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Encyclopedia > Tahiti
Tahiti
Tahiti is famous for its black beaches
Tahiti is famous for its black beaches
Geography
Location Pacific Ocean
Archipelago Society Islands
Area 1,048 km²
Highest point Mont Orohena 2,241 m
Administration
Flag of France France
Overseas collectivity French Polynesia
Largest city Papeete (26,181)
Demographics
Population 169,677 (as of 2002)
Density 161

Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. The island had a population of 169,677 inhabitants according to the 2002 census. This makes it the most populated island of French Polynesia, with 69% of the total population. The capital is Papeete, on the northwest coast. Tahiti has also been historically known as O'tahiti. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 675 pixel, file size: 214 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Society Islands (French: ÃŽles de la Société or offically Archipel de la Société) are a group of islands in the south Pacific, administratively part of French Polynesia. ... Mont Orohena is located in centralTahiti Mont Orohena is a mountain of 2,241 m in central Tahiti in French Polynesia in the south Pacific. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A collectivité doutre-mer (in English Overseas Community) or COM, is an administrative division of France. ... Papeete Waterfront Papeete is the capital of French Polynesia, and is located on the island of Tahiti, which is part of the Society Islands, in French Polynesia. ... The Windward Islands (French Îles du Vent) are the eastern group of the Society Islands in French Polynesia. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... The Society Islands (French: ÃŽles de la Société or offically Archipel de la Société) are a group of islands in the south Pacific, administratively part of French Polynesia. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Papeete Waterfront Papeete is the capital of French Polynesia, and is located on the island of Tahiti, which is part of the Society Islands, in French Polynesia. ...

Contents

Geography

Tahiti is some 45 km (28 mi) long at the widest point and covers 1,048 km² (404 sq mi), with the highest elevation being at 2,241 m (7,352 ft) above sea level (Mount Orohena). The island consists of two roughly round portions centered on volcanic mountains, connected by a short isthmus named after the small town of Taravao, which sits there. The northwestern part is known as Tahiti Nui ("big Tahiti"), and the southeastern part, much smaller, is known as Tahiti Iti ("small Tahiti") or Taiarapu. Whereas Tahiti Nui is quite heavily populated (especially around Papeete) and benefits from rather good infrastructure such as roads and highways, Tahiti Iti has remained quite isolated, its southeastern half (Te Pari) being accessible only by boat or hiking. A main road winds around the island between the mountains and the sea while an interior road climbs past dairy farms and citrus groves with panoramic views. For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Mont Orohena is located in centralTahiti Mont Orohena is a mountain of 2,241 m in central Tahiti in French Polynesia in the south Pacific. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Isthmus (disambiguation). ... Papeete Waterfront Papeete is the capital of French Polynesia, and is located on the island of Tahiti, which is part of the Society Islands, in French Polynesia. ...


The vegetation is tremendously lush rain forest. A rainforest is a forested biome with high annual rainfall. ...


November through April is the wet season, and the wettest month is January, with 13.2 inches (335 mm) of precipitation in the capital of Papeete. August is the driest month with only 1.9 inches (48 mm) of rain. The average low temperature is 70 °F (21 °C) and the average high temperature is 88 °F (31 °C) with very little seasonal variation. The lowest temperature ever recorded in Papeete was 61 °F (16 °C) and the highest temperature recorded was 93 °F (34 °C).[1]


History

View of Raiatea Mountain. The mummies of Tahitian rulers were formerly deposited on this mountain, traditionally considered holy.

Tahiti is estimated to have been settled by Polynesians between AD 300 and 800 coming from Tonga and Samoa, although some estimates place the date earlier. The fertile island soil combined with fishing provided ample food for the population. View of Raiatea Sacred Mountain, Tahiti, from October 1920 National Geographic Magazine; photo by L. Gauthier. ... View of Raiatea Sacred Mountain, Tahiti, from October 1920 National Geographic Magazine; photo by L. Gauthier. ... A mummy is a corpse whose skin and dried flesh have been preserved by either intentional or accidental exposure to chemicals, extreme cold, very low humidity, or airlessness. ... Polynesian is an adjectival form which refers variously to: Polynesian pie Polynesian sauce, a food condiment available at Chick-fil-A the aboriginal inhabitants of Polynesia, and their: Polynesian culture Polynesian mythology Polynesian languages Category: ... Franks penetrate into northern Belgium (approximate date). ... Events December 25, Rome, coronation of Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor by Pope Leo III. Celtic monks begin work on the Book of Kells on the Island of Iona. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ...


