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Encyclopedia > Talus bone
Bone: Talus bone
Subtalar Joint
Latin Astragalus
Gray's subject #63 266
MeSH Talus
See talus for other meanings of the word

The talus bone or astragalus of the ankle joint connects the leg to the foot. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Talus (which is Latin for ankle-bone) may refer to: The talus bone, a bone connecting the leg to the foot Talos, a rock-throwing giant made of bronze in Greek mythology A sloping mass of loose rocks at the base of a cliff Scree, small broken rock found on... For a review of anatomical terms, see Anatomical position and Anatomical terms of location. ...

Contents

Anatomy

The talus is the second largest of the tarsal bones. FIG. 268– Bones of the right foot. ...


It articulates with the tibia, fibula, calcaneus, and navicular. This means that the talus is one of the bones in the human body with the highest percentage of its surface area covered by articular cartilage. It is also unique in that it has a retrograde blood supply. This simply means that arterial blood enters the bone at the distal end. This article is about the vertebrate bone. ... For other uses see fibula (disambiguation) The fibula or calf bone is a bone placed on the lateral side of the tibia, with which it is connected above and below. ... The calcaneus is the large bone making up the heel of the human foot. ... The navicular bone (also called the navicular or scaphoid) is one of the tarsal bones, found in the foot. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... This article is about retrograde motion. ... In zootomy, several terms are used to describe the location of organs and other structures in the body of bilateral animals. ...


It occupies the middle and upper part of the tarsus, supporting the tibia above, resting upon the calcaneus below, articulating on either side with the lateral and medial malleoli, and in front with the navicular. The lower extremity (distal extremity; external malleolus) of the fibula is of a pyramidal form, and somewhat flattened from side to side; it descends to a lower level than the medial malleolus. ... We dont have an article called Medial malleolus Start this article Search for Medial malleolus in. ...


Use as dice

Due to the way that the talus bone is shaped, it can land in one of four positions. This fact led to the bone assuming a role as a form of die in games of chance and gambling, such as Knucklebones. [1] Two standard six-sided pipped dice with rounded corners. ... A game of chance is a game whose outcome is strongly influenced by some randomizing device, and upon which contestants frequently wager money. ... Gamble redirects here. ... Roman statue of girl playing astragaloi Knucklebones also known as hucklebones, dibs, jackstones, chuckstones or five-stones, is a game of very ancient origin, played with five small objects, originally the knucklebones of a sheep, which are thrown up and caught in various ways. ...


Additional images

References

  1. ^ Smith, William (1891). A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities. J. Murray, 799. 

External links


This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Bishop John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...

