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Encyclopedia > Tagalog language
Tagalog
Spoken in: Philippines 
Region: Central and south Luzon
Total speakers: First language (in the Philippines): 22 million[1]


Overall (worldwide): ≈ 65 million total speakers  Map of the Philippines showing the island groups of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. ...

Ranking: 51
Language family: Austronesian
 Malayo-Polynesian
  Borneo-Philippines
   Central Philippine
    Tagalog 
Writing system: Latin (Filipino variant);
Historically written in Baybayin 
Official status
Official language in: Philippines (in the form of Filipino)
Regulated by: Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (Commission on the Filipino language)
Language codes
ISO 639-1: tl
ISO 639-2: tgl
ISO 639-3: tgl

Tagalog (pronounced [tɐˈgaːlog]) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. It is the most spoken Philippine language in terms of number of speakers. This is a list of languages, ordered by the number of native-language speakers, with some data for second-language use. ... A language family is a group of languages related by descent from a common proto-language. ... The Austronesian languages are a language family widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia. ... The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages used by some 351 million speakers. ... The Borneo-Philippines languages (or Outer Hesperonesian or Outer Western Malayo-Polynesian languages) are a branch of the Austronesian family which include the languages of the Philippines, much of Borneo, the northern peninsula of Sulawesi, and Madagascar, as outlined in Wouk and Ross (2002). ... This article needs cleanup. ... Writing systems of the world today. ... Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz redirects here. ... The Filipino alphabet (officially Makabagong alpabetong Filipino; English: Modern Filipino alphabet) is made up of 28 letters, which includes the entire 21-letter set of the Abakada (including ng) and 8 letters from the Spanish alphabet (namely C, F, J, Ñ, Q, V, X and Z). ... Baybayin (sometimes called Alibata) is a pre-Hispanic Tagalog writing system that originated from the Javanese script Kavi. ... The Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (Commission on the Filipino Language) is the official regulating body of the Filipino language. ... ISO 639-1 is the first part of the ISO 639 international-standard language-code family. ... ISO 639-2 is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. ... ISO 639-3 is an international standard for language codes. ... The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... There are over 170 languages in the Philippines; almost all of them belong to the Austronesian language family. ...


Tagalog, in its standardized form, Filipino, is the principal language of the national television and radio news media in the Philippines. (Newspapers are almost completely in English.) It is the primary language of public education. As Filipino, it is, along with English, a co-official language and the sole national language. Tagalog is widely used as a lingua franca throughout the country, and in overseas Filipino communities. However, while Tagalog may be prevalent in many fields, English, to varying degrees of fluency, is more prevalent in the fields of government and business. News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A national language is a language (or language variant, i. ... Lingua franca, literally Frankish language in Italian, was originally a mixed language consisting largely of Italian plus a vocabulary drawn from Turkish, Persian, French, Greek and Arabic and used for communication throughout the Middle East. ... Language(s) Tagalog, Visayan languages, Ilocano, Tausug, other Philippine languages, English Religion(s) Predominantly Catholic; Protestantism; Iglesia Ni Cristo; Islam; Nonreligious Related ethnic groups Filipino people, Filipino American, Filipino Canadian, Filipino Australian, Filipino British, Filipino Hong Konger An Overseas Filipino is a person of Philippine origin who lives outside of...

Contents

History

The Tagalog Baybayin script
The Tagalog Baybayin script

The word Tagalog derived from tagá-ílog, from tagá- meaning "native of" and ílog meaning "river." Thus, it means "river dweller." There are no surviving written samples of Tagalog before the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century. Very little is known about the history of the language. However, according to linguists such as Dr. David Zorc and Dr. Robert Blust, the Tagalogs originated, along with their Central Philippine cousins, from Northeastern Mindanao or Eastern Visayas.[2][3] Baybayin Alpha File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Baybayin Alpha File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Mindanao is the second largest and easternmost island in the Philippines. ... Map of the Philippines showing Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao Visayas is one of the three island groupings in the Philippines along with Luzon and Mindanao. ...


The first known book to be written in Tagalog is the Doctrina Cristiana (Christian Doctrine) of 1593. It was written in Spanish and two versions of Tagalog; one written in the Baybayin script and the other in the Latin alphabet. Throughout the 333 years of Spanish occupation, there were grammar and dictionaries written by Spanish clergymen such as Vocabulario de la Lengua Tagala by Pedro de San Buenaventura (Pila, Laguna, 1613), Vocabulario de la lengua tagala (1835) and Arte de la lengua tagala y manual tagalog para la administración de los Santos Sacramentos (1850). Poet Francisco Baltazar (1788–1862) is regarded as the foremost Tagalog writer. His most famous work is the early 19th-century Florante at Laura. Baybayin (sometimes called Alibata) is a pre-Hispanic Tagalog writing system that originated from the Javanese script Kavi. ... Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz redirects here. ... Pila is a 4th class municipality in the province of Laguna, Philippines. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Francisco Balagtas (April 2, 1788—February 20, 1862), Francisco Baltazar being his real name, is considered to be one of the great Filipino poets. ... Florante at Laura (Florante and Laura) by Francisco Baltazar (also known as Balagtas) is one of the masterpieces of Philippine literature. ...


In 1937, Tagalog was selected as the basis of the national language by the National Language Institute. In 1959, Tagalog, which had been renamed Wikang Pambansa ("National Language") by President Manuel L. Quezon in 1939, was renamed by the Secretary of Education, Jose Romero, as Pilipino to give it a national rather than ethnic label and connotation. The changing of the name did not, however, result in acceptance at the conscious level among non-Tagalogs, especially Cebuanos who had not accepted the selection.[4] Judiciary Supreme Court Chief Justice Reynato Puno Court of Appeals · Sandiganbayan Court of Tax Appeals · Ombudsman Elections Commission on Elections Chairman: Resurreccion Z. Borra 2013 | 2010 | 2007 | 2004 | 2001 | 1998 1995 | 1992 | 1987 | 1986 | All Foreign relations Government Website Human rights Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The President of the... Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina (b. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Filipino (formerly Pilipino) is the national and an official language of the Philippines as designated in the 1987 Philippine Constitution. ... For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ... The term Ethnicity redirects here. ... The Tagalogs are one of the largest Filipino ethnic groups. ... The Cebuano people usually refers to those whose native tongue is Cebuano, but more speficically the people who live in the province of Cebu. ...


