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Encyclopedia > Tatar language
Tatar
татарча / Tatarça / تاتارچا
Spoken in: Russia, Ukraine, Turkey, China, Finland, former Soviet Union
Total speakers: 7 million
Language family: Altaic[1] (controversial)
 Turkic
  Kypchak
   Kypchak–Bolgar
    Tatar 
Official status
Official language of: Tatarstan
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: tt
ISO 639-2: tat
ISO 639-3: tat

The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça, Татар теле, Татарча) is a Turkic language spoken by the Tatars. Current distribution of Human Language Families A language family is a group of related languages said to have descended from a common proto-language. ... Altaic is a proposed language family which includes 66 languages [1] spoken by about 348 million people, mostly in and around Central Asia and northeast Asia. ... Altaic is a putative language family which would include 60 languages spoken by about 250 million people, mostly in and around central Asia. ... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers. ... The Kypchak languages (also known as the Kipchak, Qypchaq, or Northeastern Turkic languages), are a major branch of the Turkic language family spoken by more than 12 million people in an area spanning from Lithuania to China. ... Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: ; Tatar: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ... ISO 639-1 is the first part of the ISO 639 international-standard language-code family. ... ISO 639-2 is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. ... ISO 639-3 is an international standard for language codes. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Unicode is an industry standard allowing computers to consistently represent and manipulate text expressed in any of the worlds writing systems. ... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers. ... Tatars (Tatar: Tatarlar/Татарлар), sometimes spelled Tartar (more about the name), is a collective name applied to the Turkic speaking people of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. ...

Contents

Classification

Tatar is a Turkic language, which is considered part of the disputed Altaic language family. The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers. ... Altaic is a proposed language family which includes 66 languages [1] spoken by about 348 million people, mostly in and around Central Asia and northeast Asia. ...


Geographic distribution

Tatar is spoken in some parts of Europe, Russia, Siberia, China, Turkey, Poland, Ukraine, Finland, and Central Asia. World map showing the location of Europe. ... It has been suggested that Western Siberia be merged into this article or section. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ...


Kazan Tatar is also native for 400,000 Bashkirs. The Bashkirs, a Turkic people, live in Russia, mostly in the republic of Bashkortostan. ...


Official status

Bilingual guide in Kazan Metro.
Bilingual guide in Kazan Metro.

Tatar is the official language of the Republic of Tatarstan. The official script of Tatar language is based on the Cyrillic alphabet with some additional letters not used in Slavic languages. Sometimes other scripts are used, mostly Latin and Arabic. All official sources in Tatarstan use Cyrillic at their web-sites and publishing. In other cases, where Tatar has no official status, the use of a specific alphabet depends on the preference of the author. Guides in Tatarstan are published in two alphabets. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 306 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Tatar language Kazan Metro Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 306 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Tatar language Kazan Metro Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Map of the Kazan Metro Kazan Metro of Kazan, Tatarstan, Russian Federation, is a single-line metro, the north-southeast running Central Line. ... A new page based on the new template is being worked on at Tatarstan/Temp, please make any changes you want to make on that page. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The Tatar language was made a de facto official language in Russia in 1917 (for the first time since 1552, when the Kazan Khanate was annexed by Russia), but only in the Tatar–Bashkir Soviet Socialist Republic. Tatar is also considered the official language in Idel-Ural State. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Events April - War between Henry II of France and Emperor Charles V. Henry invades Lorraine and captures Toul, Metz, and Verdun. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Former countries | Tatars | Tatarstan history | History of Mongolia ... Tatar Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (TASSR) was part of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. ... Idel-Ural literally means Volga-Ural in Tatar. ...


