howls of protest from fans.[citation needed] The theme of teenagers learning to take on adult roles and responsibilities was common throughout the series. The series' popularity flagged during the early 1970s and went on hiatus as of issue #43 (February 1973). Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


1970s revival

Teen Titans #50, with the majority of the Titans of that era.
Teen Titans #50, with the majority of the Titans of that era.

A few years after its cancellation, the series resumed with issue #44 (November 1976) but struggled to find focus, moving through a number of storylines in rapid succession. Notable among these are stories involving the mysterious Joker's Daughter[7], the Bumblebee and Teen Titans West, a team consisting of a number of other teen heroes including Bat-Girl (Betty Kane) and Golden Eagle. The revival was short-lived, and the series was canceled as of #53 (February 1978). Tellingly, in the last issue the heroes realized that, now in their early 20s, they had simply outgrown the "Teen" Titans. In the last panel, without speaking, they sadly go their separate ways. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x604, 87 KB) Cover of Teen Titans #50. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x604, 87 KB) Cover of Teen Titans #50. ... Duela Dent is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Bumblebee is the superhero alias of Karen Beecher, a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The first appearance of Batgirl, from Detective Comics #359, January 1967. ... The first appearance of Batgirl, from Detective Comics #359, January 1967. ... // Charley Parker The Golden Eagle is a comic book character in the Teen Titans comic book series, first introduced in Teen Titans # 50 and Justice League of America # 116. ...


(Note: After Crisis on Infinite Earths, Bumblebee and Mal Duncan/Herald were said to have been a part of the Titans West at some point, and the character of Bat-Girl was replaced with Flamebird (Bette Kane). Mal Duncan has two separate heroic identities during this run; first as the Guardian and later as the Hornblower. After Crisis on Infinite Earths, those identities were retconned away, and he was established as having always been the Herald.)
Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Bumblebee is the superhero alias of Karen Beecher, a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Mal Duncan, currently known as Vox, is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Flamebird is the name of a number of different fictional comic book superheroes that have appeared in books published by DC Comics, specifically from the Superman and Batman mythos. ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Mal Duncan, currently known as Vox, is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


New Teen Titans (1980–1996)

New Teen Titans


Cover to New Teen Titans #1 (November 1980).
Art by George Pérez. Image File history File links Derived from public domain images featured at: http://commons. ... teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: DC Comics Teen Titans George Pérez ... New Teen Titans #1. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Ongoing
Publication dates (vol. 1): 1980 - 1988
(Changed to Tales of the Teen Titans with #41)
(vol. 2): 1984 - 1996
(Changed to New Titans with #50)
Number of issues (vol. 1): 91
(vol. 2): 130
Creative team
Writer(s) various
Artist(s) various
Creator(s) Marv Wolfman
George Pérez

DC Comics Presents #26 introduces a team of new Titans, anchored by founding members Robin, Wonder Girl, and Kid Flash, soon followed by The New Teen Titans #1 (November 1980). It re-introduces the Doom Patrol's Beast Boy as Changeling and introduces the machine man Cyborg, the alien Starfire, and the dark empath Raven. Raven, an expert manipulator, forms the group to fight her demonic father Trigon, and the team remains together thereafter as a group of young adult heroes. DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... The Doom Patrol is an idiosyncratic DC Comics superhero team that has been through several incarnations. ... Beast Boy (Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a member of the Doom Patrol and former member of the Teen Titans. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... For the fictional character, see Empath (comics). ... Raven is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ... Trigon (also known as Trigon the Terrible) is a fictional villain who appears in Teen Titans comics published by DC Comics. ...


