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Encyclopedia > Teen Titans
Teen Titans


Teen Titans Image File history File links Teentitansbetter. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance (original team) The Brave and the Bold Vol. 1 #54
(current team) Teen Titans Vol. 3 #1
Created by Robert Haney
Bruno Premiani
Team status Active
Base(s) of operations Titans Tower
Roster
Current roster
Beast Boy
Cyborg
Kid Flash (Bart Allen)
Raven
Robin (Tim Drake)
Speedy (Mia Dearden)
Superboy (Kon-El)
Wonder Girl (Cassie Sandsmark)
Notable former members
Arsenal
Flash (Wally West)
Nightwing
Starfire (Koriand'r)
Tempest (Garth)
Troia
Teen Titans redirects here. For animated television series based on this comic book, see Teen Titans (animated series).

The Teen Titans (also known over the years as The New Teen Titans, The New Titans, and The Titans) is a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. As the group's name suggests, its membership has usually been composed of teenagers. The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... Bruno Premiani(1924-1984?) was an illustrator known for his work for several comic book publishers, particularly DC Comics. ... Titans Tower is a fictional building in the DC Comics universe. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Victor Vic Stone otherwise known as Cyborg, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, and is also a regular on the Teen Titans animated series. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II, originally known as Impulse and currently as Kid Flash, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe; he first appeared (cameo)in The Flash (2nd series) #91 (1994). ... Raven is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a DC Comics superhero who, as Robin (III), is Batmans sidekick but also a young hero on his own right. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... Kon-El is a superhero in the fictional DC Universe and the current Superboy. ... Wonder Girl is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Arsenal is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, and the current (third) Flash. ... In comic books published by DC Comics, Nightwing is the superheroic secret identity of Richard John Dick Grayson (Batmans first ward), adopted after his retirement as the first Robin. ... Starfire is a DC Comics fictional superhero. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Donna Troy is a superheroine in the DC Universe, the first character to (canonically) take the name of Wonder Girl. ... An animated television series or cartoon television series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Teen Titans is an animated series, created by Sam Register, Glen Murakami, and Bruce Timm, that premiered on Cartoon Network on July 19, 2003. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Spider-Man, one of the best-known superheroes. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ... A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ...

Contents


Silver Age

The Teen Titans first appeared in The Brave and the Bold #54 (July 1964), portrayed as a junior Justice League consisting of Robin I, Kid Flash I, and Aqualad, joining together as had their mentors (respectively, Batman, The Flash II, and Aquaman). They were soon joined by Wonder Girl I, whose existence as a teenaged version of Wonder Woman had previously been established, but this character was new and separate from the adult character, and their link was not immediately clear (the mystery of Wonder Girl's background would linger in the series until finally resolved in the 1980s). The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... The Justice League of America, also often referred to as the Justice League or JLA for short, is a DC Comics superhero team. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, and the current (third) Flash. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... The DC Comics hero Batman (originally and still sometimes referred to as The Batman) is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed, nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster. ... Aquaman is a DC Comics superhero. ... Donna Troy is a superheroine in the DC Universe, the first character to (canonically) take the name of Wonder Girl. ... Wonder Woman is a DC Comics superheroine. ...

The original Teen Titans
The original Teen Titans

The Teen Titans were popular enough to be awarded their own series, with issue #1 (cover-dated February 1966). The early issues were noted for their artwork by Nick Cardy. While Green Arrow's ward Speedy would naturally join (though would later be retconned to be a founding member despite not showing up for several issues), the series later introduced entirely new teenaged heroes, notably Lilith Clay and Hawk and Dove. teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: Teen Titans ... teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: Teen Titans ... Nick Cardy (born Nicholas Viscardi, circa 1921), a. ... Green Arrow (Oliver Ollie Queen) is a DC Comics superhero. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... Lilith Clay is a fictional character, a superheroine appearing in DC Comics. ... Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ...


The series' tone was often torn between the freewheeling excitement of the 1960s, and its darker side as keyed by the Vietnam War and the protests thereof. One memorable storyline beginning with #25 (February 1970) put the Titans in the middle of the accidental death of a peace activist, leading them to reconsider their means and goals, and leading to the temporary departure of Robin. The theme of teenagers learning to take on adult responsibilities was common throughout the series. The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and its allies — notably the United States military in support of...


