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"Oneness of God" redirects here. For the concept of monotheism, see monotheism. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... In theology, monotheism (Greek μόνος(monos) = single and θεός(theos) = God) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ...

Islam
Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ...



Image File history File links Mosque02. ...

Beliefs
Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ...

Allah - Oneness of God
Muhammad · Prophets of Islam Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Allah. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets. ...

Practices

Profession of Faith · Prayer
Fasting · Charity · Pilgrimage Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ... The shahadah (Arabic:  ) is the Islamic creed. ... For the Indian village, see Salat, Kulpahar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

History & Leaders
Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first purported visions in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ...

Timeline of Muslim history
Ahl al-Bayt · Sahaba
Rashidun Caliphs · Shia Imams There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ‎) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in both Sunni and Shia Islam to refer to the rightly guided Caliphs prophesised in the famous tradition, Hold firmly to my example (sunnah) and that of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (Ibn Majah, Abu Dawood). ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ...

Texts & Laws
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ...

Qur'an · Sunnah · Hadith
Fiqh · Sharia · Kalam · Tasawwuf This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sharia (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the body of Islamic law. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition that found a home in Islam and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to Allah, divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ...

Major branches
The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ...

Sunni · Shia

Culture & Society
Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ...

Academics · Art · Science
Philosophy · Architecture
Mosques · Calendar · Festivals
Demographics · Women · Politics Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... The term Islamic art denotes the arts produced from the 7th century onwards by people (not necessarily Muslim) who lived within the territory that was inhabited by culturally Islamic populations. ... This is a subarticle to Islamic studies and science. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: گاه‌شماری هجري قمری ‎ Gāhshomāri-ye hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to... Friday is an important day in the life of a Muslim and it is believed that any devotional acts done on this day gain a higher reward. ... Distribution of Islam per country. ... Most commentary on gender and politics in the Middle East and Muslim world assigns a central place to Islam, but there is little agreement about the analytic weight Islam carries on the topic of women in Islam, accounting for the subordination of women or the role it plays in relation... - - - Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ...

See also

Criticism of Islam · Islamophobia
Glossary of Islamic terms Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights · Gay rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Mens rights Childrens rights · Youth rights Disability... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ...

view

Tawīd (Arabic: توحيد; also transliterated Tawheed and Tauheed; Turkish: Tevhid) is the Islamic concept of monotheism. In Islam, Tawhīd means to assert the unity of Allah. The opposite of Tawhīd is shirk, which means "division" in Arabic, referring to idolatry. Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Due to the fact that the Arabic language has a number of phonemes that have no equivalent in English or other European languages, a number of different transliteration methods have been invented to represent certain Arabic characters, due to various conflicting goals: A desire to stay consistent with traditional usage... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... In theology, monotheism (Greek μόνος(monos) = single and θεός(theos) = God) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Shirk is the Islamic concept of the sin of idolatry. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Idolatry is a major sin in the Abrahamic religions regarding image. ...

Contents

Etymology

In the Arabic language, Tawhīd means 'unification' and is derived from the root word, ahad, which is made up of three Arabic letters. Al-Wahid, one of the 99 Names of Allah, is made up of the root word and describes wihdat or the oneness of Allah. Tawhidullah means the literal assertion of Allah's oneness and monotheistic existence. Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Ahad is an Arabic word meaning Single or One and refers to God. ... The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in The Quran[citation needed]; even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in The Quran. ... The 99 Names of God, according to Islamic tradition, are the names of God that God, or Allah, has revealed to man. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


Definition

Muslims believe that Allah cannot be held equal in any way to other beings or concepts. This monotheism is absolute, not relative or pluralistic in any sense of the word. It is for this reason that Muslims reject the concept of the Trinity held by most Christians. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Trinitarianism is the Christian doctrine that God, although one being, exists in three distinct persons (hypostases) known collectively as the Holy Trinity. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ...


Verses from the Qur'ān

Many passages of the Qur'an refer to Tawhīd. This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ...

This passage is commonly recited as part of the five daily prayers, known as salat. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Muslim view

Part of a series on the Islamic creed:
Aqidah
Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... A creed is a statement or confession of belief — usually religious belief — or faith. ... Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ...


