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Encyclopedia > Tasmania
Tasmania
Flag of Tasmania Coat of Arms of Tasmania
Flag Coat of Arms
Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle
Motto(s): "Ubertas et Fidelitas" (Fertility and Faithfulness)
Map of Australia with Tasmania highlighted
Other Australian states and territories
Capital Hobart
Government Constitutional monarchy
Governor Peter Underwood
Premier David Bartlett (ALP)
Federal representation
 - House seats 5
 - Senate seats 12
Gross State Product (2006-07)
 - Product ($m)  $19,239[1] (7th)
 - Product per capita  $39,160 (8th)
Population (End of June 2007)
 - Population  493,300 (6th)
 - Density  7.21/km² (4th)
18.7 /sq mi
Area  
 - Total  90,758 km² (7th)
35,042 sq mi
 - Land 68,401 km²
26,410 sq mi
 - Water 22,357 km² (24.63%)
8,632 sq mi
Elevation  
 - Highest Mount Ossa
+1,614 m AHD[2] (5,295 ft)
 - Lowest
Time zone UTC+10 (+11 DST)
Abbreviations  
 - Postal TAS
 - ISO 3166-2 AU-TS
Emblems  
 - Flora Tasmanian Blue Gum
 - Mineral Crocoite
Web site www.tas.gov.au

Tasmania is an Australian island and state of the same name. It is located 240 kilometres (150 mi) south of the eastern side of the continent, being separated from it by Bass Strait. The state of Tasmania includes the island of Tasmania, and other surrounding islands. Tasmania has an estimated population of 493,300 as of June 2007[3] and an area of 68,401 square kilometres (26,410 sq mi). Image File history File links Flag_of_Tasmania. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Tasmania. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of Tasmania was officially adopted by the government of Tasmania in 1875. ... The coat of arms of Tasmania. ... The following is a list of Australian state and territory slogans. ... Image File history File links Tasmania_locator-MJC.png Summary Map of Australia highlighting Tasmania Made in Adobe Illustrator by me and released under the GFDL Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... The states and territories of Australia make up the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... Each jurisdiction of Australia has its own capital, where local judicial, administrative and legislative duties are centred. ... Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... List of Governors of Tasmania Note that Tasmania was called Van Diemens Land until 1855 (see History of Tasmania). ... Chief Justice Peter Underwood was appointed to the office of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Tasmania on 2 December 2004. ... Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Tasmania. ... David Bartlett is a Tasmanian Labor politician and member of the Tasmanian House of Assembly in the electorate of Denison. ... ALP redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Type Lower house Speaker of the House David Hawker, Liberal since November 16, 2004 Members 150 Political groups ALP (85) Liberal Party (53) National Party (10) Last elections 24 November 2007 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site House of Representatives Entrance to the House of Representatives Judicial High... Type Upper house President Alan Ferguson, Liberal since 14 August 2007 Members 76 Political groups Coalition (39) ALP (28) Green (4) Democrat (4) FFP (1) Last elections 9 October 2004 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site Senate Entrance to the Senate Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State... This is a list of Australian States and Territories by Gross State Product. ... By population By area By population density Category: ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... ĝMedia:Example. ... This is a list of Australian states and mainland territories by ranking. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Panorama from top of Mount Ossa Mount Ossa is the highest mountain in Tasmania. ... The Australian Height Datum is a theoretical reference surface (datum) for altitude measurement in Australia. ... This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... UTC+10 time zone Australia (AEST—Australian Eastern Standard Time) Australian Capital Territory**, New South Wales** (except Broken Hill, which observes South Australia time), Queensland, Tasmania** (which observes DST starting on the first weekend of October instead of the last), Victoria** Guam (Chamorro Standard Time via US Law) Federated States... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... ISO 3166-2 is the second part of the ISO 3166 standard. ... Binomial name Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ... Crocoite is a mineral consisting of lead chromate, PbCrO4, and crystallizing in the monoclinic system. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... Map of Australia with Bass Strait marked in light blue Bass Strait (IPA: ) is a sea strait separating Tasmania from the south of the Australian mainland (Victoria in particular). ... Australia has thousands of islands within its territory and several external territories. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Tasmania promotes itself as the Natural State and the "Island of Inspiration"[4] owing to its large, and relatively unspoiled natural environment. Formally, almost 37% of Tasmania is in reserves, National Parks and World Heritage Sites.[5] The island is 364 kilometres long from the northernmost point to the southernmost point, and 306 kilometres from west to east. This article is about national parks. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... South East Cape is the southernmost point of the main island of Tasmania and and also the southernmost point of the mainlands of Australia and Tasmania together. ...


The state capital and largest city is Hobart, which encompasses the local government areas of City of Hobart, City of Glenorchy and City of Clarence. Other major population centres include Launceston in the north, and Devonport and Burnie in the northwest. Each jurisdiction of Australia has its own capital, where local judicial, administrative and legislative duties are centred. ... Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ... Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ... City of Glenorchy, Tasmania Glenorchy, Tasmania, agriculture (particularly orchards) but is now a largely suburban, mainly working class area. ... The City of Clarence is a Local Government Area in Tasmania, Australia. ... Launceston is a city in the north of the state of Tasmania, Australia, population approximately 90,000 (Greater urban and 99,100 statistical division), located at the juncture of the North Esk, South Esk, and Tamar rivers. ... Devonport City Council shown in green in map of Tasmania Devonport is a city in the north-west of Tasmania, Australia, at the mouth of the Mersey River. ... Burnie is a port city on the north-west coast of Tasmania, originally settled in 1827 as Emu Bay. ...


The subantarctic Macquarie Island is also under the administration of the state, as part of the Huon Valley Council local government area. Macquarie Island lies in the southwest corner of the Pacific Ocean, about half-way between Australia and Antarctica. ... The Huon Valley Council is a Local Government Area of Tasmania. ...

Contents

History

Tessellated pavement, a rare rock formation on the Tasman Peninsula
Tessellated pavement, a rare rock formation on the Tasman Peninsula
Main article: History of Tasmania

Tessellated pavement is a rare sedimentary rock formation that occurs on some ocean shores, so named because it fractures into square blocks that appear like tiles, or tessellations. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Physical history

It is believed that the island was joined to the mainland until the end of the most recent ice age approximately 10,000 years ago. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


Much of the island is composed of Jurassic dolerite intrusions (upwellings of magma) through other rock types, sometimes forming large columnar crystals. Tasmania has the world's largest areas of dolerite, with many distinctive mountains and cliffs formed from this rock type. The central plateau and the southeast portions of the island are mostly dolerite. Mount Wellington above Hobart is a good example, showing distinct columns known as the Organ Pipes. In the southwest, Precambrian quartzites are formed from very ancient sea sediments and form strikingly sharp ridges and ranges, such as Federation Peak or Frenchman's Cap. In the northeast and east, continental granites can be seen, such as at Freycinet, similar to coastal granites on mainland Australia. In the northwest and west, mineral rich volcanic rock can be seen at Mt. Read near Rosebery, or at Mt. Lyell near Queenstown. Also present in the south and northwest is limestone with some magnificent caves. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Diabase. ... Mount Wellington is the mountain on whose foothills is built much of the city of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... -1... Frenchmans Cap (42°16′ S 145°49′ E, 1446 metres) is a mountain in the West Coast region of Tasmania. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Ignimbrite is a deposit of a pyroclastic flow. ... Also see our Festval Website: [1] Rosebery Online Access Center Website: [2] Rosebery is a town on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... Mount Lyell is the name of a mountain in the West Coast Range, Tasmania, Australia. ... Queenstown is a town on the West Coast of the island of Tasmania, Australia. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cave (disambiguation). ...


The quartzite and dolerite areas in the higher mountains show evidence of glaciation and much of Australia's glaciated landscape is found on the Central Plateau and the Southwest. Cradle Mountain, another dolerite peak, for example, was a Nunatak. The combination of these different rock types offers incredible scenery, much of it distinct from any other region of the world. A glaciation (a created composite term meaning Glacial Period, referring to the Period or Era of, as well as the process of High Glacial Activity), often called an ice age, is a geological phenomenon in which massive ice sheets form in the Arctic and Antarctic and advance toward the equator. ... Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Central Tasmanian Highlands Cradle Mountain forms the northern end of the wild Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, itself a part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. ... Nunataks on Greenlands east coast A nunatak (or, more properly spelt: nunataq) is the exposed summit of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier. ...


Indigenous people

Map of the Tasmanian tribes, 1803
Map of the Tasmanian tribes, 1803
A picture of the last four Tasmanian Aborigines c.1860s. Truganini, the last to survive, is seated at far right.
A picture of the last four Tasmanian Aborigines c.1860s. Truganini, the last to survive, is seated at far right.
Main article: Tasmanian Aborigines

Tasmania was first inhabited by the Tasmanian Aborigines, and evidence indicates their presence in the region, later to become an island, at least 35,000 years ago (rising sea levels cut Tasmania off from mainland Australia about 10,000 years ago). The Aboriginal people in Tasmania were divided into nine main ethnic groups (see map). The indigenous population at the time of British settlement in 1803 has been estimated at between 5,000 and 10,000 people, but through persecution (see Black War and Black Line) and disease the population had dwindled to 300 in 1833. The entire indigenous population was moved to Flinders Island by George Augustus Robinson at this time. Truganini (1812-1876) is generally recognised as the last full-blooded Tasmanian Aborigine, although there is strong evidence that it was in fact Fanny Cochrane Smith, who was born at Wybalena, and died in 1905. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x965, 168 KB) Summary Map of Tasmanian Tribes at the time of first European contact. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x965, 168 KB) Summary Map of Tasmanian Tribes at the time of first European contact. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (916x892, 633 KB) Truganini (seated, right) - the last 4 tasmanian aborigines 1 means the typographical arrangement and layout of a published work. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (916x892, 633 KB) Truganini (seated, right) - the last 4 tasmanian aborigines 1 means the typographical arrangement and layout of a published work. ... Truganini (ca. ... A picture of the last four Tasmanian Aborigines c. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Poster issued in Van Diemens Land during the Black War depicting Lieutenant-Governor Daveys policy of friendship and equal justice for settlers and Aborigines. ... The Black Line is a notorious incident that occurred in 1830 on Tasmania, or Van Diemens Land as it was then known. ... This article is about the medical term. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Municipality of Flinders, Tasmania Flinders Island is an island in the Bass Strait, located 20 km from the north-eastern tip of Tasmania, Australia. ... George Augustus Robinson always wore a wig. ... Truganini (ca. ... Fanny Cochrane Smith Fanny Cochrane Smith, (ca. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ...