In 1971, the language issue was revived once more, and a compromise solution was worked out—a "universalist" approach to the national language, to be called Filipino rather than Pilipino. When a new constitution was drawn up in 1987, it named Filipino as the national language.[4] The constitution specified that as that Filipino language evolves, it shall be further developed and enriched on the basis of existing Philippine and other languages.


Classification

Tagalog is a Central Philippine language within the Austronesian language family. Being Malayo-Polynesian, it is related to other Austronesian languages such as Indonesian, Malay, Fijian, Maori (of New Zealand), Hawaiian, Malagasy (of Madagascar), Samoan, Tahitian, Chamorro (of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands), Tetum (of East Timor), and Paiwan (of Taiwan). It is closely related to the languages spoken in the Bicol and Visayas regions such as Bikol, Hiligaynon, Waray-Waray, and Cebuano. This article needs cleanup. ... The Austronesian languages are a language family widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia. ... The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages. ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ... Māori (or Maori) is a language spoken by the native peoples of New Zealand and the Cook Islands. ... The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from HawaiÊ»i, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ... Tahitian, a Tahitic language, is one of the two official languages of French Polynesia (along with French). ... Chamorro (Chamoru in Chamorro) is the native language of the Chamorro or Chamoru of the Northern Mariana Islands and Guam. ... Tetum (also written as Tetun) is the national language of East Timor. ... Paiwan is a native language of Taiwan, spoken by the Paiwan people, one tribe of the Taiwanese aborigines. ... Bicol Region is one of the regions of the Philippines occupying the Bicol Peninsula at the southeastern end of Luzon island. ... Map of the Philippines showing Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao Visayas is one of the three island groupings in the Philippines along with Luzon and Mindanao. ... Bicolano or Bikol is an Austronesian language used in the Philippines particularly on the Bicol Peninsula on the island of Luzon. ... Hiligaynon language test of Wikipedia at Wikimedia Incubator Hiligaynon (or Ilonggo) is an Austronesian language spoken in Western Visayas in the Philippines. ... Wáray-Wáray or Waráy (commonly spelled as Waray; also referred to as Winaray or L(in)eyte-Samarnon) is a language spoken in the provinces of Samar, Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Leyte (eastern portion), and Biliran in the Philippines. ... Cebuano, also known as Sinugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 people (according to Ethnologue). ...


Languages that have made significant contributions to Tagalog are Spanish, English, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Sanskrit, Old Malay, and Tamil language . The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Tamil ( ; IPA: ) is a Dravidian language spoken predominantly by Tamil people, originating on the Indian subcontinent. ...


Features

Geographic distribution

The Tagalog homeland, or Katagalugan, covers roughly much of the central to southern parts of the island of Luzon - particularly in Aurora, Bataan, Batangas, Bulacan, Camarines Norte, Cavite, Laguna, Metro Manila, Nueva Ecija, Quezon, and Rizal. Tagalog is also spoken natively by inhabitants living on the islands of Lubang, Marinduque, and the northern and eastern parts of Mindoro. It is spoken by approximately 64.3 million Filipinos, 96.4% of the household population[5]. 21.5 million, or 28.15% of the total Philippine population[6], of which speak it as a native language. Katagalugan is the short lived republic in the mountains of Southern Luzon founded in 1902 by members of the Filipino Katipunan. ... Map of the Philippines showing the island groups of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. ... Aurora is a province of the Philippines located in the Central Luzon region. ... This article is about province of the Philippines. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Batangas Region: CALABARZON (Region IV-A) Capital: Batangas City Founded: March 10, 1917 Population: 2000 census—1,905,348 (9th largest) Density—602 per km² (7th highest) Area: 3,165. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Bulacan Region: Central Luzon (Region III) Capital: Malolos City Founded: 1572 Population: 2000 census—2,234,088 (4th largest) Density—851 per km² (5th highest) Area: 2,625. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Camarines Norte Region: Bicol Region (Region V) Capital: Daet Founded: — Population: 2000 census—458,840 (25th smallest) Density—217 per km² (37th highest) Area: 2,112. ... This article is about the province of Cavite. ... Laguna is a province of the Philippines found in the CALABARZON region in Luzon. ... For the capital city of the Philippines, see Manila. ... Nueva Ecija is a landlocked province of the Philippines located in the Central Luzon region. ... Quezon is a province of the Philippines located in the CALABARZON region in Luzon. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Rizal Region: CALABARZON (Region IV-A) Capital: Antipolo City† Founded: June 11, 1901 Population: 2000 census—1,707,218 (11th largest) Density—1,304 per km² (2nd highest) Area: 1,308. ... Lubang Islang lies to the northwest of the northern end of Mindoro in the Philippines. ... Marinduque is an island province of the Philippines located in the MIMAROPA region in Luzon. ... Beach in Northern Mindoro Mindoro is the seventh-largest island in the Philippines. ...


Tagalog speakers are found in other parts of the Philippines as well as throughout the world, though its use is usually limited to communication between Filipino ethnic groups. It is the sixth most-spoken language in the United States with over a million speakers[7]. In Canada it is spoken by 235,615 [8]. The various ethnic groups in the Philippines identify themselves based on one or several factors like ancestry, language, religion or a shared history. ...


Official status

Predominantly Tagalog-speaking regions in the Philippines.
Predominantly Tagalog-speaking regions in the Philippines.
Main article: Filipino language

Tagalog was declared the official language by the first constitution in the Philippines, the Constitution of Biak-na-Bato in 1897.[9] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (669x1245, 45 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (669x1245, 45 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Filipino (formerly Pilipino) is the national and an official language of the Philippines as designated in the 1987 Philippine Constitution. ...


