FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ted Snyder

Ted Snyder (August 15, 1881 - July 16, 1965), was a Jewish-American Hall of Fame lyricist and composer. August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1999-The Bomb 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent or religion who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... A lyricist is an author of song lyrics. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...


Born in Freeport, Illinois, he grew up in Boscobel, Wisconsin. He learned to play the piano as a boy and as a young man returned to Illinois to work in Chicago as a pianist in a café before being employed by a music publishing company. In 1907, Snyder had his first musical composition published and the following year set up his own music publishing business in New York City. He gave Irving Berlin his first break in 1909 when he hired him as a staff writer for his company and the two eventually became business partners. In 1914, Ted Snyder became one of the founding members of ASCAP. Freeport is a city located in Stephenson County, Illinois. ... This page refers to the city of Boscobel. ... This article is about the modern musical instrument. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989), born Israel Isidore Baline, in Tyumen, Siberia (or Mahilyow (Mogilev), Belarus), was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ...


Snyder's growing name as a top-line composer led to his compositions being used in stage plays with the first to make it to Broadway in 1908. Following his teaming up with Irving Berlin, the two were hired to perform and sing their music in the 1910 musical "Up and Down Broadway." Snyder would become widely known to a later generation through hits such as 1921's "The Sheik of Araby" recorded by several artists including Benny Goodman in 1937 and The Beatles in 1962 (Decca Audition). The most notable of Snyder's works is "Who's Sorry Now?" written in 1923 in collaboration with Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby. "Who's Sorry Now?" became a No.1 hit on the UK Singles Chart for Connie Francis in 1958 and went to No. 4 on the American Billboard charts. In 2000, it was named one of the Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about the street in New York City. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman, (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was a famous Jazz musician, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Childhood and early years Goodman was born in Chicago, the son of poor Jewish immigrants who lived on Chicago... The Beatles were a British pop and rock group from Liverpool. ... Bert Kalmar (16 February 1884 - 18 September 1947) was a popular United States songwriter, born in New York City. ... Harry Ruby (October 29, 1895 – February 23, 1974) was an American songwriter and screenwriter. ... This is a list of the number one singles on the UK Singles Chart, during the 1950s. ... The UK Singles Chart is currently compiled by The Official UK Charts Company on behalf of the British record industry. ... Connie Francis MGM LP record, 1961 Connie Francis (December 12, 1938 - June 17, 2005) in Newark, New Jersey) is an American singer. ... An example of a Billboard Magazine. ... The Songs of the Century list is part of an education project by the Recording Industry Association of America, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Scholastic Inc. ... The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is a trade group representing the U.S. recording industry. ...


In 1930, Snyder retired from the songwriting business and moved to California where he opened a Hollywood nightclub. As of 2005, thirteen of his compositions have been used in motion pictures. State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Official language(s) English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of...


Ted Snyder passed away in 1965 in Woodland Hills and was interred in the Oakwood Memorial Park Cemetery in Chatsworth, California. In 1970, he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Woodland Hills is a community within the City of Los Angeles. ... The Oakwood Memorial Park Cemetery is located at 22601 Lassen Street, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California. ... Chatsworth is a community of Los Angeles, bordered by the Santa Susana Mountains and unincorporated Los Angeles County lands to the north, Porter Ranch to the northeast, Northridge to the east, West Hills to the south, and the Simi Hills, Ventura County, Simi Valley, and Chatsworth Lake Manor to the... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ...


Work on Broadway

Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... A lyricist is an author of song lyrics. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Fosse A Broadway musical based on the music & choreography of Bob Fosse (1927-1987) in the form of a review. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... A songwriter is someone who writes, in part or in full, the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ...

Links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m