Sunni Five Pillars of Islam

Shahādah - Profession of faith
Salah - Prayer
Zakâh - Paying of alms (giving to the poor)
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Image File history File links Mosque02. ... The shahadah (Arabic:  ) is the Islamic creed. ... For the Indian village, see Salat, Kulpahar. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... The fourth pillar of Islam which is fasting is practiced during the month of Ramadan. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...

Twelvers Five Pillars of Islam

Salah - Prayer
Zakâh - Paying of alms (giving to the poor)
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Wilayah - Following the authority of the Prophet and the Twelve Imams
For the Indian village, see Salat, Kulpahar. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... The fourth pillar of Islam which is fasting is practiced during the month of Ramadan. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...

Sunni Six articles of belief

Tawhīd - Oneness
Nabi and Rusul - Prophets and Messengers
Kutub - Divinely Revealed Books.
Malā'ikah - Angels
Qiyâmah - Judgment Day
Qadr - Fate
Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Six articles of belief is a set of beliefs enumerated by the Sunnis: The six Sunni articles of belief are: Belief in God (Allah), the one and only one worthy of all worship (tawhid). ... TawhÄ«d (also Tawhid or Tauhid or Tawheed; Arabic توحيد) is the Islamic concept of monotheism, derived from Ahad. ... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... The Quran identifies a number of men as prophets of Islam. ... Islamic holy books are the books the Quran records as dictated by Allah to prophets; they are the Tawrat (Torah), the Zabur (commonly the Psalms), the Injil (commonly the Gospel), and the Quran. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: ‎ literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... Qadr as an Islamic term is parallel to the western doctrines of Predestination. ...

Shi'a Twelvers
Principles of the Religion (Usul al-Din)

Tawhīd - Oneness
Adalah - Justice
Nubuwwah - Prophethood
Imamah - Leadership
Qiyâmah - Judgement day
Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Twelvers ( Ithnāˤashariyyah) are those Shiˤa Muslims who believe there were twelve Imāms, as distinct from Ismaili & Zaidi Shiite Muslims, who believe in a different number of Imams or in a different path of succession. ... In Shia Islam, Theology of Shia (UsÅ«l al-DÄ«n) is the five main beliefs that Shia Muslims must possess. ... TawhÄ«d (also Tawhid or Tauhid or Tawheed; Arabic توحيد) is the Islamic concept of monotheism, derived from Ahad. ... Adalah means Justice and denotes The Justice of God The Shias consider Justice of God as part of Usool-e-Deen (Roots of Religion). ... Nubuwwah means Prophethood and denotes that God has appointed perfect Prophets and Messengers to teach mankind Gods religion. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: ‎ literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ...

Shi'a Twelvers
Practices of the Religion (Furu al-Din)

Salah - Prayer
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Zakâh - Poor-rate
Khums - One-fifth tax
Jihad - Struggle
Amr-Bil-Ma'rūf - Commanding good
Nahi-Anil-Munkar - Forbidding evil
Tawalla - Loving the Ahl al-Bayt
Tabarra - Disassociating Ahl al-Bayt's enemies
Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Twelvers ( Ithnāˤashariyyah) are those Shiˤa Muslims who believe there were twelve Imāms, as distinct from Ismaili & Zaidi Shiite Muslims, who believe in a different number of Imams or in a different path of succession. ... In Shia Islam, the ten Branches of Religion (FurÅ« al-DÄ«n) are the ten practices that Shia Muslims must perform. ... For the Indian village, see Salat, Kulpahar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... The fourth pillar of Islam which is fasting is practiced during the month of Ramadan. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... Khums (derived from the Arabic خمس or five) is a Shia article of faith that refers to a one-fifth tax, which all adult Muslims who are financially secure and have surplus in their income normally have to pay on annual savings, net commercial profits, and all... Jihad, sometimes spelled Jahad, Jehad, Jihaad, Jiaad, or Cihad, (Arabic: ) as an Islamic term, is sometimes referred to as the sixth pillar of Islam, although it occupies no official status as such in Sunni Islam. ... Amr-Bil-MarÅ«f - Commanding the good, is a part of the Shia Branches of Religion and means to encourage people to do the necesary good in life, when they forget to do so; for example forgeting Salah. ... Nahi-Anil-Munkar - Forbiding evil, is a part of the Shia Branches of Religion and means for example to oppose injustice. ... Tawalla - Loving the Ahl al-Bayt, is a part of the Shia Branches of Religion and is derived from a Quranic verse. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ‎) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... AS SALAM AU ALIKUM, not to mistaken, this salam was not for shias its only for muslims. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ‎) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ...

