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The tallit (Modern Hebrew: טַלִּית) or tallet(h) (Sephardi Hebrew: טַלֵּית), also called talles (Yiddish), is a prayer shawl "cloak" that is worn during the morning Jewish services (the Shacharit prayers) in Judaism, during the Torah service, and on Yom Kippur. It has special twined and knotted "fringes" known as tzitzit attached to its four corners. The tallit is sometimes also referred to as the arba kanfot, meaning the ‘four wings’ (in the connotation of four corners). Hebrew (עִבְרִית, ‘Ivrit) is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family spoken by more than seven million people in Israel and Jewish communities around the world. ... The Sephardi Hebrew language is an offshoot of Biblical Hebrew favored for liturgical use by Sephardi Jewish practice. ... Yiddish (Yid. ... Jewish services are the communal prayer recitations which form part of the observance of Judaism. ... This article describes the Jewish religion; for a consideration of ethnic, historic, and cultural aspects of the Jewish identity refer to the article Jew. ... Some knots: 1. ... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ...


While some other Jewish garments or objects might be treated more casually, the tallit is a special personal effect, generally used for many years or a lifetime and never discarded. Most Jewish men own very few tallitot in their lifetimes. A threadbare tallit is treated with great respect, as if it had a mantle of holiness, acquired from years of use. Although there is no mandatory tradition, a tallit is likely to be given as a special gift, from father to son, from father-in-law to son-in-law, from teacher to student. It may also be purchased to mark a special occasion, such as a wedding, a b'nai mitzvah, or a trip to Israel. When a man dies, it is traditional that he be buried dressed only in his kittel, with his tallit is draped over him. A kittel (Yiddish: קיתל, robe) is a white robe worn on special occasions by religious Jews. ...


Since wearing a tallit at certain times is considered an obligation for men, a synagogue will usually have a rack available with extras, for visitors and guests, or for those who forgot to bring their own with them. The extras that a synagogue has available to lend are usually plain and simple, but sufficient to fulfill the obligation. Although non-Jewish male visitors are expected to wear a kippah (headcovering) when visiting a synagogue, it would be frowned upon for a non-Jew to put on a tallit, unless he is studying or preparing for conversion to Judaism.


According to Rabbinic Judaism, men are required to wear it at various points of their lives as Jews, and most sages regarded the tzitzis as compulsory. In Reform Judaism, the use of a tallit was declining during much of the 20th century, but in recent years, it has returned to favor. Various authorities have differed as to whether women are permitted to wear a tallit. In Orthodox Judaism, many authorities discourage women from wearing a tallit while some Modern Orthodox authorities permit it. In other branches of Judaism it is more commonly practiced.[citation needed] Rabbinic Judaism (or in Hebrew Yahadut Rabanit - יהדות רבנית) is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the written Torah as well as the Oral Law (the Mishnah, Talmuds and subsequent rabbinic decisions) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ... Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary... Modern Orthodox Judaism is a philosophy that attempts to adapt Orthodox Judaism and interaction with the surrounding non-Jewish, modern world. ...

Contents


Terminology

At the kotel (western wall) in Jerusalem, men wear tallitot for morning prayers.
At the kotel (western wall) in Jerusalem, men wear tallitot for morning prayers.
In Zefat, Israel, an artist prepares a handloom for weaving a tallit.
In Zefat, Israel, an artist prepares a handloom for weaving a tallit.
Trying on a tallit during a trip to Israel. In Israel, one can order a handmade tallit, choosing colors and patterns.
Trying on a tallit during a trip to Israel. In Israel, one can order a handmade tallit, choosing colors and patterns.
A religious Jewish man ties the tzitzis (corner fringes), being careful to follow the correct sequence of knots, according the tradition of the buyer.
A religious Jewish man ties the tzitzis (corner fringes), being careful to follow the correct sequence of knots, according the tradition of the buyer.
Tying the tzitzis (corner fringes), showing the blue thread, with a bluish dye derived from the Meditteranean snail Hexaplex trunculus. It is controversial whether this dye is the true chilazon.
Tying the tzitzis (corner fringes), showing the blue thread, with a bluish dye derived from the Meditteranean snail Hexaplex trunculus. It is controversial whether this dye is the true chilazon.
The tzitzis strings of one corner of a tallit. The eight strings are really four that are folded through the hole on the tallit. This tzitzit is tied Ashkenazi-style.
The tzitzis strings of one corner of a tallit. The eight strings are really four that are folded through the hole on the tallit. This tzitzit is tied Ashkenazi-style.
Comparison of Ashkenazi vs. Sephardi-style tying. Note the difference in the number and style of the winds.
Comparison of Ashkenazi vs. Sephardi-style tying. Note the difference in the number and style of the winds.
A man wearing a prayer shawl draped over the head, as is often done during prayer. The fringes along the entire sides are merely decorative in nature, while the tzitzis (lower left) are coming from the corner holes.
A man wearing a prayer shawl draped over the head, as is often done during prayer. The fringes along the entire sides are merely decorative in nature, while the tzitzis (lower left) are coming from the corner holes.

