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Encyclopedia > Taksin
Taksin
King of Siam (Thonburi)

Statue of King Taksin in Wongwienyai, Thonburi
Reign 28 December 17686 April 1782
Coronation 28 December 1768
Born 17 April 1734(1734-04-17)
Died 7 April 1782 (aged 47)
Predecessor Boromaracha V (prior to fall of Ayutthaya)
Successor Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke
Issue 30 sons and daughters
Royal anthem Thonburi Dynasty
Father Hai-Hong
Mother Nok-lang

Taksin (Thai: ตากสินมหาราช listen ; Chinese: 鄭昭; pinyin: Zhèng Chāo; Teochew: Dênchao; April 17, 1734 - April 7, 1782) was king of Siam from 1768 to 1782. Thaksin redirects here. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... King Boromaracha v, also known as Suriyat Amarin or Ekkathat (also spelled Ekathat), Thai: , ruled from 1758-1767, and was the last king of the Ayutthaya kingdom. ... His Majesty King Rama I of Siam (portrait in the National History Museum, Bangkok) Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke or Rama I the Great, was king of Thailand from 1782 to 1809. ... Image File history File links Th-Taksin_the_Great. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Teochiu can refer to: Chaozhou(潮州), a prefecture-level city in Guangdong Province, China. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the country formerly called Siam see Thailand SIAM is an acronym for Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ...

Contents

Early life and career

King Taksin as a monk in 1754.

He was born in Ayutthaya and given the name Sin (Treasure). His father Hai-Hong, who worked as a tax-collector,[1] was a Teochew Chinese immigrant with roots from Chenghai District,[2] and his mother Lady Nok-lang was Thai.[3] When aged 7 he started his education in a Buddhist monastery. After 7 years of education he was sent by his father to serve as a royal page. According to legend, when he and his friend Tong-Duang were Buddhist novices they met a Chinese fortune-teller who told them that they both had lucky lines in the palms of their hands and would both become kings. Neither took it seriously, but Tong-Duang was later the successor of King Taksin, Rama I. Ayutthaya (full name Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Thai พระนครศรีอยุธยา; also spelled Ayudhya) city is the capital of Ayutthaya province in Thailand. ... Chaozhou (Chinese: 潮州 lit. ... Chenghai or Tenghai (澄海, Hanyu Pinyin: ChénghÇŽi, Teochew: ThÄ›ng Hài) is a district of the city of Shantou, Guangdong Province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Theravada (Pali; Sanskrit: Sthaviravada) is one of the eighteen (or twenty) Nikāya schools that formed early in the history of Buddhism. ... This article is about the Southeast Asian temple. ... Chiromancy or cheiromancy,(Greek cheir, “hand”; manteia, “divination”), art of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm also known as palmistry or palm-reading consists of the practice (or pseudoscience) of evaluating a persons character or future life by reading the palm of that person... His Majesty King Rama I of Siam (portrait in the National History Museum, Bangkok) Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke or Rama I the Great, was king of Thailand from 1782 to 1809. ...


Sin was first deputy governor and later governor of the Tak province,[4] which gained him his name Tak-Sin, "Treasure of Tak," (or Treasure Exposed, as Tak (Exposed) is exposed to danger from Burma); though his official noble title was Phraya Tak. When he was promoted to be governor of Kamphaeng Phet province, he had to return to Ayutthaya. The Burmese attacked at that time and besieged the Thai capital. Taksin took a leading part in the city's defense. Shortly before Ayutthaya fell in 1767, Taksin cut his way out of the city at the head of a small army.[5] This action was never adequately explained as the Royal compound and Ayutthaya proper was located on an island; how Taksin and his followers fought their way out of the Burmese encirclement remains a mystery. Tak (Thai ตาก) is one of the northern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. ... Kamphaeng Phet (Thai กำแพงเพชร) is one of the provinces (changwat) of Thailand, located in the north of the country. ...


After the destruction of Ayutthaya and the death of the Thai king, the country was split into six parts, with Taksin controlling the east coast. Together with Tong-Duang, now General Chao Phraya Chakri, he managed to drive back the Burmese, defeat his rivals and reunify the country.


