FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Take Me Out to the Ball Game

"Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is an early-20th century Tin Pan Alley song which became the unofficial anthem of baseball -- though neither of its authors had ever been to a game. The song is traditionally sung during the seventh-inning stretch of a baseball game, in spite of being written from the perspective of someone not at a game. Fans are encouraged to sing along. Take Me Out to the Ballgame is the first episode of the second season of the HBO television series Sex and the City. ... Nelvana Limited is a Canadian entertainment company, founded in 1971, that is well-known for its work in childrens animation, among many things. ... This article is about a television special. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Tin Pan Alley was the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Contents

History of the song

The words were written in 1908 by Jack Norworth, who while riding a subway train, was inspired by a sign that said "Baseball Today — Polo Grounds". The words were set to music by Albert Von Tilzer, although neither had ever seen a baseball game. (Norworth and Von Tilzer finally saw their first Major League Baseball games 32 and 20 years later, respectively.) The song was first sung by Norworth's wife Nora Bayes and popularized by various vaudeville acts. Norworth wrote an alternative version of the song in 1927. Norworth, with his wife, also wrote "Shine On, Harvest Moon." Jack Norworth (5 January 1879 - 1 September 1959) was a U.S. songwriter, singer, and vaudeville performer. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their first... Albert Von Tilzer (March 29, 1878 - October 1, 1956) was an American songwriter, the younger brother of Harry Von Tilzer. ... Nora Bayes Nora Bayes (1880 - 19 June 1928) was a popular United States entertainer of the early 20th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shine On, Harvest Moon is the name of a popular early-1900s song credited to Jack Norworth and his wife Nora Bayes. ...


Lyrics

Below are the two versions side by side for comparison:

1908 Version

Katie Casey was baseball mad,
Had the fever and had it bad.
Just to root for the home town crew,
Ev'ry sou1
Katie blew.
On a Saturday her young beau
Called to see if she'd like to go
To see a show, but Miss Kate said "No,
I'll tell you what you can do:"

1927 Version

Nelly Kelly loved baseball games,
Knew the players, knew all their names.
You could see her there ev'ry day,
Shout "Hurray"
When they'd play.
Her boyfriend by the name of Joe
Said, "To Coney Isle, dear, let's go",
Then Nelly started to fret and pout,
And to him, I heard her shout:
For other uses, see Coney Island (disambiguation). ...

[Chorus]

Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd;
Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack,
I don't care if I never get back.
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don't win, it's a shame.
For it's one, two, three strikes, you're out,
At the old ball game.
A bag of Frito-Lays Cracker Jack, featuring Sailor Jack and his dog Bingo. ...


Katie Casey saw all the games,
Knew the players by their first names.
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along,
Good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Katie Casey knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song:
Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ...


Nelly Kelly was sure some fan,
She would root just like any man,
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along,
Good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Nelly Kelly knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song:
Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ...

[repeat Chorus]

1 The term "sou", now obscure, was at the time common slang for a low-denomination coin. Carly Simon's version, produced for Ken Burns' 1994 documentary on baseball, reads "Ev'ry cent / Katie spent". A solidus (the Latin word for solid) was originally a gold coin issued by the Romans. ... For a Wiktionary project on slang terms, see here {Missing Link} Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Carly Elisabeth Simon (born June 25, 1945 in New York City) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and two-time Grammy Award winning American musician who emerged as one of the leading lights of the early 1970s singer-songwriter movement. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Modern renditions of the song

Nowadays the verses to the song are almost never heard, with only the chorus generally sung. It is commonly held to be the third most-often-played song in the United States, after "The Star-Spangled Banner" and "Happy Birthday to You". The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the U.S.A., with lyrics written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key. ... Happy Birthday to You is often sung when a birthday cake is brought to a party table before the birthday boy or girl blows the candles out on the cake. ...


In the I Love Lucy episode "Lucy and Harpo Marx", Harpo plays "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" on his harp. I Love Lucy is a television situational comedy aired on CBS in the 1950s. ...


In the Marx Brothers comedy, A Night at the Opera, Harpo and Chico, in sabotaging the opera Il Trovatore sneak a rendition of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" within the Overture. When the Overture comes to the song, they, in the orchestra pit, feign a game of baseball, while Groucho appears as a stadium vendor calling out, "PEANUTS, PEANUTS! GETCHER RED HOT PEANUTS!!" Groucho, Gummo, Minnie (mother), Zeppo, Frenchy (father), Chico and Harpo. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... An orchestra pit is the usually lowered area (hence pit) in front of a stage where an orchestra accompanies the performers. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... A vendor is one who sells something. ...


