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Encyclopedia > Ted Stevens
Ted Stevens
Ted Stevens

Incumbent
Assumed office 
December 24, 1968
Serving with Lisa Murkowski
Preceded by Bob Bartlett

In office
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2007
Preceded by Robert Byrd
Succeeded by Robert Byrd

In office
January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1985
Preceded by Alan Cranston
Succeeded by Alan Simpson

Born November 18, 1923 (1923-11-18) (age 84)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Political party Republican
Spouse 1. Ann Cherrington, deceased
2. Catherine Ann Chandler
Alma mater UCLA
Harvard
Religion Episcopalian

Theodore Fulton Stevens (born November 18, 1923) is the senior United States Senator from Alaska. As the longest serving Republican in the Senate, Stevens served as President pro tempore from January 3, 2003, to January 3, 2007. Cursive is an indie rock band from Omaha, Nebraska, on Saddle Creek Records. ... Ted Stevens is a musician from Omaha, Nebraska. ... Ted Stevens, from senate. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ... Bronze by Felix W. de Weldon. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Alan MacGregor Cranston (June 19, 1914 – December 31, 2000) was a U.S. journalist and politician. ... Alan Simpson could be one half of Galton and Simpson Alan Simpson the British politician Alan K. Simpson the American politician This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... GOP redirects here. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Stevens has had a six-decade career of government service, beginning with his service in World War II. In the 1950s, he held senior positions in the Eisenhower Interior Department. He has served continuously in the Senate since December 1968. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ...


When the 110th Congress convened and Democrats took control of the chamber, he was replaced as President pro tem by Robert Byrd, and thus took Byrd's previous honorary role of "President pro tempore emeritus". He is one of three persons, alongside Byrd and Strom Thurmond, who served previously as president pro tem and remained in Senate. Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ...


Stevens is currently under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for possible corruption based on his relationship with an oil service company executive who has pled guilty to bribing Alaskan legislators, including Stevens' son, former State Senator Ben Stevens. On July 30, 2007, the IRS and the FBI searched Stevens' home in Alaska.[1] F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ... Ben Stevens (born 1959) is an American politician and former President of the Alaska State Senate. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Childhood and youth

Stevens was born November 18, 1923 in Indianapolis, Indiana, the third of four children,[2][3] in a small cottage built by his paternal grandfather after the marriage of his father, George A. Stevens, to Gertrude S. Chancellor. The family later lived in Chicago, where George Stevens was an accountant before the stock market crash of 1929 instigated the Great Depression, ending his job.[3][4] Around this time, when Ted Stevens was six years old, his parents divorced, and Stevens and his three siblings went back to Indianapolis to live with their paternal grandparents, followed shortly thereafter by their father, who developed problems with his eyes and went blind for several years. Stevens' mother moved to California and sent for Stevens' siblings as she could afford to, but Stevens stayed in Indianapolis helping to care for his father and a mentally retarded cousin, Patricia Acker, who also lived with the family. The only adult in the household with a job was Stevens' grandfather. Stevens helped to support the family by working as a newsboy, and would later remember selling a lot of newspapers on March 1, 1932, when newspaper headlines blared the news of the Lindbergh kidnapping.[3] is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... In days leading up to Black Thursday the market was unstable. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lindbergh baby kidnapping poster. ...


In 1934, Stevens' grandfather punctured a lung in a fall down a tall flight of stairs, contracted pneumonia, and died.[3] By the time Stevens was fifteen, in 1938, his father had died of cancer.[4] Stevens and his cousin Patricia moved to Manhattan Beach, California to live with Patricia's mother, Gladys Swindells.[3] Stevens attended Redondo Union High School, participating in extracurricular activities including working on the school newspaper and becoming a member of a student theater group, a service society affiliated with the YMCA, and, during his senior year, the lettermen's society. Stevens also worked at jobs before and after school,[4] but also had time for surfing with his friend Russell Green, son of the president of Signal Gas and Oil Company, who remained a close friend through Stevens' life.[3] Location of Manhattan Beach in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1912-12-12 [2] Government  - Mayor Jim Aldinger [1] Area  - Total 10. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Redondo Union High School is a public high school in Redondo Beach, California. ...


Military service

After graduating from high school in 1942, Stevens enrolled at Oregon State University to study engineering,[5] attending for a semester.[3] With World War II in progress, Stevens attempted to join the Navy Air Corps, but failed the vision exam. He corrected his vision through a course of prescribed eye exercises, and in 1943 was accepted for a Army Air Corps Air Cadet program at Montana State College.[3][5] After scoring near the top of an aptitude test for flight training, Stevens was transferred to preflight training in Santa Ana, California and received his wings in early 1944. He went on to Bergstrom Field in Texas, where he trained to fly P-38s, but due to an incident during graduation, in which a graduate booed at the colonel who delivered the graduation address, Stevens never flew a fighter in combat. Instead, Stevens later recalled, "Suddenly we were copilots in a troop carrier squad."[3] Oregon State University (OSU) is a four-year research and degree-granting public university, located in Corvallis, Oregon (USA). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... Montana State University - Bozeman (MSU) is a public university located in Bozeman, Montana, USA. It is the main campus in the Montana State University System and the states land-grant university. ... Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Bergstrom AFB, Texas - 1962 Bergstrom Air Force Base (1942-1993) was located seven miles southeast of Austin, Texas. ... P-38 redirects here. ...


Stevens served in the China-Burma-India theater with the Fourteenth Air Force Transport Section, which supported the "Flying Tigers," from 1944 to 1946. He and other pilots in the transport section flew C-46 and C-47 transport planes, often without escort, mostly in support of Chinese units fighting the Japanese.[3] Stevens received the Distinguished Flying Cross for flying behind enemy lines, the Air Medal, and the Yuan Hai medal awarded by the Chinese Nationalist government.[3][6] He was discharged from the Army Air Forces in March 1946.[3] China Burma India Theater (CBI) was the name used by the United States Army for its forces in China, Burma, India during World War II. Well-known US units in this theater included the Flying Tigers, transport and bomber units flying the Hump, the engineers who built Ledo Road, and... The United States Fourteenth Air Force, also 14th Air Force (14 AF), is a Numbered Air Force (NAF) of Air Force Space Command (AFSPC). ... Flying Tigers was the nickname of the 1st American Volunteer Group (AVG), a group of United States Army (USAAF), Navy (USN), and Marine Corps (USMC) pilots and ground crew, recruited under a secret Presidential sanction by Claire Chennault. ... Lamb Air C-46 The Curtiss-Wright C-46 Commando was a transport aircraft used by the United States Army Air Forces during World War II. Also known to the men who flew them as The Whale. The C-46 served a similar role as its brother the Douglas C... The Douglas C-47 Skytrain or Dakota is a military transport that was developed from the Douglas DC-3 airliner. ... The Distinguished Flying Cross. ... Air Medal Ribbon The Air Medal is a military decoration of the United States which was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on May 11, 1942. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ...