The villains' motivations are often complex, following trends that were coming to a head at that time towards greater depth in comics , particularly in the case of Deathstroke the Terminator, a mercenary who takes a contract to kill the Titans, in order to fulfill a job his son is unable to complete. This leads to the Titans' most complex adventure, in which a psychopathic girl named Terra infiltrates the Titans in order to destroy them. This story also features Dick Grayson, the original Robin, adopting the identity of Nightwing and the introduction of a new member in Jericho, the son of Deathstroke. New Teen Titans also regularly features the Monitor as a background character. Deathstroke the Terminator (Slade Wilson), also called simply Deathstroke (and originally simply the Terminator), is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... A mercenary is a soldier who fights or engages in warfare primarily for private gain, usually with little regard for ideological, national, or political considerations, however, when the term mercenary is used to refer to a soldier of a national, regular army, it usually is an insult, epithet or pejorative. ... Terra is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... Jericho (Joseph William Wilson) is a fictional character, a superhero who was a member of the Teen Titans in the acclaimed 1980s period of New Teen Titans by Marv Wolfman and George Perez, published by DC Comics. ... The Monitor was a character created by comic book writer Marv Wolfman and comics artist George Pérez as one of the main characters of DC Comics Crisis on Infinite Earths limited series. ...


Other notable New Teen Titans stories include "A Day in the Life...", featured a day in the team members’ personal lives. "Who is Donna Troy?" depicts Robin investigating Wonder Girl's true identity (#38), and "We are Gathered Here Today..." tells the story of Wonder Girl's wedding, noteworthy for being the rare superhero wedding in which a fight didn't break out (#50).


Tales of the New Teen Titans, a four-part limited series by Wolfman and Perez, was published in 1982, detailing the back stories of Cyborg, Raven, Starfire, and Changeling. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...


New Teen Titans and the Uncanny X-Men

The brainchild of writer Marv Wolfman and artist George Pérez, New Teen Titans is widely thought of as DC's answer to the increasingly popular Uncanny X-Men from Marvel Comics: Both series depict young heroes from disparate backgrounds whose internal conflicts are as integral to the series as is their combat against villains. Both books were instrumental in moving mainstream comics in a more character-driven direction.[citation needed] New Teen Titans also uses long story arcs, and the characters are sometimes involved in galactic and interdimensional conflicts. Much as Uncanny X-Men made a star out of artist John Byrne, The New Teen Titans did the same for Pérez. The two teams actually met in the 1982 crossover one-shot entitled "Apokolips...Now". Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... The Uncanny X-Men, first published as simply The X-Men, is the flagship Marvel Comics comic book series within the X-Men franchise. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ... John Byrne. ... In comic books, an intercompany crossover (also called cross-company, or simply company crossover) is a comic or series of comics where a character (or group of characters) published by one company meets a character published by another (for example, DC Comics Superman meeting Marvels Spider-Man). ...

Cover to New Teen Titans #1 (1984). Art by George Perez.
Enlarge
Cover to New Teen Titans #1 (1984). Art by George Perez.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (995x1529, 434 KB) Summary Cover to New Teen Titans #1 (1984). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (995x1529, 434 KB) Summary Cover to New Teen Titans #1 (1984). ...

A second series

New Teen Titans fans experienced some title and numbering confusion when DC moved some of its more popular books from the newsstand to the direct distribution market (comic book specialty stores) in 1984. New Teen Titans became Tales of the Teen Titans for a year (not to be confused with the earlier limited series), while a new concurrently published series named The New Teen Titans launched with a new #1. The former book began reprinting the latter's stories for the newsstand a year later, and ran until issue #91, but the direct market series printed only new stories. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...


Issue #1 of the direct market New Teen Titans created controversy when Dick Grayson and Starfire were depicted in bed together, although it had been established for some time that they were a monogamous couple. Pérez left the series after New Teen Titans vol. 2, #5, and the series began to flounder as Marv Wolfman reportedly suffered from writer's block[citation needed], and other writers contributed from time to time. José Luis Garcia Lopez followed Pérez as artist, and Eduardo Barreto contributed a lengthy run. Pérez returned with issue #50, the series again being renamed, this time to The New Titans: the characters were no longer teenagers. Issue #50 tells a new origin story for Wonder Girl, her link to Wonder Woman having been severed due to retcons in Crisis on Infinite Earths. Pérez remained through issue #61. Writers block is a phenomenon involving temporary loss of ability to continue writing, usually due to lack of inspiration or creativity. ... José Luis García-López is a Spanish-born comic-book artist who works in the United States of America, mostly for DC Comics. ... Eduardo Barreto is an artist who has worked in the comic book industry. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