One should note, however, that Bolshevist Russia did not recognize official languages as such; however, there were a number of languages that could be used in trial in some republics. In the Soviet epoch, Tatar was such a language in Bashkortostan, Mari El and other regions of the Russian SFSR (the Soviet Republic comprised of the area of modern-day Russia). Bolshevist Russia is a common term that refers to the Bolshevik side in the Russian Civil War, or more specifically the Russian government between the October Revolution (November 7, 1917) and the constitution of the Soviet Union (December 30, 1922). ... Soviet redirects here. ... The Republic of Bashkortostan, or Bashkiria (Russian: or ; Bashkir: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ... The Mari El Republic (Russian: Респу́блика Мари́й Эл; Mari: Марий Эл Республика) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation... State motto: Russian: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! Translation: Workers of the world, unite! Capital Moscow Official language Russian Established In the USSR:  - Since  - Until November 7, 1917 November 7, 1917 December 12, 1991 (dissolution) Area  - Total  - Water (%) Ranked 1st in the USSR 17,075,200 km² 13% Population  - Total   - Density Ranked 1st in the...


The usage of Tatar declined from the 1930s onwards. In the 1980s it was not studied in city schools, not even by Tatar pupils. Although the language was used in rural schools, Tatar-speaking pupils had little chance to enter university, because all higher education was in Russian. Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


According to some, Tatar is no longer an endangered language, although it is still a low prestige language. Higher education in Tatar can only be found in Tatarstan, and is restricted to the humanities. In other regions Tatar is primarily a spoken language and the number of speakers as well as their proficiency tends to decrease. Tatar is popular as a written language only in Tatar-speaking areas where schools with Tatar language lessons are situated. On the other hand, Tatar is the only language in use in rural districts of Tatarstan. Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: ; Tatar: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ... Cities and towns under republics jurisdiction Kazan (Казань) (capital) city districts: Aviastroitelny (Авиастроительный) Kirovsky (Кировский) Moskovsky (Московский) Novo-Savinovsky (Ново-Савиновский) Privolzhsky (Приволжский) Sovetsky (Советский) with 1 selsovet under the city districts jurisdiction. ...


Dialects of Kazan Tatar

There are 3 main dialects of Tatar: Western (Mişär or Mishar), Middle (Tatarstan's most popular language), and Eastern (Siberian). All of these dialects also have subdivisions. Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: ; Tatar: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ...


Mişär

In the Western (Mişär) dialect Ç is pronounced as [ʧ] (southern or lambir mishars) and as [ʦ] (northern mishars or nizhgars). C is pronounced as [ʤ]. There are no differences between v and w, q and k, g and ğ in Mişär dialect. So, modern Tatar Cyrillic alphabet represent Mishar pronunciation WYSIWYS, but for the main speakers of the language Cyrillic has difficult rules to pronounce right. (Cyrillic Tatar doesn't have special letters for q, ğ and w)


This is the dialect spoken by the Tatar minority of Finland.


Middle

Minzälä

In the Minzälä subdialect of the Middle Dialect z is pronounced as [ð], as opposed to other dialects where it is silent.


Slang
Main article: Tatar-Russian code-switching

In bilingual city people often pronounce x instead of h, k instead of q, g instead of ğ , v instead of w - or making the distinction is less common than it used to be. This could be viewed as an influence of the Russian language. Another theory is that these cities were places where both the Western and Middle dialects were used. The Tatar-Russian code-switching is a code-switching language of urban population of Tatarstan, and is spoke predominantly among bilingual Tatars. ...


The influence of Russian language is significant. Russian words and phrases are used with Tatar grammar or Russian grammar in Tatar texts. Some Russian verbs are taken entirely, un-nativized, and followed with itärgä. Some English words and phrases are also used.


There was a distinct cryptolect the Gäp, spoken predominantly in Kazan, but now it is extinct or near the extinction. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with cant (language). ... The Yaña Bistä slang, Yaña Bistä gäbe or simply Gäp was a distinct cryptolect of the Tatar language, spoken in Yaña Bistä (The New Quarter) of Kazan, traditionally known by its high crime rate. ... Kazan (Russian: ; Tatar: Qazan, Казан) is the capital city of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia, and one of Russias largest cities. ...


Siberian Tatar

The Siberian Tatars use a different language from literary Kazan Tatar. Kazan Tatar was used as literary writing language before 1930, but since then only Russian has been used as a written language. The Native Western Siberian Tatars (200,000) is an ethnos or part of the Tatar ethnos (disputed). ... ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Siberian Tatars pronounce [ts] instead of ç, [j] instead of c and sometimes [p] and [t] instead of b and d. There are also grammatical differences within the dialect, scattered across Western Siberia.


