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Encyclopedia > Techno
Techno
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
mid-1980s Detroit, Michigan, USA
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity Moderate, largely in late-1980s and 1990s Europe, more popular in Eastern Europe and Brazil currently
Derivative forms IDM, trance, acid house,hardcore
Subgenres
Acid, ambient, minimal, wonky, industrial
Fusion genres
Microhouse, ghettotech, tech house, tech trance, techstep
Regional scenes
Detroit techno, Nortec, Schranz, Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass, Jtek
Other topics
Electronic musical instrumentcomputer musicrecord labelsravesfree partyteknival

Techno is a form of electronic dance music (EDM) that emerged in Detroit, Michigan, USA during the mid to late 1980s. Many styles of techno now exist, but Detroit techno, a genre in its own right, is seen as the foundation upon which a number of subgenres have been built.[1] Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Industrial music is a loose term for a number of different styles of experimental music, especially but not necessarily electronic music. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Electronic music has existed, in various forms, for more than a century. ... Chicago house is a style of house music. ... Detroit redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... Synth redirects here. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... In the field of electronic music, a sequencer was traditionally a device or piece of software that allows the user to record, play back and edit musical patterns. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... Intelligent dance music (commonly IDM) is a genre of electronic music derived from dance music of the 1980s and early 1990s which puts an emphasis on novel processing and sequencing. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... Problems playing the files? See media help. ... Contemporary dance music includes many different styles or music genres, such as: Ambient House Ambient dub Ambient Goa Chillout Dark ambient Dronology Illbient Lowercase Psybient Sub Dub Breakbeat/Breaks Baltimore breaks Big beat Breakcore Brokenbeat Cut & paste Florida breaks Grime Nu skool breaks Progressive breaks Raggacore Downtempo/IDM Acid jazz... ACID TECHNO RULES Acid techno is the term used to describe a style of techno that originated in the London squat party scene in the mid 1990s. ... Ambient music is a loosely defined musical genre that incorporates elements of a number of different styles - including jazz, electronic music, new age, rock and roll, modern classical music, reggae, traditional, world and even noise. ... Minimal techno, a minimalist sub-genre of techno music, is characterized by a stripped-down[1], glitchy sound, a fairly steady rhythm (usually around 120-135 BPM), repetition of short loops, and subtle changes. ... Wonky techno is a style of techno music that is based around breaking from a formulaic 4-4 beat structure and experimenting with new sounds and rhythms. ... This article is about music. ... Two of the heavy hitters of the genre DJ Funk (l) DJ Assault (r). ... Tech house is a fusion of house and techno music. ... Tech-trance, or Tek-Trance, is a subgenre of trance. ... Techstep (also referred to as tech) is a major subgenre of drum and bass, characterized by a dark, sci-fi mood, near-exclusive use of synthesised or sampled sound sources, and influences from industrial and techno music at the forefront. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nortec (from the combination of norteño and techno) is an electronic musical genre from Tijuana (a border city in Baja California, Mexico) that first gained popularity in the late 1990s. ... Schranz [] is the name given to European (especially German) hard techno, a style of techno typically around 140-150 BPM and based around massively bass-heavy kick drums, driving percussion and distorted, looping synth noises. ... Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass or Yorkshire Techno was a short-lived and very localised musical movement centred on the northern English cities of Bradford & Leeds in West Yorkshire and Sheffield in South Yorkshire in 1989-1991. ... JTEK® is a Registered Trademark under JTEK Machinery, Inc Stafford, Texas Sources: http://tarr. ... Telharmonium, created by Thaddeus Cahill 1897 Luigi Russolo and his assistant Ugo Piatti with their Intonarumori, 1913 Léon Theremin and his Theremin, 1919 Trautonium, 1928 An electronic musical instrument is a musical instrument that produces its sounds using electronics. ... Computer music is music generated with, or composed with the aid of, computers. ... This is a list of notable electronic music record labels: 12 Inch Records 12k 3 Beat Music 4-Sight Records 8bitpeoples Accidental Music AD Music Ad Noiseam ADP Records Additive Records A Different Drum Alex Tronic Records Alfa Matrix All Around The World A-Musik Anjunabeats Anjunadeep Ant-Zen Architecture... A rave party, more often called a rave, is an all-night dance event where DJs and other performers play electronic dance music and rave music. ... A free party is a party free from the restrictions of the legal club scene. ... Paris Teknival, May 2005 Teknivals (the word is a portmanteau of the words tekno and festival) are free parties which take place worldwide. ... The Fixer is a name used by two villainous fictional characters in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Electronic dance music is a broad set of percussive music genres that largely inherit from 1970s disco music and, to some extent, the experimental pop music of Kraftwerk. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ...


The initial take on techno arose from the melding of Eurocentric synthesizer-based music with various African American styles such as Chicago house, funk, electro, and electric jazz. Added to this was the influence of futuristic and fictional themes that were relevant to life in American late capitalist society: most particularly the novel Future Shock by Alvin Toffler. Techno music pioneer Juan Atkins cites Toffler's phrase "techno rebels" as inspiring him to use the word techno to describe the musical style he helped to create. This unique blend of influences aligns techno with the aesthetic referred to as AfroDiasporic Futurism.[2] To producers such as Derrick May, the transference of spirit from the machine to the body is often a central preoccupation; essentially an expression of technological spirituality. In this manner: "techno dance music defeats what Adorno saw as the alienating effect of mechanisation on the modern consciousness".[3] Eurocentrism is the practice, conscious or otherwise, of placing emphasis on European (and, generally, Western) concerns, culture and values at the expense of those of other cultures. ... Synth redirects here. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Chicago house is a style of house music. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... Futurism was a 20th century art movement. ... Capitalism is an economic system in which the means of production are mostly privately owned, and capital is invested in the production, distribution and other trade of goods and services, for profit in a competitive free market. ... Future Shock is a controversial book written by the sociologist and futurologist Alvin Toffler in 1970. ... Alvin Toffler Alvin Toffler (born October 3, 1928) is an American writer and futurist, known for his works discussing the digital revolution, communications revolution, corporate revolution and technological singularity. ... Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962 in Detroit) is an American musician. ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... Afrofuturism, or afro-futurism, is an African diaspora subculture whose thinkers and artists see science, technology and science fiction as means of exploring the black experience and finding new strategies to overcome oppression. ... Derrick May, also known as Mayday and Rhythim is Rhythim, is an electronic musician from Detroit, Michigan U.S.. He was born in Detroit in 1963 and began to explore electronic music early in his life. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... Adorno (front right) and Horkheimer (front left); Habermas in back, right. ...


Music journalists and fans of techno are generally selective in their use of the term; so a clear distinction can be made between sometimes related but often qualitatively different styles, such as tech house and trance. "Techno" is also commonly confused with generalized descriptors, such as electronic music and dance music.[4][5] Tech house is a fusion of house and techno music. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Detroit origins

The "Belleville Four"
The "Belleville Four"

The template for the Detroit techno sound was primarily developed by four individuals, Juan Atkins, Kevin Saunderson, Derrick May (the so-called Belleville Three), and Eddie Fowlkes, all of whom attended school together at Belleville High, near Detroit, Michigan. By the close of the 1980s, the four had operated under various guises: Atkins as Model 500, Flinstones, and Magic Juan; Fowlkes simply as Eddie "Flashin" Fowlkes; Saunderson as Reese, Keynotes, and Kaos; with May using the aliases Mayday, R-Tyme, and Rhythim Is Rhythim. There were also a number of joint ventures, the most commercially successful of which was the Atkins and Saunderson (with James Pennington) collaboration on the first Inner City single, Big Fun. Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962 in Detroit) is an American musician. ... Inner City (Kevin Saunderson and Paris Grey) Kevin Saunderson (born in Brooklyn, New York on May 9, 1964) is an American electronic music producer. ... Derrick May, also known as Mayday and Rhythim is Rhythim, is an electronic musician from Detroit, Michigan U.S.. He was born in Detroit in 1963 and began to explore electronic music early in his life. ... Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962) is an American musician. ... Rhythim is Rhythim is a pseudonym of Techno innovator Derrick May, releases include Nude Photo, Strings of Life and The Beginning. ... James Pennington, also known as Suburban Knight, is an artist and DJ/Producer with Underground Resistance (UR), an independent record label based in Detroit, USA. James made a break through when his music was featured in the video game Grand Theft Auto - Vice City. ... The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ...