The word tallit in Modern Hebrew is pronounced tah-LEET, or [ta.lít] in IPA, with the stress on the final syllable. Less common today, but historically quite widespread, is the pronunciation tallet, or [ta.lét] in IPA. The same word is pronounced TAH-lis in Yiddish, transcribed [tá.lɛs] or [tá.lıs] in IPA, with the stress on the initial syllable. Both pronunciations are commonly interchanged and refer to the same object. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 77 KB) Summary Photo by Howard Metzenberg, donated to the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 77 KB) Summary Photo by Howard Metzenberg, donated to the public domain. ... Western Wall by night The Western Wall, known as the Kotel HaMaaravi (or simply Kotel)הכותל המערבי in Hebrew , also called the Wailing Wall (or Al-Buraq Wall, in a mix of English and Arabic) is a retaining wall from the time of the Second, q. ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: Yerushalayim; Arabic: al-Quds; Greek Ιεροσόλυμα; Latin: Hierosolyma) is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 metres (about 2000-2500 feet). ... Image File history File links Zefat_weaver. ... Image File history File links Zefat_weaver. ... Safed (Hebrew צפת Tzfat, Arabic صفد Safad, other English spellings Zefat,Safad,Tsfat etc. ... Image File history File links Tallit_try_on. ... Image File history File links Tallit_try_on. ... Image File history File links Tallit_knotting2. ... Image File history File links Tallit_knotting2. ... Tzitzit,Tzitzis, or Tzitzith - tassles (heb. ... Image File history File links Tallit_knotting. ... Image File history File links Tallit_knotting. ... Tzitzit,Tzitzis, or Tzitzith - tassles (heb. ... Binomial name Hexaplex trunculus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Murex trunculus Phyllanotus trunculus Truncullariopsis trunculus Hexaplex trunculus (known as the trunculus murex, purple murex or banded dye-murex) is a marine snail that produces a distinctive purple dye, considered valuable in ancient times and often used to dye fabrics; if left in... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 1401 KB) Summary Picture of tzitzis strings Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 1401 KB) Summary Picture of tzitzis strings Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 270 KB) Summary I just took this pic. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 270 KB) Summary I just took this pic. ... Sephardim (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew SÉ™fardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Sfaradim, Tiberian Hebrew ) are a subgroup of Jews, generally defined in contrast to Ashkenazim and/or . ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 1000 KB) Summary Jewish Prayer Shawl Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 1000 KB) Summary Jewish Prayer Shawl Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ...


The correct plural of tallit in Modern Hebrew is tallitot, pronounced tah-lee-TOT, or [ta.li.tót] in IPA; the traditional Sephardi plural of tallét is talletot, pronounced tah-leh-TOT, or [ta.le.tót] in IPA. The Yiddish plural, which has its roots in the Mediaeval Ashkenazi masculine form tallēt (compare Modern Ashkenazi/Israeli Hebrew tallit gadol with the masculine form of the adjective) with the analogous plural ending -im and diphthongisation of the accented ē, is taleisim, pronounced, tah-LEY-sim, or [ta.léj.sɛm] or [ta.léj.sım] in IPA. Again, all these plurals are interchangeable and are more or less commonly heard. The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ...


