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Encyclopedia > Ted Rall
A Ted Rall cartoon depicting John Kerry and George W. Bush. Bush is always portrayed as Generalissimo El Busho - a vicious military dictator - in Rall's comics.

Ted Rall, born 1963 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and raised near Dayton, Ohio, is a liberal columnist and syndicated editorial cartoonist whose political cartoons often appear in a multi-panel comic-strip format. Fair Use - lowered quality - Fully attributed. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Augusto Pinochet (sitting) was an army general who led a military coup in Chile in 1973. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... An editorial cartoonist, also known as a political cartoonist, is an artist who draws cartoons that contain some level of political or social commentary. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...


From 1981 to 1984, Rall attended Columbia University's engineering school where he contributed cartoons to the campus newspapers, including the Columbia Daily Spectator and the Jester. He failed to complete his studies in the engineering school, where he majored in applied physics and nuclear engineering, but returned to graduate several years later from Columbia's School of General Studies in 1991 with a bachelor of arts, with honors, in history. Rall says meeting Keith Haring in 1986, at a subway station, inspired him to pursue cartooning as a full-time profession. Columbia University is a private research university in the United States and a member of the prestigious Ivy League. ... The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS) is a school of Columbia University which awards degrees in engineering, applied physics and applied mathematics. ... The Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily newspaper, written by Columbia University undergraduates, servicing the university community and the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. ... Jester of Columbia cover from April, 2006 The Jester of Columbia, or simply the Jester , is a humor magazine at Columbia University in New York City. ... The School of General Studies, commonly known as General Studies or simply GS, is Columbia Universitys undergraduate college for non-traditional students. ... Harings Radiant Baby Keith Haring (May 4, 1958 - February 16, 1990) was a pre-eminent artist and social activist whose work responded to the New York street culture of the 1980s. ...


Rall writes a weekly syndicated column and edits the Attitude series of alternative cartooning anthologies and spin-off collections by up-and-coming cartoonists. He also travels to and writes about Central Asia, a region he believes to be pivotal to U.S. foreign policy concerns. In November 2001 he went to Afghanistan as a war correspondent for The Village Voice and KFI Radio in Los Angeles. The Village Voice is a weekly newspaper in New York City featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ...

Contents

Style

Rall is one of a new breed of editorial cartoonists who began in the alternative weeklies during the 1980s and early 1990s with wordy, abstractly drawn strips about politics and social issues. His abstract drawing style reflects a distinct break from the cross-hatched style developed by Jeff MacNelly during the 1960s, a house style that had become virtually synonymous with American editorial cartooning. Syndicated since 1991, he enjoyed success in mainstream newspapers like the New York Times and Washington Post. Unexpected attacks on sacred cows led to a reputation for unorthodox politics. He was, for example, one of the few liberal cartoonists to call for Bill Clinton's impeachment for lying under oath. He is also opposed to gun control legislation. His cartoons have appeared regularly in Rolling Stone, Time, Fortune and Men's Health magazines, and were for several years the most reproduced cartoons in the New York Times. Jeffrey Kenneth MacNelly (1948 - June 8, 2000) was a famous American editorial cartoonist, widely considered to be one of the best editorial cartoonists of the modern era. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ... Sacred Cows, subtitled The Songs That Helped Us, is the title of an album featuring the rock band The Swirling Eddies, performing their own less-than-serious versions of popular CCM hits, released in 1996 on StarSong. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Mens Health (MH), published by Rodale Press in Emmaus, Pennsylvania, United States, is the largest circulation mens lifestyle magazine in the world. ...


Generation X

Rall's 1990s work focused on the issues and concerns surrounding Generation X, Americans born between 1961 and 1981. While living in San Francisco Rall met Dave Eggers, who hired him as a contributing editor and writer for Might magazine, a publication Eggers edited and co-founded. Among other essays, Rall authored two seminal essays for Might, "Confessions of an Investment Banker" and "College is for Suckers." He wrote Op/Ed columns for The New York Times, including "Why I Will Not Vote" (1994), which justified apathy among Generation Xers who saw neither the Democrats or Republicans responding to their concerns. In 1998 Rall published "Revenge of the Latchkey Kids," a compendium of essays and cartoons that criticized the Baby Boomer-dominated media for ignoring and ridiculing young adults and their achievements. Generation X is a term used to describe generations in many countries around the world. ... Dave Eggers at the 2005 Hay Festival Dave Eggers (born March 12, 1970) is an American writer, editor, and publisher. ... Might is a now defunct magazine founded by Dave Eggers in the early 90s, the author of A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius. This magazine can be described as an effort of 20-somethings to say something, instead of nothing. ...


