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Encyclopedia > Ted Williams
Ted Williams
Outfielder
Born: August 30, 1918(1918-08-30)
Died: July 5, 2002 (aged 83)
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1939
for the Boston Red Sox
Final game
September 28, 1960
for the Boston Red Sox
Career statistics
AVG     .344
HR     521
RBI     1839
Teams

As Player
Ted Williams & Tom Yawkey File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Homerun redirects here. ... “RBI” redirects here. ...

As Manager
Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... // August 22 — European Championships Marathon, Oslo, Norway Mens Winner: Mikko Hietanen (FIN) 2:24:55 January 23: Hall of Fame election: The writers vote again fails to select an inductee, despite a newly revamped voting process. ... See also: 1951 in sports, 1953 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Tim Flock AAA Racing: Troy Ruttman won the Indianapolis 500 Chuck Stevenson won the season championship Formula One Championship - Italy 24 hours of Le Mans: Hermann Lang / Fritz Reiss won, driving... See also: 1952 in sports, other events of 1953, 1954 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Bill Vukovich won the Indianapolis 500 Sam Hanks won the season driving championship Formula One Championship - Alberto Ascari of Italy 24 hours of... // December 4 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Barry Magee (NZL) 2:19:04 Stock car racing: Junior Johnson won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Rex White Indianapolis 500 - Jim Rathmann USAC Racing - A.J. Foyt won the season championship Formula One Championship - Jack Brabham of Australia 24 hours of...

Career highlights and awards
Career Records
Awards
Notable Achievements
  • AL Triple Crown (1942, 1947)
  • Last player to hit at least .400 in a season (.406 in 1941)
  • Oldest batting champ in Major League history at 40 in 1958
  • All-Star - AL (x17)
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1966
Vote     93.38% (first ballot)

Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. He played 19 seasons, twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot, with the Boston Red Sox. Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... // August 16 — Enschede Marathon, Netherlands Mens Winner: Kazuo Matsubara (JPN) 2:19:29 September 21 — European Championships Marathon, Athens, Greece Mens Winner: Ron Hill (ENG) 2:16:48 December 7 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Jerome Drayton (CAN) 2:11:13 Stock car racing: LeeRoy Yarbrough won... See also: 1970 in sports, other events of 1971, 1972 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Richard Petty won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Richard Petty Indianapolis 500 - Al Unser, Sr. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... See also: 1971 in sports, other events of 1972, 1973 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: February 20: A.J. Foyt won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Richard Petty Indianapolis 500 - Mark Donohue USAC Racing - Joe Leonard won the season championship Formula... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP award) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1946 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1941 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1947 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1957 throughout the world. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1941 throughout the world. ... See also: 1957 in sports, other events of 1958, 1959 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Lee Petty Indianapolis 500 - Jimmy Bryan USAC Racing - Tony Bettenhausen won the season championship Formula One Championship - Mike Hawthorn of Great Britain February 23 - Cuban rebels kidnap... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 20 - The Baseball Writers Association of America voters elect Ted Williams to the Hall of Fame. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The position of the left fielder A left fielder, abbreviated LF, is an outfielder in the sport of baseball who plays defense in left field. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds...


Williams was a two-time American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner, led the league in batting six times, and won the Triple Crown twice. He had a career batting average of .344, with 521 home runs, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966. He is the last player in Major League Baseball to bat over .400 in a single season (.406 in 1941). Williams holds the highest career batting average of anyone with 500 or more home runs. His career year was 1941, when he hit .406 with 37 HR, 120 RBI, and 135 runs scored. His .551 on base percentage set a record that stood for 61 years. An avid sport fisherman, he hosted a television show about fishing and was inducted into the Fishing Hall of Fame. The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Homerun redirects here. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... See also: 1965 in sports, other events of 1966, 1967 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Richard Petty won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - David Pearson Indianapolis 500 - Graham Hill USAC Racing - Mario Andretti won the season championship Formula One Championship - Jack... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ...

Contents

Early life

Ted Williams was born in San Diego, California as Teddy Samuel Williams, named after his father, Samuel Stuart Williams, and Teddy Roosevelt. At some point, the name and date of birth on his birth certificate was changed to Theodore, but his mother and his closest friends always called him Teddy. His father was a soldier, sheriff, and photographer from New York and greatly admired the former president. His mother, May Venzor, was a Salvation Army worker from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.[2][3] San Diego redirects here. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ... Misi n de Nuestra Se ora de Guadalupe Ciudad Ju rez (2000 population 1,142,354) is a city in Chihuahua, Mexico, across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas, USA. It is the major port of entry and transportation center of north central Mexico and the fifth largest city...