Prior to achieving notoriety, the budding musicians, "mix" tape traders, and aspiring DJs[6] found inspiration in Midnight Funk Association, an eclectic five-hour late-night radio program hosted on various Detroit radio stations, including WCHB, WGPR, and WJLB-FM from 1977 through the mid-1980s by DJ Charles "The Electrifying Mojo" Johnson.[7] Mojo's show featured heavy doses of electronic sounds from the likes of Giorgio Moroder, Kraftwerk, and Tangerine Dream alongside the funk of Parliament and the new wave sounds of the B-52s.[8] Atkins has noted that: A DJ mix or DJ set is a sequence of musical tracks typically mixed together to appear as one continuous track. ... The Midnight Funk Association was an eclectic, 5-hour, late-night radio program hosted by The Electrifying Mojo on various Detroit, Michigan radio stations including WCHB, WGPR, and WJLB-FM from 1977 through the mid-1980s. ... WCHB is an American AM radio station licensed to Taylor, Michigan, at 1200 kHz, and serving the Detroit market. ... WGPR is a U.S. radio station founded in 1964 in Detroit, Michigan. ... Charles The Electrifying Mojo Johnson was a Detroit, USA radio disc jockey from the 1970s through the 1990s, whose on-air journey of musical and social development shaped a generation of music-lovers in Detroit and throughout southeastern Michigan and Canada, and was of paramount importance to the development of... Giorgio Moroder (born Giovanni Giorgio Moroder on April 26, 1940 in Ortisei, Italy) is an Academy Award-winning Italian record producer, songwriter and performer, whose groundbreaking work with synthesizers during the 1970s was a significant influence on new wave, techno and electronic music in general. ... Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ... Tangerine Dream is a German electronic music group founded in 1967 by Edgar Froese. ... Parliament was originally The Parliaments, a doo-wop group based out of George Clintons Plainfield, New Jersey barber shop. ... For the rock band, see The B-52s For the long range strategic bomber, see B-52 Stratofortress This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

He [Mojo] played all the Parliament and Funkadelic that anybody ever wanted to hear. Those two groups were really big in Detroit at the time. In fact, they were one of the main reasons why disco didn't really grab hold in Detroit in '79. Mojo usd to play a lot of funk just to be different from all the other stations that had gone over to disco. When 'Knee Deep'[9] came out, that just put the last nail in the coffin of disco music.[10]

Despite the short-lived disco boom in Detroit, it had the effect of inspiring many individuals to take up mixing, Juan Atkins among them. Subsequently, Atkins taught Derrick May how to mix records, and in 1980 the pair started working together as a DJ duo called Deep Space Soundworks,[11] or just Deep Space. In 1980 or 1981 they met with Mojo and proposed that they provide mixes for his show, which they did end up doing the following year.[10] This article is about the band. ...


The music was initially conceived as party music that was played on daily mixed radio programs and played at high school club parties in Detroit. Late 1970s/early 1980s high school clubs such as Brats, Charivari, Ciabattino, Comrades, Gables, Hardwear, Rafael, Rumours, Snobs, and Weekends[12] created the incubator in which techno was grown. These young promoters developed and nurtured the local dance music scene by both catering to the tastes of the local audience of young people and by marketing parties with new DJs and their music. As these local clubs grew in popularity, groups of DJs began to band together to market their mixing skills and sound systems to the clubs in order to cater to the growing audiences of listeners. Locations like local church activity centers, vacant warehouses, offices, and YMCA auditoriums were the early locations where underage crowds gathered and the musical form was nurtured and defined.[13] A sound system is a group of DJs and engineers contributing and working together as one, often playing and producing one particular kind of music. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ...

Clear, Cybotron's 1983 electro classic
Clear, Cybotron's 1983 electro classic

Of the four individuals responsible for establishing techno as a genre in its own right, it is Juan Atkins who is recognized as the originator. Indeed, in 1995 American music technology publication Keyboard Magazine honored Atkins as one of "12 Who Count" in the history of keyboard music. At that time, Detroit techno was still relatively unknown in the United States despite its notoriety in Europe. In the early 1980s Atkins began recording with musical partner Richard "3070" Davis (and later with a third member, Jon-5) as Cybotron. This trio released a number of electro-inspired tunes, the best known of which is "Clear." According to a recent bio on MySpace, Atkins "...coined the term techno to describe their music, taking as one inspiration the works of Futurist and author Alvin Toffler, from whom he borrowed the terms 'cybotron' and 'metroplex.' Atkins has used the term to describe earlier bands that made heavy use of synthesizers, such as Kraftwerk, although many people would consider Kraftwerk's music and Juan's early music in Cybotron as electro."[14] Clear (1990) Cybotron was a techno group formed in 1980 by Juan Atkins and Richard 3070 Davis in Detroit, Michigan. ... Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Keyboard Magazine Keyboard Magazine is a Music Magazine covering the Electronic Music Instrument commondly called the Keyboard. ... Richard Dean (Rick or Ricky) Davis (born November 24, 1958 in Denver, Colorado and grew up in Claremont, California) is a retired American soccer midfielder, and former captain of the U.S. National Team for much of the 1980s. ... Clear (1990) Cybotron was a techno group formed in 1980 by Juan Atkins and Richard 3070 Davis in Detroit, Michigan. ... Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... For other meanings of this term, see Futurists (disambiguation). ...


Eventually, Atkins started producing his own music under the pseudonym Model 500, and in 1985 he established the record label Metroplex. In the same year, he released a seminal work entitled "No UFOs," one of the first Detroit techno productions to receive wider attention and an important turning point[15] for the music. Of this time, Atkins has said: Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962) is an American musician. ... Metroplex is a techno record label in Detroit, founded in 1985 by techno pioneer Juan Atkins. ...

When I started Metroplex around February or March of '85 and released "No UFOs," I thought I was just going to make my money back on it, but I wound up selling between 10,000 and 15,000 copies. I had no idea that my record would happen in Chicago. Derrick's parents had moved there, and he was making regular trips between Detroit and Chicago. So when I came out with 'No UFOs,' he took copies out to Chicago and gave them to some DJs, and it just happened.[10]

The music soon attracted enough attention to garner its own weekend club, the Music Institute (MI), which opened at 1315 Broadway in downtown Detroit in mid-1988. The venue was secured by George Baker and Alton Miller. D. Wynn and Derrick May were the regular Friday night DJs, and Baker and Chez Damier played to a mostly gay crowd on Saturday nights. The club closed on November 24, 1989, with Derrick May playing "Strings of Life" along with a recording of clock tower bells.[16] Though short-lived, MI was known internationally for its all-night sets, its sparse white rooms, and its juice bar stocked with "smart drinks" (the Institute never served liquor). is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Smart drinks, also known as nootropic drinks, are beverages made from a mix of fruit juices, vitamins and any number of amino acid supplements. ...


Relatively quickly, techno began to be seen by its originators and up-and-coming producers as an expression of Future Shock post-industrial angst.[citation needed] It also took on increasingly high-tech and science fiction-oriented themes. Alvin Toffler Alvin Toffler (born October 3, 1928) is an American writer and futurist, known for his works discussing the digital revolution, communications revolution, corporate revolution and technological singularity. ... A post-industrial society is a society in which an economic transition has occurred from a manufacturing based economy to a service based economy, a diffusion of national and global capital, and mass privatization. ... For other uses, see Angst (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...

Cover for the 1988 release. Techno! The New Dance Sound of Detroit
Cover for the 1988 release. Techno! The New Dance Sound of Detroit

Following the release in 1988 of an album compiled by Neil Rushton (an A&R scout for 10 Records)[17] and Derrick May, titled Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit,[18] the music press began to characterize techno as Detroit's relatively high-tech, mechanical brand of house music, as it retained the same basic structure as the soulful, minimalist post-disco styles that were forged in Chicago and New York City at the start of the decade. The music's producers, especially May and Saunderson, admit to having been fascinated by the Chicago club scene and influenced by house in particular.[19][20] May's 1987–88 hit "Strings of Life" (released under the nom de plume Rhythm Is Rhythm), for example, is considered a classic in both the house and techno genres.[21][22][23] At the same time, there is evidence that the Chicago house sound developed as a result of Frankie Knuckles' using a drum machine he bought from Derrick May. Juan Atkins claims that: In the music industry, Artists and Repertoire (A&R) is the division of a record label company that is responsible for scouting and artist development. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Chicago house is a style of house music. ... New York house, also known as New York garage, US garage or just garage, is a style of house music born in the Paradise Garage nightclub in New York City, USA in the early 1980s. ... Frankie Knuckles (born January 18, 1955, in New York City) is a DJ, producer and remix artist. ...