Historical origin

There is much confusion among the masses as to the origins of the tallit. The actual four-cornered garment began with no relevance whatsoever to Jewish practice. Beginning when Moses received the Torah on Mount Sinai, all of Israel were commanded to place tzitzit on the corners of their four-cornered garments. (Numbers 15:37-41 and Commandment 376 out of 613 in the Sefer HaChinuch ISBN 0-87306-605-7). The purpose of such a commandment, as given by the verses in Numbers, is so that the people of Israel should glance at the strings and remember all of the commandments of God. Moses or Móshe (מֹשֶׁה, Standard Hebrew, Tiberian Hebrew Mōšeh, Arabic موسى Mūsa, Geez ሙሴ Musse) is a legendary Hebrew liberator, leader, lawgiver, prophet, and historian, and also one of the greatest figures in Jewish history. ... Torah () is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or law. It is the central and most important document of Judaism revered by Jews through the ages. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Most people at the time (both Jews as well as non-Jews) wore clothing that bears little resemblance to modern apparel. Most clothing consisted of a sheet-like item wrapped around the body following the local customs of the time. This can perhaps be compared to the "'abayah," or blanket, worn by the Bedouins for protection from sun and rain, or the stola/toga of ancient Greece and Rome. As sheets, these garments had four corners and were thus subsequently (from Sinai, onwards) required to possess these tzitzis. As recorded in the Talmud, these were sometimes worn partly doubled, and sometimes with the ends thrown over the shoulders (Shabbos 147a; Menachos 41a). Bedouin resting at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic badawi بدوي, a generic name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Sahara via the Western Desert, Sinai, and Negev to the eastern coast of the Arabian desert. ... The stola was the traditional garment of Roman women, corresponding to the toga that was worn by men. ... Roman clad in toga The toga was a distinctive garment of Ancient Rome. ... Tractate Brachos, folio 2a The Talmud (תלמוד) is a record of rabbinic discussions of Jewish law, ethics, customs, and stories, which are authoritative in Jewish tradition. ...


As modern day dawned and people began wearing the apparel with which we are all quite familiar (shirts and slacks, etc.), the four-cornered sheet-like cloth fell out of style and practicality, and to this end, the Biblical commandment to attach tzitzis to one's garments effectively became obsolete. However, in a demonstration of love for the Almighty and their desire to keep His commandments, the Rabbis ordained that Jews should purposely wear four-cornered garments to necessitate the attachment of the tzitzis.


The tzitzis that are spoken about in Numbers (ibid.) refer to four twisted strings of wool that are inserted into a hole (or two holes, depending on varying tradition) on each of the four corners of the sheet-like cloth that are folded over to produce eight strings and then tied together in an intricate pattern of knots and twirlings.


In Numbers, the Torah also states that a blue string is to be placed on each corner as well. The blue string was similar to the white strings except that it had been dyed with a special dye, the tekhelet, from an organism known as the chilazon. However, over the many years of exile in the Diaspora, noted as being sometime between 500-600 CE, the identity of this organism, as well as the proper procedure for processing the dye, was lost. . Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Look up Diaspora in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Over the many years of absence of this tekhelet, there had been a custom among some to include some sort of colored stripe on the actual four cornered cloth as a reminder of the Biblical decree or the blue string. The Rambam, a leading Sefardic Biblical commentator, placed a blue stripe on his tallit, Rashi, a leading Ashkenazic Biblical commentator, placed a black stripe on his tallit (Rashi's school of thought was that the blue color of the tekheilet was actually a very dark blue/purplish color, and thus more similar to black than to the light blue of the Rambam's stripe.) This blue on a white background became accepted as a symbol for the Jewish community, and was the inspiration for the development of the Flag of Israel. This color might be synonymous with the dye color known as Tyrian purple, used by the royalty and upper class of ancient times. A less common practice is the use of the blue thread, regardless of the source of the dye. Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon (Hebrew: רבי משה בן מיימון; Arabic: Mussa bin Maimun ibn Abdallah al-Kurtubi al-Israili; March 30, 1135—December 13, 1204), commonly known by his Greek name Maimonides, was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal: ספרד, Standard Hebrew Səfárad, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄áraḏ / Səp̄āraḏ), or whose ancestors were among the Jews expelled from... Rashi Rashi רשי, an acronym for Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac (Hebrew: רבי שלמה בן יצחק) or Shlomo Yitzchaki, (February 22, 1040 – July 17, 1105) is one of Judaisms classic meforshim (Bible and Talmud commentators), and wrote the first comprehensive commentaries on the Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible) and Talmud. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... Flag ratio: 8:11 Another common colorization of the flag, using lighter blue. ... Tyrian purple is a purple dye made in the ancient Phoenician city of Tyre from a secretion of Spiny Dye-Murex (Murex brandaris), a marine snail. ...


While many statements about this dye exist in rabbinic literature, they are not clear enough to provide positive identification. Only in the 20th century has archaeological research, combined with readings of rabbinic literature, allowed scientists to speculate about the source of this dye. The cuttlefish and the Murex trunculus snail have both been identified as possibly being the true chilazon, with the latter gaining more acceptance but both still being far from attaining universal approval. In recent years, following discovery of a method to produce blue die from the Murex trunculus snail, a few noted individuals have begun to produce the blue dye, claiming it to be the original tekhelet. Families Sepiadariidae Sepiidae Cuttlefish are animals of the order Sepiida, and are marine cephalopods, small relatives of squids and nautilus. ... This article or section should be merged with Trunculus Murex Binomial name Murex trunculus Murex trunculus is a mollusc, source of the royal Tyrian purple. ...