Williams lived in San Diego's North Park neighborhood (4121 Utah Street) and played his high school ball at Herbert Hoover High School in San Diego. Though he soon had offers from the St. Louis Cardinals and the New York Yankees, his mother thought him too young to leave home so he signed with the local Padres (at that time, a minor league organization) while still in high school. He had minor league stints for his hometown San Diego Padres and the Minneapolis Millers. Herbert Hoover High School is a comprehensive public secondary school located in the City Heights neighborhood of San Diego, California. ... Minor leagues in the sense intended in this article are professional sports leagues which are not regarded as the premier leagues in those sports. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The San Diego Padres were a minor league baseball team which played in the Pacific Coast League from 1936 through 1968. ... The Minneapolis Millers were a professional minor league baseball team that played in Minneapolis, Minnesota until 1960. ...


Early in his career, he stated that he wished to be known as "greatest hitter who ever lived," an honor that he achieved in the eyes of many by the end of his career. Carl Yastrzemski said of Williams, "He studied hitting the way a broker studies the stock market." Carl Yastrzemskis number 8 was retired by the Boston Red Sox in 1989 Carl Michael Yaz Yastrzemski (pronounced ), i. ...


Major League Career

Williams moved up to the major-league Red Sox in 1939, immediately making an impact as he led the American League in RBIs and finishing 4th in MVP balloting. In 1941, he entered the last day of the season with a batting average of .3995. This would have been rounded up to .400, making him the first man to hit .400 since Bill Terry in 1930. Manager Joe Cronin left the decision whether to play up to him. Williams opted to play in both games of the day's doubleheader and risk losing his record. He got 6 hits in 8 at bats, raising his season average to .406. Williams also hit .400 in 1952 and .407 in 1953, both partial seasons; nobody has hit over .400 in a season since Williams. See also: 1938 in sports, other events of 1939, 1940 in sports and the list of years in sports. Many sporting events did not take place because of World War II. // Auto Racing August 11 - Jean Bugatti, automobile designer and the 30-year-old son of Ettore Bugatti, died in... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... See also: 1940 in sports, 1942 in sports and the list of years in sports. Many sporting events did not take place because of World War II. Baseball The New York Yankees won the World Series, beating the Brooklyn Dodgers by 4 games to 1. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... William Harold Terry (October 30, 1898 _ January 9, 1989) was a Major League Baseball first baseman and manager. ... // The St. ... Doubleheader is the term used to describe two baseball games played between the same two teams on the same day. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ...


At the time, this achievement was overshadowed by Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak in the same season. Their rivalry was played up by the press; Williams always felt himself slightly better as a hitter, but acknowledged that DiMaggio was the better all-around player. Also in 1941, Williams set a major-league record for on-base percentage in a season at .551. That record would last until 2002, when Barry Bonds upped this mark to .582. A lesser-known accomplishment is Williams' 1949 record feat of reaching base for the most consecutive games, 84. In addition, Williams holds the third longest such streak of 69 in 1941. In 1957, Williams reached base in 16 consecutive plate appearances, also a major-league record. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... This year in baseball: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 8 - Ozzie Smith is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is currently a left fielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball. ...


One of Williams' other memorable accomplishments was his game-winning home run off Rip Sewell's notorious eephus pitch during the 1941 All-Star Game in Fenway Park. He challenged Sewell to throw the pitch. The first time he threw it, it was a strike. Williams challenged Sewell again and this time hit a home run. Archival footage shows a delighted Williams hopping around the bases, clapping; he later said this was his greatest thrill in baseball. He later admitted that he was running toward the pitcher as he swung (therefore the hit shouldn't have counted). Truett Banks Rip Sewell (May 11, 1907 – 1989) was a professional baseball pitcher, known to be one of the greatest junk pitchers. ... An Eephus pitch, (also spelled Ephus) in baseball, is considered a junk pitch with very low speed. ... See also: 1940 in sports, 1942 in sports and the list of years in sports. Many sporting events did not take place because of World War II. Baseball The New York Yankees won the World Series, beating the Brooklyn Dodgers by 4 games to 1. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World...


Among the few blemishes on Williams's playing record was his performance in his lone post-season appearance, the 1946 World Series. Williams managed just 5 singles in 25 at-bats, with just 1 RBI, as the Red Sox lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. Much of Williams' lack of production was due to his stubborn insistence into hitting into the Cardinals' defensive shift, which frequently involved five or six of the Cardinals' fielders positioned to the right of second base. This shift was a version of the Boudreau Shift, popularized by Cleveland Indians manager Lou Boudreau in an attempt to reduce Williams's effectiveness. Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Louis Boudreau (July 17, 1917 - August 10, 2001) was a Major League Baseball player and the American League MVP Award winner in 1948. ...


Williams was also playing with a sore elbow that he injured during a pre-World Series exhibition game, while the Cardinals and Brooklyn Dodgers were playing a best-of-three series to determine the National League champion. However, Williams refused to use the injury as an excuse for his sub-par play. Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899...