The series' popularity flagged heading into the 1970s, and it went on hiatus as of #43 (February 1973).


Notable Silver Age appearances

The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ...

Silver Age members

First appearance with the team is noted.


Founding members

In comic books published by DC Comics, Nightwing is the superheroic secret identity of Richard John Dick Grayson (Batmans first ward), adopted after his retirement as the first Robin. ... In comic books published by DC Comics, Nightwing is the superheroic secret identity of Richard John Dick Grayson (Batmans first ward), adopted after his retirement as the first Robin. ... Wally West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, and the current (third) Flash. ... The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed, nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Donna Troy is a superheroine in the DC Universe, the first character to (canonically) take the name of Wonder Girl. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ...

Later members

Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... Lilith Clay is a fictional character, a superheroine appearing in DC Comics. ... Lilith Clay is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in DC Comics. ... Herald (Malcolm A. Duncan, Guardian II, Hornblower) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Herald (Malcolm A. Duncan, Guardian II, Hornblower) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Herald (Malcolm A. Duncan, Guardian II, Hornblower) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Herald (Malcolm A. Duncan, Guardian II, Hornblower) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ...

Honorary members

  • Aquagirl (The Teen Titans #30)
  • Gnarrk (The Teen Titans #32)

Aquagirl is the name of several fictional characters, a superhero from DC Comics. ...

1970s revival

A few years later, the series was revived resuming with #44 (November 1976), but struggled to find focus, moving through a number of storylines in rapid succession. Notable among these were the mysterious Joker's Daughter, as well as the Teen Titans West, consisting of a number of other teen heroes from around the DC Universe. The revival was short-lived, and the series was cancelled as of #53 (February 1978). The Harlequin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ...


Notable 1970s appearances

  • The Teen Titans #44-53

New 1970s members

The Harlequin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Harlequin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Bumblebee is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero who is a member of the superhero team, Teen Titans. ... The first appearance of Batgirl, from Detective Comics #359, January 1967. ... Flamebird is a code-name shared by various DC Comics superheroes, specifically from the Superman and Batman mythos. ... The Golden Eagle is a comic book character in the Teen Titans comic book series, first introduced in Teen Titans # 50 and Justice League of America # 116. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

The New Teen Titans/The New Titans era (1980-1996)

George Perez and Marv Wolfman's Titans. This is the most famous of the Teen Titans incarnations.
George Perez and Marv Wolfman's Titans. This is the most famous of the Teen Titans incarnations.

The Titans were again revived with a new series. Previewed in DC Comics Presents #26 (October 1980), The New Teen Titans #1 (November 1980) introduced a team of new Titans, anchored by previous members Robin I, Wonder Girl I, and Kid Flash I. It re-introduced the Changeling (formerly Beast Boy), and introduced for the first time the man-machine Cyborg, the alien Starfire, and the dark empath Raven. Raven, an expert manipulator, formed the group to fight her demonic father Trigon, and the team remained together thereafter as a group of young adult heroes. teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: DC Comics Teen Titans George Pérez ... teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: DC Comics Teen Titans George Pérez ... George Pérez (born June 9, 1954 in The Bronx, New York) is a Puerto Rican-American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... DC Comics Presents. ... /Changeling/Beast Boy in the animated series (left) and in the comics (right) Changeling (real name Garfield Logan) is a shape-shifting superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Victor Vic Stone otherwise known as Cyborg, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, and is also a regular on the Teen Titans animated series. ... Starfire is a DC Comics fictional superhero. ... Empathy is awareness of the thoughts, feelings, or states of mind of others, perhaps by means of some degree of vicarious experience of others feelings or mental states. ... Raven is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ... Trigon (also known as Trigon the Terrible) is a fictional villain who appears in Teen Titans comics published by DC Comics. ...


The brainchild of writer Marv Wolfman and artist George Pérez, it has been widely speculated that the book was DC's answer to the increasingly popular X-Men from Marvel Comics, and indeed both books involved a group of young adult heroes from disparate backgrounds whose internal conflicts were as much a part of the book as their combat against villains. In any event, both books were instrumental in moving mainstream comics in a more character-driven direction. The title also borrowed the use of long story arcs and having the characters swept up in galactic battles and interdimensional conflicts. Much as X-Men made a fan favorite out of artist John Byrne, The New Teen Titans did the same for Pérez. Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... The Uncanny X-Men #135 (1980), cover by John Byrne. ...