Radio

Rall had a Saturday and Sunday radio talk show on KFI radio in Los Angeles from August 1998 to August 2000, when he was fired for, among other reasons, devoting too much time to discussions of Asia and the Middle East.[citation needed] After 9/11 KFI brought him back to travel to Afghanistan and file live on-air reports from the battle of Kunduz and elsewhere in northern Afghanistan. Rall's show was also broadcast live from Havana as well as Pakistani-held Kashmir. Rall has been a frequent guest on National Public Radio, the BBC and Fox Radio. KFI is an AM radio station that began operating on March 31, 1922 as one of the United States first high-powered, clear channel stations. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


Central and South Asia

Rall began frequent travels to Central Asia in 1997, when he attempted to drive the Silk Road from Beijing to Istanbul via China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan as a staff writer for P.O.V. magazine. P.O.V. published his adventures as "Silk Road to Ruin," a title he used for his 2006 collection of essays and cartoons about Central Asia. Rall returned to the region for P.O.V. in 1999 to travel the Karakoram Highway from Kashgar, in western China, to Islamabad. Subsequent trips included two trips in 2000, "Stan Trek 2000"--in which Rall brought along 23 listeners to his radio show for a bus journey from Turkmenistan to Kyrgyzstan via Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan--and a U.S. State Department-sponsored visit to Turkmenistan, where he met with Turkmen college students and dissidents to explain the nature of free press in a democracy. A 2002 assignment for Gear magazine to cover the world championships of buzkashi in Tajikistan was not published due to the magazine's going out of business, but turned up in an edited form in "Silk Road to Ruin." Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... The Silk Road Silk Route redirects here. ... Karakoram Highway route map The highest point on the highway: the Khunjerab Pass The Karakoram Highway (KKH) is the highest paved international road in the world. ...


Editor

The Attitude: The New Subversive Cartoonists series of books is an influential series of anthologies of alternative comics edited by Rall. Frustrated that cartoons prevalent in alternative weekly newspapers were being ignored in favor of mainstream and art comics, Rall edited the first "Attitude" anthology, Attitude: The New Subversive Political Cartoonists, in 2002, with its mission to bring together cartoonists who were "too alternative for the mainstream and too mainstream for the alternative." Attitude 2: The New Subversive Alternative Cartoonists followed in 2004, and in 2006 Attitude 3: The New Subversive Online Cartoonists appeared. Each volume contains interviews with, cartoons by and personal ephemera related to 21 different cartoon creators. The first and second volumes emphasized political and humor cartoons; the third volume exclusively features webcartoonists. An anthology is a collection of literary works, originally of poems, but in recent years its usage has broadened to be applied to collections of short stories and comic strips. ... For the publisher Alternative Comics, see Alternative Comics (publisher). ...


Rall also edited three cartoons collections by Andy Singer, Neil Swaab and Stephanie McMillan under the name "Attitude Presents:". The "Attitude" series has become influential among alternative cartoonists. Rehabilitating Mr. ... Stephanie McMillan is a set decorator. ...


Controversies

Rall's work can polarize readers. While his supporters consider him audacious and brilliant, his detractors call him cruel and talentless. In 1999, Rall created a controversy, especially among fellow cartoonists, when he wrote an article in the Village Voice [1] accusing Maus creator Art Spiegelman of lacking talent and controlling who gets high-profile assignments from magazines like The New Yorker through personal connections, including his wife, a New Yorker editor. As a self-described prank, New York Press illustrator Danny Hellman sent two sets of e-mails under Rall's name to at least 35 cartoonists and editors. After Hellman ignored his cease-and-desist notices, Rall filed a $1.5-million lawsuit for libel per se, libel per quod, injurious falsehood, violation of civil rights, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Rall's suit stated that Hellman was attempting to sabotage his career. Eventually four of Rall's five claims were dismissed, leaving only libel per se.[2] The lawsuit is awaiting trial. The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... Maus: A Survivors Tale is a memoir presented as a graphic novel by Art Spiegelman. ... Art Spiegelman (born February 15, 1948) is an American comics artist, editor, and advocate for the medium of comics, best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning comic memoir, Maus. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... New York Press is a free alternative weekly in New York City. ... Danny Hellman (born August 2, 1964) is a freelance illustrator and cartoonist nicknamed Dirty Danny. ... It has been suggested that Eddress be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that civil trial be merged into this article or section. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Intentional infliction of emotional distress (IIED) is a common law tort claim for intentional conduct that results in extreme emotional distress. ...


