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Encyclopedia > Ted Kennedy
Ted Kennedy
Ted Kennedy

Incumbent
Assumed office 
November 6, 1962
Serving with John Kerry
Preceded by Benjamin A. Smith II

In office
January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1971
Preceded by Russell B. Long
Succeeded by Robert Byrd

In office
January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1981
Preceded by James Eastland
Succeeded by Strom Thurmond

Born February 22, 1932 (1932-02-22) (age 76)
Boston, Massachusetts
Political party Democratic
Spouse 1. Joan Bennett Kennedy (1958-1982, div.)
2. Victoria Reggie Kennedy (from 1992)
Alma mater Harvard University (1956)
University of Virginia School of Law (1959)
Profession politician, lawyer
Net Worth $43-162 million (USD) [1]
Religion Roman Catholic
Website Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. In office since November 1962, Kennedy is the second-longest serving member of the Senate, after President pro tempore of the United States Senate Robert Byrd of West Virginia. [2][3] The most prominent living member of the Kennedy family, he is the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, both of whom were assassinated, the former on November 22, 1963, the latter on June 5, 1968. He is also the father of Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy. Ted Kennedy can refer to more than one person: Ted Kennedy, U.S. senator from Massachusetts Ted Kennedy (hockey), professional ice hockey player Ted Kennedy (priest), Australian clergyman Ted Kennedy (baseball) (1865-1907), an American baseball player Ed Kennedy Category: ... Image File history File links TedKennedy(D-MA). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Benjamin Atwood Smith II (March 16, 1916 - September 6, 1991) was a United States Senator from the U.S. State of Massachusetts. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Russell Billiu Long Russell Billiu Long (November 3, 1918 – May 9, 2003) was an American politician who served in the United States Senate as a Democrat from Louisiana from 1948 until 1987. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see James Eastland (disambiguation). ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Boston redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Joan Bennett Kennedy was born September 9, 1936 in Riverdale, New York as Virginia Joan Bennett. ... Jan. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... Harvard redirects here. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Senior Senator and Junior Senator are terms commonly used in the media to describe U.S. Senators. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This is a classification of current U.S. Senators by seniority. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The Irish Catholic political dynasty, John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy The Kennedy family is a prominent Irish-American family in American politics and government descending from the marriage of Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Patrick Kennedy, see Patrick Kennedy (disambiguation). ...


Ted Kennedy is a staunch advocate of liberal principles, and is one of the most influential and enduring icons of his party. This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ...

Contents

Family and youth

Kennedy is the youngest of nine children of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, a prominent Irish-American family. He attended the Fessenden School, and later Milton Academy and entered Harvard College in 1950, where he resided in Winthrop House. Kennedy was also a member of the Owl Club. He was expelled from Harvard in May 1951 after he was caught cheating during a Spanish examination.[4] Kennedy entered the United States Army for two years and was assigned to the SHAPE headquarters in Paris. He eventually re-entered Harvard, graduating in 1956.[2] In the 1955 Harvard-Yale football game (which Yale won 21-7), Kennedy caught Harvard's only touchdown pass.[2] In 1958, he attended the Hague Academy of International Law. He earned his law degree from the University of Virginia, where he was the winner of the William Minor Lile Moot Court Competition,[5] and was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1959.[2] While he was in law school, he managed his brother John's 1958 Senate re-election campaign. For other persons named Joseph Kennedy, see Joseph Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy (July 22, 1890 – January 22, 1995) married into the Kennedy family and became its matriarch in the 20th century, when its members helped shape American politics. ... The Fessenden School is a private day and boarding school for boys founded in 1903 by Fredrick Fessenden. ... Milton Academy is a private, preparatory, coeducational boarding and day school in Milton, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... Winthrop House Crest John Winthrop House is the one of the twelve undergraduate residences at Harvard College and home to slightly under 400 students. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... This article is about describing the shape of an object. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Half-time festivities at The Game, Yale Bowl The Game (always capitalized) is a title given to several U.S. college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual contest between Harvard and Yale. ... Yale redirects here. ... The Hague Academy of International Law is a center for high-level education in international law housed in the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1958 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of President Dwight D. Eisenhowers second term. ...


His home is in Hyannis, Massachusetts, where he lives with his second wife, Victoria Reggie Kennedy, a Washington lawyer and the daughter of Louisiana judge Edmund Reggie, and her children from a previous marriage, Curran and Caroline. Victoria is president and co-founder of Common Sense about Kids and Guns[6], an advocacy group that seeks to reduce gun deaths and injuries to children in the United States. He has three grown children from his first marriage with Virginia Joan Bennett (married on November 29, 1958, in Bronxville, New York), whom he met while delivering a speech at Manhattanville College: Kara Kennedy (born February 27, 1960), Edward Jr. (born September 26, 1961) and Patrick (born July 14, 1967). Kara married Michael Allen on September 9, 1990 in Centerville, Massachusetts. They have two children: Grace Kennedy Allen (born September 19, 1994 in Washington, D.C.) and Max Greathouse Allen (born December 20, 1996 in Rockville, Maryland). Kennedy has five grandchildren. After his brothers John and Robert were assassinated (in 1963 and 1968 respectively), he took on the role of surrogate father for his brothers' 13 children.[7] Hyannis Harbor, Hyannis Statue of Iyannough, in downtown Hyannis. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Edmund M. Reggie (born 1926) is a Louisiana politician. ... Joan Bennett Kennedy was born September 9, 1936 in Riverdale, New York as Virginia Joan Bennett. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Bronxville is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States, located 15 miles north of midtown Manhattan. ... The architectural and administrative centerpiece of the Manhattanville campus, Reid Hall (1864), is named after Whitelaw Reid owner of the New York Tribune. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Moore Kennedy, Jr. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Patrick Kennedy, see Patrick Kennedy (disambiguation). ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... There are at least two places in Massachusetts called Centerville: a village in Barnstable a neighborhood in Beverly This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Location in the State of Maryland Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Founded 1717 Incorporated 1860 Government  - Mayor Larry Giammo Area  - Total 13. ...