Although the first European sighting of the islands was by a Spanish ship in 1606, Spain made no effort to trade with or colonize the island. Samuel Wallis, an English sea captain, sighted Tahiti on June 18, 1767, and is considered the first European visitor to the island. The perceived relaxation and contented nature of the local people and the characterization of the island as a paradise much impressed early European visitors, planting the seed for a romanticization by the West that endures to this day. Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... Samuel Wallis (c. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Occident redirects here. ...


Wallis was followed in April 1768 by the French explorer Louis-Antoine de Bougainville who was completing the first French circumnavigation. Bougainville made Tahiti famous in Europe when he published the account of his travel in Voyage autour du Monde. He described the island as an earthly paradise where men and women live happily in innocence, away from the corruption of civilization. His account of the island powerfully illustrated the concept of the noble savage, and influenced the utopian thoughts of philosophers such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau before the advent of the French Revolution. 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1729-1811) Louis Antoine de Bougainville (November 11, 1729–August 31, 1811) was a French navigator and military commander. ... A section of Benjamin Wests The Death of General Wolfe; Wests depiction of this Native American has been considered an idealization in the tradition of the Noble savage (Fryd, 75) In the 18th century culture of Primitivism the noble savage, uncorrupted by the influences of civilization was considered... See Utopia (disambiguation) for other meanings of this word Utopia, in its most common and general meaning, refers to a hypothetical perfect society. ... Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (June 28, 1712 – July 2, 1778) was a Genevan philosopher of the Enlightenment whose political ideas influenced the French Revolution, the development of socialist theory, and the growth of nationalism. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


In 1774 Captain James Cook visited the island, and estimated the population at that time to be some 200,000. This was probably too high; another estimate from the same period was 121,500. After Cook's visit, European ships landed on the island with ever greater frequency. The best-known of these ships was HMS Bounty, whose crew mutinied shortly after leaving Tahiti in 1789. The European influence caused significant disruption to the traditional society, by bringing prostitution, venereal diseases, and alcohol to the island. Introduced diseases including typhus and smallpox killed so many Tahitians that by 1797, the island's population was only about 16,000. Later it was to drop as low as 6,000. Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... This article is about the British explorer. ... for other meaning see Mutiny on the Bounty (disambiguation) The mutineers turning Lt Bligh and some of the officers and crew adrift from HMAV Bounty, 29 April 1789 The Mutiny on the Bounty was a historical event in the late 18th century, most widely known through fiction, of an officer... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Whore redirects here. ... Sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), are diseases that are commonly transmitted between partners through some form of sexual activity, most commonly vaginal intercourse, oral sex, or anal sex. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage (also known as booze in slang term) is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Dupetit Thouars taking over Tahiti on September 9th, 1842.
Dupetit Thouars taking over Tahiti on September 9th, 1842.

In 1842, a European crisis involving Morocco escalated between France and Great Britain when Admiral Dupetit Thouars, acting independently of the French government, was able to convince Tahiti's Queen Pomare IV to accept a French protectorate. George Pritchard, a Birmingham-born missionary and acting British Consul, had been away at the time of the agreement. However he returned to work towards indoctrinating the locals against the Roman Catholic French. In November 1843, Dupetit-Thouars (again completely on his own initiative) landed sailors on the island, formally annexing it to France. He then proceeded to throw Pritchard into prison, subsequently sending him unceremoniously back to Britain. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2247x1162, 2064 KB) Dupetit Thouars taking over Tahiti on September 9th, 1842. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2247x1162, 2064 KB) Dupetit Thouars taking over Tahiti on September 9th, 1842. ... Abel Aubert Dupetit Thouars (1793-1864). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Abel Aubert Dupetit Thouars (1793-1864). ... Pomare IV (February 28, 1813 - September 17, 1877), more properly Aimatta Pomare IV Vahine-o-Punuateraitua (otherwise known as Aimata or simply as Pomare IV), was the queen of Tahiti between 1827 and 1877. ... This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


News of the events in Tahiti reached Europe in early 1844. The French statesman François Guizot, supported by King Louis-Philippe of France, had strongly denounced the annexation of the island. However, war between the French and the Tahitians continued until 1847. The island remained a French protectorate until June 29, 1880, when King Pomare V (184291) was forced to cede the sovereignty of Tahiti and its dependencies to France. He was given the titular position of Officer of the Orders of the Legion of Honour and Agricultural Merit of France. In 1946, Tahiti and the whole of French Polynesia became a Territoire d'outre-mer (French overseas territory). In 2003, this status was changed to that of Collectivité d'outre-mer (French overseas community). Jan. ... François Pierre Guillaume Guizot (October 4, 1787 -September 12, 1874) was a French historian, orator and statesman. ... Louis-Philippe of France (6 October 1773 – 26 August 1850) was King of the French from 1830 to 1848 in what was known as the July Monarchy. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pomare V (3 November 1839 - 12 June 1891) was the last king of Tahiti, reigning from 1877 until his forced abdication in 1880. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... French Legion of Honor The Légion dhonneur (in Legion of Honor (AmE) or Legion of Honour (ComE)) is an Order of Chivalry awarded by the President of France. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Territoire doutre-mer (TOM, French for Overseas territory) is an administrative division of France. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A collectivité doutre-mer (in English Overseas Community) or COM, is an administrative division of France. ...