Liberating Thailand's country

On January 3, 1766. General Taksin then set about reining in a number of rebellious Thai princes and reasserting central control over the entire kingdom including the tributary kingdoms. Two soldiers under General Taksin, named Phraya Pichai and Mek, were instrumental in his future. Sin was appointed ruler of the city of Kamphaeng Phet at the same time the Burmese forces were attacking the city of Ayutthya and the surrounding kingdom. As the ruler of Kamphaeng Phet,General Taksin placed his trustworthy friend Mek in charge of Tak province and took his army along with Phra Ya Phi Chai to assist the Royal Forces against the Burmese attacking the city of Ayutthaya.[6] is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Phraya Pichai or Phraya Pichai Dabhak (literally Phraya Pichai Broken Sword) was a Siamese general serving under King Taksin. ... Kamphaeng Phet is a town in Thailand, capital of the Kamphaeng Phet province. ... Tak may refer to: Tak Province, a northern province in Thailand Tak (town), the capital of Tak Province in Thailand Tak district, the district around the town Tak (rapper), a rapper and member of Styles of Beyond Tak (function), a recursive mathematical function Tak and the Power of Juju, Tak...


General Taksin's route to mobilized the troop

General Taksin lead his army to Ban Phran Nok. His party crossed with 30 Burmese cavalrymen and 200 conscripts routed from Prachinburi province. As the Force of Burmese chased them to Ban Phran Nok, General Taksin commanded his soldiers to separate into two ways and attacked attacked the Burmese. General Taksin's party emerged victorious.[7] Prachinburi is a town in Thailand, capital of the Prachinburi province. ...


As the news of General Taksin's army's victory spread, General Taksin convinced the Thai people to persuade governors to join him. General Taksin lead his army to Nakhon Nayok, passed Dong Sri Maha Pho. As Burmese chased General Taksin's army again to Prachinburi, where he defeated them. Nakhon Nayok is a capital city of Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand. ...


General Taksin went to Chachoengsao province,Chonburi province and then to Ban Na Klua, Bang Lamung. They arrived in Rayong, whose governor acknowledged General Taksin's leadership. He allowed General Taksin's army to stay in Rayong. In less than a month General Taksin and his force sallied the force of Burmese out of Ayutthaya and seized Rayong as a tributary state. Then they went to Chanthaburi province. Chachoengsao is a town in Thailand, capital of the Chachoengsao Province. ... Chunburi is both a province and a city in Thailand. ... Bang Lamung (Thai: ) is a district (Amphoe) in the southern part of Chonburi Province, Thailand. ... Rayong is a small town in Thailand, capital of the Rayong Province. ... Chanthaburi is a town in Thailand, capital of the Chanthaburi Province. ...


Attacking Chanthaburi

Before attacking Chanthaburi his forces were ordered to eat their last meal and discard their eating utensils. It was either victory or die in the fight. However, Chanthaburi was taken and became the stronghold for the resistance forces. Chanthaburi is a town in Thailand, capital of the Chanthaburi Province. ...


After Ayutthaya was lost, the Burmese Army appointed "Suki Phanaikong" as the Commander in Charge of the area at Pho Sam Ton Camp. Suki created much havoc for the area inhabitants, who were then prisoners of war. The Thai women were abused and ravaged. A Thai named Thong In sold out to the Burmese and was put in charge of the prisoners of war, and coerced many into assisting the Burmese army.[8] Ayutthaya (also spelled Ayudhya or Ayuthia) refers to The old capital of Thailand, see Ayutthaya (city) The province around the city, Ayutthaya province The ruins of the old palace, see Ayutthaya historical park Ayutthaya kingdom as the period of Thai history (1365-1768) in which Ayutthaya was capital This is...


When General Taksin finally assembled a larger army at Chanthaburi he mounted an attack on the Pho Sam Ton Camp. The attack was successful and both Suki and Thong In were killed during the battle, which finished on June 15, 1767. The many who did not die or manage to escape back to Burma were taken prisoner.[9] [10] is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


King of Siam

Thonburi Palace

On December 28, 1768, he was crowned king of Siam in the new capital at Thonburi. Two years later, King Taksin launched a war against the Nguyen Lords over their control of Cambodia. After some initial defeats, the joint Siamese-Cambodian army defeated the Nguyen army in 1771 and 1772. These defeats helped provoke an internal rebellion (the Tay Son rebellion) which would soon sweep the Nguyen out of power. In 1773, the Nguyen made peace with King Taksin, giving back some land they controlled in Cambodia.[11] Over the next few years, Taksin managed to gain control over Chiang Mai and putting Cambodia under the vassalage of Siam by 1779, after repeated military campaigns.[12] is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Thon Buri (ธนบุรี) was capital of Thailand for a short time during the reign of King Taksin, after the previous capital Ayutthaya was sacked by the Burmese. ... The Nguyen Lords (1558 - 1775) were a series of rulers of Southern Vietnam. ... Tay Son Dynasty Origin of the Tay Son The name of Tay Son is used in many ways referring back to the period of peasant rebellions and decentralized dynasty established between the eras of the Le and Nguyen dynasties. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A street scene in Chiang Mai, showing (centre right), a gate of the old city wall. ...