European arrival

The first reported sighting of Tasmania by a European was on 24 November 1642 by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman who named the island Anthoonij van Diemenslandt, after his sponsor, the Governor of the Dutch East Indies Anthony van Diemen. The name was later shortened to Van Diemen's Land by the British. Captain James Cook also sighted the island in 1777, and numerous other European seafarers made landfalls, adding a colourful array to the names of topographical features. is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... Portrait of Tasman Abel Janszoon Tasman (1603 - October 10, 1659), was a Dutch seafarer, explorer, and merchant. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthony van Diemen Anthony van Diemen (Culemborg, 1593– Batavia, 19 April 1645), or Antonius, Dutch colonial governor, was born in Culemborg in the Netherlands, the son of Bartholomeus van Diemen and Elisabeth Hoevenaar. ... 1663 map of Van Diemens Land, showing the parts discovered by Tasman, including Storm Bay, Maria Island and Schouten Island. ... This article is about the British explorer. ...


The first settlement was by the British at Risdon Cove on the eastern bank of the Derwent estuary in 1803, by a small party sent from Sydney, under Lt. John Bowen for the purpose of preventing the French from claiming the island. An alternative settlement was established by Captain David Collins 5 km to the south in 1804 in Sullivan's Cove on the western side of the Derwent, where fresh water was more plentiful. The latter settlement became known as Hobart Town or Hobarton, later shortened to Hobart, after the British Colonial Secretary of the time, Lord Hobart. The settlement at Risdon was later abandoned. Risdon Cove was the site of the first European settlement in Van Diemens Land, now Tasmania, the smallest Australian state. ... The Derwent is a river in Tasmania, Australia. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Sullivans Cove, is on the Derwent River, adjacent to the CBD of Hobart, Tasmania. ...


The early settlers were mostly convicts and their military guards, with the task of developing agriculture and other industries. Numerous other convict-based settlements were made in Van Diemen's Land, including secondary prisons, such as the particularly harsh penal colonies at Port Arthur in the southeast and Macquarie Harbour on the West Coast. The iconic view of the penitentiary originally built as a flour mill, across the water. ... Macquarie Harbour is a large, shallow, inlet on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. ...


Van Diemen's Land was proclaimed a separate colony from New South Wales, with its own judicial establishment and Legislative Council, on 3 December 1825. NSW redirects here. ... The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of Tasmania in Australia. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


World attention

View of Hobart foreshore with Mt Wellington in the background
View of Hobart foreshore with Mt Wellington in the background

Although the state is seldom in the world news, global attention has turned to Tasmania a few times. Tasmania was badly affected by the 1967 Tasmanian fires in which there was major loss of life and property. In the 1970s the state government announced plans to flood environmentally significant Lake Pedder. The collapse of the Tasman Bridge when struck by the bulk ore carrier MV Lake Illawarra in 1975 made crossing the River Derwent at Hobart almost impossible. National and international attention surrounded the campaign against the Franklin Dam in the early 1980s. This contributed to the start of the Green movement. Image File history File links Copied from German page, where Thomasgl said (in German): Port of Hobart with view of city centre and Mount Wellington, taken in December 2000 with thomasgls digital camera File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... Image File history File links Copied from German page, where Thomasgl said (in German): Port of Hobart with view of city centre and Mount Wellington, taken in December 2000 with thomasgls digital camera File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... The 1967 Tasmanian fires were an Australian natural disaster which occurred on 7 February 1967, an event which became known as the Black Tuesday bushfires. ... Old Lake Pedder, 1970 Lake Pedder is a lake located in the southwest of Tasmania, Australia and consists of a large water catchment contained by three dams. ... Tasman Bridge from Mt Nelson The Tasman Bridge is a five-lane bridge crossing the Derwent River, near the CBD of Hobart, Tasmania. ... The MV Lake Illawarra was a handyweight bulk carrier of 7274 tons in the service of the shipping company Australian National Lines, which famously and dramatically collided with pylon 19 of Hobarts giant high concrete arch style Tasman Bridge on the evening of 5 January 1975 at 9. ... River Derwent is the name of several rivers in England: River Derwent, Derbyshire; see also Derwent Reservoir, Derbyshire, also Upper Derwent Valley. ... The photograph Morning Mist, Rock Island Bend, Franklin River, by Peter Dombrovskis, was used by the Tasmanian Wilderness Society in advertising. ... “Greens” redirects here. ...


Tasmania has received a position in the top ten of several popular international tourism publications.


On 28 April 1996 in the incident now known as the Port Arthur Massacre, lone gunman Martin Bryant shot and killed 35 people (including tourists and residents) and injured 37 others. The use of firearms was immediately reviewed, and new gun ownership laws were adopted nationwide, with Tasmania's law one of the strictest in the nation. is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the 1894 massacre in Lüshunkou, see Port Arthur massacre (China). ... Martin John Bryant (born 7 May 1967) murdered 35 people and injured 37 others in the Port Arthur massacre, a killing spree in Tasmania in 1996. ... Firearms redirects here. ...


The Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race is an annual blue-water sailing event that attracts foreign media attention. Map of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race route. ...


On 14 May 2004 the royal wedding of former Hobart woman Mary Donaldson to Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark, and their subsequent visit in 2005, again drew some international attention to the state. is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The monogram of Mary and Frederik Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary of Denmark, formerly Mary Elizabeth Donaldson (b. ... Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark (born Frederik André Henrik Christian on 26 May 1968 in Copenhagen, Denmark) is the eldest son of Queen Margrethe II and her husband, Prince Consort Henrik. ...


In April 2006 the Beaconsfield Gold Mine created world media attention when a minor earthquake triggered a mine collapse that killed one person and trapped two others underground for fourteen days. Location of Beaconsfield Beaconsfield is a town near the Tamar River, in the north-east of Tasmania, Australia. ... Location of Beaconsfield The Beaconsfield mine collapse occurred on April 25, 2006 in Beaconsfield, Tasmania, Australia. ...


Geography

Tasmania map
Tasmania map
Main article: Geography of Tasmania

Tasmania is a rugged island of temperate climate, and was considered so similar in some ways to pre-industrial England that it was referred to by some English colonists as 'a Southern England'. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1273x1495, 157 KB) Summary This maps source is here, with the uploaders modifications, and the GMT homepage says that the tools are released under the GNU General Public License. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1273x1495, 157 KB) Summary This maps source is here, with the uploaders modifications, and the GMT homepage says that the tools are released under the GNU General Public License. ... Tasmania: Landsat satellite photo The geography of Tasmania is rugged and varied. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Tasmania has been volcanically inactive in recent geological times, and has rugged mountain ranges over much of its land area.


The most mountainous regions are the Central Highlands and south western areas, which cover most of the central, west and south west parts of the state. The central east area (the Midlands) is fairly flat only by comparison, and is predominantly used for agriculture, although various types of farming activity can be seen all around the state. Municipality of Central Highlands The Municipality of Central Highlands is a local government area of Tasmania. ... The Midlands in Tasmania refers to the relatively flat, dry agricultural area between Launceston and Hobart, so named because it covers most of the middle of these two cities. ...


The West Coast has a high rainfall which powers most of the hydro-electric projects, and its earnings from mineral activities are significant. The West Coast Range has some of the better known West Coast mines on its slopes – notably the Mount Lyell mine. West Coast Range The West Coast Range of Tasmania, is one of the more significant group of mountains in Tasmania - in that it has had significant mines utilising the geologically rich zone of Mount Read Volcanics. ... Mount Lyell is the name of a mountain in the West Coast Range, Tasmania, Australia. ...


The Southwest region, in particular, is densely forested, the National Park holding some of the last temperate rainforests in the world. Management of such an isolated and inaccessible area has been made easier and more reliable with the advent of satellite imaging. Categories: Stub | National parks of Tasmania ... Earth observation satellites are satellites specifically designed to observe Earth from orbit, similar to reconnaissance satellites but intended for non-military uses such as environmental monitoring, meteorology, map making etc. ...

Most of the population lives on and around the coastal rivers – the Derwent and the Tamar and Mersey Rivers in the north. Cataract Gorge, Tasmania (I took this picture) File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmania Cataract Gorge Geography of Tasmania Categories: GFDL images ... Cataract Gorge, Tasmania (I took this picture) File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmania Cataract Gorge Geography of Tasmania Categories: GFDL images ... The Cataract Gorge Reserve is one of Launceston and northern Tasmanias premier tourist attractions. ... Launceston is a city in the north of the state of Tasmania, Australia, population approximately 90,000 (Greater urban and 99,100 statistical division), located at the juncture of the North Esk, South Esk, and Tamar rivers. ... The Derwent is a river in Tasmania, Australia. ... Tamar River The Tamar River in northern Tasmania is formed by the merging of the North Esk River and South Esk Rivers in Launceston. ... The Mersey River is a river on the north-west coast of Tasmania, Australia. ...


The temperate climate (Tasmania is the only Australian state with any land south of the 40th parallel), rustic environment and numerous historic features make Tasmania a popular choice for retirees who prefer a temperate climate over a tropical one such as Queensland. Tasmania receives snow in the highlands during winter months, but very little in significantly populated areas. This article is about the geographical term. ... Naples beach in Florida lined with coconut trees is an example of a tropical climate. ... For other uses, see Queensland (disambiguation). ...


Tasmania is separated from the Australian mainland by Bass Strait, one of the roughest bodies of water in the world[citation needed], primarily a result of its shallow depth (typically around 60 m) and its susceptibility to Southern Ocean currents and swells.


Climate, soils and vegetation

Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Central Tasmanian Highlands
Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Central Tasmanian Highlands
See also: Climate diagrams of Tasmania

Tasmania is located at latitude 42° South, longitude 147° East, right in the pathway of the notorious "Roaring Forties" wind that encircles the globe. The Tasmanian climate is extremely variable with high fluctuations in temperature and wind speed during the average week. Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Tasmanian Central Highlands This is a cropped version of a photo taken by myself (Charles Gregory - Chuq) on 12th October 2003. ... Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Tasmanian Central Highlands This is a cropped version of a photo taken by myself (Charles Gregory - Chuq) on 12th October 2003. ... Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Central Tasmanian Highlands Cradle Mountain forms the northern end of the wild Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, itself a part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. ... The Roaring Forties is a name given, especially by sailors, to the latitudes between 40° and 50°, so called because of the boisterous and prevailing westerly winds. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ...