It is said that when the Jews will look at this blue string, they will come to think of the blue sea, and the sea will make them think of the blue heavens, and the heavens will make them remember God above them, and they will thus be protected from sinning. Tekhelet corresponds to the color of the divine revelation (Midrash Numbers Rabbah xv.).


Kinds of tallit

There are two kinds of tallittallit gadol and tallit katan.


Tallit gadol

The tallit gadol (traditionally known as tallét gedolah amongst Sephardim), or "large" tallit, is worn over ones clothing resting on the shoulders. This is the prayer shawl that is worn during the morning services in synagogue and by the leader of the prayers during some other services. Lesko synagogue, Poland A synagogue (Hebrew: בית כנסת ; beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: שול, shul) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ...


Tallit katan

The tallit katan (traditionally known as tallét ketannah amongst Sephardim), or "small" tallit, is worn for the duration of the day by Orthodox Jewish men. While it should not be worn directly on the skin, it is often worn beneath one's shirt (yet above an undershirt) so as to conform to societal dress codes. However, Chassidim tend to wear them on top of their shirts, as they do not desire to conform to the modern Western-style mode of dress. They do, however, wear a suit vest over their tallit katan. Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ...


The tallit katan is also known as arba kanfot (Yid. arba kanfos or tzitzit (Yid. tzitzis). Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ...


Description of tallit gadol

The tallit gadol, which can be spread out like a sheet, is traditionally usually woven of wool — especially amongst Ashkenazim. Some Spanish and Portuguese Jews, however, have the tradition to use silk talletot, and cotton or linen are also traditional choices. In our days, other materials are also used — including synthetic materials like rayon, polyester and acrylic. Talletot may be of any colour, but are typically white, and usually with black, blue or white stripes along the lateral sides (see Historical Origins above for stripe explanation). See Alpaca wool, Angora wool (of rabbits) and Cashmere wool (of goats) for information about other wools. ... Painting of the Amsterdam Esnoga — considered the mother synagogue by the Spanish and Portuguese Jews — by Emanuel de Witte (ab. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax (and historically, cannabis) plant. ... Cellulose is treated with alkali and carbon disulfide to yield viscose. ... SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester is a category of polymers, or, more specifically condensation polymers, which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ... Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer with a weight average molecular weight of ~100,000. ...


Sizes of talletot vary greatly. The silk and synthetic ones vary in size, for men, from about 36 × 54 inches (91 × 137 cm) to 72 × 96 inches (183 × 244 cm). The woolen tallit is proportionately larger (sometimes reaching to the ankle), conforming to the Halakha that the tallit should be large enough to be full-body apparel and not just scarf-like. A ribbon, or a band artistically woven with silver or gold threads (called "spania"), and about 24 inches (61 cm) long by 2 to 6 inches (5 to 15 cm) wide, may be sewn on the side of the tallit that is nearest to the head, and is called the atarah, or ‘crown’. Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה; also transliterated as Halakhah, Halacha, Halakhot and Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law as well as customs and traditions. ...


From the four corners of the tallit hang fringes called tzitzit, in compliance with the laws in the Torah (Book of Numbers 15:38). Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ... Torah () is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or law. It is the central and most important document of Judaism revered by Jews through the ages. ... The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ...


Blessings

When putting on a Tallit Katan

The tzitzis are first inspected to make sure they are properly intact before wearing the talit katan. While holding the Tallit Katan in readiness to put it on, and the following blessing is recited. If the person will later put on a Tallit Gadol, this blessing is omitted. The Tallit Katan is then donned; many kiss the tzitzit.

ברוך אתה ה׳ אלהינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וצונו על מצות ציצת The Tetragrammaton (Greek: τετραγράμματον; word with four letters) is the usual reference to the Hebrew name for God, which is spelled (in the Hebrew alphabet): (yodh) (heh) (vav) (heh) or (YHWH). ...


יהי רצון מלפניך ה׳ אלהי ואלהי אבותי שתהי חשובה מצות ציצת לפניך כאלו קימתיה בכל פרטיה ודקדוקי וכונותיה ותריג מצות התלוים בה אמן סלה The Tetragrammaton (Greek: τετραγράμματον; word with four letters) is the usual reference to the Hebrew name for God, which is spelled (in the Hebrew alphabet): (yodh) (heh) (vav) (heh) or (YHWH). ...