In order to legitimize his claim for the Kingdom, he sent a diplomatic envoy to China which then was ruled by Qianlong Emperor. China recognized King Taksin as the rightful ruler of Siam, and Taksin began the reunification of Siam. During this time he actively encouraged the Chinese to settle in Siam, principally those from Chaozhou, partly with the intention to revive the stagnating economy[13] and upgrading the local workforce at that time.[14] The Qianlong Emperor (born Hongli, September 25, 1711 – February 7, 1799) was the fifth emperor of the Manchu Qing Dynasty, and the fourth Qing emperor to rule over China. ...

Map of Siam during 1768–1782

King Taksin had to fight almost constantly for most of his reign to maintain the independence of his country. As the economic influence of the immigrant Chinese community grew with time many aristocrats, which he took in from the Ayutthaya nobility began to turn against him for having allied with the Chinese merchants. The opposition were led mainly by the Bunnags, a trader-aristocrat family of Persian origins.[15]


Thai historians indicate that the strain on him took its toll and the king started to become a religious fanatic. In 1781 Taksin showed increasing signs of madness. He believed himself to be a future Buddha, and he flogged monks who refused to worship him as such.[16] Several historians have suggested that this tale may have been created as an excuse for his overthrow. However, the letters of a French priest who was in Thonburi at the time support the accounts of the monarch's peculiar behavior. For the historical founder of Buddhism, see Gautama Buddha. ...


Death

With the Burmese threat still prevalent, a strong ruler was needed on the throne. King Taksin was declared insane and a coup d'état removed him from the throne in March 1782.[17] Although he requested to be allowed to join the monkhood, the deposed king was executed shortly after the coup on April 7, 1782, along with some of his loyal followers, including Phraya Pichai, within the next few days. He was sealed in a velvet sack and was beaten to death with a scented sandalwood club, in accordance with the ancient tradition that no royal blood should touch the ground.[18] His execution was viewed as necessary in order to prevent the former king's becoming the center of a possible revolt against his successor. Coup redirects here. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Phraya Pichai or Phraya Pichai Dabhak (literally Phraya Pichai Broken Sword) was a Siamese general serving under King Taksin. ...


Another account claimed that Taksin was secretly sent to a palace located in the remote mountains of Nakhon Si Thammarat where he lived until 1825, and that a substitute was arranged and beaten to death in his place.[19] This article is about the town Nakhon Si Thammarat. ...


When the coup occurred, General Chao Phraya Chakri was away fighting in Cambodia, but he quickly returned to the Thai capital. When he arrived in Thonburi, the rebels surrendered and offered Chakri the throne. Another view of the events is that General Chakri actually wanted to be King and had accused King Taksin of being Chinese; however, this overlooks the fact that Chao Phraya Chakri was himself of partly Chinese origin as well as he himself being married to one of Taksin's daughters.[20] However, prior to returning to Thonburi, Chao Phraya Chakri had Taksin's son summoned to Cambodia and executed. His Majesty King Rama I of Siam (portrait in the National History Museum, Bangkok) Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke or Rama I the Great, was king of Thailand from 1782 to 1809. ...


Legacy

In 1981 the Thai cabinet passed a resolution to bestow on King Taksin the honorary title of the Great. The date of his coronation, December 28, is the official day of homage to King Taksin, although it is not designated as a public holiday. The Maw Sukha Association on January 31, 1999 cast the King Taksin Savior of the Nation Amulet, which sought to honour the contributions of King Taksin to Siam during his reign.[21] is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


The monarch remains a favorite of Thai Chinese, and is referred to as the King of Thonburi. Taksin's equestrian statue stands in the middle of Wongwien Yai (the Big Traffic Circle) in Thonburi, and is a well known Bangkok landmark. The Thai Chinese is a group of overseas Chinese born in Thailand. ...


Miscellaneous

  • The Na Nakhon (also spelled Na Nakorn)[22] family is descended from King Taksin.[23]
  • Due to the ancient views of medicine and the human mind at the time, King Taksin's peculiar behaviors were often described as madness. With the advent of modern views of the human mind and psychology, many modern historians now believe the symptoms that were recorded in historical records more closely resembles signs of a midlife crisis.[24]

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Faith No More. ...