The language of the Chulym Tatars is considered to be an independent language, as are the other "Tatar" languages to the East of them. Chulyum also known as Chulym-Turkic , Chulym Tatar (not at all related to the Tatar language), or Küerik is a language of Chulyms. ... The Chulyms (Чулымцы in Russian; self-designation: Чулымские люди, or Chulymian people) are a Turkic people in the Tomsk Oblast and Krasnoyarsk Krai in Russia. ...


Tatar in Russia

There are some 5,300,000 Tatar speakers in Russia. Only about 4,500,000 of them are Tatars. Other speakers are Bashkirs (520,000), Russians (130,000), Chuvashs (70,000), Maris (42,000), Udmurts and Mordvins. There are local Tatar language speakers in Tatarstan, this number includes Azeri, Armenian, Kazakh and Jewish communities. The Azeri, also referred to as Azerbaijanian Turks, are a Turkic-Muslim people. ... Languages Kazakh (and/or languages in country of residence) Religions Sunni Islam Related ethnic groups Kipchak and other Turk peoples, ancient Indo-Iranian tribes, Mongols The Kazakhs (also spelled Kazaks, Qazaqs; Kazakh: Қазақтар []; Russian: Казахи; the English name is transliterated from Russian) are a Turk people of the northern parts of Central... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


Phonology

Vowels

Tatar has 16 vowel symbols representing a variable number of sounds. As a Turkic language, Tatar exhibits vowel harmony, with some of the vowels considered front and others back. Vowel harmony (also metaphony) is a type of long-distance assimilatory phonological process involving vowels. ...


Front vowels: ä [æ~ə], â [æ], e [e], é [ɛ], i [i], ó [ø], ö [œ], ü [y]


Back vowels: a [ɑ~ʌ], á [ɑ], í [ɯɪ], ı [ɯ~ɨ:], o [o~o:], u–ú [u]


The usage of í, â, á, ó, ú, é is not universal, and sometimes ıy, a, ya, yo, yu and e are used instead.


Some of them are found only in Slavic loanwords, such as é, ó, long o, long ı. Acute in á, ó, ú denotes palatalisation, but sometimes a palatalisated consonant is marked by following y before the vowel. This is only a problem for Russian loanwords. A loanword (or loan word) is a word directly taken into one language from another with little or no translation. ...


The commonly pronounced 10 vowels are native Tatar vowels: a–ä, u–ü, í–i, o–ö, ı–e. The last two pairs are considered to be short vowels. They also could mean a long vowels, but only in loanwords. [ə] and [ʌ] are not considered to be independent vowels. Loaned vowels are considered to be back vowels.


Consonants

The consonants of Tatar
Bilabial Labio-
dental
Dental Alveolar Post-
alveolar
Palatal Velar Uvular Glottal
Plosives p /p/ b /b/ t /t/ d /d/ k /k/ ɡ /ɡ/ q /q/
Nasals m /m/ n /n/ ñ /ŋ/
Fricatives f /f/ v /v/ s /s/ z /z/ ş /ʃ/
ç /ɕ/
j /ʒ/
c /ʑ/
ğ /ɣ/ h /h/
Trill r /r/
Approximant y /j/ ([j~ɪ])
Lateral
approximant
l /l/

Most of these phonemes are common to or have equivalents in all Turkic languages. In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips. ... In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ... Alveolars are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, the internal side of the upper gums (known as the alveoles of the upper teeth). ... Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants). ... Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the middle or back part of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth). ... Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum). ... Uvulars are consonants articulated with the back of the tongue against or near the uvula, that is, further back in the mouth than velar consonants. ... The vocal cords, also known as vocal folds, are composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched horizontally across the human larynx. ... A stop or plosive or occlusive is a consonant sound produced by stopping the airflow in the vocal tract. ... A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... In music, a trill is a type of ornament; see trill (music) In phonetics, a trill is a type of consonant; see trill consonant In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Trill are two symbiotic races of aliens; see Trill (Star Trek). ... Approximants are speech sounds that could be regarded as intermediate between vowels and typical consonants. ... Laterals are L-like consonants pronounced with an occlusion made somewhere along the axis of the tongue, while air from the lungs escapes at one side or both sides of the tongue. ...