Derrick sold Chicago DJ Frankie Knuckles a TR909 drum machine. This was back when the Powerplant was open in Chicago, but before any of the Chicago DJs were making records. They were all into playing Italian imports; 'No UFOs' was the only U.S.-based independent record that they played. So Frankie Knuckles started using the 909 at his shows at the Powerplant. Boss had just brought out their little sampling footpedal, and somebody took one along there. Somebody was on the mic, and they sampled that and played it over the drumtrack pattern. Having got the drum machine and the sampler, they could make their own tunes to play at parties. One thing just led to another, and Chip E used the 909 to make his own record, and from then on, all these DJs in Chicago borrowed that 909 to come out with their own records.[10]

Atkins also believes that the first acid house producers, seeking to distance house music from disco, emulated the techno sound.[24] For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... This article is about the music genre. ...

Detroit sound

George Clinton: Computer Games (1982)
George Clinton: Computer Games (1982)

In merging a European synth-pop aesthetic with the sensibilities of soul, funk, house, and electro, the early producers pushed dance music into unchartered terrain. The initial pioneers of the emerging genre melded the beat-centric styles of their Motown predecessors with the music technology of the time to create characteristically intense grooves and percussive basslines. The resulting Detroit sound exerted an influence on widely differing styles of electronic music but also maintained an identity as a genre in its own right, one commonly referred to as "Detroit techno." Derrick May famously described the sound of techno as something that is "...like Detroit... a complete mistake, it's like George Clinton and Kraftwerk are stuck in an elevator with only a sequencer to keep them company."[25] For other persons named George Clinton, see George Clinton (disambiguation). ... Synthpop is a style of popular music in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Electro is either (a) a prefix used to indicate a relationship to electricity, as in electro-mechanical, or electro-magnet, or (b) a stand-alone word. ... Motown Records, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named George Clinton, see George Clinton (disambiguation). ... Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ...


With time, the sound became more refined, and was given added sophistication with the addition of jazz-tinged colors. Arguably, it was Manchester (UK)-based techno act 808 State that fueled this development, with tracks such as Pacific and Cobra Bora, taken from the 1989 release Ninety. In Detroit, a producer heavily influenced by said jazz sensibilities at this time was Detroit's Mike Banks, a demonstration of which can be found on the influential Underground Resistance release Nation 2 Nation (1991). By 1993 Detroit acts such as Model 500 and UR had made explicit references to the genre, with the tracks Jazz is the Teacher (1993) and Hi-Tech Jazz (1993), the latter from the groundbreaking EP Galaxy 2 Galaxy. This lead was followed by a number of techno producers in the UK who were evidently influenced of both jazz and UR, Dave Angels' Seas of Tranquility EP (1994) being a case in point.[26] For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For the American state with the area code 808, see Hawaii. ... Ninety is the second full-length album and first on ZTT Records by British house music pioneers 808 State, released in 1989. ... Mike Mad Mike Banks is the co-founder, along with Jeff Mills, of US record label Underground Resistance. ... Underground Resistance (commonly abbreviated to UR) are a musical collective from Detroit, Michigan, in the United States of America. ... Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962) is an American musician. ... Underground Resistance (commonly abbreviated to UR) are a musical collective from Detroit, Michigan, in the United States of America. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Jeff Mills and Mike Banks had an idea that Jazz music and musicians could operate with the same man machine doctrine that was seen in Kraftwerks music. ... For other uses, see Ur (disambiguation). ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


Proto-techno

Kraftwerk: Computer World (1981)
Kraftwerk: Computer World (1981)

Some commentators who believe things are not so clear-cut have attempted to redefine the origins of techno by incorporating musical precursors to the Detroit sound as part of a historical survey of the genre. This essentially removes any chronologically distinct point of origination. To support this view, they point to examples such as "Sharevari" (1981) by A Number of Names,[27] the earliest compositions by Cybotron (1981), Donna Summer and Giorgio Moroder's "I Feel Love" (1977), Moroder's "From Here to Eternity" (1977), and the more dance floor-oriented selections from Kraftwerk's repertoire (1977–83).[citation needed]Juan Atkins has acknowledged that his earliest enthusiasm was for Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder, particularly Moroder's work with Donna Summer and the producer's own album E=MC2. Atkins also mentions that "...around 1980 I had a tape of nothing but Kraftwerk, Telex, Devo, Giorgio Moroder and Gary Numan, and I'd ride around in my car playing it."[10] Derrick May has also identified the influence of Kraftwerk and other European synthesizer music in commenting that "it was just classy and clean, and to us it was beautiful, like outer space. Living around Detroit, there was so little beauty... everything is an ugly mess in Detroit, and so we were attracted to this music. It, like, ignited our imagination!" [28] Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ... Clear (1990) Cybotron was a techno group formed in 1980 by Juan Atkins and Richard 3070 Davis in Detroit, Michigan. ... Donna Summer (born LaDonna Adrian Gaines on December 31, 1948) is an American singer, songwriter, and artist, best known for a string of dance hits in the late 1970s that earned her the title Queen Of Disco and as one of the few disco-based artists to have longevity on... Giorgio Moroder (born Giovanni Giorgio Moroder on April 26, 1940 in Ortisei, Italy) is an Academy Award-winning Italian record producer, songwriter and performer, whose groundbreaking work with synthesizers during the 1970s was a significant influence on new wave, techno and electronic music in general. ... Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ...


It seems apparent that certain electro-disco and European synth pop productions share with techno a dependence on machine-generated beats and dance floor popularity. However, for some, the comparisons remain contentious, as do the efforts to regress further into the past to find antecedents. The logical extension of this rationale entails a further regression to the sequenced electronic music of Raymond Scott, whose "The Rhythm Modulator," "The Bass-Line Generator," and "IBM Probe" are considered early examples of technolike music.[29] It is also noteworthy that the possible influence of electronic music found in American sci-fi movie soundtracks, such as the work of Louis and Bebe Barron for the film Forbidden Planet, appears to be unconsidered. This article is about the music genre. ... Raymond Scott, 1937 Raymond Scott (born Harry Warnow, September 10, 1908 – February 8, 1994), was an American composer, orchestra leader, pianist, engineer, recording studio maverick, and electronic instrument inventor. ... Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ... Louis (1920-1989) and Bebe Barron (b. ... This article is about the 1956 film. ...


Developments

UR Featured on the cover of The Wire, November 2007
UR Featured on the cover of The Wire, November 2007

As the original sound evolved it also diverged to such an extent that a wide spectrum of stylistically distinct musics was being referred to as techno. This ranged from overtly pop oriented acts such as Moby to the distinctly anti-commercial sentiments of the appropriately named Underground Resistance. By the late 1980s and early '90s, the original techno sound had garnered a large underground following in the UK, Belgium, and Germany. Its popularity in Europe was largely due to the growth of a free party scene, known as rave, and a thriving club culture. In America, apart from regional scenes in Detroit, New York, and Chicago, interest was limited. Producers from Detroit, frustrated by the lack of opportunity in their home country, looked to Europe for their future livelihood. This so-called first wave was soon joined by a number of up-and-coming artists, including Carl Craig, Jay Denham, Kenny Larkin, and Stacey Pullen, with UR's Jeff Mills, Mike Banks, and Robert Hood pushing their own unique sound. A number of New York producers were also making an impression at this time, notably Frankie Bones, Lenny Dee, and Joey Beltram. In the same period, close to Detroit (Windsor, Ontario), Richie Hawtin, with business partner John Acquaviva, launched the influential imprint Plus 8 Records. Underground Resistance (commonly abbreviated to UR) are a musical collective from Detroit, Michigan, in the United States of America. ... The Wire is a British avant garde music magazine. ... Moby (born Richard Melville Hall, September 11, 1965) is an American songwriter, musician and singer. ... Underground Resistance (commonly abbreviated to UR) are a musical collective from Detroit, Michigan, in the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Carl Craig is a Detroit-based producer of techno music, and is considered to be one of the most important names[1] in the Detroit second generation of techno producers and DJs. ... Underground Resistance (commonly abbreviated to UR) are a musical collective from Detroit, Michigan, in the United States of America. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Mike Mad Mike Banks is the co-founder, along with Jeff Mills, of US record label Underground Resistance. ... Robert Hood is an American electronic music producer and DJ. He is best known for producing hard minimal techno. ... Frankie Bones Frankie Bones (born Frank Mitchell) is an American techno and house music disc jockey from New York City. ... Joey Beltram (born November 6, 1971) is an American DJ and record producer, known best for the pioneering techno music recordings Energy Flash and Mentasm, with which he was supposedly trying to emulate the hard-edged energetic style of his heroes Led Zeppelin. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... Richard (Richie) Hawtin (born June 4, 1970, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England) is a English-Canadian electronic musician and internationally-touring DJ who was an influential part of Detroit technos second wave of artists in the early 1990s. ... Heycos 23:26, 16 April 2006 (UTC) Category: ... Canadian Techno record label, based in Windsor, Ontario and founded in 1990 by DJs Richie Hawtin and John Acquaviva. ...