Children

King Taksin have 21 sons and 9 daughters named [25]

  • HRH Crown Prince Krom Khun Intarapitak
  • HRH Crown Prince Noi
  • HRH Crown Prince Ampawan
  • HRH Crown Prince Tassaphong
  • HRH Princess Komol
  • HRH Princess Bubpha
  • HRH Crown Prince Singhara
  • HRH Crown Prince Sila
  • HRH Crown Prince Onica
  • HRH Princess Sumalee
  • HRH Crown Prince Dhamrong
  • HRH Crown Prince Lamang
  • HRH Crown Prince Lek
  • HRH Crown Prince Tassabhai
  • HRH Princess Chamchulee
  • HRH Princess Sangwal
  • HRH Princess Samleewan
  • HRH Crown Prince Narendhorn Raja Kumarn
  • HRH Crown Prince Kandhawong
  • HRH Crown Prince Makin
  • HRH Crown Prince Isindhorn
  • HRH Princess Prapaipak
  • HRH Crown Prince Subandhuwong
  • HRH Crown Prince Bua
  • HRH Princess Panjapapee
  • Chao Phraya Nakorn Noi
  • HRH Crown Prince (don't know name)
  • HRH Crown Prince Nudang
  • HRH Princess Sudchartree
  • Chao Phraya Nakhonratchasima Thong In

Major event of King Taksin's reign

In King Taksin's reign from 1767 to 1782, wars were fought to unify, defend and expand the country almost all the time. A brief survey of major events is given below [26] Year 1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

  • 1767
    • Ayutthaya was lost to the Burmese for the second time.
    • The country was liberated when the Burmese were defeated at Pho SamTon Camp.
    • Thon Buri was established as the capital.
    • A Burmese army attacked Bang Kung.
  • 1768
    • King Taksin ascended the Throne.
    • An army was sent to suppress the Phitsanulok faction.
    • Chao Phra Fang's faction attacked the Phitsanulok faction.
    • An army was sent to suppress the Phimai faction.
  • 1769
    • A delegation from Si Sattanakhanahut headed by the ruler's son brought tribute to become a vassal state.
    • An army was sent to suppress Cambodia.
    • An army was sent to suppress Nakhon Si Thammarat.
  • 1770
    • An army was sent to suppress the Sawangkhaburi faction.
    • The Burmese advanced an army against Sawankhalok.
    • The first expedition to subdue Chiang Mai.
  • 1771
    • Construction of Thon Buri city wall.
    • An expedition to subdue Cambodia.
  • 1772
    • The first Burmese attack on Phichai Province.
  • 1773
    • Tattooing on the wrist (to classify men as soldiers of the king, fresh recruits, or provincial soldiers).
    • The Burmese second attack on Phichai Province.
  • 1774
    • The second expedition to subdue Chiang Mai.
    • A Burmese attack on Bang Kaew (a District in Ratchaburi).
  • 1775
    • A Burmese attack on Phisanulok.
  • 1776
    • The Nang Rong revolt and an expedition to subdue provinces along Mekong River.
    • King Taksin started meditation practice.
  • 1777
    • The title of Chao Phraya Chakri Somdet Chao Phraya Maha Kasatsuhk was created.
  • 1778
    • Si Sattanakhanahut sent an army to attack Phra Woh at Nong Bua Lamphu and Don Mod Daeng.
  • 1779
    • An expedition to subdue Vientiane.
    • The Emerald Buddha was brought to Thon Buri.
    • Maha Da rebellion.
  • 1780
    • An uprising in Cambodia.
    • A Vietnamese revolt in Thon Buri.
  • 1781
    • An expedition to subdue Cambodia.
    • Unrest in Thon Buri.
    • Phraya San's uprising.
    • Civil war between Phraya San and Phraya Suriya Aphai.
  • 1782
    • Deliberation on the problem of King Taksin.
    • The end of Thon Buri period.

