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Encyclopedia > Technical diving

Technical diving is a form of SCUBA diving that exceeds the scope of recreational diving. Technical divers require advanced training, extensive experience, and specialized equipment. SCUBA is an acronym for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. ... Recreational diving is a type of diving that uses SCUBA equipment for the purpose of leisure and enjoyment. ...

Contents


Definitions

Depth

Technical dives may be defined as being to depths deeper than 100 feet / 30 meters. This definition is derived from the fact that breathing regular air while experiencing pressures greater than those at 100 feet or deeper causes a progressively increasing amount of impairment due to nitrogen narcosis. This increases the level of risk and training required. This is a fairly conservative definition of technical diving. Look up air in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nitrogen narcosis or inert gas narcosis is a reversible alteration in consciousness producing a state similar to alcohol intoxication in SCUBA divers at depths beyond 30m. ...


Stops

Technical dives may alternatively be defined as dives with durations long enough to require mandatory decompression stops, which may optionally be performed using enriched oxygen breathing gas mixtures such as nitrox or pure oxygen. This definition is derived from the fact that metabolically inert gases, such as nitrogen and helium, in the diver's breathing gas are absorbed into body tissues when breathed under high pressure. These dissolved gases must be allowed to release gradually from body tissues to prevent decompression sickness or the bends. This form of diving implies a much larger reliance on redundancy and training since it is no longer physiologically safe to make a direct ascent to the surface in the case of any problems underwater. A Decompression Stop is a period of time a diver must spend at a constant depth in shallow water at the end of a dive in order safely to eliminate inert gases from the divers body to avoid decompression sickness. ... General Name, Symbol, Number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series Chalcogens Group, Period, Block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless Atomic mass 15. ... Air is the most common and only natural breathing gas. ... Typical decal used on scuba cylinders containing Nitrox Nitrox is a breathing gas consisting of oxygen and nitrogen (similar to air), but with a higher proportion of oxygen than the normal 20. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nitrogen, N, 13 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless Atomic mass 14. ... General Name, Symbol, Number helium, He, 2 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 4. ... Biological tissue is a substance made up of cells that perform a similar function. ... Decompression sickness (DCS), divers disease, the bends, or caisson disease is the name given to a variety of symptoms suffered by a person exposed to a reduction in the pressure surrounding their body. ... I was looking for the bends as in the illness and this camels excrement came out. ...


Mixes

Technical dives may also be defined as being to depths requiring the use of breathing gas mixtures other than air such as trimix, heliox, and heliair. This definition is derived from the fact that breathing a mixture with the same oxygen concentration as is found in air (roughly 21%) at depths greater than 180 feet / 55 meters results in a very rapidly increasing risk of severe symptoms of oxygen toxicity. These symptoms can include visual and auditory hallucinations, loss of muscle control, full body seizures, and loss of consciousness. Increasing depth also causes air to become narcotic and results in impairing divers ability to react or think clearly (see Nitrogen narcosis). By adding helium to the breathing mix divers can reduce the narcosis. They can also lower the level of oxygen in the mix to reduce the danger of oxygen toxicity. Once the oxygen is reduced below 16% the mix is known as a hypoxic mix as it doesn't contain enough oxygen to be used safely at the surface. Air is the most common and only natural breathing gas. ... Trimix is a breathing gas, consisting of oxygen, helium and nitrogen, and is often used during the deep phase of dives carried out using Technical diving techniques. ... Heliox is a gas that is composed of a mixture of helium (He) and oxygen (O2). ... Heliair is a breathing gas consisting of mixture of oxygen, nitrogen and helium and is often used during the deep phase of dives carried out using technical diving techniques. ... Look up air in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Oxygen toxicity or oxygen toxicity syndrome is severe hyperoxia caused by breathing oxygen at elevated partial pressures. ... Nitrogen narcosis or inert gas narcosis is a reversible alteration in consciousness producing a state similar to alcohol intoxication in SCUBA divers at depths beyond 30m. ...