Summer lasts from December to February when the average maximum temperature at sea level is 21 °C (70 °F). Winter is from June to August with an average maximum temperature at sea level of 12 °C (54 °F). Inland, temperatures are much cooler. Liawenee on the Central Plateau is regarded as the coldest place in Australia with temperatures even in February ranging only from a still-cold minimum of 4 °C (39 °F) to a maximum of 17 °C (63 °F). In winter the Central Plateau ranges from around -2 °C (28 °F) to 3 °C (37 °F), with much, though very soft, snow.


Highest maximum temperature: 40.8 °C (105.4 °F), Hobart, 4 January 1976 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Lowest minimum temperature: -13.0 °C (8.6 °F), Butlers Gorge and Shannon, 30 June 1983 [6] is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ...


Rainfall in Tasmania follows a complicated pattern rather analogous to that found on large continents at the same latitude in the northern hemisphere. On the western side rainfall increases from around 1,600 mm (64 inches) at Strahan on the coast up to 2,700 mm (110 inches) at Cradle Valley in the highlands. There is a strong winter maximum in rainfall: January and February typically averages between 30 and 40 percent the rainfall of July and August, though even in the driest months rain usually falls on every second day and the number of rainy days per year is much greater than on any part of the Australian mainland. Further east in the Lake Country, annual rainfall declines to around 900 mm (35 inches), whilst in the Midlands, annual rainfall is as low as 450 mm (18 inches) at Ross and generally below 600 mm (24 inches). Here the rainfall is more evenly distributed than in the west, and most months receive very similar averages.


The densely populated northern coast is a much drier version of the western side, with annual rainfall ranging from 710 mm (28 inches) at Launceston to 1,050 mm (42 inches) at Burnie in the west and Scottsdale in the east. Most rain falls in winter and in summer the average can be as low as 35 mm (1.5 inches) per month in the Lower Tamar. The east coast is wetter than the Midlands, with an average annual rainfall ranging from 1,000 mm (40 inches) at St. Helens to around 640 mm at Swansea. Here the rainfall is evenly distributed over the year but can be very erratic as heavy rainfalls from the warm Tasman Sea are quite frequent. Whereas a three-day fall of 125 mm (5 inches) occurs only once every fifty years the north coast, it occurs on average once every four or five years around Swansea and Bicheno, and on 7-8 June 1954 there were many falls as large as 230 mm (9 inches) in two days in that area. The east coast is sometime called the "sun coast" because of its sunny climate due to the rain shadow of the prevailing westerly winds. is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ...


Tasmania's reputation in Australia for having high rainfall, however, differs from the true situation: several sections of inland Tasmania, together with Flinders Island, were declared drought-affected areas by the state government on 1 May 2007. Municipality of Flinders, Tasmania Flinders Island is an island in the Bass Strait, located 20 km from the north-eastern tip of Tasmania, Australia. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Soils

Great Oyster Bay on the Freycinet Peninsula
Great Oyster Bay on the Freycinet Peninsula
Hellyer Gorge, Tasmania
Hellyer Gorge, Tasmania

Despite the presence of some Quaternary glaciation, Tasmania's soils are no more fertile than those of mainland Australia, largely because most are severely leached and the areas with driest climate (thus least leaching) were unaffected by glaciation or alluvia derived therefrom. Most soils on the Bass Strait Islands, the east coast and western Tasmania are very infertile Spodosols or Psamments, with some even less fertile "lateritic podzolic soils" in the latter region. Most of these lands are thus not used for agriculture, but there is much productive forestry - which remains the economic mainstay of the state. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 333 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 499 pixel, file size: 254 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Blick über die Great Oyster Bay auf die Freycinet-Halbinsel, Tasmanien, Australien Fotograf: Jörn Brauns Datum: 31. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 333 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 499 pixel, file size: 254 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Blick über die Great Oyster Bay auf die Freycinet-Halbinsel, Tasmanien, Australien Fotograf: Jörn Brauns Datum: 31. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 681 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Flora of Australia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 681 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Flora of Australia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... A glaciation (a created composite term meaning Glacial Period, referring to the Period or Era of, as well as the process of High Glacial Activity), often called an ice age, is a geological phenomenon in which massive ice sheets form in the Arctic and Antarctic and advance toward the equator. ... Leaching may refer to: Leaching (agriculture) Leaching (chemical science) Leaching (metallurgy) Dump leaching Heap leaching Tank leaching Leaching (pedology) Bioleaching Parboiling, also known as leaching Categories: ... Podsol (also spelled Podzol, or known as Spodosol) is the typical soil of coniferous, or Boreal forests. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


On the north coast, apart from some relatively fertile alluvial soils used for fruit growing, there are also deep red, easily workable soils known as "krasnozems" ("red land"). These soils are highly acidic and fix phosphate very effectively, but their extremely favourable physical properties make them extensively used for dairying, beef cattle and fodder crops.


The Midlands and the Lower Derwent present a different story from the rest of the state. Owing to a relatively dry climate and alkaline (mostly dolerite) parent material, these soils are relatively unleached and contain lime in the deeper subsoil. They are mostly classified as "prairie soils" or "brown earths" and bear some resemblance to the chernozems of Russia and North America, although they are much lower in available phosphorus and somewhat acidic in the surface levels. Their higher nutrient levels, however, allow them to support productive pasture and large numbers of sheep are grazed in these regions. Some grain crops are also grown in the driest areas. In the alluvial areas of southeastern Tasmania, rich alluvial soils permit apples to be grown. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Diabase. ... Chernozem, or Black Earth (from Polish czarnoziem which means black soil), a kind of soil. ... General Name, symbol, number phosphorus, P, 15 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 3, p Appearance waxy white/ red/ black/ colorless Standard atomic weight 30. ... This article is about the fruit. ...


Vegetation

Mountain Ash, worlds tallest flowering plant.
Mountain Ash, worlds tallest flowering plant.
Lavender farm in Tasmania
Lavender farm in Tasmania

All these factors contribute to the extremely diverse Tasmanian vegetation, from the heavily grazed grassland of the dry Midlands to the tall evergreen eucalypt forest, alpine heathlands and large areas of cool temperate rainforests and moorlands in the rest of the State. Many flora species are unique to Tasmania, and some are related to species in South America and New Zealand through ancestors which grew on the super continent of Gondwana, 50 million years ago. Binomial name Lagarostrobos franklinii The species Lagarostrobos franklinii, known as Huon Pine or Macquarie Pine, is a species of conifer growing mainly in the wetter southeastern corner of Tasmania, Australia. ... Image File history File links Tasmania_logging_02_Worlds_tallest_flowering_plant. ... Image File history File links Tasmania_logging_02_Worlds_tallest_flowering_plant. ... Bold text Binomial name F.Muell. ... Species About 25-30, including: Lavandula abrotanoides Lavandula angustifolia Lavandula canariensis Lavandula dentata Lavandula lanata Lavandula latifolia Lavandula multifida Lavandula pinnata Lavandula stoechas Lavandula viridis Lavandula x intermedia The Lavenders Lavandula are a genus of about 25-30 species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native from the... Eucalypts are tree species belonging to three closely related genera, Angophora, Corymbia and Eucalyptus. ... For the climate of the mountains named the Alps, see climate) for a region above the tree-line. ... A map showing the areas where temperate rain forest can be found Temperate rain forest in the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, United States. ... For other uses of Gondwana and Gondwanaland, see Gondwana (disambiguation). ...


Tasmania is also home to some of the tallest and oldest trees of the world. While individual Huon Pines are believed to be more than 2.000 years old, which is impressive by itself, a stand of male Huon Pines at Mount Read has maintained itself by vegetative reproduction and is estimated to be more than 10.000 years old.[7] The tallest trees in Australia are found in the Styx Valley and Mountain Ashes on the island are more than 90 metres tall. As these are still growing, there is hope they will surpass the tallest tree ever measured in the country, a Mountain Ash growing at Thorpdale, Victoria measuring more than 112 metres before it was felled in 1884.[8] Binomial name Lagarostrobos franklinii The species Lagarostrobos franklinii, known as Huon Pine or Macquarie Pine, is a species of conifer growing mainly in the wetter southeastern corner of Tasmania, Australia. ... Mount Read is a mountain in Tasmania, Australia, that is at the north west edge of what is known as the West Coast Range As colourful a history as that of Mount Lyell, Mount Read has had mines, settlements and other activities on its slopes for over a hundred years. ... Production of new individuals along a leaf margin of the air plant, Kalanchoë pinnata. ... Bold text Binomial name F.Muell. ... Welcome to Thorpdale - Heart of Potato Country Thorpdale ( ) is a small country town in the Gippsland area of eastern Victoria, Australia, less than 20 km south of Trafalgar. ...


Government

Official logo of Tasmanian Government
Official logo of Tasmanian Government
See also: Local Government Areas of Tasmania

The form of the government of Tasmania is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. Since 1901 Tasmania has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Australian Constitution regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth, and prescribes which powers each level of government enjoys. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tasmanian Coat of Arms featuring two Thylacines The form of the Government of Tasmania is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... Local Government Areas of Tasmania, Australia This article also includes lists of towns, suburbs and localities of Tasmania. ... The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (in full, An Act to constitute the Commonwealth of Australia) is the primary constitutional text of the Commonwealth of Australia. ...


Politics

Tasmanian politics is often characterised as being overly concerned with personality and parochialism.[citation needed] These factors may be due to the relative smallness of the Tasmanian electorate, as well as historical claims of Launceston being the "northern capital".[citation needed] From 1803 until the proclamation of Van Diemen's Land in 1823, the island had been split into two dependencies of New South Wales, with Hobart and Launceston the administrative centres. List of Governors of Tasmania Note that Tasmania was called Van Diemens Land until 1855 (see History of Tasmania). ... The Parliament of Tasmania consists of the Governor of Tasmania, the Tasmanian Legislative Council and the Tasmanian House of Assembly. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Parochialism means being provincial, being narrow in scope, or considering only small sections of an issue. ... Launceston is a city in the north of the state of Tasmania, Australia, population approximately 90,000 (Greater urban and 99,100 statistical division), located at the juncture of the North Esk, South Esk, and Tamar rivers. ...