Shi'a Ismaili 7 pillars

Walayah - Guardianship
Taharah - Purity & cleanliness
Salah - Prayers
Zakâh - Purifying religious dues
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Jihad - Struggle
Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the ShÄ«a community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... Shia Ismaili Seven Pillars of Islam have three doctrines that are not included in the Sunni Five Pillars of Islam: Walayah, Taharah and Jihad. ... Guardianship is a Ismaili and Druze pillar of Islam. ... Purity is a Ismaili pillar of Islam. ... For the Indian village, see Salat, Kulpahar. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... The fourth pillar of Islam which is fasting is practiced during the month of Ramadan. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Jihad, sometimes spelled Jahad, Jehad, Jihaad, Jiaad, or Cihad, (Arabic: ) as an Islamic term, is sometimes referred to as the sixth pillar of Islam, although it occupies no official status as such in Sunni Islam. ...

Others

Salafi/Kharijite Sixth pillar of Islam. This article is on the beliefs of the followers of the Salaf. ... Kharijites were members of an Islamic sect in late 7th and early 8th century AD, concentrated in todays southern Iraq. ... The term Sixth pillar of Islam refers to an addition to the Five Pillars of Islam; the five pillars of Islam explain the basic tenets of the Muslim faith. ...

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Both Shi'a and Sunni Muslims agree that the most fundamental aspect of Islam revolves around the total acceptance of an "Absolute and Perfect Creator". The Muslim profession of faith, or Shahadah (Lā 'ilāha 'illā lāh -- There is no god but Allah" is an expression of Tawhīd. The shahadah (Arabic:  ) is the Islamic creed. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...

Sunni View

Sunni Muslims regard Tawhīd as one of seven major aspects of the Islamic creed (Arabic: Aqidah). Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ...


Fakhrud-Din Ibn ^Asakir, a prominent scholar on Ashariyy Creed, in his book Brilliance of the Minarets [translation can be found at [1] and [2] wrote the following on Sunni creed:

  • Know, may Allah guide us and you, that it is obligatory upon every accountable person to know that Allah is the only God in His Dominion.
  • He created the entire world, the upper and lower, the ^Arsh and Kursiyy, the heavens and earth, and what is in them and in between them. Surat al-Furqan, 2:
  • All the creation is subjugated by His Power. No speck moves except by His will. He has no manager for the creation with Him, and has no partner in Dominion. Surat at-Tawbah, 129: Surat al-An^am, 110: Surat Az-Zumar, 62:
  • He is attributed with Life and is Qayyum. He is not seized by somnolence or sleep. Surat al-Baqarah, 255
  • He is the One Who knows about the unforeseen and what is evidenced by His creation. Nothing on earth or in heaven is hidden from Him. He knows what is on land and in sea.
  • Not a leaf does fall but He knows about it. There is no grain in the darkness of earth, nor anything which is moist or dry but is inscribed in a clear Book. His Knowledge encompasses everything. He knows the count of all things. Surat al-Jinn, 28
  • He does whatever He wills. He has the power to do whatever He wills. Surat Qaf, 29; Surat at-Takwir, 29:
  • To Him is the Dominion and He needs none; To Him belong the Glory and Everlastingness. To Him are the Ruling and al-Qada' (the Creating). He has the Names of Perfection. No one hinders what He decreed. No one prevents what He gives. He does in His dominion whatever He wills. He rules His creation with whatever He wills. Surat al-Ma'idah, 120: Adh-Dhariyat, 58: Surat Fussilat, 12: Surat 'Al ^Imran, 4; Surat al-'Isra', 23: adh-Dhariyat, 56: Surat Yunus, 99: Surat al-Qasas, 68:
  • He does not hope for reward and does not fear punishment. Surat adh-Dhariyat, 57:
  • There is no right on Him that is binding, and no one exercises rule over Him. Every endowment from Him is due to His Generosity and every punishment from Him is just. He is not questioned about what He does, but they are questioned. Surat an-Nur, 21: Al-Anbiya', 23; Surat al-'Anbiya', 23:
  • He existed before the creation. He does not have a before or an after. He does not have an above or a below, a right or a left, an in front of or a behind, a whole or a part. Surat ash-Shura, 11:
  • It must not be said: When was He? Or where was He? Or how is He? He existed without a place. He created the universe and willed for the existence of time. He is not bound to time and is not designated with place.
  • His management of one matter does not distract Him from another. Delusions do not apply to Him, and He is not encompassed by the mind. He is not conceivable in the mind. He is not imagined in the self nor pictured in delusions. He is not grasped with delusions or thoughts. Surat Yasin, 82; Surat ash-Shura, 11: 112:4

