FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > Tecumseh's curse

The term Tecumseh's curse or zero-year curse is sometimes used to describe a chain of events that began with the death of United States President William Henry Harrison from pneumonia. Commonly attributed to Indian chief Tecumseh (and sometimes to his brother Tenskwatawa, aka "The Prophet", who was defeated in the Battle of Tippecanoe by Harrison), the curse is said to have proclaimed the death of all presidents elected every 20 years. Legend has it that the curse was pronounced by the Prophet while sitting for a painting. This version has been the most widely accepted, but several scholars have questioned its validity. [1] The coincidental twenty-year pattern was noted in a Ripley's Believe It or Not book published in 1934. For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States, (1841). ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the microscopic, air-filled sacs (alveoli) responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... This 1848 drawing of Tecumseh was based on a sketch done from life in 1808. ... Tenskwatawa or Elskwatawa (1775 – November 1836) was a Native American religious and political leader known as the Shawnee Prophet. ... The Battle of Tippecanoe was a decisive victory by United States forces led by then-Governor of the Indiana Territory William Henry Harrison over the forces of Tecumsehs growing American Indian confederation. ... Look up Curse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ripleys Believe It or Not! deals in the bizarre—events and items so strange and unusual that it is often hard to believe that they actually exist--but they do: believe it. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Victims of the purported curse

Indeed, all American presidents elected in a year divisible by 20 between 1840 and 1960 died in office: 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ...

Zachary Taylor, the only other President to die in office, was elected in 1848 and died in 1850 of indigestion. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States, (1841). ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the microscopic, air-filled sacs (alveoli) responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... take you to calendar). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed the Rail Splitter and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States (1881), and the second U.S. President to be assassinated. ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... The name Mckinley redirects here. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865–August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923, when he became the sixth president to die in office. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... FDR redirects here. ... A cerebral hemorrhage or hemorrhagic stroke is a form of stroke that occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures or bleeds. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784–July 9, 1850) was an American military leader and the twelfth president of the United States. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Indigestion is a condition that is frequently caused by eating too fast, especially by eating high-fat foods quickly. ...


It is worth noting that Franklin Roosevelt was in his fourth term of office, and Abraham Lincoln and William McKinley were in their second terms, at the times of their deaths.


The curse ends?

The first president to survive the "curse" by not dying during his presidency was Ronald Reagan. He was elected in 1980 and narrowly survived an assassination attempt early during his first presidential term (March 30, 1981), a bullet missing his heart by less than one inch. Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Chaos outside the Washington Hilton Hotel after the assassination attempt on President Reagan on March 30, 1981 The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the United States Presidency of Ronald W. Reagan. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


George W. Bush, elected in 2000, is still alive; his second term of presidency ends on January 20, 2009. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former governor of Texas. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
William Henry Harrison Tecumseh - Books, journals, articles @ The Questia Online Library (1509 words)
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