Barukh atah, adonai, eloheinu, melech haolam, asher kiedshanu b'mitzvotav, v'tzievahnu al mitzvat tzitzit


Y'hie rahtzon miel'fanehchah, adonai ehlohay vaylohay ahvotay, sheht'hay khashuvah mitzvot tzitzit lfahnehkhah, k'ielu kieyahm'tieah b'khal prahtehyah v'diek'dukehyah v'khahu'notehyeh, v'tahr'yag mitzvot hat'luyim ba. Amen Selah The word Amen (Tiberian Hebrew אמן ’Āmēn So be it; truly, Standard Hebrew אמן Amen, Arabic آمين ’Āmīn) is a declaration of affirmation found in the Hebrew Bible and in the Quran. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Blessed are You, Lord, our God, King of the universe, Who has sanctified us with His commandments, and commanded us regarding the commandment of fringes


May it be the will before you, Lord, my God and the God of my forefathers, that it should be considered the commandment of fringes before You as if I had fulfilled it in all its aspects, its details and its intentions, as well as the 613 commandments that are dependent on it. So be it, [consider what we have said].


For putting on a Tallit Gadol

On inspection of the Tzitzit

ברכי נפשי את ה׳ ה׳ אלהי גדלת מאד הוד והדר לבשת עטה אור כשלמה נוטה שמים כיריעה The Tetragrammaton (Greek: τετραγράμματον; word with four letters) is the usual reference to the Hebrew name for God, which is spelled (in the Hebrew alphabet): (yodh) (heh) (vav) (heh) or (YHWH). ... The Tetragrammaton (Greek: τετραγράμματον; word with four letters) is the usual reference to the Hebrew name for God, which is spelled (in the Hebrew alphabet): (yodh) (heh) (vav) (heh) or (YHWH). ...

Barkhie nefshie et adonai, adonai ehlohay gadaltah m'od, vhadar lavashtah. Oteh aur kasal'mah, noteh shamahyim kah'rieah


Bless, O my soul, you Lord, Lord my God, You are very great; glory and majesty You have worn; donning light as a garment, stretching out the heavens like a curtain (Psalms 104 1-2) Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh. ...


Before putting on the Tallit

ברוך אתה ה׳ אלהינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וצונו להתעטף בציצת The Tetragrammaton (Greek: τετραγράμματον; word with four letters) is the usual reference to the Hebrew name for God, which is spelled (in the Hebrew alphabet): (yodh) (heh) (vav) (heh) or (YHWH). ...

Barukh atah adonai ehlohaynu melekh haolam, asher kied'shanu b'mitzvotav v'tzievanu lhiet'atayf batzitzit


Blessed are You, Lord, our God, King of the universe, Who has sanctified us with His commandments and has commanded us to wrap outselves in fringes.


After wrapping the Tallit around the body

מה יקר חסדך אלהים ובני אדם בצל כנפיך יחסיון ירוין מדשן ביתך ונחל עדניך תשקם כי עמך מקור חיים באורך נראה אור משך חסדך לידעיך וצדקתך לישרי לב

Mah yakahr Khas'd'khah ehlohiym uvnay adam b'tzayl k'nahfehkhah yehkhehsahyun. Yier'v'yun miedehshen baytehkhah v'nahkhal ahdahnehkhah tahsh'kaym. Kie em'kha m'kor khayiym, b'or'khah niereh aur. M'shokh khas'd'khah l'yod'ehkhah, v'tzied'kaht'khah l'yiesh'ray layv


How precious is your kindness, O God! Mankind in the shelter of Your wings takes refuge. They will be sated from the abundance of Your house, and from that stream of Your delights You give them to drink. For with You is the source of life; by Your light may we see light. Extend Your kindness to those who know You, and Your righteousness to the upright of heart.


Use

Obligation for men

The prayer shawl (No. 1 above) is worn over one's clothes, and is traditionally worn by Sephardi males from early childhood and by the majority of Ashkenazi males only after marriage; although many Ashkenaz criticize this practice as it delays an important mitzvah beyond the time a Bar Mitzvah male is responsible for it. In some Ashkenazi communities, especially western European Ashkenazim, one accordingly has the practice of all men over 13 wearing the tallit gadol. Sephardim (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew SÉ™fardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Sfaradim, Tiberian Hebrew ) are a subgroup of Jews, generally defined in contrast to Ashkenazim and/or . ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... Mitzvah (Hebrew: מצווה, commandment; plural, mitzvot; from צוה, tzavah, command) is a word used in Judaism to refer to (a) the commandments, of which there are 613, given in the Torah (the first five books of the Hebrew Bible) or (b) any Jewish law at all. ... When a Jewish child reaches the age of maturity (12 years and one day for girls, 13 years and one day for boys) that child becomes responsible for him/herself under Jewish law; at this point a boy is said to become Bar Mitzvah (בר מצווה, son of the commandment... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ...