Year 1767 (MDCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Phitsanulok is an important and historic town in north central Thailand and is the capital of Phitsanulok province, which stretches all the way to the Laotian border. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the town Nakhon Si Thammarat. ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Thonburi (ธนบุรี) was capital of Thailand for a short time during the reign of King Taksin, after the previous capital Ayutthaya was sacked by the Burmese. ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

References

  1. ^ Carl Parkes. Moon Handbooks: Southeast Asia 4 Ed. Avalon Travel Publishing, 770. ISBN 1566913373. 
  2. ^ Bertil Lintner. Blood Brothers: The Criminal Underworld of Asia. Macmillan Publishers. ISBN 1403961549. 
  3. ^ David K. Wyatt. Thailand: A Short History. Yale University Press, 140. ISBN 0300035829. 
  4. ^ Anthony Webster. Gentleman Capitalists: British Imperialism in Southeast Asia 1770-1890. I.B. Tauris, 156. ISBN 1860641717. 
  5. ^ John Bowman. Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture. Columbia University Press, 514. ISBN 0231110049. 
  6. ^ translate from http://th.wikipedia.org/wiki/KingTaksin
  7. ^ King Taksin: Warfare and National Revival (1767-1782) Thailand into the 2000's, the National Identity Board Office of the Prime Minister, 2000, page 12.
  8. ^ [1] Sattahip Naval Base
  9. ^ Arjarn Tony Moore/Khun Clint Heyliger Siamese & Thai Hero's & Heroines
  10. ^ Royal Thai Army Radio and Television King Taksin's Liberating
  11. ^ Thomas J. Barnes. Tay Son: Rebellion in 18th Century Vietnam. Xlibris Corporation, 74. ISBN 0738818186. 
  12. ^ Norman G. Owen. The Emergence Of Modern Southeast Asia. National University of Singapore Press, 94. ISBN 9971693283. 
  13. ^ Chris Baker, Pasuk Phongpaichit. A History of Thailand. Cambridge University Press, 32. ISBN 0521816157. 
  14. ^ Editors of Time Out. Time Out Bangkok: And Beach Escapes. Time Out, 84. ISBN 1846700213. 
  15. ^ Paul M. Handley. The King Never Smiles. Yale University Press, 27. ISBN 0300106823. 
  16. ^ David K. Wyatt. Thailand: A Short History. Yale University Press, 143. ISBN 0300035829. 
  17. ^ Rough Guides. The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia. Rough Guides, 823. ISBN 1858285534. 
  18. ^ Arne Kislenko. Culture and Customs of Thailand (Culture and Customs of Asia). Greenwood Press, 12. ISBN 0313321280. 
  19. ^ David K. Wyatt. Thailand: A Short History. Yale University Press, 145. ISBN 0300035829. ; Siamese/Thai history and culture–Part 4
  20. ^ Gary G. Hamilton [2006]. Commerce and Capitalism in Chinese Societies. Routledge, 254. ISBN 0415157048. 
  21. ^ Donald K. Swearer (2004). Becoming the Buddha: The Ritual of Image. Princeton University Press, 235. ISBN 0691114358. 
  22. ^ William B. Dickinson (1966). Editorial Research Reports on World Affairs. Congressional Quarterly, 64. 
  23. ^ Paul M. Handley. The King Never Smiles. Yale University Press, 466 (Back matter). ISBN 0300106823. 
  24. ^ CareerJournal–The Lows and Highs Of a Midlife Crisis
  25. ^ User:2T/ref/ราชสกุลจักรีวงศ์
  26. ^ King Taksin the Great wangdermpalace.com

Bertil Lintner is a Swedish journalist based in Thailand, a REVIEW senior writer and the author of several works on Asia, including Blood Brothers: The Criminal Underworld of Asia. ... Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately-held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. ... David K. Wyatt (1937 - November 15, 2006) was an highly acclaimed American historian, working on Southeast Asian topics, especially Thailand. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ... Dr. John Bowman Winifred (born 1942) is an Irish historian and broadcaster. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Xlibris is a Philadelphia-based self-publishing and on-demand printing services provider. ... Chris Baker is a Thailand-based writer. ... Pasuk Phongpaichit is a Thai economist, a Professor at Chulalongkorn University, and the author of several books on corruption in Thailand. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Time-out can mean: sport time-out, a break in play that may be called by a side to formulate strategy or respond to an players injury. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ... David K. Wyatt (1937 - November 15, 2006) was an highly acclaimed American historian, working on Southeast Asian topics, especially Thailand. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ... Rough Guides Ltd is a large travel guidebook and reference publisher, owned by Pearson PLC. Their travel titles cover more than 200 destinations, and are distributed worldwide through the Penguin Group. ... David K. Wyatt (1937 - November 15, 2006) was an highly acclaimed American historian, working on Southeast Asian topics, especially Thailand. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... The Princeton University Press is a publishing house, a division of Princeton University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... Congressional Quarterly (CQ) produces a number of publications that report primarily on the United States Congress. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ...