In 1935, the Philippine constitution designated English and Spanish as official languages, but mandated the development and adoption of a common national language based on one of the existing native languages.[10] After study and deliberation, the National Language Institute, a committee composed of seven members who represented various regions in the Philippines, chose Tagalog as the basis for the evolution and adoption of the national language of the Philippines.[11][4] President Manuel L. Quezon then, on December 30, 1937, proclaimed the selection of the Tagalog language to be used as the basis for the evolution and adoption of the national language of the Philippines.[11] In 1939 President Quezon renamed Tagalog as wikang pambansâ (national language).[4] In 1939, the language was further renamed as "Pilipino".[4] is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 1973 constitution designated Tagalog (as Pilipino), along with English, as an official language and mandated the development and formal adoption of a common national language to be known as Filipino.[12] The 1987 constitution designated Filipino as the national language, mandating that as it evolves, it shall be further developed and enriched on the basis of existing Philippine and other languages.[13]


Since 1940, Tagalog has been taught in schools throughout the Philippines. It is the only one out of over 170 Philippine languages that is officially used in schools and businesses, (info from culturegrams)[citation needed] though Article XIV, Section 7 of the 1987 Constitution of the Philippines does specify, in part: Judiciary Supreme Court Chief Justice Reynato Puno Court of Appeals · Sandiganbayan Court of Tax Appeals · Ombudsman Elections Commission on Elections Chairman: Resurreccion Z. Borra 2013 | 2010 | 2007 | 2004 | 2001 | 1998 1995 | 1992 | 1987 | 1986 | All Foreign relations Government Website Human rights Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Constitution of the...

Subject to provisions of law and as the Congress may deem appropriate, the Government shall take steps to initiate and sustain the use of Filipino as a medium of official communication and as language of instruction in the educational system.[13]

The regional languages are the auxiliary official languages in the regions and shall serve as auxiliary media of instruction therein.[13]

Filipino

Filipino, the national language of the Philippines, is the de facto standardized variant of the Tagalog language. Other Philippine languages have also influenced Filipino, primarily through migration from the provinces to Metro Manila of speakers of those other languages. Languages in the Philippines number more than 170 and almost all of them belong to the Western Malayo-Polynesian languages. ... Judiciary Supreme Court Chief Justice Reynato Puno Court of Appeals · Sandiganbayan Court of Tax Appeals · Ombudsman Elections Commission on Elections Chairman: Resurreccion Z. Borra 2013 | 2010 | 2007 | 2004 | 2001 | 1998 1995 | 1992 | 1987 | 1986 | All Foreign relations Government Website Human rights Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The province (Filipino: lalawigan... For the capital city of the Philippines, see Manila. ...


Dialects

At present, no comprehensive dialectology has been done in the Tagalog-speaking regions, though there have been descriptions in the form of dictionaries and grammars on various Tagalog dialects. Ethnologue lists Lubang, Manila, Marinduque, Bataan, Batangas, Bulacan, Tanay-Paete, and Tayabas as dialects of Tagalog. However, there appear to be four main dialects of which the aforementioned are a part; Northern (exemplified by the Bulacan dialect), Central (including Manila), Southern (exemplified by Batangas), and Marinduque. Dialectology is the study of dialects of a language, their evolution, differentiation, inter-intelligibity, grammar, phonetics etc. ... Ethnologue: Languages of the World is a web and print publication of SIL International (formerly known as the Summer Institute of Linguistics), a Christian linguistic service organization which studies lesser-known languages primarily to provide the speakers with Bibles in their native language. ... Batangas Tagalog also known as Batangan is a dialect of the Tagalog language spoken primarily in the province of Batangas and the island of Mindoro (Batangueño/a refers to the natives). ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Bulacan Region: Central Luzon (Region III) Capital: Malolos City Founded: 1572 Population: 2000 census—2,234,088 (4th largest) Density—851 per km² (5th highest) Area: 2,625. ... Batangas Tagalog also known as Batangan is a dialect of the Tagalog language spoken primarily in the province of Batangas and the island of Mindoro (Batangueño/a refers to the natives). ...


Some example of dialectal differences are:

  • Many Tagalog dialects, particularly those in the south, preserve the glottal stop found after consonants and before vowels. This has been lost in standard Tagalog. For example standard Tagalog ngayon (now, today), sinigang (broth stew), gabi (night), matamis (sweet), are pronounced and written ngay-on, sinig-ang, gab-i, and matam-is in other dialects.
  • In Teresian-Morong Tagalog, [r] is usually preferred over [d]. For example, bundók, dagat, dingdíng, and isdâ become bunrok, ragat, ringring, and isra, as well as their expression seen in some signages like "sandok sa dingding" was changed as "sanrok sa ringring".
  • In many southern dialects, the progressive aspect prefix of -um- verbs is na-. For example, standard Tagalog kumakain (eating) is nákáin in Quezon and Batangas Tagalog. This is the butt of some jokes by other Tagalog speakers since a phrase such as nakain ka ba ng pating is interpreted as "did a shark eat you?" by those from Manila but in reality means "do you eat shark?" to those in the south.
  • Some dialects have interjections which are a considered a trademark of their region. For example, the interjection ala e! usually identifies someone from Batangas while as does hane?! in Morong and Teresa.

Perhaps the most divergent Tagalog dialects are those spoken in Marinduque. Linguist Rosa Soberano identifies two dialects, western and eastern with the former being closer to the Tagalog dialects spoken in the provinces of Batangas and Quezon. Teresa is a 4th class urban municipality in the province of Rizal, Philippines. ... Morong is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Rizal, Philippines. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Batangas Region: CALABARZON (Region IV-A) Capital: Batangas City Founded: March 10, 1917 Population: 2000 census—1,905,348 (9th largest) Density—602 per km² (7th highest) Area: 3,165. ... Morong is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Rizal, Philippines. ... Teresa is a 4th class urban municipality in the province of Rizal, Philippines. ... Marinduque is an island province of the Philippines located in the MIMAROPA region in Luzon. ... Batangas Tagalog also known as Batangan is a dialect of the Tagalog language spoken primarily in the province of Batangas and the island of Mindoro (Batangueño/a refers to the natives). ...


One example are the verb conjugation paradigms. While some of the affixes are different, Marinduque also preserves the imperative affixes, also found in Visayan and Bikol languages, that have mostly disappeared from most Tagalog dialects by the early 20th century; they have since merged with the infinitive.