The series introduced a number of characters and puts others through radical changes during the next 7 years. Members during this time include Phantasm[8], Pantha[9], Red Star[10], Impulse[11] (later Kid Flash), Damage[12], Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner)[13], Supergirl[14], Rose Wilson[15], Minion[16] and Baby Wildebeest. As a result, the group which appears in the final issue, #130 (February 1996), bears little resemblance to the one that anchored DC's line-up in the early 1980s. Phantasm Danny Chase For the Phantasm character that first appeared in Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, see Andrea Beaumont. ... Character History Pantha was a cat-like member of one of the incarnations of the Teen Titans. ... Red Star (a. ... now. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional comic book superhero from the DC Comics universe, known for most of his publication history as Green Lantern, a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Various incarnations of Supergirl (from left to right): Original Kara Zor-El, Matrix, Kara in the 70s, Modern Kara, Linda Danvers, Power Girl, and Kara from Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Rose Wilson is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Wildebeest is a name used by many characters in DC Comics New Titans series. ...


Team Titans

Deathwing, art by Phil Jimenez.
Deathwing, art by Phil Jimenez.

Team Titans is another Titans spin-off. The series ran from 1992 to 1994 in 28 issues and two annuals. One of only several Teams Titans from the future, they function as a terrorist cell fighting against a world dictator, Lord Chaos, the son of Donna Troy and Robert Long. Sent ten years into the past, their mission is to kill Donna Troy and prevent his birth. Killowat, Redwing, Dagon, Prestor Jon and Battalion are all erased from existence during the 1994 Zero Hour storyline, and the series was cancelled. Mirage, Terra, and Deathwing survive; it is established that they are from the current timeline after all. Mirage and Terra join the main Titans team, and Deathwing is enthralled by an evil aspect of Raven and turned against the Titans. Image File history File linksMetadata Tmtdeathwing. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Tmtdeathwing. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... Two comic-book characters share the name Lord Chaos: image=[[1]] Lord Chaos, in the fictional universe of Marvel Comics, is a fundamental entity of cosmic proportions that embodies disarray and confusion. ... Character history Killowat Killowats story began 10 years in the future; Or, rather, the false future where Lord Chaos reigned and a force known as the Team Titans struggled to overthrow his tyranny. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Zero Hour was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... Two comic-book characters share the name Mirage: Marvel Comics Danielle Moonstar, a mutant superheroine with ties to the X-Men. ... Terra is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... In the Warhammer 40,000 universe, the Deathwing is the First Company of the Dark Angels Space Marine Chapter. ...


Teen Titans (1996–1998)

Cover to Teen Titans vol. 2, #5, featuring the 1996–98 team.

A new Teen Titans series written by Dan Jurgens began later that year with a new #1 issue (October 1996). Atom, who had become a teenager following the events of Zero Hour, leads the brand-new team, with Arsenal becoming a mentor about halfway through the 24-issue run, which ended in September 1998. Download high resolution version (450x717, 520 KB) This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... Download high resolution version (450x717, 520 KB) This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... Arsenal is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


The Titans (1999–2002)

The Titans roster. Art by Phil Jimenez.
The Titans roster. Art by Phil Jimenez.

The team is revived in a 3-issue limited series, JLA/Titans: The Technis Imperative, featuring nearly every character who had been a Titan and showcasing the return of Cyborg. This limited series leads into The Titans written by Devin Grayson, starting with Titans Secret Files #1 (March 1999). Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cover to DC Special: The Return of Donna Troy #1. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Devin Kallie Grayson is a comic book writer. ...