Williams was an obsessive student of batting, famously using a lighter bat than most sluggers because it generated more speed and stepping out of the batter's box when a cloud would pass over the stadium to ensure he could see the ball properly. David Halberstam's Summer of '49 recalls him warning teammates not to leave their bats on the ground as they would absorb moisture and become heavier. His devotion allowed him to hit for power and average while maintaining extraordinary plate discipline. In 1970 he wrote a book on the subject, The Science of Hitting (revised 1986), which is still read by many baseball players, and he was known to enthusiastically discuss hitting with active players up until the time of his death. He lacked foot speed, as attested by his 16-year career total of only 24 stolen bases, one inside-the-park home run, and one occasion of hitting for the cycle. He felt that with more speed he could have raised his average considerably and hit .400 over at least one more season. This article is about the author and journalist. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... In baseball parlance, an inside-the-park home run or leg home run is a play where a hitter scores a home run without hitting the ball out of play. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ...


Despite Williams's lack of interest in fielding, he was considered a sure fielder with a good throwing arm, although he occasionally expressed regret that he had not worked harder on his fielding. In his autobiography, My Turn At Bat, Williams admits that as a youngster his dream was that someday he would be walking down the street and a father, walking with his son, would point to Williams and say, "Son, there goes the greatest hitter who ever lived."


When Pumpsie Green became the first black player on the Boston Red Sox, it was Williams who made Green feel welcome on the team. Topps baseball card - 1960 Series, #317 Elijah Jerry (Pumpsie) Green (born October 27, 1933 in Oakland, California) is a former Major League Baseball backup infielder who played with the Boston Red Sox (1959-62) and New York Mets (1963). ...


In a climactic ending to his career, he hit a home run in his very last at bat on September 28, 1960. is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1960 throughout the world. ...


Military Service

Williams being sworn into the military on May 22, 1942.

Williams served as a United States Marine Corps pilot during World War II and the Korean War. During World War II he served as a flight instructor at Naval Air Station Pensacola teaching young pilots to fly the F4U Corsair. He finished the war in Hawaii and was released from active duty in January of 1946; however he did remain in the reserves.[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (984x688, 374 KB)Photo scanned from Marine Corps Air Stations of World War II by Shettle, M.L., Bowersville, Georgia: Schaertel Publishing Co. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (984x688, 374 KB)Photo scanned from Marine Corps Air Stations of World War II by Shettle, M.L., Bowersville, Georgia: Schaertel Publishing Co. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... An aircraft carrier is a warship whose main role is to deploy and recover aircraft. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Naval Air Station Pensacola, The Cradle of Naval Aviation, is a United States Navy base located in Warrington, Florida, a community southwest of the Pensacola city limits. ... The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service in World War II and the Korean War (and in isolated local conflicts). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ...

Press photo of Williams signing autographs in Kokomo, Indiana 1944.

In 1952, at the age of 34, he was recalled to active duty for service in the Korean War. After getting checked out on the new F9F Panther at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, he was assigned to VMF-311, Marine Aircraft Group 33 (MAG-33) in Korea.[5] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The American Grumman F9F Panther was the manufacturers first jet fighter and the U.S. Navys second. ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point is an airfield located in Havelock, North Carolina, USA, in the eastern part of the state at . ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Marine Attack Squadron 311 (VMA-311) is a United States Marine Corps fighter squadron consisting of AV-8B Harrier (V/STOL) jets. ... Marine Aviation and Training Support Group 33 (MATSG-33) is a United States Marine Corps aviation training group that was originally established during World War II as Marine Aircraft Group 33 (MAG-33). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ...


On February 16, 1953, Williams was part of a 35-plane strike package against a tank and infantry training school just south of Pyongyang, North Korea. During the mission a piece of flak knocked out his hydraulics and electrical systems, causing Williams to have to "limp" his plane back to US Air Force base K-13, also called Suwon Air Base. K-13 was the closest to the front lines, where he was. is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... FLAK was a punk rock side project of members of the band Machinae Supremacy in 2001. ... Table of Hydraulics and Hydrostatics, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ...


He crash-landed his fighter jet and after scrambling out of the jet he made the comment, "I ran faster than Mickey Mantle." [citation needed] For bringing the plane back he was also awarded the Air Medal. Air Medal Ribbon The Air Medal is a military decoration of the United States which was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on May 11, 1942. ...


Williams stayed on K-13 for several days while his plane was repaired. Because he was so popular, GI's from all around the base came to see him and his plane. After it was repaired, Williams flew his plane back to his Marine station.


Williams eventually flew 38 combat missions before being pulled from flight status in June of 1953 after an old ear infection acted up.[6]. During the war he also served in the same unit as John Glenn. While these absences, which took almost five years out of the heart of a great career, significantly limited his career totals, he never publicly complained about the time devoted to military service. Biographer Leigh Montville argues that Williams was not happy about being pressed into service in Korea, but he did what he felt was his patriotic duty. Williams once said in an interview that becoming a Marine officer and a naval aviator were the two accomplishments of his life of which he was the most proud. [citation needed] For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ...


Williams had a strong respect for General Douglas MacArthur, referring to him as his "idol". [7] For Williams' fortieth birthday, MacArthur sent him an oil painting of himself with the inscription "To Ted Williams - not only America's greatest baseball player, but a great American who served his country. Your friend, Douglas MacArthur. General U.S. Army." [8] This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ...