Manileño Tagalog Marinduque Dialect English
Susulat sina Maria at Fulgencia kay Juan. Másúlat da Maria at Fulgencia kay Juan. "Maria and Fulgencia will write to Juan."
Mag-aaral siya sa Maynila. Gaaral siya sa Maynila. "He will study in Manila."
Magluto ka! Pagluto ka! "Cook!"
Kainin mo iyan. Kaina mo yaan. "Eat that."
Tinatawag tayo ni Tatay. Inatawag nganì kitá ni Tatay. "Father is calling us."
Tutulungan ba kayó ni Hilarion? Atulungan ga kamo ni Hilarion? "Will Hilarion help you (pl.)?"

Code-switching

Taglish and Englog are names given to a mix of English and Tagalog. The amount of English vs.Tagalog varies from the occasional use of English loan words to outright code-switching where the language changes in mid-sentence. Such code-switching is prevalent throughout the Philippines and in various of the languages of the Philippines other than Tagalog. Taglish, a portmanteau of the words Tagalog and English, is an informal dialect of Tagalog in the Philippines that infuses English terms. ... 58. ... Code-switching is a term in linguistics referring to alternation between one or more languages, dialects, or language registers in the course of discourse between people who have more than one language in common. ...

Nasirà ang motorcycle ko kahapon!
"My motorcycle broke down yesterday!"
Huwág kang maninigarilyo, because it is harmful to your health.
"Never smoke cigarettes, ..."

Code switching also entails the use of foreign words that are Filipinized by reforming them using Filipino rules, such as verb conjugations. Users typically use Filipino or English words, whichever comes to mind first or whichever is easier to use.

Magshoshopping kami sa mall. Sino ba ang magdadrive sa shoppingan?
"We will go shopping at the mall. Who will drive to the shopping center anyway?"

Although it is generally looked down upon, code-switching is prevalent in all levels of society; however, city-dwellers, the highly educated, and people born around and after World War II are more likely to do it. Politicians as highly placed as President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo have code-switched in interviews. PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ...


The practice is common in television, radio, and print media as well. Advertisements from companies like Wells Fargo, Wal-Mart, Albertsons, McDonald's, and Western Union have contained Taglish. An older Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Wells Fargos corporate headquarters and main branch Wells Fargo & Co. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... A typical Albertsons store. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Western Union (NYSE: WU) is a financial services and communications company based in the United States. ...


The Chinese and the non-Tagalog communities in the Philippines also frequently code-switch their language, be it Cebuano or Min Nan Chinese, with Taglish. Cebuano, also known as Sinugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 people (according to Ethnologue). ... Mǐn N n (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name B ; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ...


Phonology

Main article: Tagalog phonology

Tagalog has 21 phonemes; 16 consonants and five vowels. Syllable structure is relatively simple. Each syllable contains at least a consonant and a vowel, except for borrowed words such as trak which means "truck", or tsokolate meaning "chocolate". In human language, a phoneme is the theoretical representation of a sound. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


Vowels

Before the arrival of the Spanish, Tagalog had three vowel phonemes: /a/, /i/, and /u/. This was later expanded to five vowels with the introduction of Spanish words.


They are:

There are four main diphthongs; /aɪ/, /oɪ/, /aʊ/, and /iʊ/. Vowels See also: IPA, Consonants Near‑close Close‑mid Mid Open‑mid Near‑open Open Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. ... Vowels See also: IPA, Consonants Near‑close Close‑mid Mid Open‑mid Near‑open Open Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. ... Vowels See also: IPA, Consonants Near-close Close-mid Mid Open-mid Near-open Open Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. ... Vowels Near-close Close-mid Mid Open-mid Near-open Open Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. ... Vowels See also: IPA, Consonants Near‑close Close‑mid Mid Open‑mid Near‑open Open Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. ... In phonetics, a diphthong (also gliding vowel) (Greek δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally with two sounds, or with two tones) is a monosyllabic vowel combination involving a quick but smooth movement from one vowel to another, often interpreted by listeners as a single vowel sound or phoneme. ...


Consonants

Below is a chart of Tagalog consonants. All the stops are unaspirated. The velar nasal occurs in all positions including at the beginning of a word. The velar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ...

Bilabial Dental Palatal Velar Glottal
Nasal m n ŋ
Plosive Voiceless p t k ʔ
Voiced b d g
Fricative s h
Flap ɾ
Lateral l
Approximant w j

In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ... Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth). ... Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum). ... Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis. ... A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ... A stop or plosive or occlusive is a consonant sound produced by stopping the airflow in the vocal tract. ... Fricatives (or spirants) are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together. ... In phonetics, a flap or tap is a type of consonantal sound, which is produced with a single contraction of the muscles so that one articulator (such as the tongue) is thrown against another. ... Laterals are L-like consonants pronounced with an occlusion made somewhere along the axis of the tongue, while air from the lungs escapes at one side or both sides of the tongue. ... Approximants are speech sounds that could be regarded as intermediate between vowels and typical consonants. ...

Stress

Stress is phonemic in Tagalog. Primary stress occurs on either the last or the next-to-the-last (penultimate) syllable of a word. Vowel lengthening accompanies primary or secondary stress except when stress occurs at the end of a word. Stress on words is very important, they differentiate words with the same spellings, but with different meanings, e.g. tayo(to stand) and tayo(us; we)