This article is about the skeletal organs. ... In common usage, a human leg is the lower limb of the body, extending from the hip to the ankle, and including the thigh, the knee, and the cnemis. ... The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of the mammalian bodies. ... The femur head which is globular and forms rather more than a hemisphere, is directed upward, medialward, and a little forward, the greater part of its convexity being above and in front. ... The femur neck is a flattened pyramidal process of bone, connecting the head with the body, and forming with the latter a wide angle opening medialward. ... Bones of the Hip In anatomy, the hip is the bony projection of the femur, known as the greater trochanter, and the overlying muscle and fat. ... The medial surface of the Upper extremity of femur, of much less extent than the lateral, presents at its base a deep depression, the trochanteric fossa (digital fossa), for the insertion of the tendon of the Obturator externus, and above and in front of this an impression for the insertion... The Lesser Trochanter (small trochanter) of the femur is a conical eminence, which varies in size in different subjects; it projects from the lower and back part of the base of the neck. ... Running obliquely downward and medialward from the tubercle of the femur is the intertrochanteric line (spiral line of the femur); it winds around the medial side of the body of the bone, below the lesser trochanter, and ends about 5 cm. ... Running obliquely downward and medialward from the summit of the greater trochanter on the posterior surface of the neck is a prominent ridge, the intertrochanteric crest. ... The body of the femur (or shaft), almost cylindrical in form, is a little broader above than in the center, broadest and somewhat flattened from before backward below. ... The linea aspera is a ridge of roughened surface on the posterior aspect of the femur, to which are attached muscles and intermusclular septa. ... The linea aspera is a ridge of roughened surface on the posterior aspect of the femur, to which are attached muscles and intermusclular septa. ... The upper part of the gluteal tuberosity is often elongated into a roughened crest, on which a more or less well-marked, rounded tubercle, the third trochanter, is occasionally developed. ... On the posterior surface of the femur, the intermediate ridge or pectineal line is continued to the base of the lesser trochanter and gives attachment to the pectineus muscle. ... The lower extremity of the femur (or distal extremity), larger than the upper extremity of femur, is somewhat cuboid in form, but its transverse diameter is greater than its antero-posterior; it consists of two oblong eminences known as the condyles. ... The medial lip of the linea aspera ends below at the summit of the medial condyle, in a small tubercle, the adductor tubercle, which affords insertion to the tendon of the Adductor magnus. ... The lateral epicondyle of the femur, smaller and less prominent than the medial epicondyle, gives attachment to the fibular collateral ligament of the knee-joint. ... The medial epicondyle of the femur is a large convex eminence to which the tibial collateral ligament of the knee-joint is attached. ... The lateral condyle is one of the two projections on the lower extremity of femur. ... The medial condyle is one of the two projections on the lower extremity of femur. ... The articular surface of the lower end of the femur occupies the anterior, inferior, and posterior surfaces of the condyles. ... This article is about the vertebrate bone. ... The upper extremity of the tibia (or proximal extremity) is large, and expanded into two eminences, the medial condyle and lateral condyle. ... Posteriorly, the medial condyle and lateral condyle are separated from each other by a shallow depression, the posterior intercondyloid fossa (or intercondylar area), which gives attachment to part of the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee-joint. ... The anterior intercondyloid fossa (or intercondylar area) is the location where the anterior cruciate ligament attaches to the tibia. ... The lateral condyle is the lateral portion of the upper extremity of tibia. ... The medial condyle is the medial portion of the upper extremity of tibia. ... The body of the tibia has three borders and three surfaces. ... Narrow below where the anterior surfaces of the condyles of the tibia end in a large oblong elevation, the tuberosity of the tibia, which gives attachment to the ligamentum patellae. ... The posterior surface of the tibia presents, at its upper part, a prominent ridge, the soleal line (popliteal line in older texts), which extends obliquely downward from the back part of the articular facet for the fibula to the medial border, at the junction of its upper and middle thirds. ... The lower extremity of the tibia, much smaller than the upper extremity of tibia, presents five surfaces; it is prolonged downward on its medial side as a strong process, the medial malleolus. ... We dont have an article called Medial malleolus Start this article Search for Medial malleolus in. ... For other uses see fibula (disambiguation) The fibula or calf bone is a bone placed on the lateral side of the tibia, with which it is connected above and below. ... The upper extremity or head of the fibula is of an irregular quadrate form, presenting above a flattened articular surface, directed upward, forward, and medialward, for articulation with a corresponding surface on the lateral condyle of the tibia. ... The body of fibula presents four borders - the antero-lateral, the antero-medial, the postero-lateral, and the postero-medial; and four surfaces - anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral. ... The lower extremity (distal extremity; external malleolus) of the fibula is of a pyramidal form, and somewhat flattened from side to side; it descends to a lower level than the medial malleolus. ... FIG. 268– Bones of the right foot. ... The calcaneus is the large bone making up the heel of the human foot. ... At the upper and forepart of the medial surface of the calcaneus is a horizontal eminence, the sustentaculum tali, which gives attachment to a slip of the tendon of the Tibialis posterior. ... The two oblique grooves of the lateral surface of the calcaneus are separated by an elevated ridge, or tubercle, the trochlear process (peroneal tubercle, or fibular trochlea of calcaneus), which varies much in size in different bones. ... The navicular bone occurs in human and horse anatomy. ... The cuboid bone is one of seven Tarsal bones. ... There are three cuneiform bones in the human foot: the medial cuneiform, the intermediate cuneiform and the lateral cuneiform. ... There are three cuneiform bones in the human foot: the medial cuneiform, the intermediate cuneiform and the lateral cuneiform. ... There are three cuneiform bones in the human foot: the medial cuneiform, the intermediate cuneiform and the lateral cuneiform. ... There are three cuneiform bones in the human foot: the medial cuneiform, the intermediate cuneiform and the lateral cuneiform. ... The metatarsus consists of the five long bones of the foot, which are numbered from the medial side (ossa metatarsalia I.-V.); each presents for examination a body and two extremities. ... The first metatarsal bone is remarkable for its great thickness, and is the shortest of the metatarsal bones. ... The second metatarsal bone is the longest of the metatarsal bones, being prolonged backward into the recess formed by the three cuneiform bones. ... The third metatarsal bone articulates proximally, by means of a triangular smooth surface, with the third cuneiform; medially, by two facets, with the second metatarsal; and laterally, by a single facet, with the fourth metatarsal. ... The fourth metatarsal bone is smaller in size than the third; its base presents an oblique quadrilateral surface for articulation with the cuboid; a smooth facet on the medial side, divided by a ridge into an anterior portion for articulation with the third metatarsal, and a posterior portion for articulation... The fifth metatarsal bone is recognized by a rough eminence, the tuberosity, on the lateral side of its base. ... For other uses, see Patella (disambiguation). ... The phalanges of the foot correspond, in number and general arrangement, with those of the hand; there are two in the great toe, and three in each of the other toes. ...

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