Arguably, it was developments in American-produced techno between 1990 and '92 that fueled the expansion and eventual divergence of techno in Europe, particularly in Germany. In Berlin, following the closure of a free party venue called UFO, the club Tresor opened in 1991. The venue was, for a time, a standard bearer for techno in Europe and played host to many of the leading Detroit producers, some of whom relocated to Berlin. There were a number of other techno producers building on the Detroit sound at this time, but there was also an abundance of EDM derivatives beginning to emerge. Some drew heavily upon the Detroit aesthetic, while others fused components of preceding dance music forms. This led to the appearance (in the UK, initially) of what was inventive new music, much of which bore little, if any, relation to the original techno sound—Breakbeat hardcore and the initial jungle (drum and bass) excursions being primary examples. This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Tresor (German for safe or vault) is an underground techno nightclub and record label. ... Breakbeat hardcore (popularly known as rave music, originally referred to as simply hardcore in the United Kingdom, with old school hardcore a common term in the 21st century) is a style of electronic music that primarily uses breakbeats for its rhythm lines. ... Oldschool jungle is the name given to a style of electronic music that incorporates influences from genres including breakbeat hardcore, techno, rare groove and reggae/dub/dancehall. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ...


As EDM continued to transmute a number of Detroit producers began to question the trajectory techno was taking. One response came in the form of so-called minimal techno (a term producer Daniel Bell found difficult to accept, finding minimalism in the artistic sense of the word, too "arty".[30] Another Detroit based producer credited with ushering the emergence of the minimal strain is one time member of UR, Robert Hood.[31] Hood describes the situation in the early 1990's as one where techno had become too "ravey", with increasing tempos leading to the emergence of gabber. Such trends saw the demise of the soul infused techno that typified the original Detroit sound leading Hood and others to redefine the music as a basic stripped down, raw sound. Just drums, basslines and funky grooves and only what's essential. Only what is essential to make people move.[32] Hood explains that Minimal techno, a minimalist sub-genre of techno music, is characterized by a stripped-down[1], glitchy sound, a fairly steady rhythm (usually around 120-135 BPM), repetition of short loops, and subtle changes. ... Daniel Bell Daniel Bell (born 10 May 1919) is a sociologist and professor emeritus at Harvard University. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... Gabber (IPA pronunciation: ), gabba, or hardcore, is a style of electronic music and a subgenre of hardcore techno. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ...

I think Dan [Bell] and I both realized that something was missing - an element...in what we both know as techno. It sounded great from a production point of standpoint, but there was a 'jack' element in the [old] structure. People would complain that there's no funk, no feeling in techno anymore, and the easy escape is to put a vocalist and some piano on top to fill the emotional gap.I thought it was time for a return to the original underground.[30]

As the mid-1990's approached, the term "intelligent dance music" (IDM) had gained common usage in an attempt to differentiate the increasingly sophisticated takes on EDM[33] from two other strands of techno that had emerged: one being a harder, faster, industrial sounding variant known as Schranz; and the other, an overtly commercial strain that was simply referred to as "cheese." The Warp Records compilation Artifical Intelligence[34] is credited as the record that ushered the rise of IDM and electronica. Of this time, Warp founder and managing director Steve Beckett has said that Intelligent dance music (commonly IDM) is a genre of electronic music derived from dance music of the 1980s and early 1990s which puts an emphasis on novel processing and sequencing. ... Schranz [] is the name given to European (especially German) hard techno, a style of techno typically around 140-150 BPM and based around massively bass-heavy kick drums, driving percussion and distorted, looping synth noises. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Warp Records is a pioneering independent UK record label, founded in Sheffield in 1989, notable for discovering some of the most enduring artists in electronic music. ... Artificial Intelligence is a series of albums by Warp Records released in the early 1990s to exhibit the capabilities and sounds of electronic music. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ...

...the dance scene was changing and we were hearing B-sides that weren't dance but were interesting and fitted into experimental, progressive rock, so we decided to make the compilation Artificial Intelligence, which became a milestone... it felt like we were leading the market rather than it leading us, the music was aimed at home listening rather than clubs and dance floors: people coming home, off their nuts, and having the most interesting part of the night listening to totally tripped out music. The sound fed the scene.[35]

Divergence

With an increasing diversification (and commercialisation) of dance music, the collectivist sentiment prominent in the early rave scene diminished, each new faction having its own particular attitude and vision of how dance music (or in certain cases, non-dance music) should evolve. Some examples are ambient techno, trance, industrial techno, breakbeat hardcore, gabber, acid techno, happy hardcore, and minimal techno. Less well-known styles related to techno or its subgenres include the primarily Sheffield (UK)-based bleep techno, a regional variant that had some success between 1989 and 1991, and a scene that was responsible for putting Warp Records on the map (largely as a result of its fifth release, LFO's self-titled 12″). More recent offshoots are nortec, wonky techno, and ghettotech (a style that combines some of the aesthetics of techno with hip-hop and house music). Other niche scenes include nu jazz, speedcore, breakcore, broken beat, digital hardcore, glitch, and so-called no-beat techno.[36] For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... Ambient music is a loosely defined musical genre that incorporates elements of a number of different styles - including jazz, electronic music, new age, rock and roll, modern classical music, reggae, traditional, world and even noise. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... Industrial techno is a cross between power noise, traditional industrial, and techno . ... Breakbeat hardcore (popularly known as rave music, originally referred to as simply hardcore in the United Kingdom, with old school hardcore a common term in the 21st century) is a style of electronic music that primarily uses breakbeats for its rhythm lines. ... Gabber (IPA pronunciation: ), gabba, or hardcore, is a style of electronic music and a subgenre of hardcore techno. ... ACID TECHNO RULES Acid techno is the term used to describe a style of techno that originated in the London squat party scene in the mid 1990s. ... Happy hardcore is a form of dance music typified by a very fast tempo (usually around 165-180 BPM), often coupled with male or female vocals, and sentimental lyrics. ... Minimal techno, a minimalist sub-genre of techno music, is characterized by a stripped-down[1], glitchy sound, a fairly steady rhythm (usually around 120-135 BPM), repetition of short loops, and subtle changes. ... Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass or Yorkshire Techno was a short-lived and very localised musical movement centred on the northern English cities of Bradford & Leeds in West Yorkshire and Sheffield in South Yorkshire in 1989-1991. ... LFO is an English techno group on the Warp Records label. ... Nortec (from the combination of norteño and techno) is an electronic musical genre from Tijuana (a border city in Baja California, Mexico) that first gained popularity in the late 1990s. ... Wonky techno is a style of techno music that is based around breaking from a formulaic 4-4 beat structure and experimenting with new sounds and rhythms. ... Two of the heavy hitters of the genre DJ Funk (l) DJ Assault (r). ... Hip-Hop music is a style of popular music. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Nu-jazz (sometimes electro-jazz) was coined in the late 1990s to refer to styles which combine jazz textures and sometimes jazz instrumentation with electronic music. ... Speedcore is a form of hardcore techno that is typically identified by its high rate of beats per minute and aggressive themes. ... Breakcore is a genre of electronic dance music which uses rearranged, cut-up breakbeats to create extreme sounds. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Digital hardcore is a music genre or style that was first defined by Alec Empire. ... Glitch (also known as Clicks and Cuts from a representative compilation series by the German record label Mille Plateaux) is a genre of electronic music that became popular in the late 1990s with the increasing use of digital signal processing, particularly on computers. ...


Commercial exposure

Underworld during a live performance
Underworld during a live performance

Whilst techno and its derivatives only occasionally produce commercially successful mainstream acts—Underworld and Orbital being two better known examples—the genre has significantly affected many other areas of music. In an effort to appear relevant, many established artists, for example Madonna and U2, have dabbled with dance music, yet such endeavors have rarely evidenced a genuine understanding or appreciation of techno's origins.[37] The mainstream music industry has been responsible for the growth of a huge remix industry. This is largely a drive to gain exposure for artists that are not identified with club styles such as house, techno, and drum & bass. Many club acts and dance DJs have made very successful careers out of remixing alone, Armand Van Helden being a good example. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Underworld is the principal name under which British electronic music duo Karl Hyde and Rick Smith have recorded since the late 1980s. ... Underworld is the principal name under which British electronic music duo Karl Hyde and Rick Smith have recorded since the late 1980s. ... Orbital was an English techno duo from 1989 until 2004, consisting of brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... Armand Van Helden (born 1970 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a record producer and remixer whose biggest commercial successes came from his remixes of the 1996 Tori Amos song Professional Widow, which reached the top of the UK Singles Chart, and his own track U Dont Know Me which was...