Sounds

  • /a/ is raised slightly to [ɐ] in unstressed positions and also occasionally in stressed positions (‘inang bayan’ [in'ɐŋ 'bɐjən])
  • Unstressed /i/ is usually pronounced [ɪ] as in English "bit"
  • At the final syallable, /i/ can be pronounced as [i ~ e ~ ɛ] as [e ~ ɛ] was an allophone of [ɪ ~ i] in final syllables.
  • Unstressed /ɛ/ and /o/ can sometimes be pronounced as [i ~ ɪ ~ e] and [u ~ ʊ ~ ɔ] except final syllables. [o~ ʊ ~ ɔ] and [u ~ ʊ] were also former allophones.
  • Unstressed /u/ is usually pronounced [ʊ] as in English "book"
  • The diphthong /aɪ/ and the sequence /aʔi/ have a tendency to become [eɪ ~ ɛː].
  • The diphthong /aʊ/ and the sequence /aʔu/ have a tendency to become [oʊ ~ ɔː].
  • /k/ between vowels has a tendency to become [x] as in Spanish "José", whereas in the initial position it has a tendency to become [kx].
  • Intervocalic /g/ and /k/ tend to become [ɰ] (see preceding).
  • /ɾ/ and /d/ are sometimes interchangeable as /ɾ/ and /d/ were once allophones in Tagalog.
  • A glottal stop that occurs at the end of a word is often omitted when it is in the middle of a sentence, especially in the Metro Manila area. The vowel it follows is then usually lengthened. However, it is preserved in many other dialects.
  • /o/ tends to become [ɔ] in stressed positions.
  • /niy/, /siy/, /tiy/, and /diy/ may be pronounced as [nj]/[nij], [sj]/[sij], [tj]/[tij] and [dj]/[dij], respectively, especially in but not limited to rural areas.
  • /ts/ may be pronounced as [ts], especially in but not limited to rural areas.
  • /e/ or /i/ before s-consonant clusters have a tendency to become silent.

In phonetics, an allophone is one of several similar phones that belong to the same phoneme. ...

Historical changes

Tagalog differs from its Central Philippine counterparts with its treatment of the Proto-Philippine schwa vowel . In Bikol & Visayan, this sound merged with /u/ and [o]. In Tagalog, it has merged with /i/. For example, Proto-Philippine *dəkət (adhere, stick) is Tagalog dikít and Visayan & Bikol dukot. The IPA symbol for the Schwa In linguistics, specifically phonetics and phonology, schwa can mean: An unstressed and toneless neutral vowel sound in any language, often but not necessarily a mid-central vowel. ...


Proto-Philippine *r, *j, and *z merged with /d/ but is /l/ between vowels. Proto-Philippine *ngajan (name) and *hajək (kiss) became Tagalog ngalan and halík.


Proto-Philippine *R merged with /g/. *tubiR (water) and *zuRuʔ (blood) became Tagalog tubig and dugô.


Grammar

Further information: Tagalog grammar

This article describes the grammar of both Tagalog, and Filipino - which is de facto based on Tagalog. ...

Writing system

Baybayin

Main article: Baybayin

Tagalog was written in an abugida called Baybayin prior to the arrival of the Spaniards in the 16th century. This particular writing system was composed of symbols representing three vowels and 14 consonants. Belonging to the Brahmic family of scripts, it shares similarities with the Old Kawi script of Java and is believed to be descended from the script used by the Bugis in Sulawesi. Baybayin (sometimes called Alibata) is a pre-Hispanic Tagalog writing system that originated from the Javanese script Kavi. ... An inscription of Swampy Cree using Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics, an abugida developed by Christian missionaries for Aboriginal Canadian languages An abugida (from Ge‘ez አቡጊዳ ’äbugida) is a segmental writing system in which each letter (basic character) represents a consonant accompanied by a specific vowel; other vowels are indicated by modification... Baybayin (sometimes called Alibata) is a pre-Hispanic Tagalog writing system that originated from the Javanese script Kavi. ... Writing systems of the world today. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas (writing systems) used in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, Manchuria, descended from the Brāhmī script of Mauryan India. ... Old Kawi is the oldest Kawi script used on Bali in 775 AD. It is written on palm leaves. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about ethnic groups of South Sulawesi. ... Sulawesi (formerly more commonly known as Celebes, IPA: a Portuguese-originated form of the name) is one of the four larger Sunda Islands of Indonesia and is situated between Borneo and the Maluku Islands. ...


Although it enjoyed a relatively high level of literacy, the script gradually fell into disuse in favor of the Latin alphabet during Spanish colonial rule. Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz redirects here. ...


There has been confusion of how to use Baybayin. Each letter in the Latin Alphabet is not represented with one of those in the Baybayin alphabet. Rather than letters being put together to make sounds as in Western languages. Baybayin uses symbols to represent syllables.


A "kudlit" resembling an apostrophe is used above or below a symbol to change the vowel sound after its consonant. If the kudlit is used above, the vowel is an "E" or "I" sound. If the Kudlit is used below, the vowel is an "O" or "U" sound. A special kudlit was later added by Spanish missionaries in which a cross placed below the symbol to get rid of the vowel sound all together, leaving a consonant. Previously, the final consonant was just left out, leaving the reader to use context to determine the final consonants.


Example:

Baybayin is encoded in Unicode version 3.2 in the range 1700-171F under the name "Tagalog". Image File history File links Baybayin Sample 2 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Latin alphabet

Main article: Filipino orthography

Until the first half of the 20th century, Tagalog was widely written in a variety of ways based on Spanish orthography. When Tagalog became the national language, grammarian Lope K. Santos introduced a new alphabet consisting of 20 letters called ABAKADA in school grammar books called balarilà; A B K D E G H I L M N NG O P R S T U W Y. The Filipino alphabet (officially Makabagong alpabetong Filipino; English: Modern Filipino alphabet) is made up of 28 letters, which includes the entire 21-letter set of the Abakada (including ng) and 8 letters from the Spanish alphabet (namely C, F, J, Ñ, Q, V, X and Z). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


As Pilipino, the national language, the alphabet was expanded in 1976 to include the letters C, CH, F, J, Q, RR, V, X, and Z in order to accommodate words of Spanish and English origin. Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Filipino is the national language de facto based on Tagalog that borrows vocabulary from other languages. In 1987, the Filipino alphabet was reduced from 33 to 28; A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ñ Ng O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z. This article is about the year 1987. ...


ng and mga

The genitive marker ng and the plural marker mga are abbreviations that are pronounced nang [naŋ] and mangá [mɐ'ŋa]. Ng means "of" (ex. Siya ay kapatid ng nanay ko. She is the sibling of my mother) while nang means "when" or "while." Mga denotes plurality (ex. Iyan ang mga damit ko. Those are my clothes). For other uses, see Ng (disambiguation). ... MGA can be an abbreviation of: Malaysian Golf Association Massachusetts Golf Association Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd Melengestrol Acetate - a contraceptive used on cattle Metal Gear Acid - a PlayStation Portable video game by Konami Metropolitan Golf Association of New York Minnesota Golf Association Minnesota Grocers Association Mounted Games Association Myasthenia Gravis...