This incarnation of the team consists of a mix of former original Titans, including Nightwing, Troia, Arsenal, Tempest, and the Flash (Wally West), from the original team; Starfire, Cyborg, and Changeling, from the New Teen Titans; Damage from the New Titans (the 1994 series); and Argent from the Teen Titans (the 1996 series). There was one new member, Jesse Quick. This version of the team lasted until issue #50 (2002). Richard John Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Donna Troy is a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Arsenal is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... DC Comics has featured two superheroes with the name Tempest. ... Barry Allen as the Flash. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... Beast Boy (Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a member of the Doom Patrol and former member of the Teen Titans. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Argent is a DC Comics fictional superhero. ... Jesse Chambers, formerly known as Jesse Quick is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


The West Coast branch of the team - Titans L.A. - appears once, in the pages of Titans Secret Files #2.


Between the end of Teen Titans and the beginning The Titans, the next generation of young heroes - Superboy, Robin, Impulse, Wonder Girl, Secret and Arrowette - formed their own team in Young Justice, a series similar to the original Teen Titans. Superboy (also known as Conner Kent or Kon-El) is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... now. ... Three of the Wonder Girls: Donna Troy, Wonder Woman, Cassandra Sandsmark, by Adam Hughes. ... Secret (Greta Hayes) is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... Arrowette is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Young Justice is the name of a comic book written by Peter David and published by DC Comics, and the DC Universe superhero team within it, created by Todd DeZago. ...


Both series were concluded with the three-issue limited series Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day, which lead into new Teen Titans and Outsiders series.
The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... The Outsiders are a DC Comics superhero group. ...


Teen Titans (2003 - present)

Teen Titans vol. 3, #1 (July 2003) by Geoff Johns and Mike McKone. Variant cover art by Michael Turner.
Teen Titans vol. 3, #1 (July 2003) by Geoff Johns and Mike McKone. Variant cover art by Michael Turner.

Writer Geoff JohnsTeen Titans series began in 2003, again featuring a mix of previous and new members, most of whom had been part of Young Justice. Image File history File links Derived from public domain images featured at: http://commons. ... Download high resolution version (534x780, 127 KB)Template:Nosource Teen Titans by Michael Turner This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organisation to promote their works in the media. ... Download high resolution version (534x780, 127 KB)Template:Nosource Teen Titans by Michael Turner This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organisation to promote their works in the media. ... Geoff Johns in an interview about the Batman character. ... The cover of Superman/Batman: Supergirl, the collected hardcover edition of the Supergirl from Krypton arc. ... Geoff Johns in an interview about the Batman character. ... Young Justice is the name of a comic book written by Peter David and published by DC Comics, and the DC Universe superhero team within it, created by Todd DeZago. ...


The series’ original lineup mirrors and also inverts the lineup of Marv Wolfman's New Teen Titans series: veteran members Cyborg, Starfire, and Beast Boy return, joined by younger heroes Robin, Superboy, Wonder Girl and Kid Flash. Raven re-joins the team in issue #12, and the new Speedy joins the team in Green Arrow #46, first appearing in the Titans book in issue #21. During the “Insiders” crossover with The Outsiders (issues #24–25), Superboy comes under Lex Luthor's control and attacks the team, afterwards taking a leave of absence that ends during Infinite Crisis. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Superboy (also known as Conner Kent or Kon-El) is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... now. ... Mia Dearden is a DC Comics superhero, the second character to take the mantle of Green Arrows sidekick Speedy. ... Alexander Joseph Lex Luthor is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and Supermans nemesis. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics. ...


The new series saw the team’s relocation from the east to the west coast, its headquarters located in San Francisco instead of the traditional New York City location. The new Titans Tower also has a memorial hall with statues of the fallen Titans. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Nickname: Big Apple; City that never Sleeps; Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Current Titans Tower, San Francisco. ...