Higher education and law school

After the war, Stevens attended UCLA, where he earned a bachelor's degree in political science in 1947. He applied to law school at Stanford University and the University of Michigan, but on the advice of his friend Russell Green's father to "look East," he applied also to Harvard Law School, and ended up attending there. Stevens' education was partly financed by the G.I. Bill; he made up the difference by borrowing money from an uncle, selling his blood, and working several jobs, including one as a bartender in Boston.[3] During the summer of 1949, Stevens was a research assistant in the office of the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of California.[7][8] The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 (better known as the G.I. Bill) provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G.I.s) as well as one year of unemployment compensation. ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... The United States District Court for the Southern District of California is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties: Imperial and San Diego. ...


While at Harvard, Stevens wrote a paper on maritime law which received honorable mention for the Addison Brown prize, a Harvard Law School award made for the best essay by a student on a subject related to private international law or maritime law.[7] The essay later became a Harvard Law Review article[9] whose scholarship Justice Jay Rabinowitz of the Alaska Supreme Court praised 45 years later, telling the Anchorage Daily News in 1994 that the high court had issued a recent opinion citing the article.[3] Stevens graduated from Harvard Law School in 1950.[3] The Harvard Law Review is a journal of legal scholarship published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School. ... Jay Andrew Rabinowitz[1] (February 25, 1927–June 16, 2001[2]) was an American lawyer, best known for serving as an Alaska Supreme Court justice from February 1965 to February 1997. ... The Alaska Supreme Court is the state supreme court in the State of Alaskas judicial department (Alaska Court System). ... The Anchorage Daily News is a daily newspaper in Anchorage, Alaska. ...


Early legal career

After graduation, Stevens went to work in the Washington, D.C. law offices of Northcutt Ely.[7][10] Twenty years previously Ely had been executive assistant to Secretary of the Interior Ray Lyman Wilbur during the Hoover administration,[11] and by 1950 headed a prominent law firm specializing in natural resources issues.[10] One of Ely's clients, Emil Usibelli, founder of the Usibelli Coal Mine in Healy, Alaska,[12] was trying to sell coal to the military, and Stevens was assigned to handle his legal affairs.[10] ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Calvin Coolidge Ray Lyman Wilbur Ray Lyman Wilbur (April 13, 1875–June 26, 1949) was a medical doctor, the 3rd President of Stanford University, and the 31st United States Secretary of the Interior. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Healy is a small town on the Parks highway a few miles north of the entrence to Denali National Park. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...


Marriage and family

In early 1952 Stevens married Ann Mary Chennington. Ann, a Democrat, was the adopted daughter of University of Denver chancellor Ben Mark Cherrington. She had graduated from Reed College in Portland, Oregon and during the Truman administration had worked for the State Department.[10] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the victim of Mt. ... Department of State redirects here. ...


In December 1978, Stevens survived the crash of a Lear Jet at Anchorage International Airport. The crash killed five people, including his first wife, Ann.[13] In 2000, the Alaska Legislature voted to rename the airport the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. C-GBFP - Adlair Aviation - Learjet 25 (LJ25) refueling at Cambridge Bay Airport, Nunavut, Canada. ... Ted Stevens International Airport is an airport in Anchorage, Alaska. ...


Stevens' son, Ben Stevens, was appointed to the Alaska Senate in 2001 by Democratic Governor Tony Knowles, and was the Senate President until the fall of 2006. Ben Stevens (born 1959) is an American politician and former President of the Alaska State Senate. ... The Alaska Senate in session. ... Official campaign photo of Tony Knowles Anthony Carroll Tony Knowles (born January 1, 1943 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American Democratic politician and businessman who served as Governor of Alaska from December 1994 to December 2002. ...


Aside from Ben, Stevens and his first wife Ann had two daughters, Susan and Beth, and two sons, Walter and Ted. He and his second wife Catherine have a daughter, Lily.


Stevens' current home in Alaska is in Girdwood. Girdwood is an unincorporated ski resort community within the Municipality of Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


Early Alaska career

In 1952, while still working for Norcutt Ely, Stevens volunteered for the presidential campaign of Dwight D. Eisenhower, writing position papers for the campaign on western water law and lands. By the time Eisenhower won the election that November, Stevens had acquired contacts who told him, "We want you to come over to Interior." Stevens left his job with Ely, but a job in the Eisenhower administration didn't come through[10] as a result of a temporary hiring freeze instituted by Eisenhower in an effort to reduce spending.[8] Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...


Instead, Stevens was offered a job with the Fairbanks, Alaska law firm of Emil Usibelli's Alaska attorney, Charles Clasby, whose firm, Collins and Clasby, had just lost one of its attorneys.[10][8] Stevens and his wife had met and liked both Usibelli and Clasby, and decided to make the move.[10] They loaded up their 1947 Buick[14] and, traveling on a $600 loan from Clasby, they drove across country from Washington, D.C. and up the Alaska Highway in the dead of winter, arriving in Fairbanks in February 1953. Stevens later recalled kidding Gov. Walter Hickel about the loan. "He likes to say that he came to Alaska with 37 cents in his pocket," he said of Hickel. "I came $600 in debt."[10] Ann Stevens recalled in 1968 that they made the move to Alaska "on a six-month trial basis."[14] Fairbanks redirects here. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Map of Alaska Highway (in red) The Alaska Highway, also the Alaskan Highway, Alaska-Canadian Highway, and the Alcan Highway, runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia to Fairbanks, Alaska, via Whitehorse, Yukon. ... Categories: People stubs | 1919 births | Governors of Alaska | U.S. Secretaries of the Interior ...