Even the villains' motivations could be complex, as in the case of Deathstroke the Terminator, a mercenary who took a contract on the Titans to fulfill a job his son was unable to complete. This led to the Titans' most complex adventure, in which a psychopathic girl named Terra I infiltrated the Titans in order to destroy them. This story also included the original Robin, Dick Grayson, adopting the identity Nightwing. The series also made regular feature of The Monitor as a background character. Slade Wilson, also known as Deathstroke the Terminator, is a fictional character appearing in the DC Comics universe. ... A mercenary is a soldier who fights, or engages in warfare primarily for private gain, usually with little regard for ideological, national or political considerations. ... Terra is the name of two versions of a DC Comics superhero. ... In comic books published by DC Comics, Nightwing is the superheroic secret identity of Richard John Dick Grayson (Batmans first ward), adopted after his retirement as the first Robin. ... The Monitor was a character created by George Perez for DC Comicss Crisis on Infinite Earths maxi-series. ...


In 1982 there was a four-part mini-series by Wolfman and Perez, Tales of the New Teen Titans, that detailed the back stories of Cyborg, Raven, Starfire II, and Changeling.

A montage of the 60's, 80's and 90's incarnations of the team; art by Nick Cardy, Dan Jurgens & George Perez.
A montage of the 60's, 80's and 90's incarnations of the team; art by Nick Cardy, Dan Jurgens & George Perez.

Other notable stories included "A Day in the Life..." which featured the personal lives of the team on one day. There was also the story "Who is Donna Troy?" in which Robin investigated Wonder Girl's true identity (#38), and "We are Gathered Here Today...", the story of Wonder Girl's marriage (#50 and noteworthy for being a rare superhero wedding in which a fight didn't break out). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (444x626, 274 KB)A portrait of the Teen Titans, showing various members throughout their history; commissioned in celebration of the groups 30th anniversary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (444x626, 274 KB)A portrait of the Teen Titans, showing various members throughout their history; commissioned in celebration of the groups 30th anniversary. ...


The series underwent some numbering confusion when DC moved some of its more popular books from the newsstand to the direct distribution market (to comic book specialty stores) in 1984. The New Teen Titans became Tales of the Teen Titans for a year (not to be confused with the earlier Tales of the New Teen Titans mini-series), while a new book named The New Teen Titans was launched with a new #1. The former book began reprinting the latter's stories for the newsstand a year later, and ran to #91, but the new stories were in the direct market book.


Issue #1 of the new direct market book got some controversy as Dick Grayson and Starfire were depicted in bed together, although it had been established for some time that they were a regular couple.


Pérez left the book after #5 of the second series, and the series seemingly went into a tailspin (at some point Wolfman reportedly suffered from writer's block, and other writers chipped in from time to time). José Luis Garcia Lopez followed Pérez, and Eduardo Barreto contributed a lengthy run. Then Pérez returned with #50 (the book again being renamed, this time to The New Titans, the characters effectively no longer being teens) to tell another origin story for Wonder Girl (her previous link to Wonder Woman having been severed due to retcons in Crisis on Infinite Earths), resulting in her being renamed Troia. Pérez this time hung on through #61. Writers block is the psychological or social condition in which a writer temporarily loses the capability to continue writing, whether through losing inspiration or confidence in his/her creativity, or through other personal difficulties. ... Eduardo Barreto is an artist who has worked in the comic book industry. ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau retcon – is the adding of new information to historical material, or deliberately changing previously established facts in a work of serial fiction. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1. ...


Following this, the book introduced a number of characters, put others through some radical changes, and though it ran for another 7 years, the group which appeared in the final issue, #130 (February 1996), bore little resemblance to the one which had anchored DC's line-up in the early 1980s.


Notable New Teen Titans appearances

  • DC Comics Presents #26
  • The New Teen Titans vol. 1, #1-40
  • Tales of the Teen Titans #41-58, Annuals #1-3
  • The New Teen Titans vol. 2, #1-49
  • The New Titans #50-130, Annuals #1-11
  • Secret Origins Annual #3 (relates the team's post-Crisis origin[s])

DC Comics Presents. ... Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12 issue comic book mini-series produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to clean up their 50-year-old, convoluted and confusing continuity. ...

