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Encyclopedia > Tandy 1000

The Tandy 1000 was a line of more or less IBM PC compatible home computer systems produced by the Tandy Corporation for sale in its Radio Shack chain of stores. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Children playing on a Amstrad CPC 464 in the 1980s. ... Tandy Corporation is the former name of the parent company of RadioShack Corporation, a Fort Worth, Texas-based company best known for its RadioShack electronics stores. ... RadioShack Corporation (formerly Radio Shack) (NYSE: RSH) runs a chain of electronics retail stores in the United States, as well as parts of Europe. ...


The machine was geared toward home use and a modest budget, and it copied the IBM PCjr's 16-color graphics (PCjr's graphics were an extension of CGA video) and 3-voice sound, but didn't use the PCjr cartridge ports. As the Tandy 1000 outlasted the PCjr by many years these graphics and sound standards became known as "Tandy-compatible" or "TGA," and many software packages of the era listed their adherence to Tandy standards on the package. The IBM PCjr was a relatively inexpensive home computer of the 1980s, and it was IBMs first attempt to enter the educational and home computer markets. ... The Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), introduced in 1981, was IBMs first color graphics card, and the first color computer display standard for the IBM PC. The standard IBM CGA graphics card was equipped with 16 kilobytes of video memory. ... In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ...


The Tandy machine had built-in game ports compatible with those on the TRS-80 Color Computer, as well as a port for a "light wand". Most Tandy 1000 models also featured line-level sound and composite video outputs so that a standard television could be used as a monitor, albeit with much poorer video quality. Unlike most PC clones, several Tandy 1000 computers had MS-DOS built into ROM and could boot in a few seconds. Tandy bundled DeskMate, a suite of consumer-oriented applications, with various Tandy 1000 models. A PCI based soundcard with a DA-15 connector The game port is the traditional connection for video game input devices on an x86-based PCs. ... 4k TRS-80 Color Computer from 1981, 26-3001 The Radio Shack TRS-80 color computer (also called Tandy Color Computer, or CoCo) was a home computer based around the Motorola 6809E processor and part of the TRS-80 line. ... Line level is a term used to denote the strength of an audio signal used to transmit analog sound information between audio components such as CD and DVD players, TVs, audio amplifiers, and mixing consoles. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Read-only memory (ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ... DeskMate was an operating environment that competed with early versions of Microsoft Windows. ...


The original line was equipped with the Intel 8088 CPU, which was later extended to faster clock speeds and also the 8086 and 286 processors. Common models of the machine included the Tandy 1000, EX, HX, SX, TX, SL, RL, and TL. An Intel 8088 microprocessor The Intel 8088 is an Intel microprocessor based on the 8086, with 16-bit registers and an 8-bit external data bus. ... Die of an Intel 80486DX2 microprocessor (actual size: 12×6. ... The intels 8086 was the first one launched in 1978. ... AMD 80286 at 12 MHz. ...


Eventually the Tandy Corporation sold its computer manufacturing business to AST Computers. When that occurred, instead of selling Tandy computers, Radio Shack stores began selling computers made by other manufacturers, such as Compaq. AST Research, Inc. ... Compaq Computer Corporation is an American personal computer company founded in 1982, and now a brand name of Hewlett-Packard. ...

Contents

Selected Tandy 1000 Models

Tandy 1000

The original Tandy 1000 was a large computer similar in size to the IBM PC, though with a plastic case to reduce weight. The original Tandy 1000 featured a proprietary keyboard port along with 2 joystick ports on the front of the case. The rear featured a digital monitor connector (compatible with CGA/EGA monitors), a composite video-out connector, a single RCA-style monophonic line-level audio connector, a port for a light wand, and an unusual edge-card connector used to attach a parallel printer. The original Tandy 1000 came standard with one 5.25 disk drive, with an additional bay usable for the installation of a second 5.25 disk drive (available as a kit from Radio Shack). 128k of memory was standard, with the computer accepting up to 640k of total memory with the addition of expansion cards. MS-DOS 2.11 and DeskMate 1.0 were included with the system. IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... The Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), introduced in 1981, was IBMs first color graphics card, and the first color computer display standard for the IBM PC. The standard IBM CGA graphics card was equipped with 16 kilobytes of video memory. ... The Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA) is the IBM PC computer display standard specification located between CGA and VGA in terms of graphics performance (that is, colour and space resolution). ... RadioShack Corporation (formerly Radio Shack) (NYSE: RSH) runs a chain of electronics retail stores in the United States, as well as parts of Europe. ...