One Year Later: The new Teen Titans

Main article: One Year Later

In the "One Year Later" jump after Infinite Crisis, Robin has returned to the Teen Titans after a year of travel with Batman and Nightwing. Feeling abandoned by Robin following the death of Superboy, Wonder Girl has quit the team and has been working alone, fighting the Brotherhood of Evil. Starfire is missing in action, never having returned from her journey into space. Raven and Beast Boy have split up: Raven's whereabouts are unknown, though she is rumored to be in Russia; and Beast Boy has left the Titans to join the new Doom Patrol. Joining him in the Doom Patrol are former Titans Bumblebee and Herald (renamed Vox). Speedy is said to be currently on an island with Connor Hawke. Kid Flash, who had aged into adulthood and lost his powers, is "kind of retired", according to Robin; however, he has now become the DCU's new Flash. Cyborg has been damaged and inactive since his return from space, but 16-year-old genius fraternal twins Wendy and Marvin, have repaired him and given him new capabilities. New members include Kid Devil and Rose Wilson (as Ravager IV), the latter of who was accepted at the request of Nightwing. One Year Later event logo. ... One Year Later event logo. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics. ... The Brotherhood of Evil is a group of DC Comics supervillains, arch-enemies of the original Doom Patrol and the Teen Titans. ... The Doom Patrol is an idiosyncratic DC Comics superhero team that has been through several incarnations. ... Green Arrow (Connor Hawke) is a DC Comics superhero. ... Wendy Harris was half of the pair of Marvin & Wendy, two teen-age sidekicks of the Super Friends who, along with Marvins pet dog Wonderdog, first appeared in the 1973 Super Friends cartoon. ... Marvin White was half of the pair of Marvin & Wendy, two teen-age sidekicks of the Super Friends who, along with Marvins pet dog Wonderdog, first appeared in the 1973 Super Friends cartoon. ... Kid Devil (Edward Bloomberg) is a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Rose Wilson is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ...


During the lost year, at least 24[17] new members joined the team, all of them short-term. Without proper leadership or the feeling of family the Titans normally provides, none of the new members could get along and work together. In issue #38, the Titans found a scrapbook left behind by Raven that included photos of the OYL members, which consisted of both new and old team members.


A memorial to Superboy has been erected outside Titans Tower. Unknown to the other Titans, Robin secretly has been attempting to re-clone Superboy, with nearly 100 failed attempts. This was until Wonder Girl found the lab, where she and Robin shared an awkward kiss. Current Titans Tower, San Francisco. ...


At the end of Teen Titans vol. 3, #40 the team was composed of Robin, Kid Devil, Ravager, Raven, Wonder Girl, Cyborg, the resurrected Jericho and a character new to OYL called Miss Martian. Jericho (Joseph William Wilson) is a fictional character, a superhero who was a member of the Teen Titans in the acclaimed 1980s period of New Teen Titans by Marv Wolfman and George Perez, published by DC Comics. ... Miss Martian is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe who was first mentioned in Teen Titans #34 and first appeared in Teen Titans #37. ...


At the end of Teen Titans vol. 3, #41, Robin tells Wonder Girl that he believes Raven can bring Superboy back to life, just like she did with Jericho.


There are also two active teams of Titans. The main Teen Titans team is still located on the west coast and Titans East is on the east coast. Geoff Johns referred to Titans East as juvenile delinquents who will be causing trouble, and described one character as who he believes will be the first white trash superhero.[18] Titans East is the name of several DC Comics teams. ...

Awards

The various series and characters have received a good deal of recognition over the years. The story "Then & Now" from Teen Titans (1996 series) issues 12–15, was a top votegetter for the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Award for Favorite Story for 1998. Comics Buyers Guide (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ...


Trade paperbacks

Silver Age Teen Titans

Graphic novels by DC collecting the most well-known adventures of this era:

Title Material collected
Showcase Presents Teen Titans Volume one The Brave and the Bold #54 & #60, Showcase #59, and Teen Titans vol. 1 #1–18
The Silver Age Teen Titans Archives Vol. 1 The Brave and the Bold #54 & #60, Showcase #59 and Teen Titans vol 1. #1–5

New Teen Titans

Graphic novels by DC collecting the most well-known adventures of this era:

Title Material collected
DC Archives: The New Teen Titans Volume one DC Comics Presents #26
The New Teen Titans vol. 1, #1–8
DC Archives: The New Teen Titans Volume two The New Teen Titans vol. 1, #9–16
Best of DC (Blue Ribbon Digest) #18.
DC Archives: The New Teen Titans Volume three The New Teen Titans vol. 1, #17–20
Tales Of The New Teen Titans #1–4 .
The Judas Contract The New Teen Titans vol. 1, #39–40
Tales of the Teen Titans #41–44
Annual #3
The Terror of Trigon The New Teen Titans vol. 2, #1–5
Who is Donna Troy? The New Teen Titans vol. 1, #38
Tales of the Teen Titans #50
The New Titans #50–55
Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003.