Views on use by women

Historically, women have not been obligated to don a tallit, as they are not bound to positive precepts with a time constraint (Babylonian Talmud, tractate Kiddushin 29a), and the obligation of donning a tallit only applies by day. Still, many early authorities permit women to wear a tallit, such as Isaac ibn Ghiyyat (b. 1038), Rashi (1040-1105), Rabbeinu Tam (ca 1100-1171), Zerachya ben Yitzhak Halevi of Lunel (ca. 1125-1186), Rambam (11351204), R. Eliezer ben Yoel Halevi (ca 1140-ca 1225), Rashba (1235−1310), Aharon Halevi of Barcelona (b. ca 1235?), R. Yisrael Yaaqob Alghazi (1680-1761), R. Yomtob ben Yisrael Alghazi (1726-1802)). However, there was a gradual movement towards prohibition, mainly initiated by the Medieval Ashkenazi Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg (the Maharam). The Rema states that while women are technically allowed to don a tallit it would appear to be an act of arrogance (yuhara) for women to perform this commandment (Shulkhan Arukh, O.C. 17:2 in Mappah). The first page of the Talmud, in the standard Vilna edition. ... Events Independent declaration of Western Xia. ... Rashi Rashi רשי, an acronym for Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac (Hebrew: רבי שלמה בן יצחק) or Shlomo Yitzchaki, (February 22, 1040 – July 17, 1105) is one of Judaisms classic meforshim (Bible and Talmud commentators), and wrote the first comprehensive commentaries on the Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible) and Talmud. ... Events March War of Independence of Western Xia occurred. ... Events Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor deposed by his son, Henry V Tamna kingdom annexed by Korean Goryeo Dynasty. ... Rabbeinu Tam (רבינו תם) (real name Rabbeinu Yaakov, or Jacob in English) was the son of Rabbeinu Meir and his wife Yochebed. ... Events William II of England dies in a hunting accident - Henry I becomes King of England King Henry I proclaims the Charter of Liberties, one of the first examples of a constitution. ... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ... Events May 23 - Lothair of Saxony becomes Holy Roman Emperor on the death of Henry V. War ends between Toulouse and Provence. ... Events John the Chanter becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Events January - Byland Abbey founded Stephen of Blois succeeds King Henry I. Empress Maud, daughter of Henry I and widow of Henry V opposed Stephen and claims the throne as her own Owain Gwynedd of Wales defeats the Normans at Crug Mawr. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Events Henry Jasomirgott was made count palatine of the Rhine. ... Events Births Thomas Aquinas, Christian philosopher and theologian (d. ... Shlomo ben Aderet (or Solomon son of Aderet) (1235-1310), universally known to scholars of Judaism as the Rashba (the acronym for his Hebrew name), was a Medieval rabbi, Halakhist, and famous Talmudist. ... Events Anglo-Norman invasion of Connacht St. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... --69. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... Tombs of Meir of Rothenburg and Alexander ben Salomon Wimpfen on the jewish cemetery in Worms, Germany Meir of Rothenburg (c. ... Moses Isserles (or Moshe Isserlis) (1530 - 1572), was a rabbi and Talmudist, best known for his fundamental work of halakha (Jewish law), titled the Mapah (HaMapah), a component of the Shulkhan Arukh; he is also well known for Darkhei Moshe, a commentary on the Tur. ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ...


Within contemporary Orthodox Judaism, there is a debate on the appropriateness of women wearing tzitzit, which has hinged on whether women are allowed to perform commandments from which they are technically exempt. According to Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik the issue depends on the intention with which such an act is undertaken, e.g. whether it is intended to bring a person closer to the Almighty, or for political or protest purposes. Other commentators hold that women are prohibited generally, without making an individual inquiry. The view that women donning a tallit would be guilty of arrogance is cited as applying to attempts of making a political statement as to the ritual status of the genders, rather than an act of becoming closer to the Almighty. Other authorities, particularly in the Modern Orthodox community, are generally more inclined to regard contemporary women's intentions as religiously appropriate. Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary... Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... Modern Orthodox Judaism is a philosophy that attempts to adapt Orthodox Judaism and interaction with the surrounding non-Jewish, modern world. ...


Amongst those commentators above who held that women could perform the mitzvah of tzitzit, R. Yisrael Yaaqob Alghazi (16801761) and R. Yomtob ben Yisrael Alghazi (17261802) held that the observance of this mitzvah by women was not only permitted but actually commendable, since such diligence amongst the non-obligated would inspire these women's male relatives to be even more diligent in their own observance. Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... --69. ...


