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Encyclopedia > Tautology
Look up tautology in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Tautology can refer to: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (from wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ...

Example of a tautology: "It is either raining or not raining." Within the study of logic, a tautology is a statement containing more than one sub-statement, that is true regardless of the truth values of its parts. ... Propositional logic or sentential logic is the logic of propositions, sentences, or clauses. ... In rhetoric, a tautology is a use of redundant language in speech or writing, or, put simply, saying the same thing twice. // Tautology, often regarded as a fault of style, was defined by Fowler as saying the same thing twice. In fact, it is not necessary for the entire meaning... Image File history File links Disambig_gray. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tautology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (760 words)
In traditional grammar, a tautology is a redundancy due to superfluous qualification, often leading to the schoolboy definition of "saying the same thing twice".
A logical tautology is a statement that is true regardless of the truth values of its parts.
Tautologies can be used to introduce a red herring in an argument, but neither necessarily implies the other.
Tautology - definition of Tautology in Encyclopedia (585 words)
In linguistics, a tautology is a redundancy due to superfluous qualification.
The opposite of a tautology is a contradiction, which is a statement that is always false.
A tautology may be intended to amplify or emphasize a certain aspect of the thing being discussed: for example, a gift is by definition free of charge, but one might talk about a "free gift" if the fact that no money was paid is of particular importance.
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