In the Commonwealth Parliament, Tasmania is well represented in the Senate, where seats are not proportional to population. Between 1975 and 2005, Tasmanian independent senator Brian Harradine often held the balance of power. As a result he was able to gain the passage of legislation that, although often matching his conservative religious views, was also very financially rewarding for the state. Harradine successfully defended his seat in six consecutive senate elections and did not stand for re-election at the 2004 federal election. His term ended in June 2005. Type Upper house President Alan Ferguson, Liberal since 14 August 2007 Members 76 Political groups Coalition (39) ALP (28) Green (4) Democrat (4) FFP (1) Last elections 9 October 2004 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site Senate Entrance to the Senate Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State... Brian Harradine (born January 9, Australian politician, has been an independent member of the Australian Senate since 1975, representing the state of Tasmania. ... In parliamentary politics, the term balance of power sometimes describes the pragmatic mechanism exercised by a minor political party or other grouping whose guaranteed support may enable an otherwise minority government to obtain and hold office. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ...


Tasmania's House of Assembly and local government elections use a system of multi-seat proportional representation known as Hare-Clark. The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of Tasmania in Australia. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ...


In the 2002 state election, the Labor Party held 14 of the 25 available seats. The Liberal Party saw their percentage of the vote decrease dramatically, claiming only 7 seats. The Greens won four seats, with over 18% of the vote, the highest proportion of any Green party in any parliament in the world. Legislative elections for the Tasmanian House of Assembly were held on Saturday July 20, 2002. ... ALP redirects here. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... The Tasmanian Greens are a political party who developed from numerous environmental campaigns in Tasmania including the flooding of Lake Pedder and the building of the Franklin Dam. ...


On 23 February 2004, the Premier Jim Bacon announced his retirement, due to being diagnosed with lung cancer from smoking. In his last months he opened a vigorous anti-smoking campaign which included many restrictions of where individuals could smoke, such as pubs. He died four months later. is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Alexander Bacon AC (May 15, 1950 - June 20, 2004) was Premier of Tasmania from 1998 to 2004. ... Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. ...


Bacon was succeeded by Paul Lennon, who, after leading the state for two years, went on to win the 2006 state election in his own right. Lennon resigned in 2008, and was succeeded by David Bartlett. Paul Anthony Lennon (born 8 October 1955), Australian politician, has been Premier of Tasmania since 21 March 2004. ... Legislative elections for the House of Assembly were held in the Australian state of Tasmania on 18 March 2006. ... David Bartlett is a Tasmanian Labor politician and member of the Tasmanian House of Assembly in the electorate of Denison. ...


Tasmania has a number of relatively unspoilt, ecologically valuable regions. Proposals for local economic development have therefore been faced with strong requirements for environmental sensitivity, or outright opposition. In particular, proposals for hydroelectric power generation proved controversial in the late 20th century. In the 1970s, opposition to the construction of the Lake Pedder impoundment led to the formation of the world's first green party, the United Tasmania Group. For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... Old Lake Pedder, 1970 Lake Pedder is a lake located in the southwest of Tasmania, Australia and consists of a large water catchment contained by three dams. ... A Green party is a formally organized political party based on the principles of Green politics. ... The United Tasmania Group (UTG) is generally acknowledged as the worlds first Green Party. ...


In the early 1980s the state was again plunged into often bitter debate over the proposed Franklin River Dam. The anti-dam sentiment was shared by many Australians outside Tasmania, and proved a factor in the election of the Hawke Labor government in 1983, which halted construction of the dam. Since the 1980s the environmental focus has shifted to old growth logging, which has proved a highly divisive issue. The Tasmania Together process recommended an end to clear felling in high conservation old growth forests by January 2003. The photograph Morning Mist, Rock Island Bend, Franklin River, by Peter Dombrovskis, was used by the Tasmanian Wilderness Society in advertising. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... Old growth forest, sometimes called late seral forest or ancient forest is an area of forest that has attained great age and exhibits unique biological features. ... For other uses, see Log. ...


Economy

Western Tasmania with natural resources on 1865 map
Western Tasmania with natural resources on 1865 map

Tasmania's erratic economy was first experienced by colonists in the early 1800s.[citation needed] The reasons have been many and varied over the years. More recently the reasons have been attributed to: lack of federal infrastructure highway, lack of a gold rush, lack of open immigration initiatives, lack of population, decline in the wool and mineral economies, lack of early colonial initiatives, or lack of foreign investment. For the length of the history of Tasmania there has been a continuing exodus of youth to mainland Australia in order to seek employment opportunities. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1248x1534, 724 KB) Western Tasmania - map of 1865 with natural resources File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmania ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1248x1534, 724 KB) Western Tasmania - map of 1865 with natural resources File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmania ... For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Gold rush (disambiguation) A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ...


Traditionally Tasmania's main industries have been: mining, including copper, zinc, tin, and iron; agriculture; forestry; and tourism. Significantly in the 1940s and 1950s there had been a notion of 'Hydro-Industrialisation' embodied in the state by Hydro Tasmania. These all have had varying fortunes over the last century and more, involved in ebbs and flows of population moving in and away dependent upon the specific requirements of the dominant industries of the time. This article is about mineral extractions. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... This article is about the metallic chemical element. ... Fe redirects here. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Hydro Tasmania, known for most of its history as The HEC, is the predominant electricity generator in the state of Tasmania, Australia. ...


There had been a decline in manufacturing during the 1990s, leading to a drain of some of the island's trained and experienced working population to mainland Australia. The major urban centres such as Melbourne and Sydney are popular destinations. Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


The state has a large number of food exporting sectors, including but not limited to seafood (for example, Atlantic salmon, abalone and crayfish).[citation needed] Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ... Binomial name Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758 Atlantic salmon, known scientifically as Salmo salar, is a species of fish in the family Salmonidae, which is found in the northern Atlantic Ocean and in rivers that flow into the Atlantic. ... Species Many, see species section. ... Families Astacoidea   Astacidae   Cambaridae Parastacoidea   Parastacidae Crayfish, often referred to as crawfish, or crawdads, are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. ...


Since 2001, Tasmania has experienced a positive turnaround. Favourable economic conditions throughout Australia, cheaper air fares and two new Spirit of Tasmania ferries have all contributed to what is now a booming tourism industry. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Spirit of Tasmania (first ship). ...


Today, a significant number of employed Tasmanians work for the government. Other major employers include the Federal Group, owner of several hotels and Tasmania's two casinos, and Gunns Limited, the state's biggest forestry company. In the late 1990s, many national companies based their call centres in the state after obtaining cheap access to broad-band fibre-optic connections.[citation needed] [[Federal Hotels:]] Wrest Point Casino (Hobart) - this was the first Casino in the southern hemisphere. ... This article is about lodging. ... This article is about casinos for gaming. ... Gunns Limited is a major forestry enterprise located in Tasmania, Australia. ... A very large collections call centre in Lakeland, FL. A call centre or call center (see spelling differences) is a centralised office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests by telephone. ...


Apparently the state's housing market was undervalued in the early part of 2000, and a large boom in the national housing market finally made Tasmanian housing prices rise dramatically. This has in part been attributed to increased levels of interstate[9] and overseas migration. A shortage of rental accommodation has caused problems for many of Tasmania's low income earners. Exactly when Immigration to Australia began is unknown but estimates typically range from 40,000 - 50,000 years ago,[1] when the ancestors of Australian Aborigines arrived on the continent via the islands of the Malay Archipelago and New Guinea. ...


Small business is a large part of the community life and it is believed by many that the business environment in Tasmania is not an easy one to survive in. However there have been many success stories, such as International Catamarans, Moorilla Estate and Tassal. Mom and pop store redirects here. ... International Catamarans, trading as Incat, is a manufacturer of large-scale catamarans based in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... Moorilla Estate is a winery located in the suburb of Berriedale, 12 km north of the city centre of Hobart, Tasmania. ... TASSAL is Australias largest producer and exporter of Atlantic Salmon, marketed under the Royal Tasmanian Salmon brand. ...


Transport

The Spirit of Tasmania links the island with mainland Australia
The Spirit of Tasmania links the island with mainland Australia

Air The fastest and cheapest method of travel across Bass Strait is by air. The main carriers are Qantas and its subsidiary JetStar, and Virgin Blue, which fly direct routes to Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, and Adelaide. Low cost airline Tiger Airways commenced services between Melbourne and Launceston in November 2007 and Hobart in January 2008. Major airports include Hobart International Airport and Launceston Airport; the smaller airports, Burnie (Wynyard), serviced by Regional Express and Devonport, serviced by Qantaslink have services to Melbourne. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 230 KB) Summary Photo by User:Adam Carr, April 2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 230 KB) Summary Photo by User:Adam Carr, April 2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Spirit of Tasmania (first ship). ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... Qantas Airways Limited (IPA: ) is the national airline of Australia. ... For the aircraft, see Lockheed JetStar. ... Virgin Blue Airlines Pty Ltd is an Australian low-cost airline and Australias second-biggest airline. ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd is a low cost airline which intends to commence services in the Australian domestic airline market on 23rd November 2007, subject to regulatory approval. ... Launceston Airport (IATA: LST, ICAO: YMLT) is a regional airport on the outskirts of Launceston, Tasmania. ... Hobart International Airport (IATA: HBA, ICAO: YMHB) is the primary passenger and freight airport of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... Hobart International Airport (IATA: HBA, ICAO: YMHB) is the primary passenger and freight airport of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... Launceston Airport (IATA: LST, ICAO: YMLT) is a regional airport on the outskirts of Launceston, Tasmania. ... Burnie Airport (IATA: BWT, ICAO: YWYY), also called Wynyard Airport, is a small regional airport located in Wynyard near the town of Burnie, Tasmania, Australia. ... Rex, Regional Express Airlines, is a regional airline serving Southeast states of Australia. ... Devonport Airport (IATA: DPO, ICAO: YDPO) is a small Australian regional airport serving the town of Devonport in Tasmanias north-west. ... QantasLink is a regional subsidiary of Australian airline Qantas and is an affiliate member of the Oneworld airline alliance. ... This article is about the Australian airport. ...


Sea The domestic sea route is serviced by Bass Strait passenger/vehicle ferries operated by the Tasmanian Government-owned TT-Line (Tasmania). The TT-Line (Tasmania) is a ferry company operating ferries from Tasmania to the mainland of Australia. ...