In a 1999 article entitled "School's out Forever" Rall criticized the manner in which the school was reopened following the Columbine High School massacre, while showing understanding for the murderers, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, claiming "the killers saved their bullets for bullies while telling other kids to leave before they got hurt". He also denounced the re-opening ceremony for the school as a "Nuremberg-style rally" and stated "leaving a few bullet holes or bloodstains behind (perhaps with an explanatory plaque) might have served as a cautionary tale for future bullies and their victims".[3] The Columbine High School massacre occurred on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School in unincorporated Jefferson County, Colorado (the CDP of Columbine) near Denver and Littleton. ... Eric David Harris (April 9, 1981 - April 20, 1999) and Dylan Bennet Klebold (September 11, 1981 - April 20, 1999) were the perpetrators of the Columbine High School massacre near Littleton, Colorado on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, murdering 12 classmates and one teacher. ... Eric David Harris (April 9, 1981 - April 20, 1999) and Dylan Bennet Klebold (September 11, 1981 - April 20, 1999) were the perpetrators of the Columbine High School massacre near Littleton, Colorado on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, murdering 12 classmates and one teacher. ...


Rall has also caused considerable controversy with post-9/11 cartoons. The "Terror Widows" cartoon [4] suggested some of the widows of men murdered in the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks were motivated by greed; it was called offensive by some and "perceptive" by others. After a concerted e-mail campaign by outraged conservative bloggers, Times online dropped the piece. [5] Rall's response to the criticism: "I've done a few lousy cartoons in my time that I'd love to take back, but this isn't one of them." Interestingly, right-wing pundit and Rall critic Ann Coulter made an almost identical argument regarding the women widowed by the 9/11 attacks nearly a year later in her book Godless. The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... A widow is a woman whose spouse has died. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...


Rall raised hackles with his May 4, 2004 Op/Ed "An Army of Scum: Or, We're Looking For a Few Good Homosexual Rapists,"[6] in which he wrote about the Abu Ghraib scandal, "American troops occupying Iraq have become virtually indistinguishable from the SS." The headline referred to news reports that American troops had systematically sodomized Iraqi prisoners with flashlights and other objects. is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... SS or ss or Ss may be: The Schutzstaffel, a Nazi paramilitary force Steamship (SS) (ship prefix) The United States Secret Service A submarine not powered by nuclear energy (SS) (United States Navy designator), see SSN A Soviet/Russian surface-to-surface missile, as listed by NATO reporting name Shortstop...


Three characters in another strip described Pat Tillman as an "idiot" a "sap" and a "hero", respectively, for abandoning his NFL career to enlist in the armed forces. Consistent with concurrent writings concerning possible motivations of soldiers who kill people having nothing to do with 9-11, Tillman is depicted saying "Sign me up, as long as I get to kill Arabs." [7]. Later, after revelations of Tillman's privately held anti-Iraq-war sentiments became public, Rall wrote that he regretted making such sweeping assumptions about Tillman's motives, describing Tillman as "one hell of an interesting human being." [8] Patrick Daniel Tillman (November 6, 1976 – April 22, 2004) was an American football player who left his professional sports career and enlisted in the United States Army in May 2002, along with his brother Kevin Tillman. ...


In a June 8, 2004, blog entry published shortly after the death of Ronald Reagan, Rall said the former President is "turning crispy brown right about now," implying that he is burning in Hell because of his policies. The post was followed by a comic depicting the President being tormented by the devil, informing him that he has arrived at a heaven that looks like hell because of Reagan-style budget cuts. is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... “The Inferno” redirects here. ...


His July 5, 2004, cartoon[9] mocked Condoleezza Rice, depicting her character being sent to a "racial re-education camp" where she refers to herself as a "house nigga" and George W. Bush's "beard". Rall, a white man, was accused of racism by Project 21, a conservative organization with some black members. is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Nigga is a term used in African American Vernacular English that began as an eye dialect form of the word nigger (which is derived ultimately from the Latin word niger meaning the color black). ... In gay slang, a beard is a female companion used to hide a gay mans sexuality by appearing in public as if she and the gay man were a heterosexual couple. ... Racism is a belief or concept that inherent differences between people (such as those upon which the concept of race is based) determine cultural or individual achievement, and may involve the idea that ones own race is superior. ... Project 21 is a media public relations group that provides broadcasters with prominent African-American conservative commentators as guests. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ...