More recently, contemporary R&B has taken a significant foray into the dance genre, thanks largely to club scene remixes such as Freemasons' recent interpretations of Beyoncé and Kelly Rowland, and whilst some criticise this as indicative of the music industry's seeking greater exposure for its big-act roster, it can also be viewed as a natural part of the process of musical evolution. One R&B artist, Missy Elliott, inadvertently exposed the popular music audience to the Detroit techno sound when she featured material from Cybotron's Clear on her 2006 release "Lose Control"; this resulted in Juan Atkins' receiving a Grammy Award nomination for his writing credit. Elliott's 2001 album Miss E... So Addictive also clearly demonstrates the influence of club culture. Contemporary R&B is a music genre of American popular music, the current iteration of the genre that began in the 1940s as rhythm and blues music. ... A nightclub (often dance club or club, particularly in the UK) is an entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... Freemasons are a Dance/House/Electronica production team from Brighton, England. ... Beyoncé in 2004 with her five Grammys. ... Kelendria Trene Rowland (born February 11, 1981) is an American R&B singer, songwriter, dancer, and actress, who rose to fame as one of the founding members of the successful R&B girl group Destinys Child, one of the best-selling female band of all time, according to the... Missy Elliott (born Melissa Arnette Elliott July 1, 1971 in Portsmouth, Virginia), is a five-time Grammy Award-winning American rapper, singer, songwriter, and record producer. ... Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962 in Detroit) is an American musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In recent years, the publication of relatively accurate histories by authors Simon Reynolds (Generation Ecstasy aka Energy Flash) and Dan Sicko (Techno Rebels), plus mainstream press coverage of the Detroit Electronic Music Festival, have helped to diffuse the genre's more dubious mythology.[38] Even the Detroit-based company Ford Motors eventually became savvy to the mass appeal of techno, noting that "...this music was created partly by the pounding clangor of the Motor City's auto factories. It became natural for us to incorporate Detroit techno into our commercials after we discovered that young people are embracing techno." With a marketing campaign targeting under-35s, Ford would choose Model 500's "No UFO's" to underpin its November 2000 MTV television advertisement for the Ford Focus.[39][40][41] In attempting to sum up the changes since the heyday of Detroit techno, Derrick May has since revised his famous quote in stating that “Kraftwerk got off on the third floor and now George Clinton’s got Napalm Death in there with him. The elevator’s stalled between the pharmacy and the athletic wear store.”[42] The Detroit Electronic Music Festival (DEMF) is an electronic dance music showcase held in Detroit each Memorial Day weekend from 2000 to 2006. ... 2002 Ford Fiesta in the UK. The Ford Motor Company (sometimes nicknamed Fords or FoMoCo, (NYSE: F) is an automobile maker founded by Henry Ford in Detroit, Michigan, and incorporated on June 16, 1903. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... This article is about the North American Ford Focus. ...


Music production practice

Reason: a popular software based music production environment
Reason: a popular software based music production environment

In general, techno is very DJ-friendly, being mainly instrumental (commercial varieties being an exception) and is produced with the intention of its being heard in the context of a continuous DJ set, wherein the DJ progresses from one record to the next via a synchronized segue or "mix." Much of the instrumentation in techno emphasizes the role of rhythm over other musical parameters, but the design of synthetic timbres, and the creative use of music production technology in general, are important aspects of the overall aesthetic practice. Reason is a popular music software program developed by Swedish software developers Propellerhead Software. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. ... A DJ mix or DJ set is a sequence of musical tracks typically mixed together to appear as one continuous track. ... In music, segue is a direction to the performer. ... Instrumentation is the study and practice of writing music for a musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Rhythm (disambiguation). ... Synth redirects here. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... Music Technology is a term that refers to all forms of technology involved with the musical arts, particularly the use of electronic devices and computer software to facilitate playback, recording, composition, storage, and performance. ... The aesthetics of music or musical aesthetics is the quality and study of the beauty and enjoyment (plaisir and jouissance), the aesthetics, of music. ...


The main drum part is almost universally in common time (4/4); meaning 4 quarter note pulses per bar. In its simplest form, time is marked with kicks (bass drum beats) on each quarter-note pulse, a snare or clap on the second and fourth pulse of the bar, with an open hi-hat sound every second eighth note. This is essentially a disco (or even polka) drum pattern and is common throughout house music and its derivatives (of which techno is one). The tempo tends to vary between approximately 120 bpm (quarter note equals 120 pulses per bar) and 150 bpm, depending on the style of techno. The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational device used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and which note value (minim, crotchet, eighth note and so on) constitutes one beat. ... In music, a quarter note (American) or crotchet (Commonwealth) is played for one quarter of the duration of a whole note. ... In music, a pulse is a series of identical, yet distinct periodic short-duration stimuli perceived as points in time (DeLone et. ... This article is about the concept of time. ... A bass drum is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ... The hi-hat stand has changed little since its invention. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a fast, lively Central European dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ... Beats per minute (bpm) is a unit typically used as either a measure of tempo in music, or a measure of ones heart rate. ...


Much of the drum programming employed in the original Detroit-based techno made use of syncopation and polyrhythm, yet in many cases the basic disco-type pattern was used as a foundation, with polyrthythmic elaborations added using other drum machine voices. It is this syncopated-feel (funkiness) that distinguishes the Detroit strain of techno from other variants; indeed, this is a feature that many DJs and producers still use to distinguish their music from commercial forms of techno, the majority of which are devoid of syncopation. Derrick May has summed up the sound as 'Hi-tech Tribalism': something "very spiritual, very bass oriented, and very drum oriented, very percussive. The original techno music was very hi-tech with a very percussive feel... it was extremely, extremely Tribal. It feels like you're in some sort of hi-tech village."[43] A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ... Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...


EDM tends to be produced with the aid of instruments (synthesizer keyboards) that are designed with the Western musical tradition in mind. However, techno does not always adhere to conventional harmonic practice, and such strictures are often ignored in favor of timbral manipulation alone. The use of motivic development (though relatively limited) and the employment of conventional musical frameworks is more widely found in commercial techno styles, for example Euro-trance, where the template is often an AABA song structure. Western music is the genres of music originating in the Western world (Europe and its former colonies) including Western classical music, American Jazz, Country and Western, pop music and rock and roll. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... In music, a motif is a perceivable or salient reoccurring fragment or succession of notes that may used to construct the entirety or parts of complete melodies, themes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The thirty-two-bar form, often shortened to AABA, is a musical form common in Tin Pan Alley songs, later popular music including rock and pop music, and jazz. ...

Example of a professional production environment
Example of a professional production environment

There are numerous ways to create techno, but the vast majority depend upon the use of loop-based step sequencing as a compositional method. Many techno musicians, or "producers," rather than employing traditional compositional techniques, will work in an improvisatory fashion, often treating the electronic music studio as one large instrument. This assemblage of devices will include units that are capable of producing unique timbres, but technical proficiency is required if the technology is to be successfully exploited. The equipment will be synchronised using a hardware or a computer-based MIDI sequencer; this enables the producer to combine, in one arrangement, the sequenced output of many devices. A typical approach is to create successive layers of material until a suitable mix is achieved. Once a usable palette of material has been generated, a producer may then focus on developing a temporal framework, a process of dictating how the work will unfold in time. Some producers achieve this by adding or removing layers of material at appropriate points in the mix. Quite often, this is achieved by physically manipulating a mixer, sequencer, effects, dynamic processing, equalisation, and filtering while recording to a multi-track device. Other producers achieve similar results by using the automation features of computer-based digital audio workstations. Some techno consists of little more than cleverly programmed rhythmic sequences and looped motifs combined with signal processing of one variety or another, frequency filtering being a commonly used process. A more idiosyncratic approach to production is evident in the music of artists such as Twerk and Autechre, where aspects of algorithmic composition are employed in the generation of material. In the field of electronic music, a sequencer was traditionally a device or piece of software that allows the user to record, play back and edit musical patterns. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Musical composition is a phrase used in a number of contexts, the most commonly used being a piece of music. ... Musical improvisation is the spontaneous creative process of making music while it is being performed. ... Synchronization (or Sync) is a problem in timekeeping which requires the coordination of events to operate a system in unison. ... In the field of electronic music, a sequencer was originally any device that recorded and played back a sequence of control information for an electronic musical instrument. ... This article is about the concept of time. ... In professional audio, a mixing console, digital mixing console, mixing desk (Brit. ... This article is about a process that reduces the dynamic range of audio signals. ... In audio processing, equalization (EQ) is the process of modifying the frequency envelope of a sound. ... An audio filter is a type of filter used for processing sound signals. ... The Tascam 85 16B analogue tape recorder can record 16 tracks of audio on 1 inch (2. ... A digital audio workstation (DAW) is a system designed to record, edit and play back digital audio. ... Digital signal processing (DSP) is the study of signals in a digital representation and the processing methods of these signals. ... An audio filter is a type of filter used for processing sound signals. ... Autechre is an English electronic music group consisting of Rob Brown (born c. ... It has been suggested that Generative music be merged into this article or section. ...