In Fairbanks, Stevens cultivated the city's Republican establishment. He befriended conservative newspaper publisher C.W. Snedden, who had purchased the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner in 1950. Snedden's wife Helen later recalled that her husband and Stevens were "like father and son." "The only problem Ted had was that he had a temper," she told the a reporter in 1994, crediting her husband with helping to steady Stevens "like you would do with your children" and with teaching Stevens the art of diplomacy.[10] The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner is a newspaper that serves the city of Fairbanks, Alaska and Fairbanks North Star Borough. ...


U.S. Attorney

Stevens had been with Charles Clasby's law firm for six months when Bob McNealy, a Democrat appointed as U.S. Attorney for Fairbanks during the Truman administration,[10] informed U.S. District Judge Harry Pratt that he would be resigning effective August 15, 1953,[15] having already delayed his resignation by several months at the request of Justice Department officials newly appointed by Eisenhower, who asked McNealy to delay his resignation until Eisenhower could appoint a replacement.[14] Despite Stevens' short tenure as an Alaska resident and his relative lack of trial or criminal law experience, Pratt asked Stevens to serve in the position until Eisenhower acted.[15] Stevens agreed. "I said, 'Sure, I'd like to do that,' " Stevens recalled years later. "Clasby said, 'It's not going to pay you as much money, but, if you want to do it, that's your business.' He was very pissed that I decided to go."[10] Most members of the Fairbanks Bar Association were outraged at the appointment of a newcomer, and members in attendance at the association's meeting that December voted to support Carl Messenger for the permanent appointment, an endorsement seconded by the Alaska Republican Part Committee for the Fairbanks-area judicial division.[15] However, Stevens was favored by Attorney General Herbert Brownell, by Senator William F. Knowland of California, and by the Republican National Committee,[15] (Alaska itself had no Senators at this time, as it was still a territory). Eisenhower sent Stevens' nomination to the U.S. Senate,[16] which confirmed him on March 30, 1954.[10] United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... The term criminal law, sometimes called penal law, refers to any of various bodies of rules in different jurisdictions whose common characteristic is the potential for unique and often severe impositions as punishment for failure to comply. ... Herbert Brownell, Jr. ... William Fife Knowland (June 26, 1908 – February 23, 1974) was a U.S. politician and newpaperman. ... The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... Currently, all United States territories are either unincorporated (meaning that they are not fully part of the United States, with all aspects of the United States Constitution applying automatically) or unorganized (meaning that they do not have a form of government specified by an Organic Act passed by the United... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Stevens soon gained a reputation as an active prosecutor who vigorously prosecuted violations of federal and territorial liquor, drug, and prostitution laws,[10] characterized by Fairbanks area homesteader Niilo Koponen (who later served in the Alaska State House of Representatives from 1982-1991) as "this rough tough shorty of a district attorney who was going to crush crime."[16] Stevens sometimes accompanied U.S. Marshals on raids. As recounted years later by Justice Jay Rabinowitz, "U.S. marshals went in with Tommy guns and Ted led the charge, smoking a stogie and with six guns on his hips."[10] However, Stevens himself has said the colorful stories spread about him as a pistol-packing D.A. were greatly exaggerated, and recalled only one incident when he carried a gun: on a vice raid to the town of Big Delta about 75 miles (121 km) southwest of Fairbanks, he carried a holstered gun on a marshal's suggestion.[10] “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ... Jay Andrew Rabinowitz[1] (February 25, 1927–June 16, 2001[2]) was an American lawyer, best known for serving as an Alaska Supreme Court justice from February 1965 to February 1997. ... Big Delta is a census-designated place located in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska. ...


Stevens also became known for his explosive temper, which was focused particularly on a criminal defense lawyer named Warren A. Taylor[10] who would later go on to become the Alaska Legislature's first Speaker of the House in the First Alaska State Legislature.[17] "Ted would get red in the face, blow up and stalk out of the courtroom," a former court clerk later recalled of Stevens' relationship with Taylor.[10] Warren Arthur Taylor (born 1891 - ?) was an important American politician from Alaska during both territorial period and first years of statehood. ... The Alaska Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The 1st Alaska State Legislature was elected November 25, 1958, upon the passage of the Alaska Statehood Act, and convened immediately after official statehood in 1959. ...


In 1956, in a trial which received national headlines, Stevens prosecuted Jack Marler, a former Internal Revenue Service agent accused of failing to file tax returns. Marler's first trial, which was handled by a different prosecutor, had ended in a deadlocked jury and a mistrial. For the second trial, Stevens was up against Edgar Paul Boyko, a flamboyant Anchorage attorney who built his defense of Marler on the theory of no taxation without representation, citing the Territory of Alaska's lack of representation in the U.S. Congress. As recalled by Boyko, his closing argument to the jury was a rabble-rousing appeal for the jury to "strike a blow for Alaskan freedom," claiming that "this case was the jury's chance to move Alaska toward statehood." Boyko remembered that "Ted had done a hell of a job in the case," but Boyko's tactics paid off, and Marler was acquitted on April 3, 1956. Following the acquittal, Stevens issued a statement saying, "I don't believe the jury's verdict is an expression of resistance to taxes or law enforcement or the start of a Boston Tea Party. I do believe, however, that the decision will be a blow to the hopes for Alaska statehood."[10] Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... No taxation without representation was a slogan in the period 1763-1775 that summarized a primary grievance of the American colonists in the Thirteen colonies. ... Alaska Territory was an organized territory of the United States from August 24, 1912 to January 3, 1959, when Alaska became the 49th state. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about a 1773 American protest. ...