Ability to ascend

Technical dives often refer to dives with a ceiling prohibiting a direct ascent to the surface: it can either be a mandatory stop (decompression obligation) or a physical ceiling:

Inside the cave at Cave Stream, New Zealand Caving is the recreational sport of exploring caves. ... The meaning of term deep diving depends on the level of the divers diver training, diving equipment, breathing gas and surface support: in recreational diving, 30 metres / 100 feet may be a deep dive in technical diving, 60 metres / 200 feet may be a deep dive in surface supplied... Ice diving is a type of penetration diving where the dive takes place under ice. ... Wreck diving is a type of recreational diving where shipwrecks are explored. ...

Equipment

Technical divers may also use various forms of less common diving equipment to accomplish their goals. Typically technical dives involve significantly longer durations than average recreational scuba dives. Technical divers therefore increase their supply of available breathing gas by either connecting multiple high capacity diving cylinders and/or by using a rebreather. The technical diver may also carry additional cylinders, known as stage bottles, to ensure adequate breathing gas supply for decompression with a reserve for bail out in case of failure of their primary breathing gas. The fundamental item of diving equipment used by divers is the SCUBA equipment, such as the Aqualung or Rebreather. ... 12 litre and 3 litre steel diving cylinders A diving cylinder or SCUBA tank is used to store and transport high pressure breathing gas as a component of an Aqua-Lung. ... Inspiration closed circuit diving rebreather A rebreather is a type of breathing set that provides a breathing gas containing oxygen and recycles exhaled gas. ...


Training

Technical diving requires specialised equipment and training. Divers interested in technical diving should seek training and dive within their personal limits. There are many technical training organisations: see the Technical Diving section of List of diver training organizations. TDI, GUE and IANTD seem to be popular at the time of writing. Recent entries into the market include DSAT the technical arm of PADI. This page lists SCUBA diver training organizations. ... Zork universe Zork games Zork Anthology Zork trilogy Zork I   Zork II   Zork III Beyond Zork   Zork Zero   Planetfall Enchanter trilogy Enchanter   Sorcerer   Spellbreaker Other games Wishbringer   Return to Zork Zork: Nemesis   Zork Grand Inquisitor Zork: The Undiscovered Underground Topics in Zork Encyclopedia Frobozzica Characters   Kings   Creatures Timeline   Magic   Calendar... International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers (IANTD) are a SCUBA diving organization concerned with certification and training in Enriched Air Nitrox diving, Technical Diving and Free Diving. ... The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) is the worlds largest recreational diving membership organization and diver training organization. ...


See also

Air is the most common and only natural breathing gas. ... Hypercapnia is a condition where there is too much carbon dioxide (CO2) in the body. ... Divers face specific physical and health risks when they go underwater (e. ... Oxygen toxicity or oxygen toxicity syndrome is severe hyperoxia caused by breathing oxygen at elevated partial pressures. ... Inspiration closed circuit diving rebreather A rebreather is a type of breathing set that provides a breathing gas containing oxygen and recycles exhaled gas. ... When using the buddy system, pairs and groups of three SCUBA divers dive together and co-operate with each other, so that they can help or rescue each other in the event of an emergency. ... Trimix is a breathing gas, consisting of oxygen, helium and nitrogen, and is often used during the deep phase of dives carried out using Technical diving techniques. ...

External links

  • Transitioningto technical diving.

  Results from FactBites:
 
NOAA Ocean Explorer: Technical Diving (1086 words)
Technical diving permits divers to dive to depths that range from 170 feet to 350 feet.
Technical diving is a term used to describe all diving methods that exceed the limits imposed on depth and/or immersion time for recreational scuba diving.
Technical diving almost always requires one or more mandatory decompression "stops" upon ascent, during which the diver may change breathing gas mixes at least once.
Technical diving - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (513 words)
Technical diving is a form of SCUBA diving that exceeds the scope of recreational diving.
Technical dives may alternatively be defined as dives with durations long enough to require mandatory decompression stops, which may optionally be performed using enriched oxygen breathing gas mixtures such as nitrox or pure oxygen.
Technical dives may also be defined as being to depths requiring the use of hypoxic breathing gas mixtures such as trimix, heliox, and heliair.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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