Summary of Career

Williams's two MVP Awards and two Triple Crowns came in four different years. Williams, Lou Gehrig, and Chuck Klein are the only players since the establishment of the MVP award to win the Triple Crown and not be named league MVP in that season. Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Charles Herbert Klein (October 7, 1904 - March 28, 1958) was a Major League Baseball player who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1928-33, 1936-39, 1940-44), Chicago Cubs (1934-36) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1939). ...


Amazingly, Ted Williams won the Triple Crown not once, but twice - in 1942, and again in 1947 after missing three years to WWII. In 1949, Williams led the league in home runs (with 43) and RBI (with 159, tied with Red Sox shortstop Vern Stephens), but lost the batting race to Detroit third-baseman George Kell. Kell had 179 hits in 522 at-bats, for a batting average of .3429, while Williams went 194-566, for an average of .34275. A single hit either way would have changed the outcome.


Because Williams's hitting was so feared, and it was known that he was a dead pull hitter, opponents frequently employed the radical, defensive "Williams Shift" against him, leaving only one fielder on the third-base half of the field. Rather than bunting the ball into the open space, the proud Williams batted as usual against the defense. The defensive tactic was later used against left-handed sluggers such as Willie McCovey, and is still used to this day against players such as Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, and David Ortiz who are also considered dead-pull hitters, and is appropriately called the infield shift. Willie Lee McCovey (born January 10, 1938 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Big Mac and Stretch, is a former slugger and first baseman who played Major League Baseball for the San Francisco Giants, San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics between 1959 and 1980. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is currently a left fielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball. ... Jason Gilbert Giambi (born January 8, 1971) is a Major League Baseball player who is the 1st baseman and designated hitter for the New York Yankees. ... David Ortiz (IPA , or roughly or-TEES, according to Latin American pronunciation) (born November 18, 1975 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, as David Américo Ortiz Arias), is a Major League Baseball designated hitter who plays for the Boston Red Sox (since 2003). ... The infield shift is a generic term used by announcers to describe a defensive alignment in which there is an extreme realignment from the standard positions to blanket one side of the field or another. ...


Ted Williams retired from the game in 1960 and hit a home run in his final at-bat, on September 28, 1960, in front of only 10,454 fans at Fenway Park. This home run, a solo shot hit off Baltimore pitcher Jack Fisher in the 8th inning that reduced the Orioles' lead to 4-3—was immortalized in The New Yorker essay "Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu", by John Updike. // December 4 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Barry Magee (NZL) 2:19:04 Stock car racing: Junior Johnson won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Rex White Indianapolis 500 - Jim Rathmann USAC Racing - A.J. Foyt won the season championship Formula One Championship - Jack Brabham of Australia 24 hours of... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American writer. ...


Renowned NBC sportscaster Bob Costas, reflecting on Williams unparalleled success as ball player, wingman, and fisherman, once asked Williams if he realized he was in real life the type of American hero John Wayne sought to portray in his movies. Replied Williams, "Yeah, I know."


Relationship with Boston media and fans

Ted Williams was on uncomfortable terms with the Boston newspapers for nearly twenty years, as he felt they liked to discuss his personal life as much as his baseball performance. He maintained a career-long feud with SPORT magazine due to a 1948 feature article in which the SPORT reporter included a quote from Williams' mother. Insecure about his upbringing, stubborn because of the immense confidence in his talents, Williams made up his mind that the "knights of the typewriter" were against him and treated most of them accordingly, as he describes in his memoir, My Turn at Bat. Boston redirects here. ... The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...


He also had an uneasy relationship with the Boston fans, though he could be very cordial one-on-one. Williams felt at times a good deal of gratitude for their passion and their knowledge of the game. On the other hand, Williams was temperamental, high-strung, and at times tactless. He gave generously to those in need, and demanded loyalty from those around him. He could not forgive the fickle nature of the fans—booing a player for booting a ground ball, then turning around and roaring approval of the same player for hitting a home run. Despite the cheers and adulation of most of his fans, the occasional boos directed at him in Fenway Park led Williams to refuse to ever tip his cap after a home run, including his swan song in 1960. He also won many fans both in and out of baseball by twice serving his country in time of war, risking his life by flying combat missions in the Marine Corps. The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ...


A Red Smith profile from 1956 describes one Boston writer trying to convince Ted Williams that first cheering and then booing a ballplayer was no different from a moviegoer applauding a "western" movie actor one day and saying the next "He stinks! Whatever gave me the idea he could act?" But Williams rejected this; when he liked a western actor like Hoot Gibson, he liked him in every picture, and would not think of booing him. Walter Wellesley Red Smith (September 25, 1905 in Green Bay, Wisconsin - January 15, 1982 in Stamford, Connecticut) was an American sportswriter who rose to become Americas most widely read sportswriter. ... Hoot Gibson (August 6, 1892 - August 23, 1962) was a rodeo champion and a pioneer cowboy film actor, director and producer. ...