The New Teen Titans graphic novels

Graphic novels by DC collecting the most well-known adventures of this era:

  • DC Archives: The New Teen Titans Volume one collects DC Comics Presents #26 and The New Teen Titans vol. 1 #1-8. Volume two collects The New Teen Titans vol. 1 #9-16 and Best of DC (Blue Ribbon Digest) #18.
  • The Judas Contract: collects The New Teen Titans vol. 1 #39-40, Tales of the Teen Titans #41-44 and Annual #3
  • The Terror of Trigon: collects The New Teen Titans vol. 2 #1-5
  • Who is Donna Troy?: collects The New Teen Titans vol. 1 #38, Tales of the Teen Titans #50, The New Titans #50-55, Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003.

New members in the New Teen Titans

  • Cyborg (DC Comics Presents #26)
  • Starfire II (DC Comics Presents #26)
  • Raven (DC Comics Presents #26)
  • Terra I (TNTT vol. 1, #30)
  • Jericho (Tales of the Teen Titans vol. 1, #44)
  • Kole (TNTT vol. 2, #9)
  • Danny Chase (later Phantasm) (New Teen Titans vol. 2 Annual #3)

Victor Vic Stone otherwise known as Cyborg, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, and is also a regular on the Teen Titans animated series. ... Starfire is a DC Comics fictional superhero. ... Raven is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe, specifically the Teen Titans comics. ... Terra is the name of two versions of a DC Comics superhero. ... Jericho (Joseph William Wilson) is a superhero who was a member of the Teen Titans in the acclaimed 1980s period of New Teen Titans by Marv Wolfman and George Perez, published by DC Comics. ... Kole is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ...

New members in the New Titans

Red Star is the name of a DC Comics superhero. ... Bartholemew Henry Bart Allen II, originally known as Impulse and currently as Kid Flash, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe; he first appeared (cameo)in The Flash (2nd series) #91 (1994). ... Damage was a comic book series from DC Comics. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional hero from the DC Comics universe. ... Supergirl is a DC Comics superhero, generally considered the female counterpart to Superman. ... Rose Wilson is a comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Wildebeest is a name used by many characters in DC Comics New Titans series. ...

Team Titans

Two comic-book characters share the name Mirage: Marvel Comics Danielle Moonstar, a mutant superheroine with ties to the X-Men. ... Terra is the name of two versions of a DC Comics superhero. ... Prestor Jon Quick Bio: Brother to Carrie [Redwing] Levine, Jon Levine had the mutant ability to interface with computers. ... Battalion is a telekinetic, able to move objects with his mind. ...

Teen Titans (1996-1998)

Teen Titans (2nd series) #5 cover, featuring the 1996-98 team

A completely unrelated group of Teen Titans began their own series later that year with a new #1 (October 1996). Led by the Atom, who had become a teenager following the events of Zero Hour, the series ended with #24 (September 1998). The entirety of this run of the title was written by Dan Jurgens. Download high resolution version (450x717, 520 KB) This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... Download high resolution version (450x717, 520 KB) This image is the cover of an individual issue of a comic book. ... The Atom is a fictional super-hero who debuted in publisher All-American Comics same-name series All-American Comics in 1940, and was reimagined by DC Comics in 1961. ... Zero Hour was a weekly comic event miniseries/crossover published by DC Comics in the summer of 1994. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ...


New members in the Teen Titans, vol.2 (1996) series

  • The Atom II (Teen Titans vol. 2, #1)
  • Argent (Teen Titans vol. 2, #1)
  • Risk (Teen Titans vol. 2, #1)
  • Joto (Teen Titans vol. 2, #1)
  • Prysm (Teen Titans vol. 2, #1)
  • Captain Marvel, Jr. (CM3) (Teen Titans vol. 2, #17)
  • Fringe (Teen Titans vol. 2, #17)

The Atom is a fictional super-hero who debuted in publisher All-American Comics same-name series All-American Comics in 1940, and was reimagined by DC Comics in 1961. ... Raised in the Colorado community of Cosmos, Cody has lived alone with his mother in one of the worst trailer parks. ... Joto is a character in the Teen Titans comic book series. ... Captain Marvel, Jr. ...