Department of the Interior

Alaska statehood

In March 1956, Stevens' friend Elmer Bennett, legislative counsel in the Department of the Interior, was promoted by Secretary of the Interior Douglas McKay to the Secretary's office. Bennett successfully lobbied McKay to replace him in his old job with Stevens, and Stevens returned to Washington, D.C. to take up the position.[18] By the time he arrived in June 1956, McKay had resigned in order to run for the U.S. Senate from his home state of Oregon[18] and Fred Andrew Seaton had been appointed to replace him.[18][19] Seaton, a newspaper publisher from Nebraska,[18] was a close friend of Fairbanks Daily News-Miner publisher C.W. Snedden, and in common with Snedden was an advocate of Alaska statehood,[19] unlike McKay, who had been lukewarm in his support.[18] Seaton asked Snedden if he knew any Alaskan who could come to Washington, D.C. to work for Alaska statehood; Snedden replied that the man he needed — Stevens — was already there working in the Department of the Interior.[19] The fight for Alaska statehood became Stevens' principal work at Interior. "He did all the work on statehood," Roger Ernst, Seaton's assistant secretary for public land management, later said of Stevens. "He wrote 90 percent of all the speeches. Statehood was his main project."[19] A sign on Stevens' door proclaimed his office "Alaskan Headquarters" and Stevens became known at the Department of the Interior as "Mr. Alaska."[18] The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally owned land. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... (James) Douglas McKay (June 24, 1893–July 22, 1959) was a Republican from Oregon who entered politics after an earlier career in business, to first become governor of the state, and later a cabinet officer. ... ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Frederick Andrew Seaton (December 11, 1909–January 16, 1974) was United States Secretary of the Interior during Dwight Eisenhowers administration. ... The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner is a newspaper that serves the city of Fairbanks, Alaska and Fairbanks North Star Borough. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally owned land. ...


Efforts to make Alaska a state had been going on since 1943, and had nearly come to fruition during the Truman administration in 1950 when a statehood bill passed in the U.S. House of Representatives, only to die in the Senate.[19] The national Republican Party opposed statehood for Alaska, in part out of fear that Alaska would elect Democrats to Congress.[19] At the time Stevens arrived in the Washington, D.C. to take up his new job, a constitutional convention to write an Alaska constitution had just been concluded on the campus of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.[20] The 55 delegates also elected three unofficial representatives, all Democrats, as unofficial delegates to Congress: Ernest Gruening and William Egan as U.S. "senators" and Ralph Rivers as U.S. "representative."[19] For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... The University of Alaska is a Land-Grant, Sea-Grant, and Space Grant university founded in 1922 in Fairbanks, Alaska. ... Bronze by George Anthonisen. ... William Allen Egan (October 8, 1914–May 6, 1984) was an American Democratic politician. ... Ralph Julian Rivers (May 23, 1903 - August 14, 1976) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Alaska. ...


President Eisenhower, a Republican, regarded Alaska as too large and sparsely populated to be economically self-sufficient as a state, and furthermore saw statehood as an obstacle to effective defense of Alaska should the Soviet Union seek to invade it.[19] Eisenhower was especially worried about the sparsely populated areas of northern and western Alaska. In March 1954, he had drawn a line on a map indicating his opinion of the portions of Alaska which he felt ought to remain in federal hands even if Alaska were granted statehood.[19]


Seaton and Stevens worked with Gen. Nathan Twining, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who had served in Alaska, and Jack L. Stempler, a top Defense Department attorney, to create a compromise that would address Eisenhower's concerns. Much of their work was conducted in a hospital room at Walter Reed Army Hospital, where Seaton was being treated for back problems.[19] Their work concentrated on refining the line on the map that Eisenhower had drawn in 1954, which became known as the PYK Line after three rivers — the Porcupine, Yukon, and Kuskokwim — whose courses defined much of the line.[19] The PYK Line was the basis for Section 10 of the Alaska Statehood Act, which Stevens wrote.[19] Under Section 10, the land north and west of the PYK Line — which included the entirety of Alaska's North Slope, the Seward Peninsula, most of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the western portions of the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands — would be part of the new state, but the President would be granted emergency powers to establish special national defense withdrawals in those areas if deemed necessary.[21] "It's still in the law but it's never been exercised," Stevens later recollected. "Now that the problem with Russia is gone, it's surplusage. But it is a special law that only applies to Alaska."[19] Nathan Farragut Twining (1897 - 1982) was a U.S. air force general. ... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... This article is about the U.S. Army medical center/hospital (not the research institute). ... The Porcupine River is a river in Alaska and in the Yukon. ... The Yukon River is a major watercourse of northwestern North America. ... The Kuskokwim River (Kusquqvak in Central Yupik) is a river, approximately 724 mi (1,165 km) long, in southwest Alaska in the United States. ... The Alaska Statehood Act, signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on July 7, 1958, allowing Alaska to enter the Union on January 3, 1959. ... ... The Seward Peninsula is a large peninsula in western Alaska. ... The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region is a treeless tundra located in southwestern Alaska. ... Volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula The Alaska Peninsula is a peninsula extending about 800 km (500 miles) to the southwest from the mainland of Alaska and ending in the Aleutian Islands. ... Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... The Pribilof Islands (often called the Fur Seal Islands, Russian: Kotovi) are a group of four volcanic islands, part of Alaska, lying in the Bering Sea, about 200 miles north of Unalaska and 200 miles south of Cape Newenham, the nearest point on the North American mainland. ...


Stevens also took part — illegally — in lobbying for the statehood bill,[19] working closely with the Alaska Statehood Committee from his office at Interior.[19] Stevens hired Margaret Atwood, daughter of Anchorage Times publisher Robert Atwood,[19] who was chairman of the Alaska Statehood Committee,[22] to work with him in the Interior Department. "We were violating the law," Stevens told a researcher in an October 1977 oral history interview for the Eisenhower Library. "[W]e were lobbying from the executive branch, and there's been a statute against that for a long time.... We more or less, I would say, masterminded the House and Senate attack from the executive branch."[19] Stevens and the younger Atwood created file cards on members of Congress based on "whether they were Rotarians or Kiwanians or Catholics or Baptists and veterans or loggers, the whole thing," Stevens said in the 1977 interview. "And we'd assigned these Alaskans to go talk to individual members of the Senate and split them down on the basis of people that had something in common with them."[19] The lobbying campaign extended to presidential press conferences. "We set Ike up quite often at press conferences by planting questions about Alaska statehood," Stevens said in the 1977 interview. "We never let a press conference go by without getting someone to try to ask him about statehood."[19] Newspapers were also a targeted, according to Stevens. "We planted editorials in weeklies and dailies and newspapers in the district of people we thought were opposed to us or states where they were opposed to us so that suddenly they were thinking twice about opposing us."[19] The Anchorage Times was a daily newspaper published in Anchorage, Alaska that became known for the pro-business political stance of longtime publisher and editor, Robert Atwood. ... The Eisenhower Presidential Center includes the Eisenhower presidential library, President Dwight David Eisenhowers boyhood home, Museum, and gravesite. ...