Among those famously associated with the song was Hall of Fame sportscaster Harry Caray, who began singing at games in Comiskey Park for the Chicago White Sox from the early 1970s to 1981, then in Wrigley Field for the Chicago Cubs from 1982 through 1997. Caray's tradition of leading the crowd in singing the song began when White Sox owner Bill Veeck snuck a public address microphone into Caray's broadcast booth, so that the crowd could hear's Caray's boundless enthusiasm and marginal musical talents — something that previously only his broadcast colleagues were privy to. After that, Caray began leading the crowd, leaning out the front window of his booth and swinging his microphone in time with the music. When Caray left Sox broadcasts to join the WGN team broadcasting Cubs games, the singing tradition went with him. Late in his career, when Caray missed a number of games due to a stroke, "guest conductors" did the honors; after Caray's death, the guest-conductor tradition has become a part of the Cubs tradition, with different celebrities doing the activities each game, whether it is part of Chicago sports, actors, musicians, news anchors, or fans. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... American Sportscasters A sportscaster, sports announcer, or sports commentator is a type of journalist on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... Harry Caray memorialized in a statue near Wrigley Field in Chicago. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1981 throughout the world. ... Wrigley Field is a baseball stadium in Chicago that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 13 - Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson become the 12th and 13th players elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America in their first year of eligibility. ... The following are the events of the year 1997 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... William Louis Veeck Jr. ... A public address system, abbreviated PA system, is an electronic amplification system used as a communication system in public areas. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Stroke (or cerebrovascular accident or CVA) is the clinical designation for a rapidly developing loss of brain function due to an interruption in the blood supply to all or part of the brain. ...


Coincidentally, the year the song was written (1908) is the last year the Cubs won the World Series — after beating out Norworth's Giants for the league championship. The 1908 World Series matched the defending champion Chicago Cubs against the Detroit Tigers in a rematch of the 1907 Series. ...


When sung at baseball games, a variety of alternative lines are sung. Most of these center on the line "Let me root, root root for the home team;" in most Major League ballparks, the actual name of the home team is substituted for the words "home team." ‹ The template below (Taginfo) is being considered for deletion. ...


For example, on the South Side of Chicago, it is sung "Let me root, root, root for the White Sox". If the team name contains one syllable, the word "team" can be appended to the team name, as in "Reds team," as sung in Cincinnati, though in recent years the Reds have taken to using "Redlegs" to fill this spot. Similarily, other two-syllable nicknames are also used, such as "Cubbies" at Chicago Cubs games, or "Twinkies" at Minnesota Twins games. Some teams replace the words "Let me" with either "So it's", "For it's", "So we'll", "With a," or "'Cause it's." Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Official website: http://egov. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1903-1960) a. ...


At a few baseball parks, such as Dodger Stadium where the Los Angeles Dodgers play, the song is played twice, but the second time has different lyrics. Dodger Stadium is a large outdoor baseball stadium in Los Angeles, California at Chávez Ravine. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms...


After the September 11, 2001 attacks, many teams replaced the song with God Bless America during the seventh inning stretch, or played the song after God Bless America. This practice largely has ceased in recent years, though God Bless America is retained for patriotic holidays such as Independence Day and Memorial Day. In some instances it is reserved for a specific day of the week, such as a Sunday. September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... God Bless America is an American patriotic song written by Irving Berlin in 1918 and revised by him in 1938. ... An Independence Day is an annual celebration commemorating the anniversary of a nations assumption of independent statehood, usually after ceasing to be a colony or part of another state. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


If a game goes to the 14th, 21st, 28th etc. innings at Wrigley Field, they will sing the song again.


Recordings of the song

The song (or at least its chorus) has been recorded many times in the nearly 100 years since it was written. It has been used as an instrumental underscore or introduction to many films or skits having to do with baseball.


The first verse of the 1927 version is sung by Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra at the start of the MGM musical film, Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949), a movie that also features a song about the famous and fictitious double play combination, O'Brien to Ryan to Goldberg. Eugene Curran Kelly (August 23, 1912 – February 2, 1996), better known as Gene Kelly, was an American dancer, actor, singer, director, producer, and choreographer. ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American jazz oriented popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the...