The phonemes /f/, /x/ and /ʒ/ were borrowed from Arabic and European languages in the Middle Ages, while /v/ was borrowed in the beginning of 20th century. Differentiation between /h/ and /x/ appeared in the 10th century with the appearance of the word Allah and the strongest influence of Arabic and Persian languages. During the atheistic Soviet period, the occurrence of /h/ greatly reduced. Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Soviet redirects here. ...


Pronunciation of loanwords

While the consonants [ʒ], [f] and [v] are not native to Tatar, they are well established. However, Tatars usually substitute fricatives for affricates, for example [ʃʲ] for [ʧ], [ʒ] or [ʒʲ] for [ʤ] and [s] for [ʦ]. Nevertheless, literary traditions recommend pronunciation of affricates in loanwords.


[ʔ] (hamza) is a sound found in Arabic loanwords and Islamic prayers. It is usually pronounced as [e] in loanwords. Hamza () is a letter in the Arabic alphabet, representing the glottal stop . ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Salat redirects here. ...


Palatalisation

Palatalisation is not common in the Tatar language. As a result, Tatar speakers have no problem using the Arabic and Jaŋalif scripts, neither of which has an accepted method for indicating palatisation. Palatalization means pronouncing a sound nearer to the hard palate, making it more like a palatal consonant; this is towards the front of the mouth for a velar or uvular consonant, but towards the back of the mouth for a front (e. ... JaÅ‹alif or Yañalif (Tatar: new alphabet - yaña älifba -> yañalif) was the first Latin writing system was used in the Soviet epoch Tatar language in 1930s. ...


In general, Russian words with palatalisation have entered into the speech of bilingual Tatars since the 1930s. When writing in the Cyrillic alphabet Russian words were spelled as they were in the Russian language. In today's Latin orthography, palatalisation is sometimes represented by an acute diacritic under the vowel. Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... The acute accent (   ) is a diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin and Greek scripts. ...


Some Tatars speak Russian without palatalisation, which is known as a Tatar accent.


Syllable types

  • V (ı-lıs, u-ra, ö-rä)
  • VC (at-law, el-geç, ir-kä)
  • CV (qa-la, ki-ä, su-la)
  • CVC (bar-sa, sız-law, köç-le, qoş-çıq)
  • VCC (ant-lar, äyt-te, ilt-kän)
  • CVCC (tört-te, qart-lar, 'qayt-qan)

Phonetic replacement

A metro sign in Tatar (top) and Russian
A metro sign in Tatar (top) and Russian

Tatar phonotactics dictate many pronunciation changes. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1306 × 979 pixel, file size: 428 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Sign in the Kazan metro, Russia. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1306 × 979 pixel, file size: 428 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Sign in the Kazan metro, Russia. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


Unrounded vowels may be pronounced as rounded after o or ö:


qorı /qoro/
borın /boron/
közge /közgö/
sorı /soro/)


Nasals are assimilated to following stops:


unber /umber/
mengeç /meñgeç/


Voicing may also undergo assimilation: Assimilation is a regular and frequent sound change process by which a phoneme changes to match an adjacent phoneme in a word. ...


küzsez /küssez/


Unstressed vowels may be syncopated or reduced: This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


urını /urnı/
kilene /kilne/
bezne /bĕzne/
kerdem /kĕrdem/
qırğıç /qĭrğıç/


Vowels may also be elided: In music, see elision (music). ...


qara urman /qar'urman/
kilä ide /kilä'yde/
turı uram /tur'uram/
bula almím /bul'almím/


In consonant clusters longer than two phones, ı or e (whichever is dictated by vowel harmony) is inserted into speech as an epenthetic vowel. In linguistics, a consonant cluster is a group of consonants which have no intervening vowel. ... Look up phone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Vowel harmony (also metaphony) is a type of long-distance assimilatory phonological process involving vowels. ... In linguistics, an epenthetic vowel breaks up a consonant cluster that is not permitted by the phonotactics of a language. ...


tekst → /tekest/
bank → /banık/ (not /bañk/)


Final devoicing is also frequent: The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject to understand later context. ...


tabíb (doctor) → [tabíp]


Grammar

Like other Turkic languages, Tatar is an agglutinative language.