External links

Taksin
Thonburi Dynasty
Born: 17 April 1734 Died: 7 April 1782
Preceded by
Borommaracha V
(
as King of Ayutthaya)
King of Siam
1768–1782
Succeeded by
Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke
(
of Rattanakosin (Bangkok))
Thon Buri (Thai: ธนบุรี) was the capital of Thailand for a short time during the reign of King Taksin the Great, after the ruin of capital Ayutthaya by the Myanmar. ... King Boromaracha v, also known as Suriyat Amarin or Ekkathat (also spelled Ekathat), Thai: , ruled from 1758-1767, and was the last king of the Ayutthaya kingdom. ... The kingdom of Ayutthaya (Thai: ) was a Thai kingdom that existed from 1350 to 1767. ... The Chakri dynasty have ruled Thailand since king Taksin was declared mad in 1782. ... His Majesty King Rama I of Siam (portrait in the National History Museum, Bangkok) Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke or Rama I the Great, was king of Thailand from 1782 to 1809. ... From 1768 to 1932 the area of modern Thailand was dominated by Siam, an absolute monarchy with capitals briefly at Thonburi and later at Rattanakosin, both in modern-day Bangkok. ... Location within Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governor Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... This is a list of people whose names in English are commonly appended with the phrase the Great, or who were called that or an equivalent phrase in their own language. ... Statue of King Ramkhamhaeng Ramkhamhaeng the Great (c. ... King Naresuan the Great (1555 - April 25, 1605, also sometimes called Naret or the Black Prince, Thai สมเด็จพระนเรศวรมหาราช) was king of Siam (today Thailand) from 1590 until his death in 1605. ... King Narai the Great (Son of Prasat Thong) (Thai: ; 1629 - July 11, 1688) became king of the Ayutthaya kingdom or Siam, todays Thailand, in 1656. ... His Majesty King Rama I of Siam (portrait in the National History Museum, Bangkok) Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke or Rama I the Great, was king of Thailand from 1782 to 1809. ... King Chulalongkorn the Great or Rama V (royal name: Phra Chula Chomklao Chaoyuhua; Thai: ) (September 20, 1853 – October 23, 1910) was the fifth king of the Chakri dynasty of Thailand. ... Bhumibol Adulyadej (Thai: ; IPA: ; Royal Institute: Phumiphon Adunyadet;  ) (born Saturday,December 5, 1927 in the Year of the Rabbit), is the current King of Thailand. ... Birth name Sejong the Great (May 6, 1397 – May 18, 1450, r. ... Ashoka redirects here. ... Kanishka (Kushan language: , Ancient Chinese: 迦腻色伽) was a king of the Kushan Empire in South Asia, ruling an empire extending from Northern India to Central Asia in the 2nd century of the common era, famous for his military, political, and spiritual achievements. ... Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar ( Jalāl ud-DÄ«n Muhammad Akbar), also known as Akbar the Great (Akbar-e-Azam) (full title: Al-Sultan al-Azam wal Khaqan al-Mukarram, Imam-i-Adil, Sultan ul-Islam Kaffatt ul-Anam, Amir ul-Muminin, Khalifat ul-Mutaali Abul-Fath Jalal... King Mengrai (or Mangrai) (1239-1317) was the founder of the Lao kingdom Lannathai. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Peter the Great or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич Pyotr I Alekse`yevich, Пётр Великий Pyotr Veli`kiy) (9 June 1672 – 8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.][1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his... Catherine the Great redirects here. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Bonaparte as general Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français... Nomen: Ramesses meryamun Ramesses (Re has fashioned him), beloved of Amun. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; almost always Kanuni Sultan Süleyman) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest-reigning Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, from 1520 to his death in 1566. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Taksin@Everything2.com (436 words)
Taksin was king of Siam from 1767 to 1782.
Taksin was a brilliant military tactician and strategist, but he must also have been charismatic, for he convinced people to follow him.
As custom dictated, Taksin was killed in the manner fitting royalty: he was placed in a velvet sack and struck on the back of the neck with a sandalwood club.
Taksin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (715 words)
Taksin the Great (Thai: ตากสินมหาราช; 鄭昭; pinyin: Zhèng Chāo; April 17, 1734 - April 7, 1782) was king of Thailand from 1767-1782.
According to legend, when he and his friend Tong-Duang were priests they met a Chinese fortune-teller who told them that they both had lucky lines in the palms of their hands and would both become kings.
King Taksin was betrayed by his best friend and right-hand man. Thai people know that King Rama I's brother refused to ever speak to his brother again after learning that King Rama I had taken the throne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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