After his famous home run in his last at-bat, Williams characteristically refused either to tip his cap as he circled the bases or to respond to prolonged cheers of "We want Ted!" from the crowd. Williams also refused to tip his cap as he was replaced in left field by Carroll Hardy to start the 9th inning, although he continued to receive warm cheers. Carroll William Hardy (born May 18, 1933 in Sturgis, South Dakota) is a former backup outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians (1958-1960[start]), Boston Red Sox (1960[end]-1962), Houston Colt . ...


Williams's aloof attitude led Updike to wryly observe that "gods do not answer letters." Williams's final home run did not take place during the final game of the 1960 season, but rather the Red Sox' last home game that year. The Red Sox played three more games, but they were on the road in New York and Williams did not appear in any of them, and it became clear that Williams's final home at-bat would be the last of his career.



At the 1999 All-Star game, held at Fenway, Williams threw the first ceremonial pitch. Walking back to the dugout he finally tipped his hat to adoring Boston fans.


Hall of Fame Induction Speech

In his induction speech in 1966, Williams included a statement calling for the recognition of the great Negro Leagues players: "I've been a very lucky guy to have worn a baseball uniform, and I hope some day the names of Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson in some way can be added as a symbol of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren't given a chance." (Montville, p.262). Part of the History of baseball series. ... Leroy Robert Satchel Paige (July 7, 1906–June 8, 1982)[1] was an American baseball player who pitched in several different Negro Leagues and in Major League Baseball. ... For the Australian rules footballer, see Joshua Gibson (footballer). ...


Williams was referencing two of the most famous names in the Negro Leagues, who were not given the opportunity to play in the Major Leagues before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. Gibson died early in 1947 and thus never played in the majors; and Paige's brief major league stint came long past his prime as a player. This powerful and unprecedented statement from the Hall of Fame podium was "a first crack in the door that ultimately would open and include Paige and Gibson and other Negro League stars in the shrine." (Montville, p.262) Paige was the first inducted, in 1971. Gibson and others followed, starting in 1972 and continuing off and on into the 21st Century. Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ...


Career Ranking

At the time of his retirement, Williams ranked third all-time in home runs (behind Babe Ruth and Jimmie Foxx), seventh in RBIs (after Ruth, Cap Anson, Lou Gehrig, Ty Cobb, Foxx, and Mel Ott; Stan Musial would pass Williams in 1962), and seventh in batting average (behind Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Shoeless Joe Jackson, Lefty O'Doul, Ed Delahanty and Tris Speaker). His career batting average is the highest of any player who played his entire career in the post-1920 live-ball era. This article is about the baseball player. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Melvin Thomas Mel Ott (March 2, 1909 – November 21, 1958), nicknamed Master Melvin, was a Major League Baseball right fielder who played his entire career for the New York Giants (1926-1947). ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Francis Joseph Lefty ODoul (March 4, 1897 - December 7, 1969) was an American Major League Baseball player who went on to become an extraordinarily successful manager in the minor leagues, and also a vital figure in the establishment of professional baseball in Japan. ... Edward James Delahanty (1867-1903) Edward James Delahanty (October 30, 1867 - July 2, 1903) was a Hall of Fame Major League Baseball player from 1888 to 1903. ... Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ... The live-ball era, also referred to as the lively ball era, is the period in Major League Baseball beginning in 1920, following the dead-ball era. ...


Williams was also second to Ruth in career slugging percentage, where he remains today, and first in on-base percentage. He was also second to Ruth in career walks, but has since dropped to fourth place behind Barry Bonds and Rickey Henderson. Williams remains the career leader in walks per plate appearance. Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is currently a left fielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball. ... Rickey Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who is baseballs all-time leader in stolen bases[1] and runs scored. ...


Most modern statistical analyses place Williams, along with Ruth and Bonds, among the three most potent hitters to have played the game. Williams' 1941 season is often considered favorably with the greatest seasons of Ruth and Bonds in terms of various offensive statistical measures such as slugging, on-base and "offensive winning percentage." As a further indication, of the ten best seasons for OPS, short for On-Base Plus Slugging Percentage, a popular modern measure of offensive productivity, four each were achieved by Ruth and Bonds, and two by Williams. OPS can also refer to a baseball term, On-base plus slugging. ...


In 1999, Williams was ranked as Number 8 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, where he was the highest-ranking left fielder. The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ...