French painter Paul Gauguin lived on Tahiti in the 1890s and painted many Tahitian subjects. Papeari has a small Gauguin museum. Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no...


Politics

Tahitian Women on the Beach (1891)
Tahitian Women on the Beach (1891)

Tahitians are French citizens with full civil and political rights. The Tahitian language and the French language are both in use. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3176x2369, 713 KB) Description: Title: de: Frauen am Strand en: Tahitian Women on the Beach Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 69 × 91 cm Country of origin: de: Frankreich Current location (city): de: Paris Current location (gallery): de: Musée... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3176x2369, 713 KB) Description: Title: de: Frauen am Strand en: Tahitian Women on the Beach Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 69 × 91 cm Country of origin: de: Frankreich Current location (city): de: Paris Current location (gallery): de: Musée... Tahitian Women on the Beach is a 1891 painting by Paul Gauguin. ... Tahitian, a Tahitic language, is one of the two official languages of French Polynesia (along with French). ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ...


Tahiti is part of French Polynesia (Polynésie Française). French Polynesia is now a semi-autonomous territory of France with its own assembly, President, budget and laws. France's influence is limited to providing subsidies, education and security. The former President of French Polynesia, Oscar Temaru, advocates full independence from France, however, only about 20% of the population is currently in favor of full independence.


During a press conference on June 26, 2006 during the second France-Oceania Summit, French President Jacques Chirac said he did not think the majority of Tahitians wanted independence. He said he would keep an open door to a possible referendum in the future. is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


Elections for the Assembly of French Polynesia, the Territorial Assembly of French Polynesia, were held on May 23, 2004 (see French Polynesian legislative election, 2004). In a surprise result, Oscar Temaru's pro-independence progressive coalition formed a Government with a one seat majority in the 57 seat parliament, defeating the conservative party led by Gaston Flosse (see also List of political parties in French Polynesia). On October 8, 2004, the Gaston Flosse led opposition party succeeded in passing a censure motion against the Government, provoking a political crisis. A major topic of controversy is whether the national government of France should use its exceptional power to call for new elections in a local government, in case of a grave political crisis. May 23, 2004 Villagers in Abga Rajil, western Sudan, claim 56 people are killed in a raid by janjaweed militia. ... Elections for the Assembly of French Polynesia, the Territorial Assembly of French Polynesia, were held on May 23, 2004. ... Political parties in French Polynesia lists political parties in French Polynesia. ...


Demographics

The population of Tahiti is predominantly of Polynesian (Pacific Islander) or mixed-Polynesian or 'demi' (around 80%) origin, with 12% European (mainly French) and 8% Chinese Hakka. Most French live in Papeete and its suburbs, notably Punaauia where they are almost 20% of the population. The Chinese are well integrated into the population despite their distinct cultural identity. Polynesian is an adjectival form which refers variously to: Polynesian pie Polynesian sauce, a food condiment available at Chick-fil-A the aboriginal inhabitants of Polynesia, and their: Polynesian culture Polynesian mythology Polynesian languages Category: ... Pacific Islands (or Pacific Person, pl: Pacific People, also called Oceanic[s]), is a geographic term used in several places, such as New Zealand and the United States, to describe the inhabitants of any of the three major sub-regions of Oceania. ... A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Papeete Waterfront Papeete is the capital of French Polynesia, and is located on the island of Tahiti, which is part of the Society Islands, in French Polynesia. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Punaauia is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. ...


Economy

Tourism is a significant industry, mostly to the islands of Bora Bora and Moorea. In July, the Heiva festival in Papeete celebrates Polynesian culture and the commemoration of the storming of the Bastille in France. Tourist redirects here. ... Mount Otemanu, Bora Bora Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort, Bora Bora Frigate Flor al, stationned in Bora-Bora lagoon Bora Bora is an atoll in French Polynesia, about 260 km northwest of the capital, Papeete. ... The Sofitel Ia Ora resort on Moorea Cooks Bay Bungalows of Hotel Hibiscus, Hauru Point, Moorea Moorea (or Moorea) is a high island in French Polynesia, part of the Society Islands, 17 km (roughly 9mi) northwest of Tahiti. ... This article is about the building. ...