Ex#1: Nang si Hudas ay madulas. - When Judas slipped.


Ex#2: Siya ay kumain nang nakatayo. - He ate while standing.


Vocabulary and borrowed words

Tagalog vocabulary is composed mostly of words of Austronesian origin with borrowings from Spanish, Min Nan Chinese (also known as Hokkien), Malay, Sanskrit, Arabic, Tamil, Persian, Kapampangan, languages spoken on Luzon, and others, especially other Austronesian languages. This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... Mǐn N n (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name B ; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ... Mǐn Nán (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name Bân-lâm-gú; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Tamil ( ; IPA: ) is a Dravidian language spoken predominantly by Tamil people, originating on the Indian subcontinent. ... Farsi redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of the Philippines showing the island groups of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. ...


Due to trade with Mexico via the Manila galleon from the 16th to the 19th centuries, many words from Nahuatl, a language spoken by Native Americans in Mexico, were introduced to Tagalog. A painting of a Spanish galleon. ... For the Spanish language as spoken in Mexico, see Mexican Spanish. ...


English has borrowed some words from Tagalog, such as abaca, adobo, aggrupation, barong, balisong, boondocks, jeepney, Manila hemp, pancit, and yaya, although the vast majority of these borrowed words are only used in the Philippines as part of the vocabularies of Philippine English. Philippine English is the variety of English used in the Philippines by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. ...


Tagalog words of foreign origin chart

Main article: Tagalog loanwords

For the Min Nan Chinese borrowings, the parentheses indicate the equivalent in standard Chinese. The Tagalog language, due to huge communication with outsiders and foreigners, has developed a weird and unique wording utilizing words from its own and other Austronesian roots and also from other foreign languages. ...

Tagalog meaning language of origin original spelling
kumustá how are you? Spanish cómo está
dasál pray Spanish rezar
kabayo horse Spanish caballo
silya chair Spanish silla
umpisá start Spanish empezar
kotse car Spanish coche
sabón soap Spanish jabón (sabón in old Sp)
relós watch Spanish reloj
litrato picture Spanish retrato
tsismis gossip Spanish chismes
giyera/gyera/gera war Spanish guerra
tsinelas slippers Spanish chinelas
karne meat Spanish carne
sapatos shoes Spanish zapatos
arina/harina flour Spanish harina
bisikleta bicycle Spanish bicicleta
sugál gambling Spanish jugar (to play)
baryo village Spanish barrio
swerte luck Spanish suerte
piyesta/pista celebration Spanish fiesta
garáhe garage Spanish garaje
ahente agent/salesman Spanish agente
ensaymada a kind of pastry Catalan ensaïmada
kamote sweet potato Nahuatl camotli
sayote chayote, choko Nahuatl hitzayotli
atswete achiote Nahuatl achiotl
sili chili pepper Nahuatl chili
tsokolate chocolate Nahuatl xocolatl
tiyangge market Nahuatl tianquiztli
sapote chico (fruit) Nahuatl tzapotl
nars nurse English  
bolpen ballpoint pen English  
drayber/drayver driver English  
tráysikel tricycle English  
lumpia (/lum·pyâ/) spring roll Min Nan Chinese 潤餅 (春捲)
siopao (/syó·paw/) steamed buns Min Nan Chinese 燒包 (肉包)
pansít (/pyan·i·sit/) noodles Min Nan Chinese 便食 (麵)
susì key Min Nan Chinese 鎖匙
kuya (see Philippine kinship) older brother Min Nan Chinese 哥亚 (哥仔)
ate (/ah·chi/) (see Philippine kinship) older sister Min Nan Chinese 亜姐 (阿姐)
bwisit annoyance Min Nan Chinese 無衣食
bakyâ wooden shoes Min Nan Chinese 木履
hikaw earrings Min Nan Chinese 耳鈎 (耳環)
kanan right Malay kanan
tulong help Malay tolong
sakit sick Malay sakit
tanghalì afternoon Malay tengah hari
dalamhatì grief Malay dalam + hati
luwalhatì glory Malay luar + hati
duryán durian Malay durian
rambután rambutan Malay rambutan
batík spot Malay batik
saráp delicious Malay sedap
asa hope Sanskrit आशा
salitâ speak Sanskrit चरितँ (cerita)
balità news Sanskrit वार्ता (berita)
karma karma Sanskrit कर्म
alak liquor Persian عرق (arak)
manggá mango Tamil மாங்காய்(mángáy)
bagay thing Tamil வகை(vagai)
hukóm judge Arabic حكم
salamat thanks Arabic سلامة
bakit why Kapampangan obakit
akyát climb Kapampangan ukyát/mukyat
at and Kapampangan at
bundók mountain Kapampangan bunduk
huwág don't Pangasinan ag
aso dog Luzon languages aso
tayo we (inc.) Luzon languages  

Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... Binomial name (Jacq. ... Binomial name Bixa orellana L. Achiote, or Achiotl, (Bixa orellana) is a shrub or small tree from the tropical regions of the Americas, also known also by its Tupi name of urucum. ... Binomial name (L.) P. Royen Sapodilla (Manilkara zapota) is a long-lived, evergreen tree native to the New World tropics. ... Philippine kinship utilizes the Generational system (see Kinship terminology) to define family. ... Philippine kinship utilizes the Generational system (see Kinship terminology) to define family. ...

Austronesian comparison chart

Below is a chart of Tagalog and sixteen other Austronesian languages comparing thirteen words; the first thirteen languages are spoken in the Philippines and the other four are spoken in Indonesia, Hawai'i, and Madagascar.