Teen Titans (2003-Present)

Note: Issues 27 and 28, pencilled by artist Rob Liefeld, were not collected in any of the trade paperbacks. DC Comics has not stated a reason for this. Example of Liefeld’s artwork from Onslaught Reborn, featuring Iron Man, Namor, Onslaught, Rikki Barnes and The Hulk (all background), as well as Captain America (center). ...

Vol. # Title Collected material Pages ISBN#
1 A Kid's Game Teen Titans vol. 3, #1–7
Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003.
192
2 Family Lost Teen Titans vol. 3, #8–12
Teen Titans #1/2.
136
3 Beast Boys and Girls Beast Boy #1–4 (1999 limited series)
Teen Titans vol. 3, #13–15
168
4 The Future is Now Teen Titans vol. 3, #16–23
Teen Titans/Legion Special #1
224
5 The Insiders Teen Titans (3rd series) #24–26
Outsiders #24–25, 28
144
The Death and Return of Donna Troy Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day #1–3
Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2005
The Return of Donna Troy #1–4
176
6 Life and Death Teen Titans vol. 3, #29–33
Teen Titans Annual #1
Robin #146–147.
208

The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...

In other media

The Filmation adaptation of the Teen Titans.
Enlarge
The Filmation adaptation of the Teen Titans.

The team's first animated appearance was in Teen Titans segments of the 1967 Filmation series The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure, featuring Speedy, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, and Aqualad. See also: 1966 in television, other events of 1967, 1968 in television and the list of years in television. For the American network television schedule, please see 1967-68 American network television schedule. ... The first Filmation logo. ... Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ...

The Teen Titans from the animated series.
The Teen Titans from the animated series.

Cyborg appeared as a member of the Super Powers Team in the final season of the Superfriends Image File history File links Teen_Titans_Switched. ... Image File history File links Teen_Titans_Switched. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... Super Friends is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1985. ...


From 2003 until 2006, a Teen Titans animated series aired, with stories that emulate the Wolfman/Perez era and an art style influenced by anime. Briefly airing on Kids' WB, Teen Titans premiered and currently airs on Cartoon Network. Teen Titans is an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami and produced by Warner Bros. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) Anime ) (IPA pronunciation: in Japanese, but typically or in English) is an abbreviation of the word animation. Outside Japan, the term most popularly refers to animation... Kids WB! is the Saturday morning cartoon portion of The CW Television Networks programming effective September 23, 2006. ... Cartoon Network is a cable television network created by Turner Broadcasting which primarily shows animated programming. ...


The main characters are Robin, Starfire, Cyborg, Raven, and Beast Boy. Many other Titans comic book characters appear, including Aqualad, Speedy, Deathstroke (named Slade), Wildebeest, and Terra. Other characters have been specifically created for the show, including Más y Menos, Mumbo, Mother Mae-Eye, and Cinderblock. A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Cyborg (Victor Stone) is a fictional DC Comics superhero best known as a member of the Teen Titans. ... Raven is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ... Beast Boy (Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a member of the Doom Patrol and former member of the Teen Titans. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... Deathstroke the Terminator (Slade Wilson), also called simply Deathstroke (and originally simply the Terminator), is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Wildebeest is a name used by many characters in DC Comics New Titans series. ... Terra is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Más y Menos poised for action; Menos is on the right, Más on the left. ... This page contains a list of the minor characters made specifically for Teen Titans. ... This page contains a list of the minor characters made specifically for Teen Titans. ... This page contains a list of the minor characters made specifically for Teen Titans. ...