From 1986 the Abel Tasman made six weekly overnight crossings between Devonport and Melbourne. It was replaced by the Spirit of Tasmania in 1993, which performed the same route and schedule. The most recent change was the 2002 replacement of the Spirit by two Superfast ferries - Spirit of Tasmania I and Spirit of Tasmania II — which brought the number of weekly overnight crossings up to fourteen, plus additional daylight crossings in peak times. In January 2004 a third ship, the slightly smaller Spirit of Tasmania III, started the Devonport to Sydney route. This service was axed by the Tasmanian Government in June 2006 quoting low passenger numbers. Two container ships owned by Toll Shipping also make daily crossings between Burnie and Melbourne. The port of Hobart also serves as a host to visiting cruise ships. Abel Tasman was the a passenger/vehicle ferry built at shipyard Nobiskrug in Rendsburg, Germany in 1975. ... Devonport City Council shown in green in map of Tasmania Devonport is a city in the north-west of Tasmania, Australia, at the mouth of the Mersey River. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Spirit of Tasmania. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Spirit of Tasmania (first ship). ... Toll NZ (NYSE: TOLL) is an Auckland, New Zealand-based transport company formed after the part-privatisation of the New Zealand Railways. ... Burnie is a port city on the north-west coast of Tasmania, originally settled in 1827 as Emu Bay. ...


The state is also home to International Catamarans, a manufacturer of very high-speed aluminium vessels (commonly known as SeaCat) that regularly broke records when they were first launched. The state government tried using them on the Bass Strait run, but eventually decided to discontinue the run due to concerns over viability and the suitability of the vessels for the extreme weather conditions sometimes experienced in the strait. Incat is a manufacturer of large HSC catamarans, based in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... Sea Cat is a surface to air missile system intended for use aboard small warships. ...


Tasmania, Hobart in particular, serves as Australia's chief sea link to Antarctica, with the Australian Antarctic Division located in Kingston. Hobart is also the home port of the French ship l'Astrolabe, which makes regular supply runs to the French Southern Territories near and in Antarctica. The Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), of the Australian Department of the Environment and Heritage, manages Australias four Antarctic stations, as well as Heard Island, as part of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions. ... Kingston is a suburb and region on the outskirts of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... Motto Liberté, égalité, fraternité Click on map to enlarge Capital Port-aux-Français Official languages French Government  -  Prefect Michel Champon Territoire doutre-mer  -  Date 1955  Population  -   estimate 140 hab. ...


Hobart has the second deepest natural port in the world, second to only Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. This article is about the Brazilian city. ...


Road Within the state, the primary form of transport is by road. Since the 1980s, many of the state's highways have undergone regular upgrades. These include the Hobart Southern Outlet, Launceston Southern Outlet, Bass Highway reconstruction, and the Huon Highway. Tasmania Highways in Tasmania The highways in Tasmania generally expand from Hobart and other major cities with secondary roads interconnecting the highways to each other. ... The Bass Highway is a highway in Tasmania, Australia. ... The Huon Highweay as a Dual Carrigeway at Sandfly ...


Rail Rail transport in Tasmania consists of narrow gauge lines to all four major population centres and to mining and forestry operations on the west coast and in the northwest. Services are operated by TasRail, a Pacific National subsidiary. Regular passenger train services in the state ceased in 1977; the only trains are for freight, and there are tourist trains in specific areas, for example the West Coast Wilderness Railway. In 2005 there were concerns that the rail service was in so much trouble that it might stop for everything but cement haulage. Rail transport in Tasmania consists a network of narrow gauge track, reaching virtually all cities and major towns in the state of Tasmania, Australia. ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8½ in (1. ... TasRail, formerly a subsidiary of the Australian Government owned Australian National Railways (ANR), operates the Tasmanian rail system which links all major ports and cities of Tasmania. ... NR Locomotive Pacific National is one of Australias largest private rail freight businesses. ... For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ... The West Coast Wilderness Railway, Tasmania is a reconstruction of the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company railway between Queenstown and Regatta Point. ...


Culture

Cuisine

During colonial times typical English cuisine would have been standard in most areas of Tasmania. The arrival of immigrants and changing cultural patterns has meant Tasmania now has a wide range of restaurants. Scattered across Tasmania are a number of vineyards and Tasmanian beer brands such as Boags and Cascade are known and sold on the mainland. King Island off the north-western coast of Tasmania has a reputation for boutique cheeses and dairy products. Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... A vineyard A vineyard is a place where grapes are grown for making wine, raisins, or table grapes. ... Boags Brewery is a brewery run by J. Boag & Sons and is located in Launceston, Australia. ... The Cascade Brewery, with Mount Wellington in the background Cascade Brewery is the oldest brewery in Australia. ... Municipality of King Island, Tasmania King Island is one of the islands that makes up the state of Tasmania, Australia. ...


Events

Sydney to Hobart line honours winner Wild Oats XI after the 2005 race
Sydney to Hobart line honours winner Wild Oats XI after the 2005 race
Constitution Dock
Constitution Dock

In order to foster tourism, the state government encourages or supports several different annual events in and around the island. The best known of these would be the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, starting on Boxing Day in Sydney and usually arriving at Constitution Dock in Hobart around three to four days later, during the Taste of Tasmania an annual food and wine festival. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1122x774, 294 KB) Summary Photo taken by Alex Wolfson 28 December 2005 Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1122x774, 294 KB) Summary Photo taken by Alex Wolfson 28 December 2005 Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Map of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race route. ... Constitution Dock, Tasmania (I took this picture myself) File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmania Categories: GFDL images ... Constitution Dock, Tasmania (I took this picture myself) File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmania Categories: GFDL images ... A range of events occur in Tasmania, from well known sporting fixtures such as Sydney to Hobart, to arts festivals such as 10 Days on the Island. ... Map of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race route. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ... Boxing Day is a public holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. ... Constitution Dock Constitution Dock is the harbour-side dock area of Hobart, the capital city of the Australian state of Tasmania, on the Derwent River. ...


Other events include the road rally Targa Tasmania which attracts world-class rally drivers and is staged all over the state, over five days. Rural or regional events include Agfest is a three-day agricultural show held at Carrick (just west of Launceston) in early May, and the Royal Hobart Show and Royal Launceston Show, both held in October of each year. Music events held in Tasmania include the Falls Festival at Marion Bay (a Victoria event now held in both Victoria and Tasmania on New Year's Eve), and the Southern Roots Festival held in Hobart each Easter. A recent addition to the state has been the 10 Days on the Island arts festival; however, it has drawn criticism from environmental groups for its acceptance of sponsorship from forestry company Gunns. Rallying (international) or rally racing (US) is a form of automobile racing that takes place on normal roads with modified production or specially built road cars. ... Targa Tasmania is a tarmac-based rally racing event held on the island state of Tasmania, Australia, annually since 1991. ... Carrick is a small town in Northern Tasmania about 18 km from Launceston it is situated on the Liffey River. ... The Royal Hobart Show is an annual event held at the Royal Showgrounds in Glenorchy in October. ... The Falls Festival is a New Years Eve music festival, held annually in Marion Bay, Tasmania and Lorne, Victoria Australia since 1993. ... Marion Bay is located on the southern part of the east coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... VIC redirects here. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... Southern Roots is an Australian music festival to be held on 7 April 2007 (the Easter weekend) at the Royal Hobart Showgrounds in Glenorchy, Hobart, Tasmania. ... 10 Days on the Island is an biennial cultural festival held in Tasmania, Australia. ... For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ... Gunns Limited is a major forestry enterprise located in Tasmania, Australia. ...


Literature

Main article: Tasmanian literature

Tasmania has a relatively small but growing literary culture. Notable titles include For the Term of His Natural Life by Marcus Clarke, The Sound of One Hand Clapping by Richard Flanagan and Out of Ireland by Christopher Koch. The ‘Tasmanian genre’ of fiction includes children's books such as Tiger Tale by Marion and Steve Isham. A map of Tasmania from 1916 showing the variety of place names. ... For the Term of his Natural Life, a novel by Marcus Clarke, is the best known novelisation of life as a convict in early Australian history. ... Marcus Andrew Hislop Clarke (24 April 1846—2 August 1881) was an Australian novelist and poet, best known for his novel For the Term of his Natural Life. ... Richard Flanagan (born 1961) is an author, historian and film director from Tasmania, Australia. ... Christopher Koch, Australian novelist, was born in Hobart in 1932. ... Tiger Tale is a childrens picture book illustrated by Marion Isham and written by Steve Isham. ...


Music

Tasmania has a varied musical scene, ranging from the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra whose home is the Federation Concert Hall, to a substantial number of small bands, orchestras, string quintets, saxophone ensembles and individual artists who perform at a variety of venues around the state. Tasmania is also home to a vibrant community of composers including Constantine Koukias, Maria Grenfell and Don Kay, who is the patron of the Tasmanian Composers Collective[10] which is the representative body for composers in Tasmania. Tasmania is also home to one of Ausralia's leading new music institutions, IHOS Music Theatre and Opera and gospel choirs, the Southern Gospel Choir. Death Metal band Psycroptic hail from Tasmania and are one of the most prominent Australian metal bands. Apart from the Classical musical season and regular gigs across the state by a number of local and interstate groups two of the highlights of the musical year would be the Falls Festival held during the summer holidays and the Carols by Candlelight held in the weeks prior to Christmas. The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra (TSO) is based in Hobart, Australia but plays regular concerts around Tasmania. ... Constantine Koukias (born 1965) is an Australian composer. ... Maria Grenfell (born 1969) is an Australian/New Zealand composer. ... Don Kay is a Tasmanian Composer. ... The Tasmanian Composers Collective is the representative body for Composers born and/or living in Tasmania, Australia. ... IHOS Music Theatre and Opera is a Tasmanian opera company was established in Hobart in 1990, by composer and artistic director Constantine Koukias, and production director Werner Ihlenfeld. ... (Left to right: Dave Haley (Drums), Joe Haley (Guitar), Jason Peppo Peppiatt (Vocals), Cameran Grant (Bass)) Psycroptic is a technical death metal band from Hobart, Tasmania in Australia. ... The Falls Festival is a New Years Eve music festival, held annually in Marion Bay, Tasmania and Lorne, Victoria Australia since 1993. ... Carols by Candlelight is an Australian Christmas tradition that has spread around the world. ...