Among Karaim, the mitzvah of tzitzit is viewed as equally binding for men and women, and both sexes therefore generally wear tallitot. The Crimean Karaites (Crimean Karaim: sg. ... Mitzvah (Hebrew: מצווה, commandment; plural, mitzvot; from צוה, tzavah, command) is a word used in Judaism to refer to (a) the commandments, of which there are 613, given in the Torah (the first five books of the Hebrew Bible) or (b) any Jewish law at all. ... Tzitzit (Ashkenazi pronunciation: tzitzis) are fringes or tassles (Hebrew: ציצת (Biblical), ציצית (Mishnaic)) found on a tallit worn by observant Jews as part of practicing Judaism. ...


Since the 1970s non-Orthodox denominations of Judaism permit women to wear a tallit. This article describes the Jewish religion; for a consideration of ethnic, historic, and cultural aspects of the Jewish identity refer to the article Jew. ...


Order of putting on tallit and tefillin

In the Talmudic and post-Talmudic periods the tefillin were worn by rabbis and scholars all day, and a special tallit was worn at prayer; hence they put on the tefillin before the tallit, as appears in the order given in "Seder Rabbi Amram Gaon" (p. 2a) and in the Zohar. In modern practice, however, the opposite order is considered more "correct". Based on the Talmudic principle of tadir v'she'ayno tadir, tadir qodem, (תדיר ושאינו תדיר, תדיר קודם: lit., frequent and infrequent, frequent first), when one performs more than one mitzva at a time, those that are performed more frequently should be performed first. While the tallit is worn daily, tefillin are not worn on the Sabbath and holidays. Tractate Brachos, folio 2a The Talmud (תלמוד) is a record of rabbinic discussions of Jewish law, ethics, customs, and stories, which are authoritative in Jewish tradition. ... Tefillin (Hebrew: תפלין), also called phylacteries, are either of two boxes containing Biblical verses and black, leather straps attached to them which are used in rabbinic Jewish prayer. ... Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbÄ«;; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbÄ«) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished, (in knowledge). In the ancient Judean schools (and among Sefaradim today) the sages... The Zohar (Hebrew זהר Splendor, radiance) is widely considered the most important work of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. ... Mitzvah מצוה is Hebrew for commandment (plural mitzvot; from צוה, tzavah - command). ...


The Kabbalists considered the tallit as a special garment for the service of God, intended, in connection with the tefillin, to inspire awe and reverence for God at prayer (Zohar, Exodus Toledot, p. 141a). The tallit is worn by all male worshipers at the morning prayer on week-days, Shabbat, and holy days; by the hazzan (cantor) at every prayer while before the ark; and by the reader of Torah, as well as by all other functionaries during the Torah service. This article is about the overall Jewish mysticisms tradition. ... God denotes the deity believed by monotheists to be the sole creator and ruler of the universe. ... Tefillin (Hebrew: תפלין), also called phylacteries, are either of two boxes containing Biblical verses and black, leather straps attached to them which are used in rabbinic Jewish prayer. ... The Zohar (Hebrew זהר Splendor, radiance) is widely considered the most important work of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. ... Jewish services are the communal prayer recitations which form part of the observance of Judaism. ... Shabbat (שבת shabbāt, rest Hebrew, or Shabbos in Ashkenazic pronunciation), is the weekly day of rest in Judaism. ... A hazzan or chazzan (Hebrew for cantor) is a Jewish musician trained in the vocal arts who helps lead the synagogue in songful prayer. ... The Ark in a synagogue (Jewish house of worship) is known as the Aron Kodesh amongst Ashkenazim and as Hekhál amongst most Sefardim. ... Torah () is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or law. It is the central and most important document of Judaism revered by Jews through the ages. ... Torah reading (in Hebrew: Kriat HaTorah or Reading [of] the Torah) has followed a steady pattern for the past two thousand years following the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem and is still practiced by Orthodox Judaism and its adherents. ...


Weddings

In many Sephardic communities, the groom traditionally wears a tallit under the chuppah (wedding canopy). In Ashkenazi communities, a more widespread custom is that the groom wears a kittel, although some Ashkenazim have in recent years started to wear a tallit according to the Sephardic custom. Sephardim (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Sfaradim, Tiberian Hebrew ) are a subgroup of Jews, generally defined in contrast to Ashkenazim and/or . ... A chuppah (also spelled huppah or huppa) is a canopy traditionally used in Jewish weddings. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, Aškanazi,Aškanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAškănāzî, ʾAškănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... A kittel (Yiddish: קיתל, robe) is a white robe worn on special occasions by religious Jews. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, Aškanazi,Aškanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAškănāzî, ʾAškănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... Sephardim (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Sfaradim, Tiberian Hebrew ) are a subgroup of Jews, generally defined in contrast to Ashkenazim and/or . ...