Roland TR-909 Drum Machine
Roland TR-909 Drum Machine

Instruments utilized by the original techno producers based in Detroit included classic drum machines like the Roland TR-808 and TR-909, devices such as the Roland TB-303 bass line generator,[44] and synthesizers such as the Roland SH-101, Kawai KC10, Yamaha DX7, and Yamaha DX100. Much of the early music sequencing was executed via MIDI using hardware sequencers such as the Korg SQD1 and Roland MC-50, and the limited amount of sampling that was featured in this early style was accomplished using an Akai S900.[45] Roland TR 909 picture This work is copyrighted. ... Roland TR 909 picture This work is copyrighted. ... Roland TR-909 The TR-909 was a partially analog, partially sample-based drum machine built by Roland Corporation in 1984. ... Roland TR-808 Introduced in late 1980, the Roland TR-808 was one of the first programmable drum machines. ... Roland TR-909 The TR-909 was a partially analog, partially sample-based drum machine built by Roland Corporation in 1984. ... Roland TB-303 The TB-303 was a synthesizer/sequencer produced by the Roland corporation in 1982 and 1983 that had a crucial role in the development of contemporary electronic music. ... Roland SH-101 is a synthesizer from the early 1980s, manufactured by Roland. ... The Yamaha DX7 was a synthesizer manufactured by the Yamaha Corporation from 1983 to 1986, based on FM synthesis developed by John Chowning. ... Musical Instrument Digital Interface, or MIDI, is a system designed to transmit information between electronic musical instruments. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... Akai () is a Japanese consumer electronics producer founded in 1929. ...


In recent years, as computer technology has become more accessible and music software has advanced, interacting with music production technology is now possible using means that bear no relationship to traditional musical performance practices:[46] for instance, laptop performance (laptronica)[47]and live coding.[48][49] In the last decade a number of software-based virtual studio environments have emerged, with products such as Propellerhead's Reason and Ableton Live finding popular appeal.[50] These software-based music production tools provide viable and cost-effective alternatives to typical hardware-based production studios, and thanks to advances in microprocessor technology, it is now possible to create high quality music using little more than a single laptop computer. Such advances have, for better or for worse, democratized music creation,[51] leading to a massive increase in the amount of home-produced music available to the general public via the internet. Artists can now also individuate their sound by creating personalized software synthesizers, effects modules, and various composition environments. Devices that once existed exclusively in the hardware domain can easily have virtual counterparts. Some of the more popular software tools for achieving such ends are commercial releases such as Max/Msp and Reaktor and freeware packages such as Pure Data, SuperCollider, and ChucK. In some sense, as a result of technological innovation, the DIY mentality that was once a core part of dance music culture[52] is seeing a resurgence.[53][54] Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... Laptop with touchpad. ... Live coding (sometimes known as interactive programming, on-the-fly programming, just in time programming) is the name given to the process of writing software in realtime as part of a performance. ... Reason is a popular music software program developed by Swedish software developers Propellerhead Software. ... Ableton Live is a loop-based software music sequencer for Macintosh and Windows by Ableton. ... A microprocessor incorporates most or all of the functions of a central processing unit (CPU) on a single integrated circuit (IC). ... Alternate meanings: MAX Max is a graphical development environment for music and multimedia developed and maintained by San Francisco-based software company Cycling74. ... An example of a Reaktor 5 ensemble Structure Reaktor is a graphical modular software sound studio developed by Native Instruments. ... The term Freeware refers to gratis proprietary software with closed source. ... Pure Data with many patches open (netpd project) Pure Data (or Pd) is a graphical programming language developed by Miller Puckette in the 1990s for the creation of interactive computer music and multimedia works. ... For the particle accelerator, see Superconducting Supercollider. ... ChucK is a concurrent, strongly-timed audio programming language for real-time synthesis, composition, and performance, which runs on Mac OS X, Linux, and Windows. ... Main articles: DIY ethic and Do it yourself DIY (or Do It Yourself) culture is a broad term used to refer to a wide range of grassroots political activism. ...


Noted artists

Heycos 23:26, 16 April 2006 (UTC) Category: ... The Advent is a British electronic music act. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Juan Atkins (born December 9, 1962 in Detroit) is an American musician. ... Wonky techno DJ and producer Si Begg (aka Simon Begg) was born in Leicester in 1972, grew up in Leamington Spa and moved to London in 1991. ... Daniel Bell Daniel Bell is considered to be one of the pioneers of the minimal techno genre. ... Joey Beltram (born November 6, 1971) is an American DJ and record producer, known best for the pioneering techno music recordings Energy Flash and Mentasm, with which he was supposedly trying to emulate the hard-edged energetic style of his heroes Led Zeppelin. ... Adam Beyer (born 1976 in Stockholm, Sweden) is a Swedish techno producer and DJ. He is the founder of Drumcode Records, Truesoul Records and Mad Eye Recordings. ... C.J. Bolland is electronic music producer and remixer Christopher Jay Bolland, born June 18, 1971 Holland. ... Frankie Bones Frankie Bones (born Frank Mitchell) is an American techno and house music disc jockey from New York City. ... Thomas Brinkmann (born 1959) is a highly regarded German producer of experimental minimal techno music. ... Marco Carola is an electronic music DJ, producer, label owner, remixer, and artist born in Naples, Italy on February 7, 1975. ... Basic Channel is a minimal techno duo of Moritz Von Oswald and Mark Ernestus that originated in Berlin, Germany in 1993. ... Dave Clarke is a Brighton born Techno Producer and DJ, often given the status The Baron of Techno. ... Carl Cox (born July 29, 1962 in Oldham, Lancashire, England) is a popular international techno and house DJ. // Carl Cox began as a hardcore and acid house DJ in the mid 1980s, making a name for himself as the Three Deck Wizard in 1988, when, during the Second Summer of... Carl Craig is a Detroit-based producer of techno music, and is considered to be one of the most important names[1] in the Detroit second generation of techno producers and DJs. ... Kirk Degiorgio, better known as As One, is a British techno producer and DJ. Born in the late 60s in Stepney, East London, and raised in Suffolk, he started producing music in the early 90s. ... Vladislav Delay is one of the pseudonyms of Sasu Ripatti (born 1976), a Finnish electronic musician. ... The group was founded by Ken Downie along with Ed Handley and Andy Turner. ... Drexciya was an electronic music band from Detroit, Michigan. ... Darren Emerson (born April 30, 1971 in Hornchurch, England) is a dance music DJ, and one-time member of the UK techno band Underworld. ... Dominik Eulberg born 1978 in Westerwald, Germany is an electronic music artist and DJ who has released numerous singles as well as full-length albums on labels such as Cocoon Recordings and Traum Schallplatten. ... A Guy Called Gerald is the stage name for musician, record producer and DJ Gerald Simpson from Moss Side in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Laurent Garnier (born February 1, 1966) is a French techno music producer and DJ. As a DJ at the Hacienda club in Manchester he was a significant player in the Madchester scene in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Boston, Massachusetts born Fred Giannelli began experimenting with electronics in the late 70s as Turning Shrines. ... Hardfloor is a German techno duo, consisting of Oliver Bondzio and Ramon Zenker. ... Richard (Richie) Hawtin (born June 4, 1970, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England) is a English-Canadian electronic musician and internationally-touring DJ who was an influential part of Detroit technos second wave of artists in the early 1990s. ... DJ Hell (real name Helmut Josef Geier, born in Munich on September 6, 1962) is a German House/Techno DJ. He is the label boss of International DeeJay Gigolo Records and has been responsible for many of the big records to come out of the Electroclash or German Squelch scene... Robert Hood is an American electronic music producer and DJ. He is best known for producing hard minimal techno. ... Ken Ishii (Japanese: ケンイシイ) is a successful Japanese techno DJ and producer from Tokyo. ... Speedy J (born Jochem Paap), is a Dutch techno producer based in the city of Rotterdam. ... Alexander Kowalski is a popular German techno (music) artist. ... Cari Lekebusch (born 1972 in Sweden) is an Electronic music artist from Sweden. ... LFO is an English techno group on the Warp Records label. ... Chris Liebing is a techno producer and DJ that releases on music labels such as CLR, Clretry, CLAU, Stigmata and Soap (distributed by Prime in England). ... Derrick May, also known as Mayday and Rhythim is Rhythim, is an electronic musician from Detroit, Michigan U.S.. He was born in Detroit in 1963 and began to explore electronic music early in his life. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Orbital was an English techno duo from 1989 until 2004, consisting of brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll. ... James Pennington, also known as Suburban Knight, is an artist and DJ/Producer with Underground Resistance (UR), an independent record label based in Detroit, USA. James made a break through when his music was featured in the video game Grand Theft Auto - Vice City. ... DJ Rush (Isaiah Major) is an successful Techno-DJ and music producer from Chicago, USA. He was born in January, 1970. ... Inner City (Kevin Saunderson and Paris Grey) Kevin Saunderson (born in Brooklyn, New York on May 9, 1964) is an American electronic music producer. ... Slam are a producer/DJ duo from Glasgow consisting of Stuart MacMillan and Orde Meikle. ... Luke Slater (Born June 12, 1968 in Reading, England) has produced techno since the beginning of the 1990s. ... Pan Sonic (originally called Panasonic) is a Finnish experimental electronic music duo consisting of Mika Vainio and Ilpo Väisänen. ... For the American state with the area code 808, see Hawaii. ... Surgeon is the pseudonym of Anthony Child, an English electronic musician and DJ. He began DJing regularly at Birminghams House of God parties in 1991 and released his eponymous debut EP on Downwards Records in 1994. ... System 7 is a band working in the dance/ambient scene. ... Keith Tucker is an American electronic musician and DJ from Detroit, Michigan. ... Aphex Twin (born Richard David James on August 18, 1971 in Limerick, Ireland) is a Cornish electronic music artist, credited with pushing forward the genres of techno, ambient, acid and drum and bass. ... Uroš Umek (born 1976 in Ljubljana, Slovenia), better known as DJ Umek, is a Slovenian techno-music composer and DJ. He is perhaps the most famous Slovenian techno artist. ... Underground Resistance (commonly abbreviated to UR) are a musical collective from Detroit, Michigan, in the United States of America. ... Underworld is the principal name under which British electronic music duo Karl Hyde and Rick Smith have recorded since the late 1980s. ... Sven Väth (sometimes Sven Vaeth), born October 26, 1964 near Frankfurt, Germany, is a DJ who has produced a large body of work since his career began in 1982. ... Ricardo Villalobos is a Chilean-German electronic music producer and DJ. He is well-known for his work in the minimal techno and microhouse genres, and is one of the most significant figures in todays minimal techno scene. ... Vitalic (born as Pascal Arbez in 1976) is an electronic music artist. ... A number of real and fictional people use the name Adam X, including: Adam X the X-Treme, a Marvel Comics character Adam X, DJ and producer, brother of Frankie Bones Adam-x, popular street artist from Poland Category: ...

