FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Te Rauparaha
Jump to: navigation, search

Te Rauparaha (1760s?-1849) was a Maori Chief and War Leader of the Ngati Toa tribe who took a leading part in the Musket Wars. He was influential in the original sale of land to the New Zealand Company and was a participant in the Wairau Massacre in Marlborough. Jump to: navigation, search Events and Trends King George III ascends the British throne in 1760. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... The Ngāti Toa iwi is a prominent Maori tribe in central New Zealand. ... Musket Wars refers to battles in the early 1800s when there was deadly inter-tribal conflict between various groups of Maori, primarily on the North Island in New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Company formed in 1839 to promote the colonisation of New Zealand. ... In New Zealand history, the Wairau Affray on June 17, 1843, also known as the Wairau Massacre in most older texts, was the first serious clash of arms between the Maori natives and the British settlers after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... Marlborough is one of the regions of New Zealand, located in the northeast of the South Island. ...

Contents


Early days

Fuck you bitch ass mother fucker. you suck erina and kama At some time around 1815, muskets became the weapon of choice and changed the character of tribal warfare. In 1819 Te Rauparaha joined with a large war party of Ngapuhi led by Tamati Waka Nene; they probably reached Cook Strait before turning back. The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Ngapuhi form one of the major and (with over 100,000 members) the single most numerous of the Maori tribes or iwi in New Zealand, occupying much the Northland Peninsula, also known as Tai Tokerau, north of the city of Auckland. ... Tamati Waka Nene (c. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ...


Migration

Over the next few years the intertribal fighting intensified, and by 1822 they were being forced out of their land around Kawhia. Led by Te Rauparaha they began a fighting retreat or migration southwards, one which ended with them controlling the southern part of the North Island and particularly Kapiti Island, which became the tribal stronghold. Attempts by various Southern Maori tribes to recover Kapiti Island in 1824 were decisively defeated. Jump to: navigation, search 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... Kapiti Island seen from Waikanae Beach, Kapiti Coast. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Trade and further conquest

There were already numerous Pakeha whaling stations in the area, and Te Rauparaha encouraged them, establishing a lucrative trade of supplies for muskets thereby increasing his mana and military strength. In 1827 he began the conquest of the South Island, and by the early 1830s he controlled most of the northern part of it. Pakeha is a New Zealand English word for European New Zealanders, that is, New Zealanders of predominantly European descent. ... Jump to: navigation, search The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales. ... Mana is a traditional term and a concept among the speakers of Oceanic languages, including Melanesians, Polynesians and Māori. ... 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... South Island The South Island forms one of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the North Island. ... Jump to: navigation, search // Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta...


Planned European settlement

The last years of Te Rauparaha's life saw the most dramatic changes. On 16 October 1839 the New Zealand Company expedition commanded by Col William Wakefield arrived at Kapiti. They were seeking to buy vast areas of land with a view to forming a permanent European settlement. Te Rauparaha sold them some land in the area that became known later as Nelson and Golden Bay. Shortly afterwards he also signed the Treaty of Waitangi, acceding to British sovereignty over New Zealand but only with the guarantee that his chiefly status would be maintained. Jump to: navigation, search October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in Leap years). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The New Zealand Company formed in 1839 to promote the colonisation of New Zealand. ... Colonel William Wakefield (1801-1848), married 1826 to Emily Sydney, the fifth child of Edward Wakefield and Priscilla Bell, he was the leader of the first colonizing expedition to New Zealand and founder of Wellington. ... The city of Nelson stands on the eastern side of Tasman Bay at the northern end of the South Island of New Zealand. ... This is about Golden Bay in New Zealand. ... The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ...


Te Rauparaha soon became alarmed at the flood of British settlers and refused to sell any more of his land. This quickly led to tension as the settlers believed they had an almost divine right to occupy the whole of New Zealand. The upshot was the Wairau Massacre when a party from Nelson tried to arrest Te Rauparaha and 22 of them were killed. The subsequent government enquiry exonerated Te Rauparaha which further angered the settlers who began a campaign to have the governor, Robert FitzRoy recalled. In New Zealand history, the Wairau Affray on June 17, 1843, also known as the Wairau Massacre in most older texts, was the first serious clash of arms between the Maori natives and the British settlers after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... Robert FitzRoy Vice Admiral Robert FitzRoy (July 5, 1805 - April 30, 1865) achieved lasting fame as the captain of HMS Beagle and as a pioneering meteorologist who invented weather forecasts, also proving an able surveyor and hydrographer as well as Governor of New Zealand. ...


Capture and eventual death

Then in May 1846 fighting broke out in the Hutt Valley between the settlers and Te Rauparaha's nephew, Te Rangihaeata. Despite his declared neutrality, Te Rauparaha was arrested, near a tribal village in what would later be called Plimmerton, by the Governor, George Grey, and held without trial before being exiled to Auckland. He was allowed to return to his people at Otaki in 1848, where he died the following year, 27 November 1849. This article is about the month of May. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Hutt Valley Campaign of 1846 during the Maori Wars could almost be seen as a sequel to the Wairau Massacre. ... Te Rangihaeata was a Maori chief who participated in and perhaps instigated the Wairau Massacre and the Hutt Valley Campaign. ... The township of Plimmerton surrounds one of the more congenial beaches in the northwest part of the Wellington urban area in New Zealand. ... George Edward Grey Statue of Sir George Grey in Albert Park, Auckland Sir George Edward Grey KCB (April 14, 1812 - September 19, 1898 ) was a soldier, explorer, Governor of South Australia, twice Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Cape Colony (South Africa), Premier of New Zealand and a writer. ... Jump to: navigation, search Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Abiding legacy

Te Rauparaha composed the haka, or challenge, that is performed by the All Blacks and many other New Zealand sports teams before international matches. Haka is the generic name for Maori dance. ... Jump to: navigation, search All Blacks The All Blacks are the national rugby union representative team of New Zealand. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
DNZB / BIOGRAPHY (3431 words)
Te Rauparaha was the son of Werawera, of Ngati Toa, and his second wife, Parekowhatu (Parekohatu), of Ngati Raukawa.
Te Rauparaha was unable to prevent Ngai Tahu attacks on whaling stations under his patronage and when they sent a war party to the Cook Strait area in the late 1830s he did not confront it.
Te Rauparaha died on 27 November 1849 and was buried near the church, Rangiatea, in Otaki.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m