A November 8, 2004, cartoon[10]) depicted mentally disabled children as classroom teachers in an attempt to make an analogy to American voters who reelected Bush, drawing complaints from advocates for the disabled and led to his cartoons being dropped from The Washington Post's website. Rall responded in his blog saying: "I regret hurting people who I have nothing against. I do want to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable, and I think I failed in that with this cartoon. Not to mention that the cartoon failed--too many people got bogged down in the analogy and the main point got lost." is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


A July 4, 2005, Op/Ed piece[11] accused George W. Bush's chief political strategist Karl Rove of being "more morally repugnant and more anti-American" than 9/11 mastermind Osama bin Laden because of his alleged role in outting CIA agent Valerie Plame. is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush until the end of August 2007. ... Anti-American sentiment is a hostility towards or disapproval of the government, culture, history, and/or people of the United States of America. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ...


Ted Rall is a frequent guest on "Hannity and Colmes," the BBC and NPR. He contributes a cartoon called "Left Coast" to the Los Angeles CityBeat. In February 2005, BBC Television broadcast a 30-minute profile of Rall as part of their series Cartoonists on the Front Line. Categories: Television stubs ... Los Angeles CityBeat is a free alternative weekly founded in June of 2003. ...


Rall is listed at #15 in Bernard Goldberg's book 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America described by the author as a "vicious, conspiracy-minded, hate-filled jerk. Rall perceived the listing as an honor, replying, "Not only am I grouped with many people whom I admire for their achievements and patriotism, I'm being demonized by McCarthyite thugs I despise." [12]. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


He coined the term "theftinomics" to describe economic policies that he says are based on theft or fraud. Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Everyday instance of theft: the bike which fits on this wheel has disappeared. ...


Rall solicited funds from readers and left-wing bloggers in an attempt to sue Ann Coulter for libel and slander for her (self-described as "joking") statement that, "Iran is soliciting cartoons on the Holocaust. So far, only Ted Rall, Garry Trudeau, and The New York Times have made submissions." Coulter first made the remark at the 2006 Conservative Political Action Committee meeting in Washington D.C. on February 10, and then printed it in her syndicated column the following week. By 18 days later, pledges totalled over $21,000.[13] [14] However, pledges are no longer being solicited, and in a December 27, 2006 blog entry, Rall posted an email that was sent to pledged contributors to the lawsuit, stating that his attorneys had determined that "the road ahead is too uncertain to justify spending thousands of dollars of pledges, not to mention my own money".[15] Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ...


In his May 16, 2006 column, Rall claimed he had confirmation from unnamed Verizon employees that the Bush administration has tapped his phone. [16] May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section should include material from Bell Atlantic This article or section should include material from GTE Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) is a local exchange telephone company formed by the merger of Bell Atlantic, a former Bell Operating Company, and GTE, which was the largest independant local exchange...


Awards

Rall's cartoons have won the 1995 and 2000 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards and the Society of Professional Journalists Deadline Club Award. He won the 2002 James Aronson Award for Social Justice Graphics. His book Real Americans Admit: The Worst Thing I've Ever Done! won first prize from the Firecracker Alternative Press Awards, his Orwell parody "2024" was named a Best Book of the Year by Amazon.com, and his graphic travelogue To Afghanistan and Back was named as one of the American Library Association's Best Books of the Year. Rall was a 1996 Pulitzer Prize finalist. He is Vice President of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists. Orwell (or Orwellian) can refer to: The writer George Orwell (pen name for Eric Blair). ... Amazon. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists (AAEC) is a professional association concerned with promoting the interests of staff, freelance and student editorial cartoonists in the United States, Canada and Mexico. ...