Senate career

In 1960, John Kennedy was elected President of the United States, and vacated his Massachusetts Senate seat. Since Ted would not be eligible to fill his brother's vacant Senate seat until February 22, 1962, when he would turn thirty, his father therefore persuaded the Massachusetts governor to name a Kennedy family friend Benjamin A. Smith II to fill out John's term, keeping the seat available for Ted.[8] In 1962, Kennedy was elected to the Senate from Massachusetts in a special election. He was elected to a full six-year term in 1964 and was reelected in 1970, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, 2000 and 2006. is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Benjamin Atwood Smith II (March 16, 1916 - September 6, 1991) was a United States Senator from the U.S. State of Massachusetts. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1964 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of President Lyndon Baines Johnson by an overwhelming majority. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Independent pickups  Conservative pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1970 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the term of President Richard M. Nixon. ... Results -- Independent holds in light yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1976 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Democratic Jimmy Carters election to the presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1982 was an election for the United States Senate following the Republican gains in 1980. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1988 was an election for the United States Senate in which, in spite of the Republican victory by George Herbert Walker Bush in the presidential election, the Republicans had a net loss of one seat in the...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1994 was an election in which the Republican Party was able to take control of the Senate from the Democrats by mobilizing voters discontented with congressional incumbents and the early presidency of Bill Clinton. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 2000 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as president. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Republican incumbent  Retiring Republican  Democratic incumbent  Retiring Democrat  Retiring Independent  States without a seat up for reelection // Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ...


Kennedy is the Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. He also serves on the Judiciary Committee, where he is the Chairman of the Immigration Subcommittee, and the Armed Services Committee, where he is the Chairman of the Seapower Subcommittee. He is also a member of the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, a founder of the Congressional Friends of Ireland and a trustee of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Jurisdiction Membership Republican Members John Cornyn, TX (Chairman) Charles Grassley, IA Jon Kyl, AZ R. Michael DeWine, OH Jeff Sessions, AL Sam Brownback, KS Tom Coburn, OK Democratic Members Edward Kennedy, MA (Ranking Member) Joe Biden, DE Dianne Feinstein, CA Russell Feingold, WI Charles Schumer, NY Richard Durbin, IL Senior... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The Joint Economic Committee is one of only four joint committees of the U.S. Congress. ... The Congressional Friends of Ireland or the Friends of Ireland in the United States Congress is opposed to violence and terrorism in Northern Ireland and dedicated to maintaining a United States policy that promotes a just, lasting, and peaceful settlement of the conflict that has cost more than 3,100... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

First Senate campaign
First Senate campaign
John, Robert and Ted Kennedy circa 1960

In 1963, the year after Ted was first elected to the Senate, his brother, President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated. Image File history File links TedKennedy_1962. ... Image File history File links TedKennedy_1962. ... Image File history File links Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Source: http://www. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... Kennedy Assassination redirects here. ...


In 1964, Kennedy was in a plane crash in which the pilot and one of Kennedy's aides were killed. He was pulled from the wreckage by fellow senator Birch E. Bayh II (D-Ind.), and spent weeks in a hospital recovering from a severe back injury, a punctured lung, broken ribs and internal bleeding. Birch Evans Bayh II (born January 22, 1928) was a U.S. Senator from Indiana between 1963 and 1981. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... “Collapsed lung” redirects here. ...


In 1968, his last surviving brother, Robert, was assassinated during his bid to be nominated as the Democratic candidate for the presidency. Kennedy delivered a very emotional eulogy at Robert's funeral. The 1993 book The Last Brother by Joe McGinniss portrayed Kennedy as particularly devastated by the death of Robert, in that Ted was closer to Robert than any other member of the Kennedy family. Look up eulogy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Joe McGinniss (born 1942) is an American writer, most notably successful in the non-fiction true crime genre. ...


After the shock from this event wore off, Kennedy was looked upon as a likely future presidential candidate. For about a year, until the Chappaquiddick incident, the Democratic establishment began to focus attention on him as the new "carrier of the torch" for the Kennedys and the party.


In January 1969, Kennedy defeated Louisiana Senator Russell B. Long to become Senate Majority Whip. He would serve as Whip until January 1971, when he was defeated by Senator Robert Byrd of West Virginia. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Russell Billiu Long Russell Billiu Long (November 3, 1918 – May 9, 2003) was an American politician who served in the United States Senate as a Democrat from Louisiana from 1948 until 1987. ... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Chappaquiddick incident

The Chappaquiddick incident refers to the circumstances surrounding the 1969 death of Mary Jo Kopechne, a former staff member in Senator Robert F. Kennedy's 1968 presidential campaign. Edward Kennedy was driving a car with Kopechne as his passenger when the Senator drove off Dike Bridge into the channel between Chappaquiddick Island and Martha's Vineyard. The Senator testified that he tried to swim down to reach her seven or eight times, before swimming to safety, leaving Kopechne to drown in the car. Kennedy pled guilty to leaving the scene of an accident and received a suspended sentence of two months in jail in return for an undisclosed amount of cash. The Chappaquiddick Incident refers to the circumstances surrounding the 1969 death of Mary Jo Kopechne, a campaign worker for the brother of U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts. ... Mary Jo Kopechne (July 26, 1940 – July 18, 1969) was an American teacher, secretary and administrator, notable for her death in a car accident on Chappaquiddick Island in a car driven by Senator Ted Kennedy. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... The On Time Ferry shuttling cars to Chappaquiddick. ... Map of Marthas Vineyard. ... A suspended sentence is a legal construct. ...