Explanation can be found at [3].


[7] [8] [9]


Seeing God

Sunni Muslims believe that Allah cannot be seen, imagined or perceived in any way in the present life of this world. Rather, they believe that only the righteous believers will see Allah on Judgment Day (after they have died).[10][11]. Yaum Al-Qiyâmah يوم القيامة (literally, Day of the Resurrection) is the Arabic name for Judgement Day. ...


The Qur'an says: This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ...

"Some faces that Day shall be Nâdirah (shining and radiant). Looking at their Lord (God)." (Qur'an 75:22-23)
"Nay! Surely, they (evil-doers) will be veiled from seeing their Lord that Day." (Qur'an 83:15)

In a hadith, Abu Huraira reports: `Abdul-Rahman bin Sakhr Al-Azdi [AKA Abu Hurairah, Abu Hurayrah or even Abu Horaira. ...

The people said to the Messenger of Allah (may peace be upon him): Messenger of Allah, shall we see our Lord on the Day of Resurrection? Muhhamad said, "Do you feel any trouble in seeing the moon on the night when it is full?" They replied, "Messenger of Allah, no." Muhammad continued, 'Do you feel any trouble in seeing the sun, when there is no cloud over it?" They said, "Messenger of Allah. no." Muhammad said: Verily you would see Him like this (as you see the sun and the moon).Sahih Muslim 001.0349

Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, ṣaḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ...

Qur'an and Tawhid

Sunnis believe that the Qur'an is uncreated, and that this view is fully compatible with Tawhid. The Hanbalis hold the view that To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

"Not only were the words and sounds of the Quran eternal, so that even its recital was uncreated, but its parchment and binding shared the same qualities''[citation needed].

Abu Hanifa expressed: Imam Abu Hanifa (699 - 765) was an important Islamic scholar and jurist and is considered the founder of the Hanifi school of fiqh. ...

We confess that the Quran is the speech of Allah, uncreated, His inspiration, and revelation, not He, yet not other than He, but His real quality, written in the copies, recited by the tongues. The ink, the paper, the writing are created, for they are the work of man" Revelation and Reason in Islam by A.J. Arberry, pp 26-27.

Arthur John Arberry (1905–1969) was a respected scholar of Arabic, Persian, and Islamic studies. ...

Sunni Salafi view

Tauhid (Islamic Monothesism) has three aspects:

  • Oneness of the Lordship of God: (Tawheed-ar-Ruboobeeyah) To believe that there is only one Lord for all the universe, Who is its Creator, Organizer, Planner, Sustainer, and Giver of security.

This aspect of Tawheed is expressed in the following verses from the Qur'an.