Notable appearances

  • Teen Titans (2nd series), #1-24, Annual #1, 1999
  • Robin/Argent Double-Shot #1
  • Superboy/Risk Double-Shot #1
  • Supergirl/Prysm Double-Shot #1
  • Impulse/Atom Double-Shot #1
  • Dark Nemesis #1

The Titans (1999-2002)

The Titans roster. Art by Phil Jimenez.
The Titans roster. Art by Phil Jimenez.

The earlier team was revived in a 3-issue mini-series, JLA/Titans, featuring nearly everyone who had ever been a Titan. This led into The Titans #1 (March 1999), written by Devin Grayson. This incarnation of the team consisted of a veritable grab bag of former Titans, including Nightwing, Troia, Arsenal, Tempest II, and the Flash III (from the original lineup), Starfire II, Cyborg, and Damage (from the New Teen Titans era), and Argent (from the 1996 series). This series lasted to #50 (2002). Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cover to DC Special: The Return of Donna Troy #1. ... A miniseries, in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Devin Kallie Grayson is an openly bisexual comic book writer. ...


It was followed by the Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day crossover, that led directly into the new Teen Titans series, and set also the grounds for the new Outsiders series. The Outsiders is a fictional superhero team, produced by DC Comics, that has seen three different incarnations. ...


New members in The Titans (1999) series

Jesse Chambers, aka Jesse Quick, is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...

'Titans L.A.' members

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Flamebird is a code-name shared by various DC Comics superheroes, specifically from the Superman and Batman mythos. ... Terra is the name of two versions of a DC Comics superhero. ... Captain Marvel, Jr. ... Bumblebee is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero who is a member of the superhero team, Teen Titans. ... Herald (Malcolm A. Duncan, Guardian II, Hornblower) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Hero Cruz is a fictional gay African American character in the DC Comics universe who first appeared in Superboy and the Ravers #1. ... Bushido is a fictional character from the DC comics team Teen Titans who will appear in Season 5 of the animated series ...

Notable appearances

  • JLA/Titans: The Technis Imperative #1-3 (collected into the graphic novel of the same name).
  • The Titans #1-50
  • Titans Secret Files # 1 & 2 (the lead story of #1 also included in the aforementioned Technis Imperative collection)
  • Titans/Legion of Super Heroes: Universe Ablaze #1-4
  • Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day #1-3 (collected later in prestige format and in the The Death and Return of Donna Troy graphic novel, see below)

The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future, featured in DC Comics. ...

Teen Titans (2003-present)

Teen Titans #1, July 2003 by Geoff Johns and Mike McKone, cover art by Michael Turner
Teen Titans #1, July 2003 by Geoff Johns and Mike McKone, cover art by Michael Turner

Writer Geoff Johns launched another Teen Titans series in 2003, again featuring a mix of previous and new members, many of whom had previously been part of Young Justice. Download high resolution version (534x780, 127 KB)Template:Nosource Teen Titans by Michael Turner This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organisation to promote their works in the media. ... Download high resolution version (534x780, 127 KB)Template:Nosource Teen Titans by Michael Turner This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organisation to promote their works in the media. ... Geoff Johns (born January 25, 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American writer of comic books. ... The cover of Superman/Batman: Supergirl, the collected hardcover edition of the Supergirl from Krypton arc. ... Geoff Johns (born January 25, 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American writer of comic books. ... Young Justice is the name of a comic book written by Peter David and published by DC Comics, and the DC Universe superhero team within it, created by Todd DeZago. ...


The original lineup of this version of the team was intended to mirror the lineup of Marv Wolfman's New Teen Titans series. Cyborg, Starfire and Beast Boy return, this time as the veteran members, whilst the current Robin, Superboy, Wonder Girl and Kid Flash (who, as Impulse, served very briefly with the New Titans before that series's cancellation) are portrayed as the rookies, inverting the dynamic of the earlier series. They were initially the core of the teen team Young Justice. Raven joins the team in the first few issues, her soul housed in a new body and having to relearn how to use her powers, putting her in a middle-ground between the veterans and the rookies. While Starfire left to join the Outsiders, Mia Dearden, the new Speedy, also joined the team during the "Lights Out" storyline. Young Justice is the name of a comic book written by Peter David and published by DC Comics, and the DC Universe superhero team within it, created by Todd DeZago. ...


This new series saw also a relocation of the team from the east to the west coast. The headquarters of this new team are located in San Francisco instead of the traditional New York City location. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The construction of the Empire State Building, 1930. ...