Plural

  • After vowels, consonants, hard: -lar (bala-lar, abí-lar, kitap-lar, qaz-lar, malay-lar, qar-lar, ağaç-lar)
  • After vowels, consonants, soft: -lär (äni-lär, sölge-lär, däftär-lär, kibet-lär, süz-lär, bäbkä-lär, mäktäp-lär, xäref-lär)
  • After nasals, hard: -nar (uram-nar, urman-nar, tolım-nar, moñ-nar, tañ-nar, şalqan-nar)
  • After nasals, soft: -när (ülän-när, keläm-när, çräm-när, iñ-när, ciñ-när, isem-när)

Writing system

Main articles: Tatar alphabet and Jaŋalif
Some guides in Kazan are in Latin script, especially in fashion boutiques
Some guides in Kazan are in Latin script, especially in fashion boutiques

Tatar has been written in a number of different alphabets. Two versions of the Tatar alphabet are currently used for the Tatar language. ... Jaŋalif or Yañalif (Tatar: new alphabet - yaña älifba -> yañalif) was the first Latin writing system was used in the Soviet epoch Tatar language in 1930s. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 418 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 418 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Kazan (Russian: ; Tatar: Qazan, Казан) is the capital city of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia, and one of Russias largest cities. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Writing was adopted from the Bolgar language, which used the Orkhon script, before the 920s. Later, the Arabic alphabet was also used, as well as the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. Bolgar (also Bolğar), also Proto-Bulgarian is the language of the Bulgars, now extinct, whose classification is unclear. ... Orkhon tablet Inscription in Kyzyl using Orkhon script Orkhon script The Orkhon script (also spelled Orhon script, also Orkhon-Yenisey script, Old Turkic script, Göktürk script, Turkish: Orhon Yazıtları) is the alphabet used by the Göktürk from the 8th century to record the Old Turkic... Centuries: 9th century - 10th century - 11th century Decades: 870s - 880s _ 890s - 900s - 910s - 920s - 930s - 940s - 950s - 960s -- 970s Years: 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 Events: Categories: 920s ... The Arabic alphabet is the script used for writing languages such as Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and others. ...


Pre–1928

Before 1928 Tatar was written with a variant of the Arabic alphabet (Iske imla ...- 1920; Yanga imla 1920-1928). İske imlâ (Tatar language for Old Orthography) is a variant of Arabic alphabet, used for Tatar language before 1920 and Old Tatar language. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Yaña imlâ (; Tatar for new orthography) was a modified variant of Arabic script that was in use for Tatar language in 1920-1927. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


1927–1938

In the Soviet Union Tatar was written with a Latin orthography called Jaŋalif. The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... JaÅ‹alif or Yañalif (Tatar: new alphabet - yaña älifba -> yañalif) was the first Latin writing system was used in the Soviet epoch Tatar language in 1930s. ...


Cyrillic

In Tatarstan (a republic of Russia where Tatar is most commonly used) and all other parts of Russia a Cyrillic alphabet is used to write Tatar; also in Kazakhstan. Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: ; Tatar: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Modern Latin

A Latin alphabet-based system has been used mostly in Tatarstan since 2000 and generally on the Internet, although this has been less common more recently due to the Russian law that all languages of Russia must be written in Cyrillic. The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: ; Tatar: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


History

Tatar's ancestors are the extinct Bolgar and Kipchak languages. Bolgar (also BolÄŸar), also Proto-Bulgarian is the language of the Bulgars, now extinct, whose classification is unclear. ... Kipchaks (also Kypchaks, Qipchaqs) are an ancient Turkic people, first mentioned in the historical chronicles of Central Asia in the 1st millennium BC. Their language was also known as Kipchak. ...


The literary Tatar language is based on Kazan Tatar's Middle (Tatarstan) dialect and the Old Tatar language (İske Tatar Tele). Both are members of the Kypchak (or Northwestern) group of Turkic languages, although they are also partly derived from the ancient Volga Bolgar language. Old Tatar language (Iske imla: يسكى تاتار تلى (translit. ... Kypchaks (also Kipchaks, Qipchaqs) are an ancient Turkic people, first mentioned in historical chronicles of Central Asia in the 1st millennium BC. The western Kypchaks were also named Kuman, Kun and Polovtsian (pl. ... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers. ... Bolgar (also BolÄŸar), also Proto-Bulgarian is the language of the Bulgars, now extinct, whose classification is unclear. ...