Tandy 1000 EX

The Tandy 1000 EX was designed as an entry-level IBM compatible personal computer. The EX was a compact computer that had the keyboard and 5.25" drive built into the computer casing. The 5.25" drive was accessible from the side of the computer, on the right hand side. The EX was marketed as a starter system for people new to computing, and sold for $1000.00 from Radio Shack in December of 1986.


Tandy 1000 HX

The Tandy 1000 HX, released in 1987, was designed as an entry level IBM compatible personal computer. The HX was meant as the successor to the EX. Like the EX, the HX was a compact computer with the keyboard built into the computer casing. The computer came with an Intel 8088 CPU, 256 kilobytes of memory, and had one 720k 3.5 inch disk drive on the right side of the machine behind the keyboard. HX computers came with MS-DOS 2.11 built into the ROM. Deskmate 2 was included with the HX.

A Tandy 1000 HX, with a Tandy RGB monitor, an external 5.25 disk drive, joystick, and a Tandy DMP-133 dot matrix printer.
A Tandy 1000 HX, with a Tandy RGB monitor, an external 5.25 disk drive, joystick, and a Tandy DMP-133 dot matrix printer.

The computer's memory could be expanded to 640k. This would be accomplished by placing a memory expansion card in the expansion slot, which came with 128 kilobytes, and adding another 384 kilobytes in memory chips to this board. Contrary to popular opinion, the expansion cards were compatible with the 8-Bit IBM slot standard. Called specialized "Plus Cards" that were built by Tandy, they used a pin attachment instead of the slot used by the IBM bus. Radio Shack eventually sold an adapter card that allowed the installation a of "Plus Card" into an 8-Bit IBM slot. There were three slots available in the computer case. There was another 3.5 inch drive slot in the computer case. On the back of the machine there was a port which allowed a user to connect an external 360 kilobyte 5.25 or 720 kilobyte 3.5 inch disk drive. There was also a slot to connect a printer. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1207x682, 74 KB) This is a Tandy 1000 HX that I owned a number of years ago. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1207x682, 74 KB) This is a Tandy 1000 HX that I owned a number of years ago. ... A dot matrix is an array of dots used to generate characters, symbols and images. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


The 1000 HX did not come with a hard drive, and Tandy Corporation did not manufacture fixed disks for this type of computer. However a number of third party vendors made fixed disks for the HX available for sale.


The settings on the computer could be changed so that instead of looking in ROM for DOS at bootup that it would go to the floppy drive instead. Most versions of MS-DOS worked with the 1000 HX, including DOS 3.x, DOS 5.x, and later versions. There was a quirk in the DOS 4.0 environment that prevented that version of DOS from working with HX computers.


Tandy 1000 SX/TX

The Tandy 1000 TX was very similar to the Tandy 1000, having an external keyboard and similar casing. The most major difference was the addition of an 80286 CPU; otherwise, it was nearly identical to the Tandy 1000, including the odd parallel port edge connector. The TX had a 3.5" drive, with an optional 5.25" drive. It contained hookups for two joysticks in the front along with the keyboard, and included a volume control with a phono input on the front. The back had all of the same ports as the Tandy 1000. The memory size was 640k (upgradable to 768k, which was devoted to video) and the computer came bundled with Deskmate. The SX was identical to the TX except it used a 8088 processor, had 384k of memory, and came with 2 5.25" drives. The Intel 80286 is an x86-family 16-bit microprocessor that was introduced by Intel on February 1, 1982. ...