The Alaska Statehood Act became law with Eisenhower's signature on July 7, 1958,[21] and Alaska formally was admitted to statehood on January 3, 1959, when Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Proclamation.[23] is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Alaska House of Representatives

After returning to Alaska, Stevens practiced law in Anchorage. He was elected to the Alaska House of Representatives in 1964, and became House majority leader in his second term. This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The Alaska House of Representatives is the lower house in the Alaska Legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


U.S. Senator

Elections

In 1968, Stevens ran for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, but lost in the primary to Anchorage Mayor Elmer E. Rasmuson. Rasmuson lost the general election to Democrat Mike Gravel. In December 1968, after the death of Democratic Senator Bob Bartlett, Governor Walter Joseph Hickel appointed Stevens to the U.S. Senate.[24] The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Elmer E. Rasmuson (1909-2000) was an Alaskan banker and philanthropist. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (IPA: ) (born May 13, 1930), is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, having served for two terms, from 1969 to 1981. ... Bronze by Felix W. de Weldon. ... This is a list of the governors of the U.S. state of Alaska, of Alaska Territory and of the District of Alaska, and the military commanders of the District of Alaska. ... Categories: People stubs | 1919 births | Governors of Alaska | U.S. Secretaries of the Interior ...


In a special election in 1970, Stevens was elected to finish the term of Bartlett with 60% of the vote. Stevens has been reelected six times since, in the 1972, 1978, 1984, 1990, 1996 and 2002 elections. His current term will expire in January 2009. Since his first election to a full term in 1972, Stevens has never received less than 66% of the vote.[25] Results -- Conservative pickups in orange, Independent pickups in yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1970 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the term of... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1972 was an election for the United States Senate coinciding with the landslide re-election of Richard M. Nixon. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1978 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Democratic President Jimmy Carters term. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1984 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald Reagans landslide re-election as President. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1990 was an election for the United States Senate in which the Democratic Party increased its majority with a net gain of one seat from the... Republican hold in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic hold in light blue, Democratic pickup in dark blue. ... Republican hold in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic hold in light blue, Democratic pickup in dark blue. ...


Stevens has announced he will run again for an Alaska seat in the US Senate in 2008.[26] The Alaska Senate Election of 2008 will be held on November 4, 2008. ...


Stevens' campaign political action committee is called the "Northern Lights PAC." In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ...


Committees

Stevens served as the Assistant Republican Whip from 1977 to 1985. In 1994, Stevens was appointed Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee. Stevens became the Senate's president pro tempore when Republicans regained control of the chamber as a result of the 2002 mid-term elections, during which the previous most senior republican senator and former president pro tempore Strom Thurmond retired. In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... The United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration is responsible for dealing with the rules of the Senate, with administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ...


Stevens chaired the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1997 to 2005, except for the 18 months when Democrats controlled the chamber. The chairmanship gave Stevens considerable influence among fellow Senators, who relied on him for home-state project funds. Due to Republican Party rules that limited committee chairmanships to six years, Stevens gave up the Appropriations gavel at the start of the 109th Congress, in January 2005. He chaired the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation during the 109th Congress. He is currently the ranking member on the committee. The U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The 109th United States Congress meets from January 4, 2005, to January 1, 2007. ... The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is a standing committee of the United States Senate in charge of all senate matters related to the following subjects: Coast Guard Coastal zone management Communications Highway safety Inland waterways, except construction Interstate commerce Marine and ocean navigation, safety, and transportation Marine...


Stevens also has been Chairman of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee, the Senate Ethics Committee, the Arms Control Observer Group, and the Joint Committee on the Library of Congress. A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... The United States Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the federal civil service, the affairs of the District of Columbia, and the United States Postal Service. ... The U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics is a select committee of the United States Senate charged with dealing with matters related to senatorial ethics. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


Political issues

Internet and network neutrality

Main article: Series of tubes

On June 28, 2006, the Senate commerce committee was in the final day of three days of hearings,[27] during which the Committee members considered over 200 amendments to an omnibus telecommunications bill. Senator Stevens authored the bill, S. 2686[28], the Communications, Consumer's Choice, and Broadband Deployment Act of 2006. Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, who referred to the Internet as a series of tubes. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Senators Olympia Snowe (R-ME) and Byron Dorgan (D-ND) cosponsored and spoke on behalf of an amendment that would have inserted strong network neutrality mandates into the bill. In between speeches by Snowe and Dorgan, Stevens gave an 11 minute speech in which he made several technical and terminological errors while attempting to explain his opposition to the amendment. For example, he referred to the internet as "not a big truck," but a "series of tubes" that could be clogged with information. He also complained that "an Internet [sic] was sent by my staff" and that commercial traffic delayed it by five days; it is believed he was referring to an email which was sent by his staff. Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States Senator from Maine. ... Byron Leslie Dorgan (born May 14, 1942) is the junior United States Senator from North Dakota. ... Network neutrality (equivalently net neutrality, Internet neutrality or NN) refers to a principle that is applied to residential broadband networks, and potentially to all networks. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, who referred to the Internet as a series of tubes. ...

Senator Stevens (right) with fellow Alaska Senator Mike Gravel

Of 22 Senators, 11 voted for the amendment and 11 against. Because it failed to garner majority support, the amendment failed. (The audio from the day's hearing is available at the Committee web site[27] as a streaming media file in RealMedia format, playable with RealPlayer. Stevens' speech begins at 1:13:11 and ends at 1:24:19.) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (IPA: ) (born May 13, 1930), is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, having served for two terms, from 1969 to 1981. ... Streaming media is multimedia that is continuously received by, and normally displayed to, the end-user while it is being delivered by the provider. ... RealMedia is a multimedia container format created by RealNetworks. ... RealPlayer, briefly known also as RealOne Player, is a cross-platform media player by RealNetworks that plays a number of multimedia formats including MP3, MPEG-4, QuickTime, Windows Media and multiple versions of proprietary RealAudio and RealVideo formats. ...