Presidential bid

Kennedy deflected supporters who urged him to run for President in 1972 and 1976 by citing family concerns, in light of the fact of his brothers' assassinations. He finally threw his hat into the ring for the Democratic nomination in the 1980 presidential election by launching an unusual, insurgent campaign against the sitting president, Jimmy Carter, a member of his own party. Despite much early support, his bid was ultimately unsuccessful. Carter was highly unpopular at the time of Kennedy's announcement and Kennedy could have expected to do well against the incumbent president but the Iran hostage crisis gave President Carter a large boost in the polls that lasted for several months. The upswing in Carter's popularity knocked the wind out of Kennedy's candidacy, which was predicated on dislodging an unpopular president. In addition, the Chappaquiddick incident still dogged the senator, and his opponents often invoked the highly recognizable melody of Simon & Garfunkel's 1970 hit song "Bridge Over Troubled Water" to remind voters of the tragedy and scandal. Kennedy's campaign received substantial negative press from what pundits criticized as a rambling response to the question "Why do you want to be President?"[9] Kennedy won 10 presidential primaries against Carter, who won 24. Eventually, he bowed out of the race, but delivered a rousing speech before the 1980 Democratic National Convention in New York City that many consider to be one of his finest moments.[10] The United States presidential election of 1980 featured a contest between incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter and his Republican opponent, Ronald Reagan, along with third party candidates, the independent John B. Anderson and Libertarian Ed Clark. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Iranian militants escort a blindfolded U.S. hostage to the media. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... Music sample Bridge over Troubled Water Problems? See media help. ... The 1980 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated President Jimmy Carter for President and Vice President Walter Mondale for Vice President. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Presidential endorsements

While Kennedy himself did not run, his endorsements for other candidates were commonly viewed as very important. In 1988 he supported the successful bid of Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis to win the nomination[11]. Four years later (1992) he initially backed former fellow Massachusetts Senator Paul Tsongas, who lost to Bill Clinton[12]. In 2000, like nearly all Democratic elected officials, Kennedy supported Vice President Al Gore against former New Jersey Senator Bill Bradley[13]. In 2004 he backed fellow Massachusetts Senator John Kerry, who won the nomination but narrowly lost to incumbent George W. Bush[14]. Currently Kennedy is supporting Illinois Senator Barack Obama[15]. Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Bill Bradley (disambiguation) and William Bradley. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Open seat redirects here. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


Democratic Party influence

Since his presidential bid, Kennedy has become one of the most recognizable and influential members of the party, and is sometimes called a "Democratic icon".[16] In April 2006, Kennedy was selected by Time as one of "America's 10 Best Senators"; the magazine noted that he had "amassed a titanic record of legislation affecting the lives of virtually every man, woman and child in the country" and that "by the late 1990s, the liberal icon had become such a prodigious cross-aisle dealer that Republican leaders began pressuring party colleagues not to sponsor bills with him".[17] TIME redirects here. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


As of 2006, Kennedy is the second-longest serving current senator, trailing only Robert Byrd. Kennedy won an eighth full term (and ninth overall term) in 2006. If he serves out his full six-year term, he will have served in the U.S. Senate for fifty years. Currently, Senator Kennedy is the chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Republican incumbent  Retiring Republican  Democratic incumbent  Retiring Democrat  Retiring Independent  States without a seat up for reelection // Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ... The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ...


In 2006, Kennedy released a children's book My Senator and Me: A Dog's-Eye View of Washington, D.C.[18] Also in 2006, Kennedy released a political history entitled America Back on Track.[19]


In 2004, Kennedy was involved in the failed presidential bid of his fellow Massachusetts Senator John Kerry, speaking for Kerry multiple times and lending his chief of staff, Mary Beth Cahill, to the Kerry campaign. Kennedy stated that he would have supported Kerry should he have chosen to run for president in 2008. On January 28, 2008, Kennedy endorsed Senator Barack Obama in his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Mary Beth Cahill is an American political figure, who served as the campaign manager of Senator John Kerrys campaign for President. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Barack Obama, the junior United States Senator from Illinois, announced his candidacy for the presidency of the United States in Springfield, Illinois, on February 10, 2007. ...


Political record

Abortion

Although he has been a staunch pro-choice advocate for the past 30 years, Kennedy adopted this position only after Roe v. Wade became law. Prior to that, he held a pro-life position. A letter to a constituent, dated August 3, 1971 opposes "the legalization of abortion on demand" saying, "While the deep concern of a woman bearing an unwanted child merits consideration and sympathy, it is my personal feeling that the legalization of abortion on demand is not in accordance with the value which our civilization places on human life. Wanted or unwanted, I believe that human life, even at its earliest stages, has certain rights which must be recognized – the right to be born, the right to love, the right to grow old."[20] Kennedy's reversal on this issue after Roe v. Wade became a source of continuing dispute between him and the Catholic Church, of which he is a member. In 1987, Kennedy delivered an impassioned speech condemning Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork as a "right-wing extremist" and warning that "Robert Bork's America" would be one marked by back alley abortions and other backward practices. Kennedy's strong opposition to Bork's nomination was important to the Senate's rejection of Bork's candidacy. In recent years, he has argued that much of the debate over abortion is a false dichotomy. Speaking at the National Press Club in 2005, he remarked, "Surely, we can all agree that abortion should be rare, and that we should do all we can to help women avoid the need to face that decision."[21] He voted against the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act. [3] Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ... This article is about the social movement. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ... “Right wing” redirects here. ... The form of the fallacy of false dichotomy as an argument map with the conclusion at the top of the tree. ... The National Press Club is an association of journalists based in Washington, D.C. It is well-known for its gatherings with invited speakers, including many presidential candidates and other influential public figuress. ... The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act (Public Law 108-105, HR 760, S 3, 18 U.S. Code 1531)[1] (or PBA Ban) is a United States law prohibiting a form of late-term abortion that the Act calls partial-birth abortion. ...