Although popular, the decision to use anime-influenced animation rather than the Bruce Timm style used in Justice League Unlimited and other DCAU shows, disappointed some fans. Other fans were more accepting, noting that many episodes are based on beloved storylines like The Judas Contract and The Terror of Trigon. While the series' storylines are sometimes serious, they are often humorous, accentuated by anime-influenced visual effects. The Teen Titans animated series is an example of anime-influenced animation. ... Harley Quinn (concept Paul Dini) was brought to life by Timms acclaimed style Bruce W. Timm (born on February 8, 1961), is an American animator and producer. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was an American animated television series produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... A Justice League Unlimited promotional image. ...


Despite high ratings, the series was cancelled after five seasons, with the final episode airing January 16th, 2006. A direct-to-DVD movie, Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo, premiered on Cartoon Network September 15th, 2006 at 7pm. Two video games were made based on the show. A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Two video games were made based off of the Teen Titans animated series. ...



In additon, Titan's members including Flash, Green Lantern, Nightwing, Robin , Hawk and Dove, and Speedy have appeared in some context in the DCAU. Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional comic book superhero from the DC Comics universe, known for most of his publication history as Green Lantern, a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Richard John Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... Roy Harper is the name of two fictional superheroes in the DC Comics Universe. ...


At Comic-Con 2006, a Judas Contract animated movie was announced. Marv Wolfman and George Pérez, creators of The New Teen Titans will be working on the direct-to-DVD movie. It is known now that the movie's animation will be done in the DCAU style instead of the Teen Titans series one. Comic-Con International, commonly known as Comic-Con or the San Diego Comic-Con, is an annual multigenre fan convention founded as the San Diego Comic Book Convention in 1970 by Shel Dorf. ...


See also

The Titans (often Teen Titans) is a team of comic book superheroes, as published by DC Comics. ...

References

  1. ^ Teen Titans vol. 1, #4) (revealed to be a founding member in Teen Titans vol. 2, #53
  2. ^ The Teen Titans #25
  3. ^ The Teen Titans #26
  4. ^ The Teen Titans #21
  5. ^ The Teen Titans #30
  6. ^ The Teen Titans #32
  7. ^ Teen Titans #48
  8. ^ The New Titans #73
  9. ^ TNT #74
  10. ^ TNT #77
  11. ^ TNT #0
  12. ^ TNT #0
  13. ^ TNT #116
  14. ^ TNT #121
  15. ^ TNT #122
  16. ^ TNT #123
  17. ^ Newsarama.Com: Teen Titans: One Year - Different
  18. ^ Newsarama.Com: Wwla - Dcu: One Year Greater Panel

External links

Justice League
Characters

Members | Villains The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... The Justice League (q. ...

Related teams

Justice Society of America | Outsiders | Teen Titans | Young Justice | Super Buddies The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... The Outsiders are a DC Comics superhero group. ... Young Justice is the name of a comic book written by Peter David and published by DC Comics, and the DC Universe superhero team within it, created by Todd DeZago. ... The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ...

Headquarters

Secret Sanctuary | Justice League Satellite | Justice League Watchtower Locations in the DC Universe, the shared universe setting of DC Comics. ... When the Justice League of America originally formed, its base of operations was the Secret Sanctuary, made out of a cave in Happy Harbor, Rhode Island. ... A cutaway of the JLA Watchtower on the moon. ...

Ongoing series

Justice League of America (vol. 2) | JLA: Classified | Justice League Adventures / Justice League Unlimited | Justice The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... Justice League Adventures is a DC comic book series featuring the Justice League, but set in the continuity (and style) of the Justice League animated series as opposed to the regular DC Universe. ... Justice is a 12-issue limited series comic book published by DC Comics beginning in August 2005, written by Alex Ross and Jim Krueger, with art by Ross and Doug Braithwaite. ...

Previous series

Justice League of America | Justice League International | Justice League Europe
Justice League Task Force | Extreme Justice | JLA | Formerly Known As the Justice League The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... Justice League Task Force was a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics from June 1993 to August 1996; it lasted 37 issues. ... Extreme Justice #0. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ...

Other media The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure | Super Friends | Legends of the Superheroes | Justice League | Justice League Unlimited

 
 

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