After the establishment of the CEP (Centre d'Experimentation du Pacifique) in 1963, the standard of living in French Polynesia increased considerably and as a result, many Polynesians abandoned traditional activities and many islanders decided to emigrate to the centre at Papeete. Even though the standard of living in Polynesia is elevated (due mainly to France's FDI investment), the economy is extremely reliant on imports. At the cessation of CEP activities, France signed the Progress Pact with Tahiti to compensate the loss of financial resources and assist in education and tourism with an investment of about US$150 Million a year from the beginning of 2006. The main trading partners with Tahiti are France which accounts for about 40% of imports and about 25% of exports, the USA, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.


Black pearl farming is also a substantial source of revenues, most of the pearls being exported to Japan, Europe and the US. Tahiti also exports vanilla, fruits, flowers, monoi, fish, coprah oil, and noni. For other uses, see Pearl (disambiguation). ... Vanilla pods Vanilla is a flavouring derived from orchids in the genus Vanilla native to Mexico. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as Great morinda, Indian mulberry, Beach mulberry, Tahitian Noni, or since recently: Noni (from Hawaiian), Nono (in Tahitian), Mengkudu (from Malay), Nonu (in Tongan), and Ach (in Hindi), is a shrub or small tree in the family Rubiaceae. ...


Unemployment affects about 13% of the active population, especially women and unqualified young people.


Tahiti’s currency, the French Pacific Franc (CFP), trades at about 84 CFP’s for every U.S. dollar. Hotels and financial institutions offer exchange services. U.S. currency and major credit cards are widely accepted. The CFP franc (in French: franc Pacifique or franc CFP ; CFP stood for Colonies françaises du Pacifique (i. ...


There is no sales tax in Tahiti. However, a special 2% reduced rate Value Added Tax (VAT) applies to all rented accommodations (hotel rooms, pensions and family stays), and room and meal packages for tourists. A 4% VAT rate applies to purchases in shops, stores and boutiques. A 6% VAT rate applies to bars, excursions, car rentals, snacks and restaurants.


Education

Tahiti hosts a French university, Université de la Polynésie Française ("University of French Polynesia"). It is a small growing university, with around 2,000 students and about 60 researchers. Le Collège La Mennais is located in Papeete. The Université de la Polynésie Française (University of French Polynesia, UPF) is a French university and the only one in French Polynesia. ...


Arts and music

Recently there has been a strong push to revive old ways and rediscover traditional arts. Traditional musical instruments include pahu and toere drums and the curious nose flute called a vivo. Guitars and ukuleles made their way into Polynesia and the locals developed a unique song style that owes much to country & western music in form but has a distinctive South Pacific island groove. Customary dancing (tamure) has slowly made its way back into French Polynesian life, but the art of making tapa (bark paper and cloth) has largely disappeared. The pahu is a traditional musical instrument of the native Hawaiian people. ... VIVO is an acronym for Video In Video Out, which is commonly pronounced Vee-Voe, but other pronounciations are in use. ... The tāmūrē is a dance from Tahiti and although denied by the local purists, for the rest of the world it is the most popular dance and the mark of Tahiti. ... Tapa from the Lau Island Group of Fiji Tapa cloth (or simply tapa) is a bark cloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean, primarily in Tonga and Samoa, but as far afield as Java, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Hawaii. ...


Transport

Air Tahiti
Air Tahiti

Faa'a International Airport is the international airport of Tahiti with Air Tahiti Nui being the national airline while Air Tahiti is the main airline for inter-island flights. The Moorea Ferry is also a notable ferry that operates from Papeete. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Faaa International Airport (IATA: PPT, ICAO: NTAA) is located in the commune (municipality) of Faaa, on the island of Tahiti, French Polynesia, approximately 5 km (3 miles) southwest from the town center of Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia. ... Air Tahiti Nui is French Polynesias flag carrier airline with its headquarters in Papeete, Tahiti. ... Air Tahiti is a regional airline based in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ...


References

  1. ^ Papeete, French Polynesia. Weatherbase.com. Last retrieved 2007-09-26.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the music of Tahiti was dominated by festivals called heiva. ... Tahiti The use of Tahiti postage stamps on mail first became valid on 25 October 1862, using the general stamps of the French Colonies. ... Tahitian, a Tahitic language, is one of the two official languages of French Polynesia (along with French). ... A nuclear-free zone is an area where nuclear weapons and/or nuclear power are banned. ... The global spread of printing with movable type from its origins in Germany began with the invention of the printing press by Johannes Gutenberg, (c. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tahiti

Coordinates: 17°40′S, 149°27′W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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