Sport

Main article: Sport in Tasmania

The dominant sports in Tasmania are cricket and Australian rules football. Tasmania has produced two prominent international cricket stars, David Boon and current Australian captain Ricky Ponting. The Tasmanian Tigers cricket team, which plays home games at Bellerive Oval on the eastern shore, represents the state in limited overs and first-class cricket competitions. In the last few years they have had significant success, with them winning the ING One Day Cup in 2004-05 for the first time in 10 years, and the Pura Cup for the first time in 2006-07. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1677x489, 214 KB) Summary {{Information |Description=Panoramic image of inside of Aurora Stadium, Launceston, During half-time break of A-League preseason game between Melbourne Victory and Adelaide United . ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1677x489, 214 KB) Summary {{Information |Description=Panoramic image of inside of Aurora Stadium, Launceston, During half-time break of A-League preseason game between Melbourne Victory and Adelaide United . ... York Park (now known as Aurora Stadium) is the major Australian rules football ground located in Inveresk, an inner city suburb of Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. ... Launceston is a city in the north of the state of Tasmania, Australia, population approximately 90,000 (Greater urban and 99,100 statistical division), located at the juncture of the North Esk, South Esk, and Tamar rivers. ... England vs Australia at Bellerive Oval in Hobart Sport is an important part of Tasmanian culture. ... This article is about the sport. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... David Clarence Boon, usually referred to as Boony (born December 29, 1960, in Launceston, Tasmania) is a former Australian cricketer of the 1980s and 1990s. ... Ricky Thomas Ponting (born December 19, 1974, in Launceston, Tasmania) is a professional Australian cricketer and current captain of the Australian cricket team in One Day International, Twenty20 International and Test cricket. ... The Tasmanian Tigers are the official first-class cricket team of Tasmania, Australia. ... Bellerive Oval is a sports ground in Bellerive, eastern shore of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... For the 2006/2007 series, see Ford Ranger One Day Cup in 2006-07 The Ford Ranger One Day Cup is the most recent name of the domestic List A cricket (One-day/limited overs cricket) competition in Australia. ... The Pura Cup (formerly known as the Sheffield Shield) is the domestic first class cricket competition in Australia. ...


Despite Australian rules football's huge popularity in the state, Tasmania does not have a team in the AFL. They do have a team (the Tasmanian Devils) in the VFL (Victorian league), and a team in the national league is a popular topic among supporters as well as the state government (one of the potential sponsors of such a team). From the 2001 season onwards, some AFL teams have played scheduled games at Aurora Stadium (at York Park in Launceston). Since 2007, the Hawthorn Football Club has been in a sponsorship agreement with the Tasmanian government to play four home games a year in Launceston. One of the notable matches to be played at York Park was an infamous match between St Kilda and Fremantle which was controversially drawn after the umpires failed to hear the siren. This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... The Tasmanian Devils Football Club is an Australian rules football team, in the Victorian Football League in Australia. ... This article is about the present day Victorian state football league. ... York Park (now known as Aurora Stadium) is the major Australian rules football ground located in Inveresk, an inner city suburb of Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. ... Launceston is a city in the north of the state of Tasmania, Australia, population approximately 90,000 (Greater urban and 99,100 statistical division), located at the juncture of the North Esk, South Esk, and Tamar rivers. ... Hawthorn Football Club, nicknamed The Hawks, are an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League (AFL). ... The St. ... Fremantle Football Club, nicknamed The Dockers and known informally as Freo, is one of 16 teams in the Australian Football League (AFL). ... The AFL siren controversy of 2006 (dubbed Sirengate) was the controversy surrounding the conclusion and result of an Australian rules football match played on 30 April 2006 during Round 5 of the Australian Football Leagues 2006 season. ...


In basketball, the state has not been represented in the National Basketball League since the demise of the Hobart Devils in 1996; however, strong representation from the state can be found in the South East Australian Basketball League. Two men's teams: The Oasis Hobart Chargers, and the Northwest Tasmania Thunder are joined in the women's SEABL by the Launceston Tornadoes and the Women's NW Tasmania Thunder also. This article is about the sport. ... The National Basketball League is Australias top-level professional basketball competition. ... {{Infobox aus sport club | clubname = Hobart Devils | image = | fullname = Hobart Devils | emblem = The Magpies | strip = White, Red, Black | founded = 1983 | sport = Basketball | league = National Basketball League | firstseason = 1983 | ground = Derwent Entertainment Centre | capacity = 5,400 | season = 1996 | song = none | president = Alick Smith | coach = Matthew Gangell | captain = Christian Gangell | position = Pg... SEABL Logo SEABL (the South East Australian Basketball League) consists of two conferences of the Australian Basketball Association (ABA). ...


Tasmania is not being represented in national association football (see Association football in Tasmania) and netball leagues. “Soccer” redirects here. ... A netball game in Australia Netball is a non-contact generally indoor sport similar to, and derived from, basketball. ...


In Tasmania, there is a motor racing circuit in Launceston called Symmons Plains Raceway. It holds rounds of the V8 Supercars, the YMF Loans Australian Superbike Championship, Australian Formula 3 Championship and the CAMS Nationals. Launceston is a city in the north of the state of Tasmania, Australia, population approximately 90,000 (Greater urban and 99,100 statistical division), located at the juncture of the North Esk, South Esk, and Tamar rivers. ... Symmons Plains International Raceway is a motor racing circuit in Australia, located about 30 kilometres (about 18. ... V8 Supercars is a touring car racing category. ... Superbike racing is a category of motorcycle racing that employs modified production motorcycles. ... Formula Three is a class of auto racing. ... The Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS), has been the governing body of Australian motorsport since 1953. ...


Finally, the town of Bridport in the north-east is home to Barnbougle Dunes, a public golf course designed by architect Tom Doak which opened in 2004 and is ranked among the top 100 courses in the world.[11] Bridport is a small town in the north-east coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... Barnbougle Dunes Golf Links is a golf course located near seaside village of Bridport in Tasmanias North-East. ... This article is about the game. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Prominent Tasmanians

Main article: List of Tasmanians

Tasmania has produced a number of significant people. These include: the Prime Minister Joseph Lyons; author Richard Flanagan the actor Errol Flynn; Baywatch actor Jaason Simmons; drummer Adam Davison; Dancer and Choreographer Graeme Murphy; Composer Peter Sculthorpe; Anglican Archbishop of Brisbane and Primate of Australia Phillip Aspinall; Crown Princess Mary of Denmark (Mary Donaldson); World Champion Woodchopper; David Foster, Australian cricket personalities Ricky Ponting and David Boon; Motor Racing Australian Touring car/V8 Supercar; John Bowe (1995 champion) Marcos Ambrose (2003-4 champion): Marcos now races in the NASCAR Busch Series. This is a list of well known Tasmanians. ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... Richard Flanagan (born 1961) is an author, historian and film director from Tasmania, Australia. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Baywatch is an American television series about the Los Angeles County Lifeguards who patrol the crowded beaches of Los Angeles County, California. ... Jaason Simmons (July 12, 1970 in Hobart, Tasmania) is an Australian actor, best known for the role of Logan Fowler on the TV series Baywatch. ... Graeme Murphy (born November 1950) is one of Australias most well known dance choreographers and formed the Sydney Dance Company in 1976 with fellow dancer and collaborator Janet Vernon. ... Peter Horace Sculthorpe AO OBE (born April 29, 1943) is a noted British composer . ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Most Revd Phillip Aspinall (born 1959) has been the Anglican Archbishop of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia since February 2002, and Primate_(religion) of the Anglican Church of Australia since July 2005. ... The monogram of Mary and Frederik Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary of Denmark, formerly Mary Elizabeth Donaldson (b. ... Woodchop or wood chooping is a woodworking task that has become a traditional sport in several cultures. ... David Big Dave Foster OAM (born 20 March 1957) is a world champion woodchopper, and Tasmanian community figure. ... Ricky Thomas Ponting (born December 19, 1974, in Launceston, Tasmania) is a professional Australian cricketer and current captain of the Australian cricket team in One Day International, Twenty20 International and Test cricket. ... David Clarence Boon, usually referred to as Boony (born December 29, 1960, in Launceston, Tasmania) is a former Australian cricketer of the 1980s and 1990s. ... Marcos Ambrose (born September 1, 1976 in Launceston, Tasmania) is an Australian racing driver. ... NASCAR Busch Series logo The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs second division (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations top level, the...


Indigenous animals

Thylacine

Captive Tasmanian Tigers in a zoo.
Captive Tasmanian Tigers in a zoo.

The island of Tasmania was home to the Thylacine, a marsupial which resembled a wild dog. Known colloquially as the Tasmanian Tiger for the distinctive striping across its back, it became extinct in mainland Australia much earlier because of competition by the dingo, introduced in prehistoric times. Owing to persecution by farmers, government-funded bounty hunters and, in the final years, collectors for overseas museums, it appears to have been exterminated in Tasmania. The last known animal died in captivity in 1936. Many alleged sightings have been recorded, none of them confirmed. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name (Harris, 1808) The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, pronounced ) was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. ... This article is about mammals. ... For other uses, see Dingo (disambiguation). ... The term captivity is used to refer to the following meanings: the state of being confined to a space from which it is hard or impossible to escape; see imprisonment. ...


Tasmanian Devil

Tasmanian Devil
Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian Devil is a carnivorous marsupial found exclusively on the island of Tasmania. The size of a small dog but stocky and muscular, the Tasmanian Devil is characterised by black fur with white patches. It has a loud and disturbing screech-like growl, possesses a vicious temperament and is predominantly a scavenger. The Devil survived European settlement and was considered widespread and common throughout Tasmania until recently. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1348x1282, 765 KB) Summary Tasmanian Devil in defensive stance Taken with Nikon D100 on Tasman Peninsula at Tasmanian Devil Park by Wayne McLean ( jgritz) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmanian Devil ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1348x1282, 765 KB) Summary Tasmanian Devil in defensive stance Taken with Nikon D100 on Tasman Peninsula at Tasmanian Devil Park by Wayne McLean ( jgritz) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Tasmanian Devil ... For other uses, see Tasmanian Devil (disambiguation). ... This article is about mammals. ...


Like a lot of wildlife, fast vehicles on roads are a problem for Tasmanian Devils, which are often killed while feeding on other road-killed animals such as wallabies. For other uses, see Wallaby (disambiguation). ...


As of 2005 the Tasmanian Devil population has been reduced by up to 80% in parts of Tasmania by the devil facial tumour disease, which is gradually spreading throughout the island. It is believed the majority starved when the tumours spread to their mouths, and that the tumours are spread by fighting between devils over carcasses they feed on – typically, fighting devils will bite one another's faces. There is no known cure for the disease, and intensive research is underway to determine its cause. There is also a captive breeding program being undertaken by the Tasmanian government to establish a disease-free, genetically-diverse population of Tasmanian Devils outside Tasmania. This has been relatively successful so far. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Devil facial tumour disease causes tumours to form in and around the mouth, interfering with feeding and eventually leading to death by starvation. ...


Birds

Many birds of the Australian mainland and surrounding oceans are also found in Tasmania. Tasmania has 12 endemic bird species: Endemic, in a broad sense, can mean belonging or native to, characteristic of, or prevalent in a particular geography, race, field, area, or environment; Native to an area or scope. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ...