Immigration policy

Ted Kennedy was a strong supporter of the 1965 Hart-Celler Act — signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson — which dramatically changed US immigration policy.[22] "The bill will not flood our cities with immigrants. It will not upset the ethnic mix of our society. It will not relax the standards of admission. It will not cause American workers to lose their jobs."[23] Kennedy is now the chair of the United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Citizenship, and remains a strong advocate for immigrants. President Johnson signs bill at Liberty Island, New York October 3, 1965 The Immigration and Naturalization Services Act of 1965 (also known as the Hart-Celler Act or the INS Act of 1965) abolished the national-origin quotas that had been in place in the United States since the Immigration... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ...


This legislation replaced the Immigration Act of 1924, which favored immigrants from northern and western Europe. Proponents of the 1965 bill argued that immigration laws and quotas were discriminatory, and that American immigration policy should accept people not on the basis of their nationality. This also abolished the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. It has been suggested that National Origins Quota of 1924 be merged into this article or section. ... The Chinese Exclusion Act may be: Another name for the Chinese Immigration Act of 1923 in Canada, coined by the Chinese-Canadian community. ...


Kennedy subsequently took a lead role in several other would-be immigration measures, including the Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act (S. 1033) ("McCain-Kennedy") in 2005 and the Secure Borders, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Reform Act of 2007, a bipartisan measure worked out with President George W. Bush which ultimately failed on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Among other reforms, the 1033 legislation proposed allowing "undocumented immigrants in the U.S. to come out of the shadows, submit to background checks, and register for a legal status. Immigrants and their families would have 6 years to earn permanent residence and ultimately citizenship." [24] Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act (S. 1033) or the McCain-Kennedy Bill is a comprehensive immigration reform bill discussed in the United States Senate during the Summer of 2005, which was first of its kind since the early 2000s in incorporating legalization, guest worker programs, border enforcement components. ... The Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2007, or, in its full name, the Secure Borders, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Reform Act of 2007 (S. 1348) is a bill pending in the 110th United States Congress that would provide a path to legal citizenship for the approximately 12 million (by some... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Gun control

Ted Kennedy has been a staunch supporter of gun control initiatives. In 2006 he was one of the 16 senators who voted against the Vitter Amendment, which prohibited the confiscation of legally-possessed firearms during a disaster. Gun Politics in the United States, incorporating the political aspects of gun politics, and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ... The Disaster Recovery Personal Protection Act of 2006 was a bill introduced in the United States Congress intended to prohibit the confiscation of legally-possessed firearms during a disaster. ...


Energy policy

Ted Kennedy has generally favored alternative energy sources and opposed additional Alaska oil drilling. However, he opposes the Cape Wind wind turbine project.[25][26] The Cape Wind Project is a controversial proposed offshore wind farm on Horseshoe Shoal in Nantucket Sound off Cape Cod in Massachusetts (). If the project moves forward on schedule, it would become one of the first offshore wind farms in the United States. ...


War on Terrorism

Although a supporter of the American-led 2001 overthrow of the Taliban government in Afghanistan, Kennedy has been a vocal critic of the American-led 2003 invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq. He has also been a harsh critic of the way the invasion of Iraq was planned and conducted by the Bush administration. Kennedy also has said that the best vote he had ever cast in the Senate was his vote against giving President Bush the authority to use force against Iraq.[27] Image File history File links KennedyGorbi. ... Image File history File links KennedyGorbi. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... For other uses of War in Afghanistan, see War in Afghanistan (disambiguation). ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim and ethnic Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ...


On September 27, 2004, Kennedy made a speech on the Senate floor regarding the war in Iraq, just prior to the 2004 U.S. Presidential election.[28] is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ...

Wikisource has original text related to this article:

In early 2007, just prior to President Bush's announcement that he would initiate a troop surge in Iraq, Senator Kennedy made a speech at the National Press Club opposing it.[29] Kennedy was the first Senator in the 110th Congress to propose legislation opposing the President's troop surge. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...


No Child Left Behind

Ted Kennedy speaks at the dedication ceremonies of the Connell School of Nursing at Boston College
Ted Kennedy speaks at the dedication ceremonies of the Connell School of Nursing at Boston College

Kennedy was a major player in the bipartisan team that wrote the controversial No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which, according to both Kennedy and President Bush, was a compromise. He then worked to get it passed in a Republican controlled Congress, despite the opposition of members from both parties. ImageMetadata File history File links Tedkennedyatbc03. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Tedkennedyatbc03. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Education in Boston, MA. Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... President Bush signing the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act at Hamilton H.S. in Hamilton, Ohio. ... GOP redirects here. ...


Northern Ireland

Kennedy has been outspoken in his views about Northern Ireland's constitutional question. In October 1971, he called for the withdrawal of British troops from Northern Ireland, and for all political participants there to begin talks on creating a United Ireland. [4][5] Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In early 2005 however, Kennedy publicly snubbed Gerry Adams by canceling a previously-arranged meeting, citing the Provisional IRA's "ongoing criminal activity and contempt for the rule of law." This decision was a direct result of the Northern Bank robbery in December 2004, and the murder of Robert McCartney the following month.[30] Gerard Adams MP (Irish: [1]; born 6 October 1948) is an Irish Republican politician and abstentionist Westminster Member of Parliament for Belfast West. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... Notes such as this Northern Bank £20 note were stolen. ... Robert McCartney (1971 – 31 January 2005) was the victim of a murder in Belfast, Northern Ireland,allegedly carried out by members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army. ...