"God is the Creator of everything. He is the guardian over everything. Unto Him belong the keys of the heavens and the earth." (Qur'an, 39:62-63).
"No creature is there crawling on the earth, but its provision rests on Allah. He knows its lodging place and it repository." (Qur'an 11:6).
  • Oneness of the Worship of God: (Tawheed-al-Ulooheeyah or Tawheed-al-Ebaadah) To believe that none has the right to be worshipped in truth except God. This aspect of Tawhid is expressed in the following verses from the Qur'an.
22) "He is God; there is no god but He, He is the Knower of the unseen and the visible; He is the All-Merciful, the All-Compassionate.
23) He is God, there is no god but He. He is the King, the All-Holy, the All-Peace, the Guardian of Faith, the All-Preserver, the All-Mighty, the All-Compeller, the All-Sublime. Glory be to God, above that which they associate!
24) He is God the Creator, the Maker, the Shaper. To Him belong the Names Most Beautiful. All that is in the heavens and the earth magnifies Him; He is the All-Mighty, the All-Wise." (The Holy Qur'an, 59:22-24).
  • Oneness of the Names and Qualities of God:(Tawheed-al-Asma-Sifaat) Muslims feel that one may not name or qualify God except with what he or Muhammad had named or qualified Him, and that nobody else can be named or qualified with those names and qualities. Also, it is a Muslim belief that those names and qualities must be followed verbatim,without changing their meaning or ignoring them completely or twisting the meanings or likening them (giving resemblance) to anything that isn't God. This aspect of Tawhid is expressed in the following verses from the Qur'an.
"Do you worship what you have carved yourself?" (Qur'an 37:95).
"Or have you taken unto you others beside Him to be your protectors, even such as have no power either for good or for harm to themselves?" (Qur'an 13:16).

For some Muslims, such as the Salafis, the following acts may be considered as shirk: This article is on the beliefs of the followers of the Salaf. ...

  • Sufi pilgrimage, such as pilgrimage to the tombs of revered early Muslims and Sufi saints.
  • Praying or seeking help from the dead
  • And many other practices.

Following Qur'anic literalism, Ibn Taymiya taught that God does not have body parts, but that He has the following attributes that the Qur'an and Hadeeth nonetheless: "Hands", "Eyes", "a Face", but that they are unlike anything we know of, as they are in a manner that befits God's majesty. Just like God Hears, and humans hear, God has a Hand, and humans have a hand, but they are different from each other as much as God is different from humans. Salafis believe that God is above the Heavens, upon the Arsh (Throne), above the Kursi (Footstool).[12]. Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... Ibn Baz was a follower of the Muslim scholars Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab and Ibn Taymiyya; he belonged to that current of Muslim thought sometimes called Salafism and sometimes called Wahabbism. ... Taqi Ad-din Abu Al-abbas Ahmad Ibn abd As-salam Ibn abd Allah Ibn Muhammad Ibn Taymiya (Arabic: أبو عباس تقي الدين أحمد بن عبد السلام بن عبد الله ابن تيمية الحراني) (January 22, 1263 - 1328), was an Islamic scholar born in Harran, located in what is now Turkey, close to the Syrian border. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... The Hadith (الحديث, pl. ... Alpha Leporis (α Lep / α Leporis) is the brightest star in the constellation Lepus. ... ...


However this dividing of Tawheed into three categories has absolutely no place in the dominant Sunni beliefs and is considered a form of trinity to resemble that of the Christians. For the mainstream Sunni Rabb is Allah and not a different entity the same way as his Sifat are His attributes and not a different entity. The reason for this is that when a person dies the first question he will be asked is MAN RABBUK? (WHO IS YOUR LORD?) he will not be asked again who is ALLAH, he will simply (if he is a true muslim) reply ALLAH.


Shi'a view

Tawhīd is among the five Shia Roots of Religion. According to Ali, the first Shi'a Imam: Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... In Shia Islam, the five Roots of Religion (UsÅ«l al-DÄ«n) are the five beliefs that Shia Muslims must possess. ... For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam only with regards to the aspect of political leadership. ...

Attaching attributes

Shi'a do not believe that God can or will ever be seen, and also reject the notion of Him having body parts, or any parts whatsoever.