  • 4 honeyeaters (family Meliphagidae) - the Yellow Wattlebird (world's largest honeyeater) and the Yellow-throated, Black-headed and Strong-billed Honeyeaters
  • 3 Australo-Papuan warblers (family Acanthizidae) - the Tasmanian Thornbill, the Scrubtit and the Tasmanian Scrubwren
  • 1 pardalote (family Pardalotidae) - the endangered Forty-spotted Pardalote
  • 1 old-world flycatcher (family Muscicapidae) - the Dusky Robin
  • 1 corvid (family Artamidae) - the Black Currawong
  • 1 parrot (family Psittacidae) - the Green Rosella
  • 1 rail (family Rallidae) - the Tasmanian Native-hen, Australia's only flightless land bird other than the giant ratites (Emu and Southern Cassowary).

The endemic Tasmanian Emu was exterminated in the mid-1800s. The Tasmanian Wedge-tailed Eagle is a threatened endemic subspecies. Genera Anthochaera Acanthagenys Plectorhyncha Philemon Xanthornyzma Entomyzon Manorina Xanthotis Meliphaga Lichenostomus Melithreptus Notiomystis Glycichaera Lichmera Trichodere Grantiella Phylidonyris Ramsayornis Conopophila Acanthorhynchus Certhionyx Myzomela Anthornis Prosthemadera Epthianura Ashbyia The honeyeaters are a large and diverse family of small to medium sized birds most common in Australia and New Guinea, but also... Genera  Anthochaera  Acanthagenys  Plectorhyncha  Philemon  Xanthornyzma  Entomyzon  Manorina  Xanthotis  Meliphaga  Lichenostomus  Melithreptus  Notiomystis  Glycichaera  Lichmera  Trichodere  Grantiella  Phylidonyris  Ramsayornis  Conopophila  Acanthorhynchus  Certhionyx  Myzomela  Anthornis  Prosthemadera  Epthianura  Ashbyia The honeyeaters are a large and diverse family of small to medium sized birds most common in Australia and New Guinea, but also... Binomial name (Daudin, 1800) The Yellow Wattlebird (Anthochaera paradoxa) is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. ... Binomial name (Vieillot, 1817) The Yellow-throated Honeyeater (Lichenostomus flavicollis) is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. ... Binomial name (Lesson, 1839) The Black-headed Honeyeater (Melithreptus affinis) is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. ... Binomial name (Gould, 1837) The Strong-billed Honeyeater (Melithreptus validirostris) is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. ... Genera 14, see list The Acanthizidae are a family of passerine birds which include gerygones, thornbills and scrubwrens. ... Binomial name Gould, 1844[1] The Tasmanian Thornbill (Acanthiza ewingii) is a small brown bird only found in Tasmania and the islands in the Bass Strait. ... Binomial name (Gould, 1855) The Scrubtit (Acanthornis magnus) is a species of bird in the Pardalotidae family. ... Binomial name Gould, 1838 The Tasmanian Scrubwren or Brown Scrubwren (Sericornis humilis) is a bird in the Pardalotidae family, native to the temperate forests of Tasmania. ... Subfamilies Pardalotinae Dasyornithinae Acanthizinae The large and diverse passerine bird family Pardalotidae includes the pardalotes, scrubwrens, thornbills, gerygones and allies. ... Binomial name Pardalotus quadragintus Gould, 1838 The Forty-spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus quadragintus) is by far the rarest pardalote, now being confined to the south-east corner of Tasmania. ... Genera many:see text The Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae is a large family of small passerine birds restricted to the Old World. ... Binomial name (Quoy & Gaimard, 1830) The Dusky Robin (Melanodryas vittata) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. ... Subfamilies Artaminae Cracticinae The family Artamidae gathers together 20 species of mostly crow-like birds native to Australasia and nearby areas. ... Binomial name Stepera fuliginosa The Black currawong (Strepera fuliginosa) is confined to Tasmania, where it is known locally as the Black Jay. ... For the runtime engine for Perl 6, see Parrot virtual machine. ... Binomial name Platycercus caledonicus (Gmelin, 1788) The Green Rosella or Tasmanian Rosella (Platycercus caledonicus) is endemic to Tasmania. ... Genera Sarothrura Himantornis Canirallus Coturnicops Micropygia Rallina Anurolimnas Laterallus Nesoclopeus Gallirallus Rallus Lewinia Dryolimnas Crex Rougetius Aramidopsis Atlantisia Aramides Amaurolimnas Gymnocrex Amaurornis Porzana Aenigmatolimnas Cyanolimnas Neocrex Pardirallus Eulabeornis Habroptila Megacrex Gallicrex Porphyrio Gallinula Fulica The family Rallidae is a large group of small to medium-sized birds which includes the... Binomial name Gallinula mortierii The Tasmanian Native-hen (Gallinula mortierii) is a flightless water hen, one of twelve species of birds endemic to Tasmania. ... Families Struthionidae (ostriches) Rheidae (rheas) Casuariidae (emus etc. ... For other uses, see EMU. Binomial name (Latham, 1790) The Emu has been recorded in the areas shown in orange. ... Binomial name Casuarius casuarius Linnaeus, 1758 The Southern Cassowary, Casuarius casuarius also known as Double-wattled Cassowary is a large, up to 170cm long, flightless black bird with hard and stiff plumage, a brown casque, blue face and neck, red nape and two red wattles hanging down its throat. ... Trinomial name Dromaius novaehollandiae diemenensis Le Souef, 1907 Synonyms Dromaeius diemenensis (lapsus) Le Souef, 1907 Dromaeius novaehollandiae diemenensis (lapsus) The Tasmanian Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae diemenensis) is an extinct subspecies of the Emu. ... Binomial name Aquila audax (Latham, 1802) The Wedge-tailed Eagle or Eaglehawk (Aquila audax) is a very large Australasian raptor and the most common of all the worlds large eagles. ...


Frogs

Tasmania is home to 11 species of frog. Three of these are found only in Tasmania, the Tasmanian Tree Frog (Litoria burrowsae), the Tasmanian Froglet (Crinia tasmaniensis) and the recently discovered Moss Froglet (Bryobatrachus nimbus). Of the 11 species that inhabit Tasmania all are native to Australia. Tasmania is home to the largest breeding population of Growling Grass Frogs (Litoria raniformis), a vulnerable species, which has declined over much of its range. Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... Binomial name Litoria burrowsae Scott, 1942 The Tasmanian Tree Frog, (Litoria burrowsae) is a species of tree frog that is found on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... Binomial name Crinia tasmaniensis Günther, 1864 The Tasmanian Froglet, (Crinia tasmaniensis) is a species of ground-dwelling frog that occurs only in Tasmania, Australia. ... Binomial name Litoria raniformis Keferstein, 1867 The Growling Grass Frog (Litoria raniformis), also commonly known as the Southern Bell Frog, Warty Swamp Frog and erroneously as the Golden Bell Frog is a species of ground dwelling tree frog is native to South eastern Australia; ranging from southern South Australia along...


European Red Fox

On 20 June 2001, Tasmania formed a fox task force to eliminate the European red fox. Officials planned to spend up to AU$ 50 million (US$ 48 million) on an eradication campaign. No foxes have been captured, shot, poisoned or photographed in the Island state in the past six years causing sceptics to claim the fox is an elaborate hoax. Authorities claim foxes (between 50 and 400) could devastate ground-nesting birds and native rodents. Experts estimate there are 30 million foxes on mainland Australia, having been introduced by European settlers.[12] The member of the Upper house,the Legislative Council member for Windermere Ivan Dean MLC has been publicly critical of the fox evidence used to obtain funding for a taxpayer funded Fox Eradication Branch of the Tasmanian D.P.I.W. Ivan Dean MLC was the Tasmanian Police Commander that led the Police investigation into the alleged importation and release of foxes into Tasmania. The investigation did not uncover any evidence of illegal importation.[13] Ivan Dean MLC raised the Tasmanian Fox issue in the Tasmanian Parliament on the 17th April 2007 [14] is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For the American comedian, see Redd Foxx. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... An expert is someone widely recognized as a reliable source of knowledge or skill whose judgement is accorded authority and status by the public or their peers. ... This article is about the animal. ... The population growth/decline of European countries The Demography of Europe refers to the changing number and composition of the population of Europe. ... Settlers are people who have travelled of their own choice, from the land of their birth to live in new lands or colonies. ...


Places in Tasmania

See also: Geography of Tasmania
A small island just off the shore of Bruny Island, South East of Tasmania
A small island just off the shore of Bruny Island, South East of Tasmania
Honeymoon Bay, Freycinet National Park, East Coast of Tasmania
Honeymoon Bay, Freycinet National Park, East Coast of Tasmania

Islands: Tasmania: Landsat satellite photo The geography of Tasmania is rugged and varied. ... Image File history File links Bruny-Island-068. ... Image File history File links Bruny-Island-068. ... South Eastern Tasmania with Bruny Island highlighted. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3488x2616, 4639 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tasmania Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3488x2616, 4639 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tasmania Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create...

Lakes: Boundary Islet is an islet about 60,000 square metres in size in the Hogan Group of islands and islets at latitude 39°12 S, south of the Wilsons Promontory, the southernmost part of both mainland Australia and mainland Victoria. ... South Eastern Tasmania with Bruny Island highlighted. ... Cape Barren Island is located off the north east coast of Tasmania, Australia, and is one of the islands of the Furneaux Group in Bass Strait. ... Municipality of Flinders, Tasmania Flinders Island is an island in the Bass Strait, located 20 km from the north-eastern tip of Tasmania, Australia. ... Municipality of King Island, Tasmania King Island is one of the islands that makes up the state of Tasmania, Australia. ... The Maatsuyker Islands is a group of islands lying south of the southern coast of Tasmania. ... Freycinet Peninsula and Schouten Island seen from space (false color). ... Maria Island is a relatively small island about 10 km off the east coast of Tasmania. ... Macquarie Island lies in the southwest corner of the Pacific Ocean, about half-way between Australia and Antarctica. ...