Judicial appointments

A longtime member of Senate Judiciary Committee (and its chairman from 1979 to 1981) Kennedy is an important Democratic voice during debates and confirmation votes on United States Supreme Court nominees. He, with elected the same year Daniel Inouye, voted on more appointments than every other Senator, excluding Robert Byrd. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Daniel Ken Inouye (born September 7, 1924) is a recipient of the Medal of Honor and currently serves as the senior United States Senator from Hawaii. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Kennedy supporter nominations of Abe Fortas and Thurgood Marshall (both by President Lyndon B. Johnson). As of Richard Nixon's nominees he backed successful nominations of Warren Burger (for Chief Justice), Harry Blackmun and Lewis F. Powell. Like most of Democrats he opposed G. Harrold Carswell and Clement Haynsworth (both rejected). He also voted against confirmation of William H. Rehnquist as Associate Justice, although he was easily confirmed. Kennedy supported Gerald Ford's nomination of John Paul Stevens, who was confirmed unanimously. As of Ronald Reagan's appointees he supported Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia and Anthony Kennedy (confirmed). Kennedy once again opposed Rehnquist, this time for Chief Justice (Rehnquist was confirmed)[31]. Abe Fortas (June 19, 1910–April 5, 1982) was a U.S. Supreme Court associate justice. ... For people and institutions etc. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Warren Burger at a press conference in May 1969 shortly after he was nominated to be Chief Justice of the United States. ... Justice Harry Blackmun Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994. ... Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr. ... George Harrold Harold Carswell (December 22, 1919 - July 13, 1992) was a Federal Judge and an unsuccessful nominee to the United States Supreme Court. ... Clement Furman Haynsworth, Jr. ... William H. Rehnquist has served as the Chief Justice of the United States since 1986. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who was the first woman to serve as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... This article is about the Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. ...


Kennedy was one of the leaders of opposition against nomination of Robert Bork. Within 45 minutes of Bork's nomination to the Court he took to the Senate floor with a strong condemnation of Bork in a nationally televised speech, declaring, "Robert Bork's America is a land in which women would be forced into back-alley abortions, blacks would sit at segregated lunch counters, rogue police could break down citizens' doors in midnight raids, schoolchildren could not be taught about evolution, writers and artists could be censored at the whim of government."[32]. Bork nomination was rejected. Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ...


Kennedy opposed both George H. W. Bush's successful nominations - David Souter and Clarence Thomas[33][34][35], and supported Bill Clinton's Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer[36][37]. George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ...


Most recently, he strongly opposed nominations of both Chief Justice John G. Roberts[38] and Justice Samuel Alito[39], both nominated by President George W. Bush. [edit] John G. Roberts, Jr. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


From 2001 to 2003, Kennedy led a forty-five member all Democrat Senate filibuster to block the appointment of former assistant Solicitor General Miguel Estrada to the United States court of appeals. When Estrada withdrew his nomination, Kennedy proclaimed it was a "a victory for the Constitution".[40] As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual tasked with arguing for the United States Government in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, when the government is party to a case. ... Miguel Angel Estrada (born September 25, 1961) is an American lawyer who became embroiled in controversy following his 2001 nomination by President George W. Bush to the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ...


In 1987, Kennedy made an influential floor speech in the Senate against the nomination of Judge Robert Bork to the Supreme Court (referenced above), warning against Bork's record on abortion, defendants' rights, civil rights and more. Bork was ultimately refused confirmation, and Kennedy was credited with leading the Democratic anti-Bork effort. But not all of the anti-Bork Democrats supported Kennedy's famous speech. Senator Joseph Biden has called Kennedy's speech "technically accurate but unfair” and said that it “drew lines in ways that were starker than reality.” [6] Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ... For specific national Supreme Courts, see Category:National supreme courts. ... Senator Joe Biden Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. ...


Same-sex marriage

Kennedy is one of only five senators who have publicly announced support for same-sex marriage. Kennedy's home state of Massachusetts is the only state in the United States within which same-sex marriage is legal. One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ...


Minimum wage

Kennedy has been a longtime advocate of raising the minimum wage. He helped pass the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007, which incrementally raises the minimum wage from $5.15 to $7.25 over a two year period. The bill also included some controversial tax cuts for small businesses and higher taxes for many $1 million-plus executives. Kennedy was quoted as saying, "Passing this wage hike represents a small, but necessary step to help lift America's working poor out of the ditches of poverty and onto the road toward economic prosperity."[41] The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on January 5, 2007 and passed on January 10. ...


Electoral history

2006 United States Senate election, Massachusetts[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edward Kennedy (incumbent) 1,497,304 69.46% -3.15%[43]
Republican Kenneth Chase 658,374 30.54%
Majority 838,930 38.92%
Turnout
Democratic hold Swing -20.81%

2000 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election[43] The 2006 Massachusetts U.S. Senate election took place on November 7, 2006. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Open seat redirects here. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Kenneth G. Chase is a Republican challenger to Ted Kennedy in the Massachusetts United States Senate election, 2006. ... Voters lining up outside a Baghdad polling station during the 2005 Iraqi election. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ...

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 73%
Jack E. Robinson III (R) 13%
Carla Howell (Lib.) 11.9%

1994 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election Jack E. Robinson III is a Republican politician from Massachusetts. ... Carla A. Howell (b. ...

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 58%
Mitt Romney (R) 41%

1988 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 65.6%
Joseph D. Malone (R) 34.4%

1982 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 60.8%
Raymond Shamie (R) 38.3%

1976 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 69.3%
Michael Robertson (R) 29%

1970 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 61.2%
Josiah A. Spaulding (R) 37%

1964 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election

Ted Kennedy (D) (inc.) 74.3%
Howard Whitmore, Jr. (R) 25.4%

1962 Massachusetts United States Senatorial Election

Ted Kennedy (D) 55%
George C. Lodge (R) 41%
H. Steuart Hughes (I) 2%
Lawrence Gilfedder (Socialist Labor) 0.2%
Mark R. Shaw (Prohibition) .06%

George C. Lodge lost the 1962 election for United States Senator from Massachusetts to Edward M. Kennedy. ... Mark R. Shaw, also known as Mark Shaw, was the Prohibition Party candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts in 1946, 1952, 1958, 1969, 1962, 1966 and 1970. ...