Retirement

Ted Williams's number 9 was retired by the Boston Red Sox in 1984

After retirement from play, Williams served as manager of the Washington Senators, continuing with the team when they became the Texas Rangers after the 1971 season. Williams's best season as a manager was 1969 when he led the expansion Senators to an 86-76 record in their only winning season in Washington. He was chosen "Manager of the Year" after that season. Like many great players, Williams became impatient with ordinary athletes' abilities and attitudes, particularly those of pitchers, whom he admitted he never respected, and his managerial career was short and largely unsuccessful. Before and after leaving Texas (which would be his only manager job), he occasionally appeared at Red Sox spring training as a guest hitting instructor. Williams would also go into a partnership with friend Al Cassidy to form the Ted Williams Baseball Camp in Lakeville, Massachusetts. It was not uncommon to find Williams fishing in the pond at the camp. The area now is owned by the town and a few of the buildings still stand. In the main lodge one can still see memorabilia from Williams' playing days. Image File history File links Bosret9. ... Image File history File links Bosret9. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... // August 16 — Enschede Marathon, Netherlands Mens Winner: Kazuo Matsubara (JPN) 2:19:29 September 21 — European Championships Marathon, Athens, Greece Mens Winner: Ron Hill (ENG) 2:16:48 December 7 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Jerome Drayton (CAN) 2:11:13 Stock car racing: LeeRoy Yarbrough won...


He was much more successful in fishing. An avid and expert fly fisherman and deep-sea fisherman, he spent many summers after baseball fishing the Miramichi River, in Miramichi, New Brunswick, Canada. Williams was named to the International Game Fish Association Hall of Fame in 2000. Some opined that Williams was a rare individual who might have been the best in the world in three different disciplines: baseball hitter, fighter jet pilot, and fly fisherman. Shortly after Williams's death, conservative pundit Steve Sailer called him "possibly the most technically proficient American of the 20th Century, as his mastery of three highly different callings demonstrates." [1] Fly rod and reel with a wild brown trout from a chalk stream. ... The Miramichi River is a Canadian river located in the east-central part of New Brunswick. ... Ritchie Wharf on the Newcastle waterfront in the City of Miramichi. ... Steve Sailer Steven Ernest Sailer (born December 20, 1958) is an American journalist and movie critic for The American Conservative, ex-correspondent for UPI, and VDARE.com columnist. ...


Williams reached an extensive deal with Sears, lending his name and talent toward marketing, developing, and endorsing a line of in-house sports equipment - specifically fishing, hunting and baseball equipment. He was also extensively involved in the Jimmy Fund, ironically later losing a brother to leukemia, and spent much of his spare time, effort, and money in support of the cancer organization. Sears, Roebuck and Company is an American mid-range chain of international department stores, founded by Richard Sears and Alvah Roebuck in the late 19th century. ... Ralph Livingstone Edwards (January 13, 1913 – November 16, 2005) was a television host and producer. ...


In his later years, Williams became a fixture at autograph shows and card shows after his son (by his third wife), John Henry Williams, took control of his career, becoming his de facto manager. The younger Williams provided structure to his father's business affairs, and rationed his father's public appearances and memorabilia signings to maximize their earnings. Although many felt that Ted was being used by his son, there is no real evidence that the younger Williams was doing anything illicit or unsavory with his father's earnings. [citation needed] John Henry Williams (August 27, 1968 – March 6, 2004) was the only son of baseball legend Ted Williams. ...


One of Ted Williams's final, and most memorable, public appearances was at the 1999 All-Star Game in Boston. Able to walk only a short distance, Williams was brought to the pitcher's mound in a golf cart. He proudly waved his cap to the crowd—a gesture he had never done as a player. Fans responded with a standing ovation that lasted several minutes. At the pitcher's mound he was surrounded by players from both teams, including fellow Red Sox Nomar Garciaparra and fellow San Diegan Tony Gwynn. Later in the year, he was among the members of the Major League Baseball All-Century Team introduced to the crowd at Turner Field in Atlanta prior to Game 2 of the World Series. The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... Anthony Nomar Garciaparra (born July 23, 1973, in Whittier, California) is a Mexican-American baseball player who currently plays third base for the Los Angeles Dodgers. ... Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball, statistically one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... View from the outfield Turner Field is a baseball stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


In his last years Williams suffered from numerous cardiac problems. He had a pacemaker installed in November 2000 and underwent open-heart surgery in January 2001. After suffering a series of strokes and congestive heart failures, he died of cardiac arrest in Crystal River, Florida, on July 5, 2002. For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... Congestive heart failure (CHF), also called congestive cardiac failure (CCF) or just heart failure, is a condition that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to fill with or pump a sufficient amount of blood throughout the body. ... Crystal River is a city in Citrus County, Florida, United States. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The Ted Williams Tunnel in Boston (December 1995), and Ted Williams Parkway in San Diego (1992) were named in his honor while he was still alive. The Ted Williams Tunnel (planned as the Third Harbor Tunnel, the Sumner and Callahan Tunnels being the first two) is the tunnel connecting South Boston with Bostons Logan International Airport. ... JUNCTION POSTMILE I-5 SD ?? I-15 SD ?? Legend Prev Next < Route 55 Route 57 > California State Highways Current - Unconstructed - Deleted - Scenic Route Description California State Route 56 runs from Interstate 5 in the Carmel Valley neighborhood of San Diego to past Interstate 15 in Poway. ...