English one two three four person house dog coconut day new we (inc.) what fire
Tagalog isa dalawa tatlo apat tao bahay aso niyog araw bago tayo ano apoy
Bicol saro duwa tulo apat tawo harong ayam niyog aldaw ba-go kita ano kalayo
Cebuano usa duha tulo upat tawo balay iro lubi adlaw bag-o kita unsa kalayo
Waray usa duha tulo upat tawo balay ayam lubi adlaw bag-o kita ano kalayo
Tausug hambuuk duwa tu upat tau bay iru' niyug adlaw ba-gu kitaniyu unu kayu
Kinaray-a sara darwa tatlo apat taho balay ayam niyog adlaw bag-o kita, taten ano kalayo
Kapampangan metung adwa atlu apat tau bale asu ngungut aldo bayu ikatamu nanu api
Pangasinan isa, sakey dua, duara talo, talora apat, apatira too abong aso niyog agew balo sikatayo anto apoy
Ilokano maysa dua tallo uppat tao balay aso niog aldaw baro datayo ania apoy
Ivatan asa dadowa tatdo apat tao vahay chito niyoy araw va-yo yaten ango apoy
Ibanag tadday dua tallu appa' tolay balay kitu niuk aggaw bagu sittam anni afi
Gaddang antet addwa tallo appat tolay balay atu ayog aw bawu ikkanetem sanenay afuy
Tboli sotu lewu tlu fat tau gunu ohu lefo kdaw lomi tekuy tedu ofih
Indonesian satu dua tiga empat orang rumah/balai anjing kelapa/nyiur hari baru kita apa/anu api
Javanese siji loro telu papat wong omah/bale asu opo/anu api
Hawaiian kahi lua kolu kanaka hale 'īlio niu ao hou kākou aha ahi
Malagasy isa roa telo efatra olona trano alika voanio andro vaovao isika inona afo

Bikol or Bicolano is an Austronesian language used in the Philippines particularly on the Bicol Peninsula on the island of Luzon. ... Cebuano, also known as Sinugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 people (according to Ethnologue). ... Wáray-Wáray or Waráy (commonly spelled as Waray; also referred to as Winaray or L(in)eyte-Samarnon) is a language spoken in the provinces of Samar, Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Leyte (eastern portion), and Biliran in the Philippines. ... Tausug is spoken in Sulu province in the Philippines. ... Kinaray-a is an Austronesian language spoken mainly in the Antique Province in the Philippines. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Pangasinan language (Pangasinan: salitan Pangasinan; Spanish: idioma pangasinense) belongs to the Malayo-Polynesian languages branch of the Austronesian languages family. ... To view the Ilokano edition of this Wikipedia article, select from the in other languages Ilokano (variants: Ilocano, Iluko, Iloco, and Iloko) is the third most-spoken language of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Ivatan language, also known as Ibatan, is an Austronesian language spoken exclusively in the Batanes Islands in the most northern reaches of the Philippines. ... The Ibanag language (also Ybanag or Ibanak) is spoken by up to 500,000 speakers (the Ibanag people) in the Philippines, in the northeastern provinces of Isabela and Cagayan, especially in Tuguegarao City, Solana, Cabagan, and Ilagan and with overseas immigrants in countries located in the Middle East, UK and... The Tbolis are one of the indigenous peoples of South Mindanao. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from Hawaiʻi, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ...

Contribution to other languages

Tagalog itself has contributed a few words into English.

  • boondocks: meaning "rural" or "back country," was imported by American soldiers stationed in the Philippines as a mispronounced version of the Tagalog bundok, which means "mountain."
  • cogon: a type of grass, used for thatching. This word came from the Tagalog word kugon (a species of tall grass).
  • ylang-ylang: a type of flower known for its fragrance.
  • Abaca: a type of hemp fiber made from a plant in the banana family, from abaká.
  • Manila hemp: a light brown cardboard material used for folders and paper usually made from abaca hemp.
  • Capiz: also known as window oyster, is used to make windows.

Yo-yo is reportedly a Tagalog word, however no such word exists in Tagalog. A boondock, in geography, is a landform consisting of a slight rise in elevation found in vegetated sandy landscapes, such as Colorados San Luis Valley. ... Binomial name Cananga odorata (Lam. ... Binomial name Musa textilis Categories: Plant stubs | Liliopsida ... Manila hemp, also known as manilla, is a type of fiber obtained from the leaves of the abaca (Musa textilis), a relative of the banana. ... Capiz is a province of the Philippines located in the Western Visayas region. ... The yo-yo is a toy consisting of two equally-sized discs of plastic, wood, or metal, connected with an axle, around which a string is wound. ...


Tagalog has contributed several words to Philippine Spanish, like barangay (from balañgay meaning barrio), the abacá, cogon, palay, etc. Spanish is a language of historical and cultural significance in the Philippines. ...


Religious literature

Religious Literature remains to be one of the most dynamic contributors to Tagalog literature. In 1970, the Philippine Bible Society translated the Bible into Tagalog, the first translation to any of the Philippine languages. Even before the Second Vatican Council, devotional materials in Tagalog had been circulating. At present, there are two circulating Tagalog translations of the Holy Bible—the Magandang Balita Biblia (a parallel translation of the Good News Bible), which is the ecumenical version and the Ang Biblia, which is a more Protestant version. Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Languages in the Philippines number more than 170 and almost all of them belong to the Western Malayo-Polynesian languages. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... The Magandang Balita Biblia (or the Tagalog Popular Version) is one of the two most widely circulated translation of the Holy Bible in the Tagalog Language [the other simply entiled Ang Biblia (meaning The Bible)], first published by the Philippine Bible Society in 1973. ... The Good News Translation (GNT) as it is known in North America, or the Good News Bible (GNB) as it is known in the rest of the world, is an English language translation of the Bible by the American Bible Society, first published (as Good News for Modern Man) in... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism) refers to initiatives aimed at greater religious unity or cooperation. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


When the Second Vatican Council, (specifically the Sacrosanctum Concilium) permitted the universal prayers to be translated into vernacular languages, the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines was one of the first to translate the Roman Missal into Tagalog. In fact, the Roman Missal in Tagalog was published as early as 1982, while not published in English until 1985. The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Sacrosanctum Concilium, the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, was one of the most significant measures enacted by the Second Vatican Council. ... Look up Vernacular in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) is the official organization of the Roman Catholic episcopacy in the Philippines. ... The Roman Missal (Missale Romanum) is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Latin rite of Mass. ... The Roman Missal (Missale Romanum) is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Latin rite of Mass. ...


Tagalog is quite a stable language, and very few revisions have been made to Catholic Bible translations. Also, as Protestantism in the Philippines is relatively young, liturgical prayers tend to be more ecumenical.