Soon after, Stevens' interpretation of how the Internet worked became a topic on the blogosphere, with many writers and commentators derisively citing Stevens' misunderstanding of Internet technology, arguing that the speech showed that Stevens had apparently formed a strong opinion on a topic which he understood poorly.[29] This Internet phenomenon sparked mainstream media attention, and was prominently featured on several episodes of Comedy Central's The Daily Show. "Series of tubes" has now become an Internet meme. Blogosphere is a collective term encompassing all blogs and their interconnections. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Daily Show is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, who referred to the Internet as a series of tubes. ... The Hampster Dance [sic] is one of the first widely distributed Internet memes and illustrates the characteristic silliness of much of the genre. ...


Logging

Stevens has been a long time logging proponent. Recently, he has strongly supported a plan that would allow 2.4 million acres of roadless old growth forest, a refuge for endangered wildlife, to be clearcut. He believes that this would revive Alaska's logging industry and bring jobs to unemployed loggers. However, the proposal would mean that thousands of miles of roads would be constructed at the expense of the Forest Service, judged to cost taxpayers 200,000 dollars per job created.


Abortion

According to Ontheissues.org[30] and NARAL[31], Ted Stevens has a voting record that indicates a pro-life perspective, despite some notable pro-choice votes[32]. This article is about the social movement. ... Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ...


However, as a former member of the Republican Main Street Partnership, Stevens presumably supported human embryonic stem cell research.[33] The Republican Main Street Partnership is a group of social liberals and moderates in the United States Republican Party. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ...


Global Warming

Stevens, once an avowed critic of anthropogenic climate change, began actively supporting legislation to combat climate change in early 2007. "Global climate change is a very serious problem for us, becoming more so every day," he said at a Senate hearing, adding that he was "concerned about the human impacts on our climate."[34] Anthropogenic climate change is climate change caused by human action, either direct or indirect. ...


However, in September 2007, Stevens said:

We're at the end of a long, long term of warming. 700 to 900 years of increased temperature, a very slow increase. We think we're close to the end of that. If we're close to the end of that, that means that we'll starting getting cooler gradually, not very rapidly, but cooler once again and stability might come to this region for a period of another 900 years.[35]

Criticism of political positions and actions

Ted Stevens has taken criticism for a wide variety of positions and actions taken in the Senate. This includes placing a secret hold on a bill that would allow easier accountability and research of all federal funding measures, describing the Internet as a "series of tubes" when taking a strong alliance with the telecommunications industry against network neutrality[36], and supporting perceived pork barrel projects such as the Gravina Island Bridge and the Knik Arm Bridge (collectively known as the "Bridges to Nowhere" by their opponents). He threatened to resign from the Senate if the federal earmark for the Alaskan bridges was sent to help repair Louisiana in the wake of Hurricane Katrina damage. Citizens Against Government Waste is a frequent critic of Stevens' affinity for pork and keeps a list of his projects. [37] Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, who referred to the Internet as a series of tubes. ... Network neutrality (equivalently net neutrality, Internet neutrality or NN) refers to a principle that is applied to residential broadband networks, and potentially to all networks. ... A pork barrel, literally, is a barrel in which pork is kept. ... The Gravina Island Bridge is a proposed $315 million bridge to replace the ferry that currently connects Ketchikan, Alaska (population 8,000) to developable land on Gravina Island and improve access to Ketchikan International Airport. ... The Knik Arm Bridge is the name of a proposed bridge to cross the Knik Arm portion of Cook Inlet, north of Anchorage, Alaska. ... An earmark has a different meaning in the field of public finance than in US politics. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) is a prominent taxpayer watchdog group in the USA. Its stated goal is to eliminate waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement in the federal government. ...


Additionally, he received criticism for introducing a bill[38] in January 2007 that would heavily restrict access to social networking sites from public schools and libraries. Sites falling under the language of this bill could include MySpace, Facebook, Digg, Wikipedia and Reddit. [39][40][41] MySpace is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. ... Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, CA Facebook is a social networking website, that was launched on February 4, 2004. ... Digg is a community-based popularity website with an emphasis on technology and science articles, recently expanding to a broader range of categories such as politics and entertainment. ... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ... reddit is a social news website where users can post links to content on the web. ...


Ethical issues and federal investigations

In December 2003, the Los Angeles Times reported that the Stevens had taken advantage of lax Senate rules to use his political influence to earn a large amount of his personal wealth.[42] According to the article, while Stevens was already a millionaire "thanks to investments with businessmen who received government contracts or other benefits with his help," the law maker who is in charge of $800 billion a year, writes "preferences he wrote into law" that he benefits from.[42] This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ...


Home remodeling and Veco

On May 29, 2007, the Anchorage Daily News reported that the FBI and a federal grand jury were investigating an "extensive" remodeling project at Stevens' home in Girdwood. The remodeling work, which more than doubled the size of the modest home ,public records show that the home is now 2,471 square feet (230 m²) and valued at about $441,000-which means that it was less than 1,200 square feet (110 m²) before the remodel, occurred in the summer and fall of 2000, was organized by VECO Corporation, an oil-field service company that has long been a strong lobbying presence in Juneau. Earlier in May, two top Veco executives pleaded guilty to federal conspiracy, bribery and tax charges.[43] In June, the Anchorage Daily News reported that a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., heard evidence in May about the expansion of Stevens' Girdwood home and other matters connecting Stevens to Veco.[44] In mid-June, FBI agents questioned several aides who work for Stevens as part of the investigation.[45] In July, Washingtonian magazine reported that Stevens had hired "Washington’s most powerful and expensive lawyer", Brendan Sullivan Jr., in response to the investigation.[46] Stevens' Alaska home was raided by the FBI and IRS on July 30, 2007.[47] VECO Corporation is an Alaska-based oil pipeline service and construction company. ... The Washingtonian is a monthly magazine distrubuted in the Washington DC area. ... Brendan V. Sullivan, Jr. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Former aide McCabe

The Justice Department is also examining whether federal funds that Stevens steered to an Alaska wildlife research center may have enriched a former aide.[48] Currently the United States Department of Commerce and the Interior Department's inspector general are investigating "how millions of dollars that Stevens, R-Alaska, obtained for the nonprofit Alaska SeaLife Center were spent."[48] According to CNN, "Among the questions is how about $700,000 of nearly $4 million directed to the National Park Service wound up being paid to companies associated with Trevor McCabe, a former legislative director for Stevens."[48] The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... The Aslaska Sealife Center opened in May of 1998 in Seward, Alaska. ...