Death

A public dispute over the disposition of Williams's body was waged after his death. Announcing there would be no funeral,[9] his son John-Henry Williams had Ted's body flown to the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Scottsdale, Arizona, where the head was separated from the body and both placed individually into cryonic suspension.[10] Barbara Joyce Ferrell, Ted's daughter by his first wife, sued,[11] saying his will stated that he wanted to be cremated.[12] John-Henry's lawyer then produced an informal "family pact" signed by Ted, John-Henry, and Ted's daughter Claudia, in which they agreed "to be put into biostasis after we die."[13] Reportedly, cryonics arrangements were hastily made post mortem by John-Henry and Claudia per their family pact. Though this action upset many family members, friends, and fans, it seems to have been the children's right under the law.[14] John Henry Williams (August 27, 1968 – March 6, 2004) was the only son of baseball legend Ted Williams. ... This bigfoot Dewar is custom-designed to contain four wholebody patients and six neuropatients immersed in liquid nitrogen at −196 degrees Celsius. ... For other uses, see Scottsdale . ... Not to be confused with cryogenics. ... The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ... Not to be confused with cryogenics. ...


In Ted Williams: The Biography of An American Hero, author Leigh Montville makes the case that the supposed family cryonics pact was merely a practice Ted Williams autograph on a plain piece of paper, around which the "agreement" had later been hand-printed. The pact document was signed "Ted Williams", the same as his autographs, whereas he would always sign his legal documents "Theodore Williams". However, Claudia testified to the authenticity of the document in a sworn affidavit.[15]


Following John-Henry's unexpected illness and death from acute myelogenous leukemia on March 6, 2004, John-Henry's body was also transported to Alcor, in fulfillment of the controversial agreement. Leukemia or leukaemia(Greek leukos λευκός, “white”; aima αίμα, “blood”) (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Recently, the Tampa Bay Devil Rays home stadium of Tropicana Stadium has installed a Ted Williams Museum behind the right field fence. From the Tampa Bay Devil Rays website: "The Ted Williams Museum and Hitters Hall of Fame brings a special element to the Tropicana Field. Fans can view an array of different artifacts and pictures of the 'Greatest hitter that ever lived.' These memorable displays range from Ted Williams' days in the military through his professional playing career. This museum is dedicated to some of the greatest players to ever 'lace 'em up,' including Willie Mays, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, and Sadaharu Oh." Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Sadaharu Oh or officially Wang Chenchih (Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Hepburn: Ō Sadaharu, born May 20, 1940), is a former baseball player and manager of the Yomiuri Giants in Nippon Professional Baseball and is the current manager of the Fukuoka Softbank Hawks. ...


Career Batting Statistics

  Yr Team
G
AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
GS
RBI
BB
IBB
SO
SH
SF
HBP
GIDP
AVG
OBP
SLG
1939 Red Sox
149
565
131
185
44
11
31
2
145
107
-
64
3
-
2
10
.327
.436
.609
1940 Red Sox
144
561
134
193
43
14
23
1
113
96
-
54
1
-
3
13
.344
.442
.594
1941 Red Sox
143
456
135
185
33
3
37
1
120
147
-
27
0
-
3
10
.406
.551
.735
1942 Red Sox
150
522
141
186
34
5
36
1
137
145
-
51
0
-
4
12
.356
.499
.648
1946 Red Sox
150
514
142
176
37
8
38
2
123
156
-
44
0
-
2
12
.342
.497
.667
1947 Red Sox
156
528
125
181
40
9
32
1
114
162
-
47
1
-
2
10
.343
.499
.634
1948 Red Sox
137
509
124
188
44
3
25
0
127
126
-
41
0
-
3
10
.369
.497
.615
1949 Red Sox
155
566
150
194
39
3
43
1
159
162
-
48
0
-
2
22
.343
.490
.650
1950 Red Sox
89
334
82
106
24
1
28
1
97
82
-
21
0
-
0
12
.317
.452
.647
1951 Red Sox
148
531
109
169
28
4
30
1
126
144
-
45
0
-
0
10
.318
.464
.556
1952 Red Sox
6
10
2
4
0
1
1
0
3
2
-
2
0
-
0
0
.400
.500
.900
1953 Red Sox
37
91
17
37
6
0
13
0
34
19
-
10
0
-
0
1
.407
.509
.901
1954 Red Sox
117
386
93
133
23
1
29
0
89
136
-
32
0
3
1
10
.345
.513
.635
1955 Red Sox
98
320
77
114
21
3
28
3
83
91
17
24
0
4
2
8
.356
.496
.703
1956 Red Sox
136
400
71
138
28
2
24
0
82
102
11
39
0
0
1
13
.345
.479
.605
1957 Red Sox
132
420
96
163
28
1
38
1
87
119
33
43
0
2
5
11
.388
.526
.731
1958 Red Sox
129
411
81
135
23
2
26
2
85
98
12
49
0
4
4
19
.328
.458
.584
1959 Red Sox
103
272
32
69
15
0
10
0
43
52
6
27
0
5
2
7
.254
.372
.419
1960 Red Sox
113
310
56
98
15
0
29
0
72
75
7
41
0
2
3
7
.316
.451
.645
Career
G
AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
GS
RBI
BB
IBB
SO
SH
SF
HBP
GIDP
AVG
OBP
SLG
19 Years
2,292
7,706
1,798
2,654
525
71
521
17
1,839
2,021
86
709
5
20
39
197
.344
.482
.634