Significant bridges: The Great Lake is a half man made lake located in the central north region of Tasmania, Australia, its original size is much smaller, it is dammed for hydro-electricity production. ... Lake Gordon is the name of a lake created by the Gordon Dam on the upper reaches of the Gordon River in central Tasmania. ... Old Lake Pedder, 1970 Lake Pedder is a lake located in the southwest of Tasmania, Australia and consists of a large water catchment contained by three dams. ... Lake St Clair Lake St Clair is a lake in the Central Highlands area of Tasmania, Australia. ... Lake Burbury, Tasmania (42°07′ S 145°40′ E) is a man made lake created by the Crotty Dam made by Hydro Tasmania inundating the upper King River valley that lies east of the West Coast Range. ... Lake Margaret () is the name of a lake high up on Mount Sedgwick, the dam built in 1912 to raised its water level by six metres, the hydroelectric Lake Margaret Power Station and a townsite in the West Coast of Tasmania in Australia. ...

Beaches: The Bowen Bridge in Tasmania was built with Federal funds following the collapse of the Tasman Bridge in 1975. ... Batman Bridge, off Tamar Hwy, Tasmania The Batman Bridge is a modern bridge crossing the Tamar River in northern Tasmania. ... The Bridgewater Bridge and Causeway is a vertical-lift bridge in Tasmania, Australia spanning the Derwent River with a specially built causeway connecting the bridge and the east bank of the river. ... We dont have an article called Ross Bridge Start this article Search for Ross Bridge in. ... The Richmond Bridge is an arch bridge located on the B31 (Convict Trail) in Richmond, 25 kilometres north of Hobart in Tasmania, Australia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Tasman Bridge from Mt Nelson The Tasman Bridge is a five-lane bridge crossing the Derwent River, near the CBD of Hobart, Tasmania. ...

Main highways: Bellerive Beach is a popular beach in the suburb of Bellerive in the City of Clarence, Tasmania, Australia. ... Howrah Beach is a popular beach in the suburb of Howrah in the City of Clarence, Tasmania, Australia. ... Ocean Beach is a long stretch of beach running north of Macquarie Heads and Hells Gates on the West Coast of Tasmania. ... Sisters Beach is located in the Waratah-Wynyard municipality of Tasmania within fifteen minutes of Wynyard, in Tasmanias North West. ...

Rivers: The Arthur Highway (A9) is a Tasmanian highway which runs from Sorell in the near south to Port Arthur in the far south-east. ... The Bass Highway is a highway in Tasmania, Australia. ... The Brooker Highway is a highway in Tasmania, Australia. ... The East Tamar Highway is a highway in Tasmania, Australia. ... The Esk Highway (route number A4) is a highway in Tasmania, Australia. ... The Lake Highway runs branches off of the Midlands Highway at Melton Mowbray in Southern tasmania and continues for 148 kilometres, with Bothwell being the main town of any size on route and terminating at Deloraine. ... Lyell Highway is signed as State Route A10. ... The Midland Highway (also known as the Midlands Highway) is the main highway in Tasmania, Australia. ... Murchison Highway This highway runs from the West Coast to Burnie, and was not made until the 1960s. ... Tasman Highway, at Cambridge(Mt. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Mountains: Arthur River is the name of both a geographical feature and a small township (Australian Postcode 7330) on the northern part of Tasmanias west coast, south of the town of Marrawah. ... The Derwent is a river in Tasmania, Australia. ... The Franklin River lies in the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park at the mid northern area of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. ... The Gordon River is one of the major rivers of Tasmania. ... Henty River Is a river in West Coast, Tasmania Tasmania to the west of the West Coast Range. ... The lower Huon River during winter The Huon River is the fourth largest river in Tasmania, Australia. ... The King River is a river on the West Coast of Tasmania. ... The Meander River is a river located in the central north of the state of Tasmania, Australia. ... The Mersey River is a river on the north-west coast of Tasmania, Australia named for the River Mersey in the United Kingdom. ... The North Esk River is one of the tributaries of the Tamar River together with the South Esk River. ... The Pieman River is a river on the West Coast of Tasmania, Australia. ... Queen River, Tasmania River flowing through Queenstown Tasmania. ... The South Esk River is the longest river in Tasmania. ... Tamar River The Tamar River in northern Tasmania is formed by the merging of the North Esk River and South Esk Rivers in Launceston. ...

Regions: Ben Lomond, 1,570 m AHD (5,151 feet), is a mountain in the north of Tasmania. ... Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Central Tasmanian Highlands Cradle Mountain forms the northern end of the wild Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, itself a part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. ... Federation Peak ([1]) is a mountain (elevation 1,224 metres) in Tasmania, Australia 90 km from Hobart. ... Mount Field is a mountain in the Wellington Ranges northwest of the city of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... Frenchmans Cap is a prominent mountain in the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park, Western Tasmania, Australia. ... The Great Western Tiers are a collection of small mountain bluffs in the northern part of the Tasmanian Central Highlands. ... Panorama from top of Mount Ossa Mount Ossa is the highest mountain in Tasmania. ... Mount Wellington is the mountain on whose foothills is built much of the city of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ... The West Coast Range () of Tasmania is a group of mountains in the West Coast area of Tasmania in Australia The range has had a significant number of mines utilising the geologically rich zone of Mount Read Volcanics. ...

See also: List of Australian islands, lakes, bridges, highways, rivers, mountains and regions. Municipality of Huon Valley, Tasmania The Huon Valley is a local government area of Tasmania. ... Municipality of Central Highlands The Municipality of Central Highlands is a local government area of Tasmania. ... (For the Derwent Valley in Derbyshire, England, see River Derwent, Derbyshire, Upper Derwent Valley and Derwent Valley Mills. ... The Midlands in Tasmania refers to the relatively flat, dry agricultural area between Launceston and Hobart, so named because it covers most of the middle of these two cities. ... The spectacular and isolated Bathurst Harbour, South West Wilderness, Tasmania, Australia Approximate area of the South West Wilderness of Tasmania Accepted alternatives: Southwest Wilderness and South-West Wilderness. ... The Tamar Valley is a very picturesque valley which runs north-west from Launceston to the coast a distance of about fifty kilometers. ... Location Map The Tasman Peninsula is located east of Hobart, at the south east corner of Tasmania, Australia. ... Municipality of West Coast The Municipality of West Coast is a local government area of Tasmania. ... Natural freshwater lakes in Australia are rare, due to the general absence of glacial and tectonic activity in AustraliaJLII J JILL JILL JILL JILLJ JILL JILL JILL JILL JILL JILL JILL UJIILLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL JILL JILL JILL JILL WHO JILL U JILL JILLJ POOOPY regions of the country lacking in organised drainage... The Golden Gate Bridge spans Golden Gate, San Francisco Bay - one of the most admired and possibly most famous bridges in the world. ... This is a list of highways in Australia, listed alphabetically along with its route number and location. ... This is a list of rivers of Australia. ... This is a list of mountains in Australia. ... This is a list of regions in Australia that are not Australian states or territories. ...


See also

Tasmania may be the smallest state in Australia, but it contains no fewer than 495 separate Protected Areas with a total area of 22,034 km² (land area: 22,020 km² – 32. ... Centenary Building, Sandy Bay campus The University of Tasmania (also abbreviated as UTAS, UTas or Tas Uni) is an Australian university, with three campuses in Tasmania. ... This is a list of schools in Tasmania. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Same-sex relationships Opposition · Persecution Violence The Australian state of Tasmania does not recognize same-sex marriage. ... Tasmanian wine is produced in the Australian state of Tasmania. ...

References

  1. ^ Australian National Accounts: State Accounts, 2006-07
  2. ^ LISTmap (Mount Ossa). Tasmanian Government Department of Primary Industries and Water. Retrieved on 2007-10-06.
  3. ^ Australian Demographic Statistics, Jun 2007, ABS
  4. ^ Tasmania - Island of Inspiration. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  5. ^ Complete National Parks and Reserves Listings. Parks and Wildlife Service (2006-11-10). Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  6. ^ Blair Trewin, State Records - Tasmania, accessed 17 July 2007.
  7. ^ Native Conifers of Western Tasmania. Department of Primary Industries and Water (2007-09-20). Retrieved on 2008-01-11.
  8. ^ Australia's Biggest, Tallest and Oldest Trees. International Society of Arboriculture Australia Chapter (2004). Retrieved on 2008-01-11.
  9. ^ ABC Television News (Tasmania), 7 p.m. Friday, 27/1/06
  10. ^ Don Kay Biography. Tasmanian Composers Collective. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  11. ^ AusGolf - World’s Top 100 Golf Courses (US Golf Magazine)
  12. ^ BBC NEWS, Fox invasion fear grips Tasmania
  13. ^ The Mercury newspaper http://www.news.com.au/mercury/story/0,22884,21582109-921,00.html
  14. ^ Tasmanian Parliament Legislative Council Hansard APril17th 2007 Part 1- Pages 1-61 [pdf]

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The logo of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service is the Tasmanian Government body responsible for the care and administration of Tasmanias National Parks and wildlife. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tasmanian Composers Collective is the representative body for Composers born and/or living in Tasmania, Australia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Alexander, Alison (editor) (2005)The Companion to Tasmanian History Centre for Tasmanian Historical Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart. ISBN 186295223X.
  • Robson, L.L. (1983) A History of Tasmania. Volume I. Van Diemen's Land From the Earliest Times to 1855 Melbourne, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195543645.
  • Robson, L.L. (1991) A History of Tasmania. Volume II. Colony and State From 1856 to the 1980s Melbourne, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195530314.

The Companion to Tasmanian History Was a volume produced in 2005 by the Centre for Tasmanian Historical Studies at the University of Tasmania in conjunction with the Tasmanian Government celebrations of the Bicentenary of Tasmania. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tasmania
  • Where is Tasmania? web page
  • Tasmania Online - the main State Government website
  • Discover Tasmania - official tourism website
  • NASA Satellite image of Tasmania
  • Another detailed map

Coordinates: 42°00′S, 147°00′E The states and territories of Australia make up the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... NSW redirects here. ... For similar terms, see Northern Territories (disambiguation) Slogan or Nickname: The Territory, The NT, The Top End Motto(s): none Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator Ted Egan Chief Minister Clare Martin (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2004... For other uses, see Queensland (disambiguation). ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... VIC redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... The Jervis Bay Territory is a territory of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Australian Antarctic Territory (AAT) is the part of Antarctica claimed by Australia. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tasmania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4010 words)
Tasmania is a rugged island of temperate climate, and was considered so similar in some ways to pre-industrial England that it was referred to by some English colonists as 'a Southern England'.
Tasmania is separated from the Australian mainland by Bass Strait, reputed to be one of the potentially roughest waters in the world.
Tasmania's rail network consists of narrow gauge lines to all four major population centres and to mining or forestry operations on the west coast and in the northwest.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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