Notable appearances

  • Teen Titans vol. 3, #1 through current issue (still in publication as of this writing)
  • Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003
  • Teen Titans/Legion Special
  • Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2005
  • Robin #146-147

The Outsiders is a fictional superhero team, produced by DC Comics, that has seen three different incarnations. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future, featured in DC Comics. ...

Teen Titans (v3) graphic novels

  • A Kid's Game: collects Teen Titans Vol. 3 #1-7 and Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003.
  • Family Lost: collects Teen Titans Vol. 3 #8-12 and Teen Titans #1/2.
  • Beast Boys and Girls: collects Beast Boy (1999 mini-series) #1-4 and Teen Titans Vol. 3 #13-15
  • The Future is Now: collects Teen Titans Vol. 3 #16-23 and Teen Titans/Legion Special #1
  • The Insiders: collects Teen Titans Vol. 3 #24-26 and Outsiders #24-25, 28 (on sale on January 2006)
  • The Death and Return of Donna Troy: collects Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day #1-3, Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2005 and The Return of Donna Troy #1-4 (on sale February 2006)

New members in the Teen Titans (2003) new series

Timothy Tim Drake is a DC Comics superhero who, as Robin (III), is Batmans sidekick but also a young hero on his own right. ... Wonder Girl is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Kon-El is a superhero in the fictional DC Universe and the current Superboy. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ...

In other media

The team's first non-comics media appearance was in several backup segments of the 1960s series The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure, which featuerd Speedy I, Kid Flash I, Wonder Girl I and Aqualad.

Main article: Teen Titans (animated series)

In 2003 a Teen Titans animated series was launched that primarily emulates the Wolfman/Perez era, featuring slightly younger characters and an anime-influenced style. It appears regularly on Cartoon Network. The main characters consist of Robin, Starfire, Cyborg, Raven, and Beast Boy. Many other original comic characters appear, including Aqualad, Speedy, Deathstroke (named Slade), Wildebeest and Terra. Other characters have been specifically created for the show, including Más Y Menos, Mumbo and Mother Mae-Eye. The show has finished its fourth season and the fifth season has begun airing. Although popular, the decision to use younger characters rather than the older teens/early 20s characters as established in the comic books has disappointed some fans. Other fans are more forgiving, noting that stories were based on the original comic stories. While the series' storylines are sometimes serious, they are often laden with humorous portions, accentuated by the use of various anime-influenced visual effects. The series was recently cancelled, and its final episodes will air in February 2006. Teen Titans is an animated series, created by Sam Register, Glen Murakami, and Bruce Timm, that premiered on Cartoon Network on July 19, 2003. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... This is the current Anime Collaboration of the Week. ... The current Cartoon Network logo, was used in North America since June 14, 2004, in Latin America since January 1, 2005, and in United Kingdom since April 11, 2005. ... Deathstroke the Terminator (Slade Wilson), sometimes called Deathstroke, is a fictional character appearing in the DC Comics universe. ... Wildebeest is a name used by many characters in DC Comics New Titans series. ... Más y Menos poised for action; Más is on the right, Menos on the left. ... This page contains a list of the minor characters made specifically for Teen Titans. ... This page contains a list of the minor characters made specifically for Teen Titans. ...


See also

The Teen Titans is a team of comic book superheroes, as published by DC Comics. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Teen Titans (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3016 words)
The Teen Titans, also known as simply The Titans, is a DC Comics superhero team that first appeared in The Brave and the Bold #54 (July 1964).
New Teen Titans became Tales of the Teen Titans for a year (not to be confused with the earlier limited series), while a new concurrently published series named The New Teen Titans launched with a new #1.
The main Teen Titans team is still located on the west coast and Titans East is on the east coast.
Teen Titans for GameCube Review - GameCube Teen Titans Review (1425 words)
Teen Titans the game makes good use of the license to spice up what is otherwise a very average beat-'em-up.
The Teen Titans cartoon show was canceled in early 2006, but that hasn't stopped publisher THQ from releasing a budget-priced beat-'em-up based on the license.
The Teen Titans are a band of teenage superheroes who use their powers to fight for "truth, justice, and pizza." The show is targeted at younger audiences, with a much greater emphasis on having fun than saving the world from evil, although they still do manage to balance both of those activities fairly well.
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