Some verses of the Qur'an that seem to ascribe God body parts, for example verse (28:88) of which says: "Every thing is mortal except His face", Shi'a interpret as meaning "except His person". Shi'a argue that the verse is not to be taken literally, arguing that it can't be said that only the face of God will remain, while His other so-called limbs (either physical or not) will die. Similarly, Shi'a argue that God has used the word "Hand" (Arabic: Yad) in several places in the Qur'an, where it means His power and His Mercy, as in the verse (5:64): "But His hands are outspread". Shi'a quote in support of the verses being allegorical: This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ...

Shi'a believe that "those who are firmly rooted" are the Ahl al-Bayt, meaning that they are the ones need to consulted for detailed information[2] One of the most respected Shi'a collection, the Nahj al-Balagha, contains a sermon where Ali is quoted as giving a long and detailed account of Tawhid, part of it being:[3] This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Sura (sometimes spelt Surah , plural Suwar ) is an Arabic term literally meaning something enclosed or surrounded by a fence or wall. ... Surat āli-Imrān (Arabic: آل عمران ) (The Family of Amram)[2] is the 3rd chapter of the Quran with two hundred verses. ... Ayah is the Arabic word for sign or miracle. ... Translations of the Qurán are interpretations of the holy book of Islam in languages other than Arabic. ... Mohammed Habib Shakir, (1866, Cairo–1939, Cairo) was an Egyptian judge, born in Cairo and a graduate from Al Azhar University. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ‎) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... It has been proposed below that Nahj al Balagha be renamed and moved to Nahj al-Balagha. ... For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ...

The sermon is one of the most complicated description of God, it maintains attributes should not be attached to God, since it would creat a duality. However, Shi'a do not understand this as the notion that God lacks attributes. A modern similitude to energy would be that attributes can not be attached to energy, for example saying that energy has redness, creating a duality bettween energy and the color red; rather it should be said that energy can be red. In the same way, Shi'a maintain that it should not be said that God has strength or wisdom, creating a duality and nullifying Tawhid. Rather, it can be said that God is strong and wise. The thought of God having body parts is completely rejected and seen as shirk.


Shaykh Saduq, one of the most distinguished of Shi'a scholars expresed:[4]

List of attributes

Shi'a list some positive attributes to God:[5]

  1. Qadím: God is eternal. He has neither a beginning nor an end.
  2. Qadir: God is omnipotent. He has power over all things.
  3. 'Alim: God is omniscient. He is all-knowing.
  4. Hai: God is living. He is alive and will remain alive forever
  5. Muríd: God has his own discretion in all affairs. He does not do anything out of compulsion.
  6. Mudrik: God is all-perceiving. He is all-hearing, all-seeing, and is omnipresent. God sees and hears everything though He has neither eyes nor ears.
  7. Mutakalim: God is the Lord of the Worlds. He can create speech in anything: the burning bush for Musa and the curtain of light for Muhammad.
  8. Sadiq: God is truthful. His words and promises are true.

And some negative attributes: Look up Hai and hai in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... As-Sadiq means, the Truthful in the Arabic Language. ...

  1. Sharík: God has no partners.
  2. Murakab: God is neither made, nor composed, of any material.
  3. Makán: God is not confined to any place and has no body.
  4. Hulúl: God does not incarnate into anything or anybody.
  5. Mahale hawadith: God is not subject to changes. God cannot change.
  6. Marí: God is not visible. He has not been seen, is not seen, and will never be seen, because he has no form or body.
  7. Ihtiyaj: God is not dependent. God is not deficient, so he does not have any needs.
  8. Sifate zayed: God does not have added qualifications. The attributes of God are not separate from His being.

Non-eternal actions

Shi'a distinct between eternal and non-eternal attributes of God: first those attributes which denote His person, and second, those attributes which denote His actions. Shaykh Saduq says:[6]

Qur'an and Tawhid

Shi'a further say that God creating and sending the Qur'an is of the non-eternal acts of God, hence Shi'a believe the Qur'an to be a creation, in contrast to Sunnis. Shi'a quote a Hadith where Muhammad is quoted as:

"(There was a time when) God existed, and there was nothing beside Him".