Rall won Second Prize in the Cartoon category of the 2007 Association of Alternative Newsweeklies Awards.[17] Also in 2007, his book "Silk Road to Ruin" picked up First Prize in the New York Book Festival Competition in the Comics/Zines category.[18] He took Second Prize in Lambda Legal's "Life Without Fair Courts" cartoon contest.[19]]


Publications

Cartoon Collections

  • Waking Up In America (St. Martin's Press, 1992), ISBN 0312085184
  • All The Rules Have Changed (Rip Off Press, 1995), ISBN 0896201198
  • Search and Destroy (Andrews McMeel 2001), ISBN 0740713965
  • America Gone Wild (Andrews McMeel, 2006), ISBN 0740760459

Graphic Novels

  • Real Americans Admit: The Worst Thing I've Ever Done! (NBM Publishing, 1996), ISBN 1561631574
  • My War With Brian (NBM, 1998), ISBN 1561632155
  • 2024: A Graphic Novel (NBM, 2001), ISBN 1561632902

Non-Fiction/Prose

  • Revenge of the Latchkey Kids: An Illustrated Guide to Surviving the '90s and Beyond (Workman, 1998), essays and cartoons, ISBN 0761107452
  • Gas War: The Truth Behind the American Occupation of Afghanistan (NBM, 2002), prose non-fiction, ISBN 0740713965
  • To Afghanistan and Back (NBM, 2002), graphic travelogue, ISBN 1561633259
  • Wake Up, You're Liberal!: How We Can Take America Back from the Right (Soft Skull Press, 2004), prose non-fiction, ISBN 1-932360-22-0
  • Generalissimo El Busho: Essays and Cartoons on the Bush Years (NBM, 2004), essays and cartoons, ISBN 1561633844
  • Silk Road to Ruin: Is Central Asia the New Middle East? (NBM, 2006), graphic novellas and essays, ISBN 1561634549

Attitude: The New Subversive Cartoonists Anthologies

  • Attitude: The New Subversive Political Cartoonists (NBM, 2002), ISBN 1561633178
  • Attitude 2: The New Subversive Alternative Cartoonists (NBM, 2004), ISBN 156163381X
  • Attitude 3: The New Subversive Online Cartoonists (NBM, 2006), ISBN 1561634654

Other

  • Shiny Adidas Track Suits and the Death of Camp (1998), contains essays from Might Magazine, ISBN 0-425-16477-2
  • 9-11: Emergency Relief (2001) 9/11 benefit anthology; contributor, ISBN 1891867121
  • Working For the Man (2003) William Messner-Loebs benefit anthology; contributor
  • Masters of War: Militarism and Blowback in the Era of American Empire (2003), cartoon foreword, ISBN 0415944996
  • Talk to Her: Interviews with Kristine McKenna (2004), illustration of Joe Stummer, ISBN 1-56097-570-9
  • Killed: Great Journalism Too Hot to Print (2004), edited by David Wallis, contains "Money Changes Everything" essay, ISBN 1-56025-581-1
  • The Disposable Male: Sex, Love, and Money (2006), by Michael Gilbert, includes cartoon, ISBN 0-9776552-3-7
  • Killed Cartoons: Casualties from the War on Free Expression (2007), edited by David Wallis, contains "Ronald Reagan airport" and "Gulf War Beach" cartoons, ISBN 0-393-32924-0

Might is a now defunct magazine founded by Dave Eggers in the early 90s, the author of A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius. This magazine can be described as an effort of 20-somethings to say something, instead of nothing. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... William Messner-Loebs (known informally as Bill Loebs) is a Michigan comic book writer and artist. ...

Blog

Ted Rall is also the author of "Search and Destroy: Ted Rall is America's BS detector" (see external links)


External links

Editorials Yahoo! Inc. ...

News articles is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

  • Review of BBC TV profile of Rall
  • Morton, Paul Interview with Econoculture, June 28, 2006

Transcripts from Hannity & Colmes is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Blog Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Search and Destroy: Ted Rall is America's BS detector

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ted Rall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1518 words)
Ted Rall, born 1963 in Cambridge, Massachusetts and raised near Dayton, Ohio, is a left wing columnist and editorial cartoonist.
Ted Rall is a frequent guest on "Hannity and Colmes", the BBC and NPR.
Rall solicited funds from readers and left wing bloggers in an attempt to sue Ann Coulter for libel and slander for her (self described as "joking") statement that, "Iran is soliciting cartoons on the Holocaust.
Ted Rall at AllExperts (1547 words)
Ted Rall, born 1963 in Cambridge, Massachusetts and raised near Dayton, Ohio, is a liberal columnist and editorial cartoonist.
Another controversial Rall cartoon was his posthumous personal attack on Pat Tillman, whom his comic described as an "idiot" and "sap" for abandoning his NFL career to enlist in the armed forces, and portrayed as an anti-Arab bigot.
Rall solicited funds from readers and left wing bloggers in an attempt to sue Ann Coulter for libel and slander for her joking statement that, "Iran is soliciting cartoons on the Holocaust.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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