The Tatar language strongly influenced most of the Caucasian, Slavic and Finnic languages in the Volga River area. The term Caucasian languages is loosely used to refer to a large and extremely varied array of languages spoken by more than 7 million people in the Caucasus region of Eastern Europe, between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... Geographical distribution of Finno-Ugric (Finno-Permic in blue, Ugric in green). ... The Volga (Russian: , Tatar Cyrillic: Идел, Latin: Ä°del) is the largest river in Europe in terms of length, discharge, and watershed. ...


Examples

  • äye – yes
  • yuq – no
  • isänme(sez)/sawmı(sız) – hello
  • sälâm – hi
  • saw bul(ığız)/xuş(ığız) – bye bye
  • zínhar öçen – please
  • min – I
  • sin – you
  • ul – he / she / it
  • bez – we
  • sez – you
  • alar – they
  • millät – nation
  • İngliz(çä) – English

See also

Tatars (Tatar: Tatarlar/Татарлар), sometimes spelled Tartar (more about the name), is a collective name applied to the Turkic speaking people of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. ... Two versions of the Tatar alphabet are currently used for the Tatar language. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "[1] Ethnologue"

External links

Wikipedia
Tatar language edition of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Tatar language on Ethnologue

Tatar language at the Open Directory Project (English) Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1058x1058, 477 KB) aa Wikipedia logo, version 1058px square, no text Wikipedia logo by Nohat (concept by Paullusmagnus); compare Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: Arabic language Talk:Anarcho-capitalism Talk:Algorithm Talk:Anno Domini Talk:The... Wikipedia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...


Tatar language at the Open Directory Project (Tatar) The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...


Tatar dictionaries at the Open Directory Project (English) The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...


Web directory at the Open Directory Project (Tatar) The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

Language studies

Forums

  • Tatar mailing list (English)
  • Tatar forum (Tatar)
  • IRC channel #tatar on the freenode network

Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of real-time Internet chat or synchronous conferencing. ... The title of this article should be freenode. ...

History and literature

Dictionaries

  • Tatar-Russian-English dictionary
v  d  e
Turkic languages
Bulgar Bulgar† | Chuvash | Hunnic† | Khazar†
Uyghur Old Turkic† | Aini²| Chagatay† | Ili Turki | Lop | Uyghur | Uzbek
Kypchak Baraba | Bashkir | Crimean Tatar¹ | Cuman† | Karachay-Balkar | Karaim | Karakalpak | Kazakh | Kipchak† | Krymchak | Kumyk | Nogai | Old Tatar† | Tatar | Urum¹ | Altay | Kyrgyz
Oghuz Afshar | Azerbaijani | Crimean Tatar¹ | Gagauz | Khorasani Turkish | Ottoman Turkish† | Pecheneg | Qashqai | Salar | Turkish | Turkmen | Urum¹
Khalaj Khalaj
Northeastern Chulym | Dolgan | Fuyü Gïrgïs | Khakas | Northern Altay | Shor | Tofa | Tuvan | Western Yugur | Sakha / Yakut
Notes: ¹Listed in more than one group, ²Mixed language, ³Disputed, †Extinct

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tatar language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1672 words)
The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça, Татар теле, Татарча) is a Turkic language belonging to the Altaic branch of the Ural-Altaic family of languages.
Tatar is the official language of the Republic of Tatarstan.
Tatar's ancestors are the extinct Bolgar and Kipchak languages.
Tatar language - definition of Tatar language in Encyclopedia (598 words)
The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça) is a very ancient Turkic language belonging to the Altaic branch of the Ural-Altaic family of languages.
Kazan Tatar language's ancestors are the extinct Bolgar and Kipchak languages.
The literary Tatar language is based on the Kazan Tatar language's Middle (Tatarstan) dialect and the Old Tatar language (İske Tatar Tele).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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