Even so, Shi'a believe the Qur'an to be perfect, in the same way that they believe God created other perfect objects, for example, the angels and the Prophets.


Muslim critiques of some views of Tawhid

Critique of the Sunni view

Shi'a view some Sunni beliefs as deviation from the truth, occurring due to acceptance of the teaching of other than the Ahl al-Bayt. However, Shi'a do not go as far as saying Sunnis are polytheist (Arabic: mushrik) , rather, that they are mistaken. Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ‎) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... Shirk, for the purposes of this article, is the Islamic concept of the sin of idolatry. ...


Attaching attributes

Shi'a critizice the Sunni for regarding as authentic hadith where God is given body parts such as a body, face, hands, fingers, and legs [13]. some of this hadith include the Hadith of seeing God as the clear as the sun, and another by Abu Huraira where God is said to move: This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A hadith in Sahih Bukhari is about speech alledgedly held by prophet Muhammad, describing the events of the Judgment day. ... `Abdul-Rahman bin Sakhr Al-Azdi [AKA Abu Hurairah, Abu Hurayrah or even Abu Horaira. ...

...God waits till when one-third of the first part of the night is over; He descends to the lowest heaven and says: It there any supplicator of forgiveness?... Sahih Muslim 004.1657-004.1660

In this hadith, also narrated by Abu Huraira, God compressed Hell with "His Foot" to accommodate for more inhabitants: Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, ṣaḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ...

... (that the Prophet said) "It will be said to the Hell, 'Are you filled?' It will say, 'Are there any more (to come)?' On that God will put His Foot on it, and it will say 'Qati! Qati! (Enough! Enough!)." Sahih Bukhari 006.060.371, 006.060.372, 006.060.373, 008.078.654, 009.093.481, 009.093.541, Sahih Muslim 40.6819, 040.6821, 040.6823, 040.6825

Shi'a have a presented a set of questions to Sunnis regarding their view on Tawheed[7] The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, ṣaḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ...


Uncreated Qur'an

While Sunnis believe the Qur'an is the uncreated word of God, Shi'a view this as claiming the Qur'an co-existed with God, in other words as shirk. Shi'a claim that this confusion stems from Sunni scholars not differentiating between non-eternal actions of God and God's eternal attributes al-islam.org.


Critique of the Shi'a view

Deifying Ali

Among the views on Shi'a Islam, there is the claim that the Shi'a breach Tawhīd by deifying Ali, while it is the Alawis that do so. (The Alawis believe that God incarnated as their imams, starting with Ali.) There are several views on the Shia. ... Deifying is the act of raising something to the status of a deity. ... For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ... Alawite is a Middle Eastern Syria. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Tawassul

Salafis claim that the Shi'a and traditional Sunni Muslims breach Tawhīd in other ways. For example, there is the claim that Shi'a and traditional Sunnis are polytheists (Arabic mushrik) when they pray through an intermediary (Arabic: Tawassul) with expressions such as Ya Muhammad and Ya Ali.[8] They equate asking Ali for help with worshiping Ali: Shirk, for the purposes of this article, is the Islamic concept of the sin of idolatry. ... Intercession in Islam (Arabic: Tawassul) is a hotly debated topic between Shia and Salafis. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ya Muhammad, Ya Ali, Ya Hussain and such are expresions used mainly by Shias. ...

As far as the Sunni Muslims are concerned, when they are in distress, they only call: "O God!" They do turn to Him only in their quest for help as they appeal for aid from Him only to remove their agony. They do that with clear perception that supplication to the Only One God is one of the aspects of worship as the Messenger of God (Peace be upon him) prescribed for them. In this respect, supplication to other than God the Omniscient is ipso facto worshipping other than Him ansar.org, allaahuakbar.