External links

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Official sites
  • Senate homepage
  • Campaign homepage
  • Committee for a Democratic Majority PAC founded by Kennedy to support and expand the Democratic majority in the Senate and House of Representatives
Kennedy in his own words
Nonpartisan information
Other links providing info

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Project Vote Smart (PVS) is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that collects and distributes information on candidates for public office in the United States. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

Further reading

  • Gary Allen (1981). Ted Kennedy: In over his head, Conservative Pr. ISBN 978-0892450206.
  • Nellie Bly. (1996). The Kennedy Men: Three Generations of Sex, Scandal and Secrets. ISBN 1-57566-106-3.
  • Richard E. Burke (1993). The Senator: My Ten Years With Ted Kennedy. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-95133-7.
  • Adam Clymer (1999). Edward M. Kennedy: A Biography. Wm. Morrow & Company. ISBN 0-688-14285-0.
  • Leo Damore (1988). Senatorial Privilege: The Chappaquiddick Cover-Up. ISBN 0-89526-564-8.
  • Murray Levin (1966) Kennedy Campaigning: the System and the Style as Practiced By Senator Edward Kennedy (Beacon Press)
  • Murray Levin (1980) Edward Kennedy: The Myth of Leadership. ISBN 0-395292492.

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Dr. Murray Burton Levin, Ph. ... Dr. Murray Burton Levin, Ph. ...

References

  1. ^ Ted Kennedy's Personal Finances. opensecrets.org (2006).
  2. ^ a b c Senator Edward M. Kennedy
  3. ^ http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/resources/pdf/chronlist.pdf
  4. ^ [1] PBS Kennedy Family Chronology
  5. ^ Features: UVA Law's 7 Senators: Virginia Law Weekly
  6. ^ Common Sense About Kids and Guns: Kennedy Bio
  7. ^ Chris Black et al., Final memorial set for victims of Kennedy crash, CNN News, July 24, 1999. Accessed online December 26, 2006.
  8. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,940066-1,00.html TIME Magazine 'Teddy & Kennedyism', September 28, 1962
  9. ^ Ted Kennedy, NNDB
  10. ^ Ted Kennedy: 1980 Democratic National Convention Address
  11. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  12. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  13. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  14. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  15. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  16. ^ Chaddock, Gail Russell (January 30, 2008), "Democratic primary: Quiet battle for the other delegates", The Christian Science Monitor, <http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0130/p01s03-uspo.html> 
  17. ^ Ted Kennedy: The Dogged Achiever, Time, April 14, 2006. Accessed online May 6, 2007.
  18. ^ Ted Kennedy pens children's book, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, January 9, 2006. Accessed online December 26, 2006.
  19. ^ Sen. Ted Kennedy and 'America Back on Track', NPR, April 20, 2006. Accessed online February 22, 2007.
  20. ^ A Tale of Two Teddies: Pro-choice Kennedy was pro-life in 1971, World NetDaily, August 3, 2005. Accessed online December 26, 2006.
  21. ^ Dionne, E.J. "The New Liberalism: Democrats Need to Show Their Family Values", Washington Post, January 14, 2005, page A19.
  22. ^ Three Decades of Mass Immigration: The Legacy of the 1965 Immigration Act, Center for Immigration Studies, September 1995. Accessed online 26 December 2006.
  23. ^ U.S. Senate, Subcommittee on Immigration and Naturalization of the Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, D.C., February 10, 1965, pp. 1–3.
  24. ^ Fighting for Real Immigration Reform.
  25. ^ Ted Kennedy on Energy & Oil, On the Issues (issues2000.org). Accessed online 26 December 2006.
  26. ^ Bending with the Wind
  27. ^ Kennedy fights 'immense new mistake' of troop surge - CNN.com
  28. ^ Senator Kennedy delivers a speech at GW University: The Effect of the War in Iraq On America's Security. Originally on the home page of kennedy.senate.gov, archived on the Internet Archive 17 January 2006.
  29. ^ Sen. Ted Kennedy at the National Press Club, YouTube.com, January 9, 2007. Accessed online 22 February 2007.
  30. ^ Kelly, Garry. "Senator Kennedy snubs Adams as US recoils at IRA crime", The Independent, 2005-03-14. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  31. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  32. ^ Court nominees will trigger rapid response | csmonitor.com
  33. ^ Our Campaigns - Candidate - Edward "Ted" Kennedy
  34. ^ U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > Roll Call Vote
  35. ^ U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > Roll Call Vote
  36. ^ U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > Roll Call Vote
  37. ^ U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > Roll Call Vote
  38. ^ U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > Roll Call Vote
  39. ^ U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > Roll Call Vote
  40. ^ CNN.com - Estrada withdraws as judicial nominee - Sep. 4, 2003
  41. ^ Senate votes to raise minimum wage, Chicago Tribune, February 1, 2007. Accessed online February 22, 2007.
  42. ^ 2006 General Election Results - US Senate Boston.com as of 2:47 PM EST November 8, 2006
  43. ^ a b Election 2000 Results from CNN.com
United States Senate
Preceded by
Benjamin A. Smith II
United States Senator (Class 1) from Massachusetts
November 6, 1962 – present
Served alongside: Leverett Saltonstall, Edward Brooke, Paul Tsongas, John Kerry
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Russell B. Long
Senate Majority Whip
Senate Democratic Whip

1969 – 1971
Succeeded by
Robert C. Byrd
Preceded by
James Eastland
Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee
1978 – 1981
Succeeded by
Strom Thurmond
Preceded by
Orrin Hatch
Chairman of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee
1987 – 1995
Succeeded by
Nancy Landon Kassebaum
Preceded by
James Jeffords
Chairman of the Senate Health, Education,
Labor, and Pensions Committee

2001 – 2003
Succeeded by
Judd Gregg
Preceded by
Michael Enzi
Chairman of the Senate Health, Education,
Labor, and Pensions Committee