A tallit is sometimes spread out as a canopy at the wedding ceremony. This may be done either instead of or in addition to the regular chuppah. Judaism considers marriage to be the ideal state of existence; a man without a wife, or a woman without a husband, are considered incomplete. ... A chuppah (also spelled huppah or huppa) is a canopy traditionally used in Jewish weddings. ...


Burial

After death, Jews are buried with varying customs, depending on where they are to be buried. In the Diaspora, burial takes place within a plain, wooden casket. The corpse is collected from the place of death (home, hospital, etc.) by the chevra kadisha (burial committee). After a ritual washing of the body , the body is dressed in a kittel (shroud) and then a tallit. One of the tzitzit is then cut off. In the Land of Israel, burial is without a casket, and the kittel and tallith are the only coverings for the corpse. Look up Diaspora in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A chevra kaddisha (Hebrew: holy society, better translated as burial society) is a loosely structured but generally closed organization of Jewish men and women who see to it that the bodies of Jews are prepared for burial according to halacha (Jewish law) and are protected from desecration, willful or not... A kittel (Yiddish: קיתל, robe) is a white robe worn on special occasions by religious Jews. ...


Tallit and Women of the Wall

In modern Israel, the tallit has become one of the symbols of struggle between tradition and change in defining women's roles in Judaism. Women Of The Wall, an organization founded in 1989 by both Orthodox and non-Orthodox women, has sought the right for women to pray out loud at the Kotel in separate women's prayer groups, to read from the Torah, to wear a tallit, tefillin, and kippah. In Jerusalem, the women of the Wall met each month on Rosh Hodesh for shacharit, before moving elsewhere to read from the Torah. At times they have been disrupted, and sometimes verbally or physically assaulted, during these monthly prayers. Their quest to pray at the Kotel has been passed around between religious and secular authorities, taken up at times by the Israel Supreme Court and the Knesset, but without formal resolution to date. [1] The kotel, the western wall of the Second Temple, Judaisms most holy site. ... Western Wall by night The Western Wall, known as the Kotel HaMaaravi (or simply Kotel)הכותל המערבי in Hebrew , also called the Wailing Wall (or Al-Buraq Wall, in a mix of English and Arabic) is a retaining wall from the time of the Second, q. ... Tefillin (Hebrew: תפלין), also called phylacteries, are either of two boxes containing Biblical verses and black, leather straps attached to them which are used in rabbinic Jewish prayer. ... A kippah (Hebrew: כִּפָּה, also kipah, kipa, kippa, plural kippot; Yiddish: יאַרמלקע, yarmlke, yarmulke, yarmulka, yarmelke, less commonly called kapel) is a thin, usually slightly-rounded cloth skullcap worn by observant Jews (usually men, but not always; see below). ... Rosh Chodesh (Hebrew: Head/Beginning [of the Hebrew] Month) is the name for the first day of every month in the Hebrew calendar. ... Jewish services are the prayers recited as part of observance of Judaism. ...



Jewish life topics
Birth: Brit milah | Zeved habat | Hebrew name | Pidyon HaBen
Coming of Age: Upsherin | B'nai Mitzvah | Wimpel | Yeshiva
Adult: Ablution in Judaism | Prayers and blessings | Grace After Meals
Marriage: Matchmaking | Role of women | Niddah | Mikvah | Tzeniut | "Get" | Feminism
Judaism : 613 commandments | Customs | Torah study: Weekly portion; Daf Yomi | Jewish holidays | Tzedakah (Charity)
Cultural: Israel | Diaspora | Immigration into Israel
Items of religious significance: Sefer Torah | Tzitzit | Tallit | Tefillin | Kippah | Menorah | Chanukkiyah | Mezuzah
Death: Chevra Kadisha | Shiv'ah | Kaddish | Tehillim | Yahrzeit | Yizkor
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Tallit Talit Tallis Talis Tallit Prayer Shawl (516 words)
We often are asked about choosing a Tallit size.
Large sizes are common for the religious community and people who enjoy a royal look while wearing their prayer shawl.
Classic style prayer shawls are made of wool or a blend of materials with striping in Black, Navy, or White.
Blessing when Donning Tallit Gadol (737 words)
The tallit is worn to remind oneself to observe all of the commandments of the Lord (see Numbers 15:38-9).
Only Bar-Mitzvah men wear a Tallit Gadol during morning services (the tallit is not worn for afternoon and evening prayers because of the commandment that one should see the tzitzit, which has been interpreted as meaning to be seen by the light of the day).
Tallit Katan, however, may be worn at all times.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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