Tandy 1000 SL, SL/2, TL, TL/2, TL/3

The Tandy SL and TL series of computers were an update of the SX and TX respectively. They came in a redesigned case and, in the case of the TL/2 and above, featured onboard XT IDE hard disk controllers. (These controllers are not AT IDE compatible and will not work with modern ATA drives.) The SL and TL machines offered an improved video chip (capable of an 640x200 resolution, 16-color screen mode) and an improved sound circuit, featuring an 8-bit mono DAC/ADC. The DAC was similar in function to sound devices which connected to the parallel port (such as the Disney Sound Source), but unlike these devices it was built into the motherboard chipset, supported DMA transfers and could sample at frequencies up to 48 kHz. While the Tandy DAC's digital playback capabilities compared favorably to those offered by Creative's 8-bit SoundBlaster audio cards, it never gained the same level of market acceptance as the SoundBlaster did.


The Tandy 1000 SL and SL/2 featured an Intel 8086 processor running at 8 MHz. The 8086's 16-bit bus gave it a small but definite performance advantage over the earlier 8088-based Tandy 1000s. The SL came with 384k of RAM preinstalled, whereas the SL/2 offered 512k. Both machines can be expanded to 640k.


The Tandy 1000 TL and TL/2 use 8 MHz Intel 80286 processors, whereas the TL/3 uses a 10 MHz 80286. These computers had 640 kilobytes of memory preinstalled, with an option for an extra 128 kilobytes to be installed, bringing the total to 768 kilobytes. The TL/2 was designed to use part of its RAM as video memory, so a machine with 768 kilobytes of memory would provide 128k for video and 640k to the operating system. However, it is impractical to expand the memory beyond 640k once a VGA graphics card is installed, as that 128k was intended to be used by the ETGA hardware only, thus rendering it unavailable to the operating system. Another limitation of the TL series is that they are still XT-class machines so it is impossible to install or use extended memory (XMS), although expanded memory (EMS) can still be used in conjunction with an 8-bit LIM EMS memory card.


Tandy 1000 RL, RL/HD, RLX, RSX

The Tandy 1000 RL/RLX/RSX series were slim-line home computers. The RL and RL/HD featured a 9.56 MHz 8086 processor, 512 KB of RAM (expandable to 768 KB to provide 128 KB for video), smaller keyboard and mouse ports (which were similar to the PS/2's ports but not directly compatible), a bidirectional parallel port and the SL's enhanced graphics and sound, but the RL/HD also included a built-in XT IDE hard drive.


The RLX was the 'mid-range' offering of the RL line. The RLX featured an 80286 processor and the same 8-bit ISA slot, XT IDE hard drive interface and sound chip as the RL, but had an NCR VGA graphics chip instead of the usual Tandy video. Also, the RLX featured a high-density, 1.44 MB 3.5" disk drive. The RLX offered 512KB of memory preinstalled, which could be expanded to 1MB. (The hard drive version came with 1MB preinstalled.)


The RSX offered a 25 MHz 80386SX processor, two 16-bit ISA slots, AcuMos SVGA video, an AT compatible IDE interface and fully PS/2 compatible keyboard and mouse ports. It was a major deviation from the Tandy 1000 design, sharing only the sound chip (which still features the Tandy DAC) in common with earlier 1000's. It came standard with 1MB of RAM, which could be expanded up to 9MB.


External links

  • The Tand-Em Project, a Tandy 1000 emulator project
  • Tvdog's Archive, Tandy 1000 programs and documentation
  • Tvdog's Mirror Archive, FTP Mirror Site for Tandy 1000 programs and documentation
  • Oldskool Shrine to the PCjr and Tandy 1000
  • Tandy 1000 Webring

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Tandy 1000 (1553 words)
The original Tandy 1000 was a large computer similar in size to the IBM PC, though with a plastic case to reduce weight.
The original Tandy 1000 came standard with one 5.25 disk drive, with an additional bay usable for the installation of a second 5.25 disk drive (available as a kit from Radio Shack).
A Tandy 1000 HX, with a Tandy RGB monitor, an external 5.25 disk drive, joystick, and a Tandy DMP-133 dot matrix printer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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