2007 – present
Incumbent
Current Committee Assignments
Committee Position
Armed Services Subcommittee Chairman
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Chairman
Joint Economic
Judiciary Subcommittee Chairman
Persondata
NAME Kennedy, Edward Moore
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Kennedy, Ted
SHORT DESCRIPTION American politician; Democratic Senator for Massachusetts
DATE OF BIRTH February 22, 1932
PLACE OF BIRTH Boston, Massachusetts
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Massachusetts ratified the Constitution on February 26, 1788. ... Tristram Dalton (May 28, 1738-May 30, 1817) was an American politician who served as Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Cabot (December 3, 1752-April 18, 1823), a Delegate and a Senator from Massachusetts, and the Presiding Officer of the Hartford Convention, was born in Salem, Massachusetts. ... Benjamin Goodhue (September 20, 1748-July 28, 1814) was a Representative and a Senator from Massachusetts. ... Jonathan Mason (September 12, 1756–November 1, 1831) was a Federalist United States Senator and Representative from Massachusetts during the early years of the United States. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... James Lloyd (December, 1769–April 5, 1831) was a Federalist United States Senator from Massachusetts during the early years of the United States. ... Christopher Gore (September 21, 1758 - March 1, 1827) was a prominent Massachusetts lawyer, Federalist politician, and diplomat. ... Eli Porter Ashmun (June 24, 1770–May 10, 1819) was a Federalist United States Senator from Massachusetts from 1816 to 1818. ... MELLEN, Prentiss, a Senator from Massachusetts; born in Sterling, Worcester County, Mass. ... Elijah Hunt Mills (1776-1829) was an American politician from Massachusetts. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Rufus Choate Rufus Choate (October 1, 1799–July 13, 1859), American lawyer and orator, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Robert Charles Winthrop Robert Charles Winthrop (May 12, 1809–November 16, 1894) was an American statesman who served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... Robert Rantoul, Jr. ... For other persons named Charles Sumner, see Charles Sumner (disambiguation). ... William Barrett Washburn (January 31, 1820–October 5, 1887) was an American politician from Massachusetts, serving in the United States House of Representatives and as Governor of Massachusetts. ... Henry Laurens Dawes (October 30, 1816 - February 5, 1903) was a United States Senator notable for the Dawes Act. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... This article was imported from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress and needs to be rewritten and/or reformatted in accordance with Wikipedia styles. ... David Ignatius Walsh (November 11, 1872 - June 11, 1947) was a United States politician from Massachusetts. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Benjamin Atwood Smith II (March 16, 1916 - September 6, 1991) was a United States Senator from the U.S. State of Massachusetts. ... Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Samuel Dexter (May 14, 1761–May 4, 1816) was an early American statesman who served both in Congress and in the Presidential Cabinet. ... Dwight Foster (December 7, 1757–April 29, 1823) was an American lawyer and politician from Brookfield, Massachusetts. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Timothy Pickering Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745 – January 29, 1829) was the third United States Secretary of State, serving in that office from 1795 to 1800 under Presidents George Washington and John Adams. ... Joseph Bradley Varnum Joseph Bradley Varnum (January 29, 1751–September 21, 1821) was a U.S. politician of the Democratic-Republican Party from the state of Massachusetts. ... 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts. ... James Lloyd (December, 1769–April 5, 1831) was a Federalist United States Senator from Massachusetts during the early years of the United States. ... Nathanial Silsbee (1773-1850) was a American politician from Massachusetts. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Isaac Chapman Bates (1779-1845) was a American politician from Massachusetts. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... Julius Rockwell (April 26, 1805 – May 19, 1888) was a United States politician from Massachusetts, and the father of Francis Williams Rockwell. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... George Frisbie Hoar (29 August 1826–30 September 1904) was a prominent United States politician. ... Winthrop Murray Crane (April 23, 1853 – October 2, 1920) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Wingate Weeks (April 11, 1860–July 12, 1926) was an American politician in the Republican Party. ... David Ignatius Walsh (November 11, 1872 - June 11, 1947) was a United States politician from Massachusetts. ... Frederick Huntington Gillett (October 16, 1851–July 31, 1935) was a prominent U.S. politician during the early 20th century. ... Marcus Allen Coolidge (October 6, 1865 - January 23, 1947) was a Democratic Senator of Massachusetts from March 4, 1931 to January 3, 1937. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... Categories: U.S. Secretaries of Commerce | People stubs | United States Senators | 1893 births | 1972 deaths ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody, 58%–42%. He was... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... State seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... This is a complete list of the governors of Massachusetts, including: governors of the Plymouth Colony, governors of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, presidents of the Dominion of New England, colonial governors of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and governors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Attorney General is an executive officer of the Massachusetts Government. ... The Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts (commonly called the treasurer) is an executive officer, elected state-wide every four years. ... Deval Laurdine Patrick (born July 31, 1956) is an American politician and the current Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Timothy P. Murray is the Mayor of Worcester, Massachusetts and is the Democratic nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tim Cahill is the current Massachusetts Treasurer and Receiver-General. ... The Massachusetts Senate is the upper house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The President of the Massachusetts Senate is the presiding officer. ... Therese Murray is an American politician from the state of Massachusetts. ... Richard R. Tisei is the Minority Leader of the Massachusetts Senate, representing the Middlesex and Essex District. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... Salvatore DiMasi is currently Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. ... The Irish Catholic political dynasty, John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy The Kennedy family is a prominent Irish-American family in American politics and government descending from the marriage of Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy. ... Bridget Murphy (1824-December 20, 1888) was the wife of Patrick Kennedy, the mother of Patrick J. Kennedy, paternal grandmother to Joseph P. Kennedy, and a great-grandmother to the assassinated United States President, John F. Kennedy. ... Patrick Joseph Kennedy (January 14, 1858 – May 18, 1929) was an American politician. ... Mary Augusta Kennedy (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the American author John Fitzgerald, see John D. Fitzgerald. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy a proposed guideline for notability (see Wikipedia:Notability (people)). If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... For other persons named Joseph Kennedy, see Joseph Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy (July 22, 1890 – January 22, 1995) married into the Kennedy family and became its matriarch in the 20th century, when its members helped shape American politics. ... Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Jacqueline Bouvier redirects here. ... Rose Marie Kennedy (September 13, 1918 – January 7, 2005) was the third child and first daughter of Joseph and Rose Kennedy, born a year after the U.S. President John F. Kennedy. ... Kathleen Kennedy Cavendish, Marchioness of Hartington (February 20, 1920 – May 13, 1948), born Kathleen Agnes Kennedy, was the second daughter of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. ... There have been at least two people called William Cavendish who have had the courtesy title of Marquess of Hartington: William John Robert Cavendish, Marquess of Hartington (December 10, 1917–September 10, 1944) son of the 10th Duke and elder brother of the 11th, killed in World War II. William... Zurab Tsereteli with Eunice Kennedy Shriver (right) Eunice Mary Kennedy Shriver (born July 10, 1921 in Brookline, Massachusetts), USA, is a member of the Kennedy family. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Patricia Kennedy Lawford For other persons named Patricia Kennedy, see Patricia Kennedy (disambiguation). ... The Rat Pack. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Ethel Skakel Kennedy (born April 11, 1928 in Chicago, Illinois) is a member of the Kennedy political family by her marriage to Robert F. Kennedy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stephen Edward Smith (24 September 1927-August 19, 1990), was the husband of Jean Ann Kennedy. ... Joan Bennett Kennedy was born September 9, 1936 in Riverdale, New York as Virginia Joan Bennett. ... Caroline Bouvier Kennedy Schlossberg (born November 27, 1957) is the daughter and only surviving child of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John-John redirects here. ... Carolyn Bessette Kennedy (January 7, 1966 – July 16, 1999), née Carolyn Jeanne Bessette, was the wife of John F. Kennedy, Jr. ... For other persons named Patrick Kennedy, see Patrick Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Robert Sargent Shriver III (born April 28, 1954), nicknamed Bobby Shriver, is a graduate of Yale College, where he became a member of Scroll and Key, and is a Yale Law School graduate and former part-owner of Baltimore Orioles. ... Maria Owings Shriver (pronounced: ) (born November 6, 1955[1] in Chicago, Illinois) is an American journalist and the wife of California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and as such, the current First Lady of California. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Mark Kennedy Shriver (born February 17, 1964) was a United States Democratic Party politician who served as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates for two consecutive terms, from 1995 to 2003. ... Christopher Lawford (born March 29, 1955), a nephew of John F. Kennedy, cousin-in-law of Arnold Schwarzenegger (appearing in two of his films, including Terminator 3), son of Peter Lawford and Patricia Kennedy Lawford, is a Hollywood actor. ... Kathleen Kennedy Townsend Kathleen Hartington Kennedy Townsend (born July 4, 1951) was lieutenant governor of the U.S. state of Maryland from 1995 to 2003. ... Joseph Kennedy, II Joseph Patrick Kennedy II (born September 24, 1952), named after his late uncle Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. ... Robert Francis Kennedy Jr. ... David Anthony Kennedy (June 15, 1955 – April 25, 1984) was born in Washington, D.C. He was the fourth of eleven children of Robert F. Kennedy and Ethel Skakel Kennedy. ... Mary Courtney Kennedy Hill (known as Courtney) was born on September 9, 1956, in Boston. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Mary Kerry Kennedy (known as Kerry) was born September 8, 1959, in Washington, D.C., the seventh of the eleven children of Robert F. Kennedy and Ethel Skakel Kennedy. ... Andrew Mark Cuomo (born December 6, 1957, in New York City) is the New York State Attorney General, having been elected to that office on November 7, 2006. ... Christopher George Kennedy was born July 4, 1963 in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Matthew Maxwell Taylor Kennedy (born January 11, 1965), also known as Max Kennedy, was born in New York, New York. ... Douglas Harriman Kennedy (born March 24, 1967 in Washington, D.C.) is the 10th child of Robert F. Kennedy and Ethel Skakel Kennedy. ... Rory Elizabeth Katherine Kennedy (born December 12, 1968) is the youngest of the eleven children of Robert F. Kennedy and Ethel Skakel Kennedy. ... William Kennedy Smith (born September 4, 1960) is an American physician whose work focuses on landmines and the rehabilitation of people disabled by them. ... Edward Moore Kennedy, Jr. ... For other persons named Patrick Kennedy, see Patrick Kennedy (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kennedy Compound consists of about 6 acres (24,000 m²) of waterfront property along Nantucket Sound. ... The Chicago Merchandise Mart North side of the Merchandise Mart Behind the Merchandise Mart A display inside the Merchandise Mart The Merchandise Mart is one of the largest commercial buildings in the world, located in Chicago, Illinois. ... This is a list of the descendants of Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, of the American Kennedy political family: Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Boston redirects here. ...

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YTedK:Ted Kennedy, the truth about Chappaquiddick, and more... (0 words)
The Kennedys had been attending the regatta for years, and their celebrations were the stuff of legend.
The assassination of Robert Kennedy had kept the family away in 1968, but in the spring of 1969 plans were under way to resume the festivities.
Accepting an assignment from Life to cover Ted Kennedy after his brother's assassination, writer Brock Brower concluded that the insecurities, fatalism and fast-living showed Ted was seeking to escape the inevitable candidacy for President.
Ted Kennedy - MSN Encarta (346 words)
Edward “Ted” Kennedy is known for his championship of social legislation.
The youngest child of American businessman Joseph P. Kennedy, he was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, and educated at Harvard University and the University of Virginia, from which he received a law degree in 1959.
Kennedy has been a leading liberal critic of Republican administrations and has called the U.S.-Iraq War “one of the greatest blunders in American history.” As a member of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources, he has fought for increases in the minimum wage and improved workplace safety.
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