See also

The Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame was instituted in 1995 to recognize the career of former Boston Red Sox players. ... Players denoted in boldface are are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... In Major League Baseball, the 500 Home Run Club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have hit 500 or more career home runs. ... Hometown Heroes was a program sponsored by DHL. On September 27, 2006, Major League Baseball announced a list of players, one from each team, voted by MLB fans: † player spent his entire career with one team The Official Hometown Heroes Panel Orestes Destrade (ESPN and XM Satellite Radio broadcaster) Steve... Insert non-formatted text hereThe following is a list of notable individual streaks achieved in Major League Baseball. ... This is a list of the top 500 Major League Baseball home run hitters. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 252 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Listed below are the occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit three home runs in a single game. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^
  2. ^ http://www.wargs.com/other/williamst.html
  3. ^ Seidel, 2
  4. ^ Mersky, p. 189
  5. ^ Mersky, p. 189
  6. ^ Mersky, p. 190
  7. ^ Leigh Montville, "Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero", p. 12
  8. ^ ibid, p. 13-14
  9. ^ http://www.boston.com/sports/redsox/williams/july_6/son_abides_no_funeral_services.shtml
  10. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/12/20/national/main533849.shtml
  11. ^ http://www.boston.com/sports/redsox/williams/july_21/Daughter_seeks_proof+.shtml
  12. ^ http://www.boston.com/sports/redsox/williams/documents/williams_will1.htm
  13. ^ http://nwfolk.com/2002_07_01_oldpiffle.html
  14. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A63917-2002Jul12.html
  15. ^ http://www.wfu.edu/~chesner/Evidence/Linked%20Files/Additional%20Assigned%20Readings/ted.williams.htm

References

  • Mersky, Peter B. (1983). U.S. Marine Corps Aviation - 1912 to the Present. Annapolis, Maryland: Nautical and Aviation Publishing Company of America. ISBN 0-933852-39-8.. 
  • Nowlin, Bill. The Kid: Ted Williams in San Diego. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Rounder Books, 2005 - discusses Williams' early life and extensively documents his ancestry.
  • Seidel, Michael (2000). Ted Williams: a Baseball Life. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0-8032-9280-5. 
  • SPORT magazine, April 1948

The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...

Books by and about Ted Williams

  • Baldasarro, Lawrence The Ted Williams Reader New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991.
  • Halberstam, David The Teammates New York: Hyperion, 2003.
  • Montville, Leigh Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero New York: Doubleday, 2004.
  • Williams, Ted and John Underwood Fishing the Big Three: Tarpon, Bonefish, Atlantic Salmon New York: Simon & Schuster, 1982.
  • Williams, Ted and John Underwood My Turn at Bat: My Story of My Life New York: Simon & Schuster, 1969.
  • Williams, Ted and John Underwood The Science of Hitting New York: Simon & Schuster, 1970.
  • Williams, Ted and David Pietrusza Ted Williams: My Life in Pictures (also published as Teddy Ballgame) Kingston (NY): SPORTClassic Books, 2002.
  • Williams, Ted and Jim Prime Ted Williams' Hit List : The Best of the Best Ranks the Best of the Rest Indianapolis: Masters Press, 1996.

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Persondata
NAME Williams, Ted
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Williams, Theodore Samuel; Splendid Splinter
SHORT DESCRIPTION American left fielder in Major League Baseball
DATE OF BIRTH August 30, 1918
PLACE OF BIRTH San Diego, CA
DATE OF DEATH July 5, 2002
PLACE OF DEATH Inverness, FL

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ted Williams - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2938 words)
Ted Williams was on uncomfortable terms with the Boston newspapers for nearly twenty years, as he felt they liked to discuss his personal life as much as his baseball performance.
Williams also refused to tip his cap as he was replaced in left field by Carroll Hardy to start the 9th inning, although he continued to receive warm cheers.
Williams best season as a manager was 1969 when he led the expansion Senators to an 86-76 record in their only winning season in Washington.
Ted Williams - MSN Encarta (384 words)
Ted Williams (1918-2002), American baseball player and manager, considered one of the greatest hitters in major league history.
Williams was voted the league's most valuable player in 1946 and 1949 and won the Triple Crown (awarded to the player who leads the league in batting average, home runs, and RBIs in one season) in 1942 and 1947.
Williams returned to baseball in 1968 as manager of the Washington Senators (now the Texas Rangers), and in his debut season was chosen American League manager of the year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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