Bibliography

  • Anz, P. & Walder, P. (eds.),Techno, Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1999 (ISBN 3908010144).
  • Barr, T., Techno: The Rough Guide, Rough Guides, 2000 (ISBN 978-1858284347).
  • Brewster B. & Broughton F., Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: The History of the Disc Jockey, Avalon Travel Publishing, 2000 (ISBN 978-0802136886).
  • Butler, M.J., Unlocking the Groove: Rhythm, Meter, and Musical Design in Electronic Dance Music, Indiana University Press, 2006 (ISBN 978-0253218049).
  • Cannon, S. & Dauncey, H., Popular Music in France from Chanson to Techno: Culture, Identity and Society, Ashgate, 2003 (ISBN 978-0754608493).
  • Collin, M., Altered State: The Story of Ecstasy Culture and Acid House, Serpent's Tail, 1998 (ISBN 978-1852426040).
  • Cox, C.(Author), Warner D (Editor), Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music, Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd., 2004 (ISBN 978-0826416155).
  • Fritz, J., Rave Culture: An Insider's Overview, Smallfry Press, 2000 (ISBN 978-0968572108).
  • Kodwo, E., More Brilliant Than the Sun: Adventures in Sonic Fiction, Quartet Books, 1998 (ISBN 978-0704380257).
  • Nelson, A., Tu, L.T.N., Headlam Hines, A. (eds.), TechniColor: Race, Technology and Everyday Life, New York University Press, 2001 (ISBN 978-0814736043).
  • Pesch, M. (Author), Weisbeck, M. (Editor), Techno Style: The Album Cover Art, Edition Olms; 5Rev Ed edition, 1998 (ISBN 978-3283002909).
  • Reynolds, S., Energy Flash: a Journey Through Rave Music and Dance Culture, Pan Macmillan, 1998 [also published in abridged form as Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture, Routledge, New York 1999] (ISBN 978-0330350563).
  • Savage, J., The Hacienda Must Be Built, International Music Publications, 1992 (ISBN 978-0863598579).
  • Sicko, D., Techno Rebels: The Renegades of Electronic Funk, Billboard Books, 1999 (ISBN 978-0823084289).
  • St. John, G., Rave Culture and Religion, Routledge, 2003 (ISBN 978-0415314497).
  • St. John, G.(ed.), FreeNRG: Notes From the Edge of the Dance Floor, Common Ground, Melbourne, 2001 (ISBN 978-1863350846).
  • Toop, D., Ocean of Sound, Serpent's Tail, 2001 [new edition] (ISBN 978-1852427436).
  • Watten, B., The Constructivist Moment: From Material Text to Cultural Poetics, Wesleyan University Press, 2003 (ISBN 978-0819566102).

Filmography

  • High Tech Soul - Catalog No.: PLX-029; Label: Plexifilm; Released: 2006-09-19; Director: Gary Bredow; Length: 64 minutes.
  • Technomania - Released: 1996 (screened at NowHere, an exhibition held at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, between May 15th and September 8th 1996); Director: Franz A. Pandal; Length: 52 minutes.
  • Tresor Berlin: The Vault and the Electronic Frontier - Pyramids of London Films; Released 2004; Director: Michael Andrawis; Length: 62 minutes
  • Universal Techno - Label: Les Films à Lou; Released: 1996; Director: Dominique Deluze; Length: 63 minutes.
  • WE CALL IT TECHNO! - A documentary about Germany’s early Techno scene and culture - Label: Sense Music & Media, Berlin, DE; Released: June 2008; A film by Maren Sextro & Holger Wick.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 2008 is the sixth month of the current leap year and has yet to occur. ...

See also

The Detroit Electronic Music Archive (or DEMA) began in June 2005 in Detroit, Michigan. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ...