Trident Seafoods

In 2007 Stevens added $3.5 million into a Senate spending bill to help finance an airport to serve a remote Alaskan island.[49] The airstrip would connect the roughly 100 permanent residents of Akutan, but the biggest beneficiary is the Seattle-based Trident Seafoods Corp. that operates "one of the world’s largest seafood processing plants on the volcanic island in the Aleutians."[49] In December 2006 a federal grand jury investigating political corruption in Alaska ordered Trident and other seafood companies to produce documents about ties to the senator’s son, former Alaska Fisheries Marketing Board Chairman Ben Stevens.[49] Trident’s Bundrant is a longtime supporter of Sen. Stevens, and Bundrant with his family contributed $17,300 since 1995 to Ted Stevens’ political campaigns and $10,800 to his leadership PAC while Bundrant also gave $55,000 to the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee.[49] Akutan may refer to: Akutan, Alaska Mount Akutan Akutan Island USS Akutan (AE-13) Category: ... Looking down the Aleutians from an airplane. ...


Bob Penney

In September, The Hill reported that Stevens had "steered millions of federal dollars to a sportfishing industry group founded by Bob Penney, a longtime friend". In 1998, Stevens invested $15,000 in Utah land deal managed by Stevens; in 2004, Stevens sold his share of the property for $150,000. [50]


Other notes

The Ted Stevens Foundation is a charity established to "assist in educating and informing the public about Senator Ted Stevens". The chairman is Tim McKeever, a lobbyist who was treasurer of Stevens' 2004 campaign. In May 2006, McKeever said that the charity was "nonpartisan and nonpolitical," and that Stevens does not raise money for the foundation, although he has attended some fund-raisers.[51] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


When he is discussing issues that are especially important to him (such as opening up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling), Stevens wears a necktie with The Incredible Hulk on it to show his seriousness.[52] Marvel Comics has sent him free Hulk paraphernalia and thrown a Hulk party for him.[53] The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...


On December 21, 2005, Senator Stevens said that the vote to block drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge "has been the saddest day of my life," [54]. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ...


In May 2006, the Senate Majority Project, a partisan political organization, nominated Stevens as "Drama Queen of the US Senate" for his "entertaining tactics".[55]


On April 13, 2007, Senator Stevens was recognized as being the longest serving Republican senator in history with a career spanning over 38 years. His colleague, Sen. Daniel Inouye (D-HI), referred to Stevens as 'The Strom Thurmond of the Arctic Circle'. is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Daniel Ken Inouye (born September 7, 1924) is a recipient of the Medal of Honor and currently serves as the senior United States Senator from Hawaii. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ...


November 18, 2003, the senator's 80th birthday, was declared "Senator Ted Stevens Appreciation Day" by the Governor of Alaska, Frank H. Murkowski.[56] is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of the governors of the U.S. state of Alaska, of Alaska Territory and of the District of Alaska, and the military commanders of the District of Alaska. ... Frank Hughes Murkowski (born March 28, 1933) is a Polish-American politician who is the current Governor of Alaska and a member of the Republican Party. ...