In 1957, jazz pianists (and baseball fans) André Previn and Russ Freeman recorded Double Play! for Contemporary Records with drummer Shelly Manne. The original song titles invoke baseball imagery, such as "Called on Account of Rain," "In the Cellar Blues" and the title track. The first track on the album is a jazz version of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." See also: 1956 in music, other events of 1957, 1958 in music and the list of years in music // January 5 - Renato Carosone and his band start their American tour in Cuba. ... André Previn (born April 6, 1929)¹ is a prominent pianist, orchestral conductor, and composer. ... Russell Donald Freeman (May 28, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois – June 27, 2002 in Las Vegas, Nevada) was a jazz pianist. ... Double Play! is a 1957 jazz album featuring pianists Russ Freeman and André Previn. ... Contemporary Records was a record label which was purchased by Fantasy Records in 1984. ... Shelly Manne (June 11, 1920–September 26, 1984), born Sheldon Manne in New York, New York, was an American jazz drummer. ...


In the early 1990s, Kidsongs released a home video that contained a rendition of the song. In this rendition, the chorus as above was sung, followed by a new verse to the same music as the chorus, with the following lyrics: "All I need is just one chance / I could hit a home run / There isn't anyone else I need / Maybe I'll go down in history / And it's root root root for the home team / Here comes fortune and fame / Cuz I know that I'll be the star / At the old ball game" Kidsongs was a series of Music Videos for children that were first released on home video. ...


One recording artist in the early 1990s released a version of the song that simply skipped the first two words, but kept the tune the same, thus highlighting the simplicity of the lyrics, and the fact that most of its words are of single syllables: "Out to the ball game take me / Out to the crowd buy me / Some peanuts and Cracker Jack, I don't /" etc. This recording was included in a traveling exhibit of baseball art, called Diamonds Are Forever.


In the mid-1990s, a Major League Baseball ad campaign featured versions of the song performed by musicians of several different genres. An alternative rock version by the Goo Goo Dolls proved widely popular.[citation needed] Alternative rock (also called alternative music or simply alternative; known primarily in the UK as indie) is a genre of rock music that emerged in the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


A complete parody of the song was featured in an episode of Freakazoid. In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Freakazoid! (or Freakazoid) is an animated television show created by Warner Brothers that aired for two seasons in 1995-1997. ...


For the 2007 season, indie rock group The Hold Steady recorded a version of the song to be played at Minnesota Twins home games, substituting new lyrics to make it Twins focused. This came about after Hold Steady lead singer (and life-long Twins fan) Craig Finn did an interview with a Minneapolis/St. Paul Star Tribune sports writer. Craig Finn, Guitar/Vocalist The Hold Steady are a Brooklyn-based musical group, although the members are from Minneapolis; something that is frequently reflected in the groups lyrics. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Stories about the song

In 1988, on the 100th anniversary of the poem Casey at the Bat, Sports Illustrated writer Frank Deford constructed a fanciful story (later expanded to book form) which posited Katie Casey as being the daughter of the famous slugger from the poem. Casey at the Bat, subtitled A Ballad of the Republic, is a poem on the subject of baseball, written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Frank Deford (born December 16, 1938, in Baltimore, Maryland) is a senior contributing writer for Sports Illustrated, author, and commentator. ...


In 2006, Jim Burke authored and illustrated a children's book version of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame." Jim Burke, (b. ...


Online recordings and references

  • Original lyric, sung by Edward Meeker, recorded in 1908 on a phonograph cylinder
  • Lyrics to 1927 version

The earliest method of recording and reproducing sound was on phonograph cylinders. ...

External link

  • Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949) at the Internet Movie Database

  Results from FactBites:
 
Take Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth (555 words)
Take Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth
In 1858, the first known baseball song was written, "The Base Ball Polka!" It was not quite as famous as Jack Norworth's 1908 classic, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game", which was written on some scrap paper on a train ride to Manhattan, New York.
Norworth then provided those paper scrap lyrics to Albert Von Tilzer who composed the music which in turn was published by the York Music Company and before the year was over, a hit song was born.
Take Me Out to the Ball Game - definition of Take Me Out to the Ball Game in Encyclopedia (444 words)
"Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is an early-20th century Tin Pan Alley song which became the unofficial anthem of baseball.
The song is traditionally sung during the seventh-inning stretch of a baseball game, in spite of the technicality that it is written from the perspective of someone not currently watching a game.
In most Major League ballparks, the line "Let me root, root, root for the home team", "the home team" is replaced by the actual name of the home team.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m