Shi'a answer that martyrs (Arabic: Shahid) should not be called dead according to the Qur'an. Shi'a also consider it illogical to be accused of polytheism on the mere account of asking Muhammad or Ali for help, arguing that it is at worst a call that will not be heard, not worse than asking a deaf person (who is alive) for help. Further, they claim that Salifis utter outright lies when they claim that Sunnis condemn this practice answering-ansar.org. Do you mean. ...


Critique of the Sunni Salafi view

Some, Shi'a in particular, are known to accuse Salafis to have abandoned many parts of Islam, and using threats of Shirk as motivation. For example, Shi'a use the Mawlid as a great festivity, used to commemorate what they perceive as the greatest prophet of God, and believe that the Salafi ban of the festivity for fear of deifying Muhammad is not only exaggerated, but also robs people of an occasion to bond with Muhammad. This does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Milad-e-sherif be merged into this article or section. ... Deifying is the act of raising something to the status of a deity. ...


Salafis claim that Muhammad didn't celebrate his own birthday, nor did Muhammad's companions celebrate Muhammad's birthday, and conclude that celebrating the Birthday of the Prophet is a Bid'ah. It has been suggested that Milad-e-sherif be merged into this article or section. ... Bidah (Arabic: بدعة ) is an Islamic term meaning (improper) innovation of religious beliefs or worship. ...


Non-Muslim uses

Refer to Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (in Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ኦርቶዶክስ ተዋሕዶ ቤተክርስትያን Yäityopya ortodoks täwahedo bétäkrestyan) is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Orthodox Church until 1959, when it was granted its own Patriarch by Coptic Orthodox Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of All...


See also

// The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... The People of Monotheism (Arabic: Ahl al-Tawhid) is one a name the Druze use for themselves. ... In theology, the doctrine of divine simplicity says that God is without parts. ... Judeo-Christian (or Judaeo-Christian) is a term used to describe the body of concepts and values which are thought to be held in common by Judaism and Christianity, and typically considered (sometimes along with classical Greco-Roman civilization) a fundamental basis for Western legal codes and moral values. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In theology, monotheism (Greek μόνος(monos) = single and θεός(theos) = God) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ... Ibn Baz was a follower of the Muslim scholars Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab and Ibn Taymiyya; he belonged to that current of Muslim thought sometimes called Salafism and sometimes called Wahabbism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Shema Yisrael (or Shma Yisroel or just Shema) (Hebrew: שמע ישראל; Hear, [O] Israel) are the first two words of a section of the Torah (Hebrew Bible) that is used as a centerpiece of all morning and evening Jewish prayer services and closely echoes the monotheistic message of Judaism. ... The Index finger The index finger, pointer finger or forefinger is the second digit of a human hand, located between the thumb and the middle finger. ... Bosniaks (natively: Bošnjaci) are South Slavs descended from those who converted to Islam during the Ottoman period (15th-19th century). ... Combatants Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predominantly Bosniak) Army of Republika Srpska, Yugoslav Peoples Army, various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro (Serbian) Croatian Defence Council, Croatian Army (Croatian) Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim... The Serbian three-finger salute where only the thumb, index, and middle fingers are extended is associated with the Serbian Orthodox Christian Church, and experts say it represents the Christian Trinity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. ... Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki making the V sign. ...

References

  1. ^ Nahj al-Balagha [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ Nahj al-Balagha sermon 1
  4. ^ Shi'ite Creed (al-Itqadat al-Imamiyyah), by Shaykh Saduq on al-islam.org [3]
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ Shi'ite Creed (al-Itqadat al-Imamiyyah), by Shaykh Saduq [5]
  7. ^ http://www.answering-ansar.org/challenges/100questions/en/chap4.php
  8. ^ Omer Iqbal, Muhammad. In the Name of God, Most Gracious, Ever Merciful. "Calling "Ya Ali/Ya Muhammad" For Help." February 19, 2007. [6]

It has been proposed below that Nahj al Balagha be renamed and moved to Nahj al-Balagha. ... It has been proposed below that Nahj al Balagha be renamed and moved to Nahj al-Balagha. ... Al-Islam. ...

External links

Sunni links:

Shi'a links:

Other links:


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Tawhid is not a new answer nor with infinitude of practice.
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