Stevens delivered a eulogy of Gerald R. Ford at the 38th President's funeral ceremony on December 30, 2006. Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, who referred to the Internet as a series of tubes. ... An earmark has a different meaning in the field of public finance than in US politics. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ "FBI raids U.S. senator's home", Associated Press, 2007-07-30. Retrieved on 2007-07-31. 
  2. ^ Theodore Fulton “Ted” Stevens genealogy. Rootsweb.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Whitney, David. (1994-08-08). "Formative years: Stevens' life wasn't easy growing up in the depression with a divided family." Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved 2007-06-01.
  4. ^ a b c Mitchell, Donald Craig. (2001). Take My Land, Take My Life: The Story of Congress's Historic Settlement of Alaska Native Land Claims, 1960–1971. Fairbanks, AK: University of Alaska Press, p. 220.
  5. ^ a b Mitchell, 2001, p. 221.
  6. ^ "About the Committee: Vice Chairman" (biography of Ted Stevens). United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-06-01.
  7. ^ a b c "With the editors..." 64 Harvard Law Review vii (1950).
  8. ^ a b c Mitchell, 2001, p. 222.
  9. ^ Stevens, Theodore F. "Erie R.R. v. Tompkins and the Uniform General Maritime Law." 64 Harvard Law Review 88–112 (1950).
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Whitney, David. (1994-08-09). "The road north: Needing work, Stevens borrows $600, answers call to Alaska." Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved 2007-06-01.
  11. ^ Ely, Northcutt. (1994-12-16). "Doctor Ray Lyman Wilbur: Third President of Stanford & Secretary of the Interior." Paper presented at the Fortnightly Club of Redlands, California, meeting #1530. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  12. ^ Alaska Mining Hall of Fame Foundation. (2006). "Emil Usibelli (1893–1964)." Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  13. ^ Michael Crowley, "In Praise of Ted Stevens, the Senate's Angriest Man", New Republic, posted August 31, 2007, print date September 10, 2007
  14. ^ a b c Mitchell, 2001, p. 223.
  15. ^ a b c d Mitchell, 2001, p. 224.
  16. ^ a b Mitchell, 2001, p. 225.
  17. ^ Voice of the Times. (2004-12-31). "Test your legislative knowledge." Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved 2007-06-07.
  18. ^ a b c d e f Mitchell, 2001, p. 226.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Whitney, David. (1994-08-10). "Seeking statehood: Stevens bent rules to bring Alaska into the union." Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved 2007-06-01.
  20. ^ University of Alaska. (ca. 2004). "Constitutional Convention." Creating Alaska: The Origins of the 49th State (website). Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  21. ^ a b Alaska Statehood Act, Pub. L. 85-508, 72 Stat. 339. July 7, 1958. Codified at 48 U.S.C., Chapter 2.
  22. ^ University of Alaska. (ca. 2004). "Alaskans for Statehood: Robert B. Atwood." Creating Alaska: The Origins of the 49th State (website). Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  23. ^ University of Alaska. (ca. 2004). "Signing of the Alaska Statehood Proclamation, January 3, 1959." Creating Alaska: The Origins of the 49th State (website). Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  24. ^ "About Senator Stevens" (official biography). United States Senator Ted Stevens (official website). Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  25. ^ Aaron Blake, "Begich’s entry tees up first tough reelection race in Stevens's career", TheHill.com, February 27, 2008.
  26. ^ "Ted Stevens -- and Senate GOP -- In Trouble", The Nation, 2007-07-30. Retrieved on 2007-05-29. 
  27. ^ a b "Full Committee Markup - Communications Reform Bill." U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science & Transportation, June 28, 2006.
  28. ^ "S.2686. A bill to amend the Communications Act of 1934 and for other purposes."
  29. ^ Singel, Ryan and Kevin Poulsen. (2006-06-30). "Your Own Personal Internet." 27B Stroke 6, Wired.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-24.
  30. ^ "Ted Stevens on Abortion." On the Issues: Every Political Leader on Every Issue. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  31. ^ "Congressional Record on Choice by State" (Alaska). NARAL. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  32. ^ "U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 108th Congress - 1st Session: On the Amendment (Harkin Amdt. No. 260). Vote date March 12, 2003. United States Senate, Legislation & Records. Retrieved on 2007-05-31
  33. ^ Congressional Members: 109th Congress. Republican Main Street Partnership. Archived from the original on 2005-11-24.
  34. ^ Adair, Bill. (2007-02-24). "Senator's new views on climate surprise foes." St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  35. ^ John Tracy, "Shishmaref feels heat of global warming", KTUU.com, September 3, 2007
  36. ^ "Full Committee Markup - Communications Reform Bill." June 28, 2006. United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  37. ^ "Senator Ted Stevens' Pork Tally." Citizens Against Government Waste. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  38. ^ Search Results - THOMAS (Library of Congress)
  39. ^ U.S. senator: It's time to ban Wikipedia in schools, libraries | Computerworld Blogs
  40. ^ Fear And Loathing on The Anti-Anti-Predator Campaign | Threat Level from Wired.com
  41. ^ DOPA Jr. Is Not A Wikipedia Ban | WebProNews
  42. ^ a b "Senator's Way to Wealth Was Paved With Favors", Los Angeles Times, December 17, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  43. ^ Richard Mauer. "Feds eye Stevens' home remodeling project", Anchorage Daily News, May 29, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  44. ^ Richard Mauer. "Grand jury examines Stevens' ties to Veco", Anchorage Daily News, June 17, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  45. ^ Matt Apuzzo. "Sen. Stevens aides questioned in probe", Associated Press, June 19, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  46. ^ Kim Eisler, "Sen. Ted Stevens Hires Super-Lawyer Brendan Sullivan", Washingtonian Magazine, July 1, 2007
  47. ^ "FBI photographs wine in raid of senator’s home", MSNBC, July 31, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  48. ^ a b c "Probe eyes money Stevens steered to research center", CNN, August 1, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  49. ^ a b c d "Stevens’ Earmark Funds Airport Project That Benefits One Company", CQ Politics, August 1, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  50. ^ Manu Raju, "Catching fish, netting earmarks up in Alaska", The Hill, September 6, 2007
  51. ^ Michael Kranish, "Limits urged on political charities: Watchdogs target funds legislators helped create", Boston Globe, May 7, 2006
  52. ^ adn.com | alaska : Senate to vote today on ANWR
  53. ^ AKLegislature.com: Anger management: Stevens meets the Hulk
  54. ^ Senate Rejects Bid for Drilling in Arctic Area - New York Times
  55. ^ http://www.senatemajority.com/node/289
  56. ^ Alaska Governor Sarah Palin

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  • United States Senator Ted Stevens, U.S. Senate site
Media
United States Senate
Preceded by
Bob Bartlett
United States Senator (Class 2) from Alaska
December 24, 1968 – present
Served alongside: Ernest Gruening, Mike Gravel, Frank Murkowski, Lisa Murkowski
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Robert P. Griffin
Senate Minority Whip
1977 – 1981
Succeeded by
Alan Cranston
Preceded by
Alan Cranston
Senate Majority Whip
1981 – 1985
Succeeded by
Alan K. Simpson
Preceded by
Malcolm Wallop
Chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee
1983 – 1987
Succeeded by
Howell Heflin
Preceded by
Wendell H. Ford
Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee
1995
Succeeded by
John Warner
Preceded by
William V. Roth, Jr.
Chairman of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee
1995 – 1997
Succeeded by
Fred Thompson
Preceded by
Mark Hatfield
Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee
1997 – 2001
Succeeded by
Robert Byrd
Preceded by
Robert Byrd
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
2003 – 2007
Succeeded by
Robert Byrd
Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee
2003 – 2005
Succeeded by
Thad Cochran
Preceded by
John McCain
Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee
2005 – 2007
Succeeded by
Daniel Inouye
Party political offices
Preceded by
Bill Brock
Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee
1975 – 1977
Succeeded by
Bob Packwood
Preceded by
Robert P. Griffin
Senate Republican Whip
1977 – 1985
Succeeded by
Alan K. Simpson
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Robert Byrd
President pro tempore emeritus of the United States Senate
2007 – present
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Stevens, Ted
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Stevens, Theodore Fulton
SHORT DESCRIPTION senior United States Senator from Alaska
DATE OF BIRTH November 18, 1923
PLACE OF BIRTH Indianapolis, Indiana
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
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  Results from FactBites:
 
TPMmuckraker: Ted Stevens Archives (12384 words)
Stevens’ acknowledgment that his son in under investigation firms up what the press pieced together in May. Former Alaska Senate President Ben Stevens was identified by the press as “state senator B” described in the guilty pleas of two former Veco executives.
Ted Stevens (R-AK) jacked his house off the ground, inserted a new first story and placed the old first floor on top, thanks to the help of a top executive at local oil company Veco Corp. who hired at least one key contractor to complete the feat of a job.
Ted Stevens does not seem to be on prosecutors' radar screen in the corruption investigation.
Ted Stevens: Information from Answers.com (1144 words)
Ted Stevens was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1923.
Stevens became the Senate's president pro tempore when Republicans regained control of the chamber as a result of the 2002 mid-term elections, during which the previous longest-serving republican senator and former president pro tempore Strom Thurmond retired.
Stevens' son, Ben Stevens, was appointed to the Alaska Senate in 2001 by Democratic Governor Tony Knowles, and is currently the Senate President.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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