References

  1. ^ Keyboard Magazine Vol. 21, No.7 (issue #231, July 1995).
  2. ^ Kodwo, E., More Brilliant Than the Sun: Adventures in Sonic Fiction, Quartet Books, 1998.
  3. ^ Mc Leod, K.,"Space oddities: aliens, futurism and meaning in popular music", Popular Music (2003) Volume 22/3. Copyright 2003 Cambridge University Press, pp. 337–355.
  4. ^ Critzon, Michael. "Eat Static is bad stuff", Central Michigan Life, 2001-09-17. Retrieved on 2007-08-12. 
  5. ^ Hamersly, Michael (2001-03-23). "Electronic Energy". The Miami Herald: page 6G. Retrieved on 2007-08-26. 
  6. ^ "Techno music pulses in Detroit", CNN, 2003-02-13. Retrieved on 2007-08-11. 
  7. ^ A Brief History of Techno – Gridface overview from 1999
  8. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music, Throbbing Words on Sound. Caipirinha Productions, Inc., 108-121. ISBN 1-1891024-06-X. 
  9. ^ Funkadelic's, 1979 release, (Not Just) Knee Deep
  10. ^ a b c d e Atkins Interview, from Music Technology Magazine, December 1988.[1]
  11. ^ Generation Ecstasy (Reynolds 1998 pp. 16–17)
  12. ^ Snobs, Brats, Ciabattino, Rafael, and Charivari are mentioned in Generation Ecstasy (Reynolds 1998 p. 15); Gables and Charivari are mentioned in Techno Rebels (Sicko 1999 pp. 35, 51–52). Citations still needed for Comrades, Hardwear, Rumours, and Weekends.
  13. ^ Sicko, Dan, Techno Rebels, Billboard Books, pp. 33–42,54–59, ISBN 0-8230-8428-0 
  14. ^ Unknown author. Juan Atkins official Myspace page. Retrieved on 2008-04-02.
  15. ^ Interview with Detroit producer Alan Oldham hosted at Spannered.org
  16. ^ Sicko, Dan, Techno Rebels, Billboard Books, pp. 92–94, ISBN 0-8230-8428-0 
  17. ^ 10 Records catalog on Discogs website
  18. ^ Tracklisting for Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit
  19. ^ Sicko, Dan, Techno Rebels, Billboard Books, pp. 77–78, ISBN ISBN 0-8230-8428-0 
  20. ^ McCollum, Brian (2002-05-22), Detroit Electronic Music Festival salutes Chicago connection, <http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-8849128_ITM>. Retrieved on 4 April 2008 
  21. ^ Harrison, Andrew (July 1992), "Derrick May", Select (London): 80–83  “RIR singles like ‘Strings of Life’…are among the few classics in the debased world of techno”
  22. ^ "Strings of Life" appears on compilations titled The Real Classics of Chicago House 2 (2003), Techno Muzik Classics (1999), House Classics Vol. One (1997), 100% House Classics Vol. 1 (1995), Classic House 2 (1994), Best of House Music Vol. 3 (1990), Best of Techno Vol. 4 (1994), House Nation - Classic House Anthems Vol. 1 (1994), and numerous other compilations with the words "techno" or "house" in their titles.
  23. ^ McCollum, Brian (2002-05-22), Detroit Electronic Music Festival salutes Chicago connection, <http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-8849128_ITM>. Retrieved on 4 April 2008 
  24. ^ Lawrence, Tim (2005-06-14). Acid? Can You Jack? (Soul Jazz liner notes). Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  25. ^ Quote taken from the inner sleeve details of Techno: The New Dance Sound of Detroit hosted in full at elemental.org
  26. ^ "Dave Angel: Background Overview at Discogs", 2003-02-13. Retrieved on 2007-08-11. 
  27. ^ Gillen B.M. (2001), Name that number:The history of Detroit's first techno record, Metro Times Detroit, news article published on 11/21/2001.
  28. ^ Silcott, M. (1999). Rave America: New school dancescapes. Toronto, ON: ECW Press.
  29. ^ "Raymond Scott's Manhattan Research", 2006-02-21. Retrieved on 2007-08-11. 
  30. ^ a b Sicko, D., Techno Rebels: The Renegades of Electronic Funk, Billboard Books, 1999, (pp. 199-200)
  31. ^ Mike Banks interview, The Wire, Issue #285 (November '07)
  32. ^ Robert Hood interview hosted at spannered.org
  33. ^ Anker M., Herrington T., Young R. (1995), New Complexity Techno, The Wire, Issue #131 (January '95)
  34. ^ Tracklisting for the Warp Records 1992 compilation Artificial Intelligence
  35. ^ Birke S. (2007), "Label Profile: Warp Records", The Independent (UK), Music Magazine (supplement), newspaper article published 2/11/07
  36. ^ Loubet E.& Couroux M., Laptop Performers, Compact Disc Designers, and No-Beat Techno Artists in Japan: Music from Nowhere, Computer Music Journal, Vol. 24, No. 4. (Winter, 2000), pp. 19-32.
  37. ^ Ross, Andrew; Lysloff, René & Gay, Leslie (2003), Music and Technoculture, Wesleyan University Press, pp. 185–186, ISBN 0819565148 
  38. ^ Gorell, Robert. "Permanent record: Jeff Mills talks Detroit techno and the exhibit that hopes to explain it.", Metro Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-11. 
  39. ^ Ford Motors press release,DETROIT, November 8, 2000.
  40. ^ Derrick Mayinterviewhosted at Atlanta's Lunar Magazine website
  41. ^ Baishya K.(2005),Techno as it should be: Juan Atkins and minimal techno, Chicago Flame, news article published 10/17/05.
  42. ^ Interviewwith Derrick May hosted at Fantazia.org
  43. ^ Derrick May interview hosted at Atlanta's Lunar Magazine website
  44. ^ Techno Music >> Synthtopia (Retrieved on 2008-01-02)
  45. ^ Keyboard Magazine Vol. 21, No.7 (issue #231), July 1995, 12 Who Count: Juan Atkins.
  46. ^ Emmerson, S. (2007), Music, Electronic Media, and Culture, Ashgate, Adlershot, pp. 111-113.
  47. ^ Emmerson, S. (2007), pp. 80-81.
  48. ^ Emmerson, S. (2007), pp. 115.
  49. ^ Collins, N.(2003a), Generative Music and Laptop Performance, Contemporary Music Review: Vol. 22, Issue 4. London: Routledge: 67-79.
  50. ^ 23rd Annual International Dance Music Awards: Best Audio Editing Software of the Year - 1st Abelton Live , 4th Reason. Best Audio DJ Software of the Year - Abelton Live.
  51. ^ Chadabe, J., Electronic music and life, Organised Sound, 9(1): 3–6, 2004 Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom.
  52. ^ Rietveld, H (1998), Repetitive Beats: Free Parties and the Politics of Contemporary DIY Dance Culture in Britain, in George McKay (ed.), DIY Culture: Party and Protest in Nineties Britain, pp.243–67. London: Verso.
  53. ^ Indy Media item mentioning DIY resurgence: One year of DIY Culture
  54. ^ Gillmor, D., Technology feeds grassroots media, BBC news report, published Thursday, 9 March 2006, 17:30 GMT.

This article is about the year. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Sounds Like Techno – an online documentary exploring techno music, from its roots and early influences in the USA to its place in Australian music today.an exhibit at Detroit Historical Museum (Jan 2003 – Jun 2004)
  • Ishkur's Guide to Electronic Music – Detailed breakdown of techno styles and other electronic music, with sample sounds, links and more.
  • Techno Music Style – Guide to techno music style; includes reviews of techno music and links to techno-related websites
  • Korg EMX Summer in Detroit - A video example of Detroit techno being performed live
  • photophunk.com - club 'n' dance photo archive with hundreds of djs, liveacts and bands
  • Techno Music Links - Archive of techno music mix sets from techno artists and deejays worldwide
Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ... ACID TECHNO RULES Acid techno is the term used to describe a style of techno that originated in the London squat party scene in the mid 1990s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Free tekno is the name given to the music predominantly played at free parties in Europe. ... Two of the heavy hitters of the genre DJ Funk (l) DJ Assault (r). ... JTEK® is a Registered Trademark under JTEK Machinery, Inc Stafford, Texas Sources: http://tarr. ... Minimal techno, a minimalist sub-genre of techno music, is characterized by a stripped-down[1], glitchy sound, a fairly steady rhythm (usually around 120-135 BPM), repetition of short loops, and subtle changes. ... Nortec (from the combination of norteño and techno) is an electronic musical genre from Tijuana (a border city in Baja California, Mexico) that first gained popularity in the late 1990s. ... Schranz [] is the name given to European (especially German) hard techno, a style of techno typically around 140-150 BPM and based around massively bass-heavy kick drums, driving percussion and distorted, looping synth noises. ... Tech house is a fusion of house and techno music. ... Tech-trance, or Tek-Trance, is a subgenre of trance. ... Wonky techno is a style of techno music that is based around breaking from a formulaic 4-4 beat structure and experimenting with new sounds and rhythms. ... Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass or Yorkshire Techno was a short-lived and very localised musical movement centred on the northern English cities of Bradford & Leeds in West Yorkshire and Sheffield in South Yorkshire in 1989-1991. ... Electronic dance music is a broad set of percussive music genres that largely inherit from 1970s disco music and, to some extent, the experimental pop music of Kraftwerk. ... This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ... Ambient music is a musical genre in which sound is more important than notes. ... This article is about breakbeat, the electronic dance music genre. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Hardcore (sometimes ardcore) is a term that has been used to describe a variety of related electronic dance music styles over almost two decades. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... Trip hop (also known as the Bristol sound) is a term coined by United Kingdom dance magazine Mixmag, to describe a musical trend in the mid-1990s; trip hop is downtempo electronic music that grew out of Englands hip hop and house scenes. ... UK garage (also known as UKG or just garage) refers to several different varieties of modern electronic dance music generally connected to the evolution of house in the United Kingdom in the mid 1990s. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Techno - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1922 words)
Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time.
Acid techno, influenced by the heavy use of the Roland TB-303 for bass and lead sounds in the style of acid house, enjoyed a surge of popularity in the mid-1990s and went on to influence acid trance.
Techno is also very DJ-friendly, being mainly instrumental, and produced with the intention of being incorporated into continuous DJ sets wherein different compositions are played with very long, synchronized segues.
Matador Records | Techno Animal (338 words)
A mechanoid manifestation of Justin Broadrick and Kevin Martin’s increasing appetite for studio explorations, the name was a practical abbreviation addressing the concept of a technological animal.
August 15 - Mom’s Cookie Factory, Oakland, CA It is probable that Techno Animal will be joined onstage by some of the MC’s who appear on the forthcoming ’The Brotherhood Of The Bomb’ double LP/CD, but that will vary from town to town.
Techno Animal just made a pair of London appearances this past week, a headline date with Newark collaborators dalek, and last night, a show in support of the Mike Patton/Buzz Osbourne/Dave Lombardo supergroup Fantomas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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