Examples

The Lord's Prayer (Ama Namin)

Ama Namin, sumasalangit ka. Sambahin ang ngalan mo. Mapasaamin ang kaharian mo, Sundin ang loob mo dito sa lupa para nang sa langit. Bigyan mo kami ngayon ng aming kakanin sa araw-araw, At patawarin mo kami sa aming mga sala, Para nang pagpapatawad namin sa nagkakasala sa amin At huwag mo kaming ipahintulot sa tukso, At iadya mo kami sa lahat ng masama. Amen.


Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Ang lahat ng tao'y isinilang na malaya at pantay-pantay sa karangalan at mga karapatan. Sila'y pinagkalooban ng katwiran at budhi at dapat magpalagayan ang isa't isa sa diwa ng pagkakapatiran.


(Every person is born free and equal with honor and rights. They are given reason and conscience and they must always trust each other for the spirit of brotherhood.)


Numbers

  Cardinal Ordinal
1 isá una / ika-isa
2 dalawá pangalawá / ika'lawa
3 tatló pangatló / ika'tlo
4 apat pang-apat / ika-apat
5 limá panlimá / ika-lima
6 anim pang-anim / ika-anim
7 pitó pampitó / ika-pito
8 waló pangwaló / ika-walo
9 siyám pansiyám / ika-siyam
10 sampû pansampû / ika-sampu
11 labíng-isá / onse (Spanish numbers are commonly used above 10) panlabíng-isá / pang-onse / ika-labing-isa
12 labingdalawá / dose panlabindalawá / pandose / ika-labing-dalawa
20 dalawampu pambente / ika-dalawang-pu
100 (i)sán(g)daán / syento pang-isán(g)daán / pansyento / ika-isang-daan
200 dalawáng daán / dos syentos  
400 apat-na-raán / kwatro syentos  
600 anim-na-raán / saís syentos  
1,000 isáng libo  
2,000 dalawáng libo / dos mil  
10,000 sanlaksa / dyes mil  
100,000 sangyuta / syento mil  
1,000,000 isáng milyón / sang-angaw  
2,000,000 dalawáng milyón / dalawang angaw  
100,000,000 isang daang milyon

Common phrases

  • Filipino: Pilipino [ˌpiːliˈpiːno]
  • English: Ingglés [ʔɪŋˈglɛs]
  • Tagalog: Tagalog [tɐˈgaːlog]
  • What is your name?: Anó ang pangalan ninyo? (plural) Anó ang pangalan mo(singular) [ɐˈno aŋ pɐˈŋaːlan nɪnˈjo]
  • How are you?: kumustá [kʊmʊsˈta]
  • Good morning!: Magandáng umaga! [mɐgɐnˈdaŋ uˈmaːga]
  • Good afternoon! (from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.): Magandáng tanghali! [mɐgɐnˈdaŋ taŋˈhaːlε]
  • Good afternoon! (from 1 p.m. to dusk): Magandáng hapon! [mɐgɐnˈdaŋ ˈhaːpon]
  • Good evening!: Magandáng gabí! [mɐgɐnˈdaŋ gɐˈbε]
  • Good-bye: paalam [pɐˈʔaːlam] (literal - "with your blessing")
  • Please: Depending on the nature of the verb, either pakí- [pɐˈki] or makí- [mɐˈki] is attached as a prefix to a verb. ngâ [ŋaʔ] is optionally added after the verb to increase politeness.
  • Thank you: salamat [sɐˈlaːmat]
  • That one: iyan [ʔiˈjan]
  • How much?: magkano? [mɐgˈkaːno]
  • Yes: oo [ˈoːʔo]
  • No: hindî [hɪnˈdɛʔ]
  • Sorry: pasensya pô (literally - "patience") or sorry/sori [pɐˈsɛːnʃa poʔ] patawad po [pɐtaːwad poʔ] (literally - "forgiveness")
  • Because: kasí [kɐˈsɛ]
  • Hurry!: Dalí! [dɐˈli], Bilís! [bɪˈlis]
  • Again: mulí [muˈli] , ulít [uˈlɛt]
  • I don't understand: Hindî ko maintindihan [hɪnˈdiː ko mɐʔɪnˌtɪndiˈhan]
  • Where's the bathroom?: Nasaán ang banyo? [ˌnaːsɐˈʔan ʔaŋ ˈbaːnjo]
  • Generic toast: Mabuhay! [mɐˈbuːhaɪ] [literally - "long live"]
  • Do you speak English? Marunong ka bang magsalitâ ng Ingglés? [mɐˈɾuːnʊŋ ka baŋ mɐgsaliˈtaː naŋ ʔɪŋˈglɛs]
  • It is fun to live. Masaya ang mabuhay! [mɐˈsa'ya ʔaŋ mɐ'buːhaɪ]

Mabuhay (pronunciation: mah-BOO-hahy) is a word derived from the Tagalog language of the Philippines. ...

References

  1. ^ Philippine Census, 2000. Table 11. Household Population by Ethnicity, Sex and Region: 2000
  2. ^ Zorc, David. 1977. The Bisayan Dialects of the Philippines: Subgrouping and Reconstruction. Pacific Linguistics C.44. Canberra: The Australian National University
  3. ^ Blust, Robert. 1991. The Greater Central Philippines hypothesis. Oceanic Linguistics 30:73–129
  4. ^ a b c d e Andrew Gonzalez (1998). "The Language Planning Situation in the Philippines". Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 19 (5, 6): p. 487–488. 
  5. ^ Results from the 2000 Census of Population and Housing: Educational Characteristics of the Filipinos, National Statistics Office, March 18, 2005, <http://www.census.gov.ph/data/sectordata/sr05153tx.html>. Retrieved on 21 January 2008 
  6. ^ Results from the 2000 Census of Population and Housing: Population expected to reach 100 million Filipinos in 14 years, National Statistics Office, October 16, 2002, <http://www.census.gov.ph/data/pressrelease/2002/pr02178tx.html>. Retrieved on 21 January 2008 
  7. ^ Census:Languages of the United States. United States. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  8. ^ Statistics Canada 2006
  9. ^ 1897 Constitution of Biak-na-Bato, Article VIII, Filipiniana.net, <http://www.filipiniana.net/read_content.jsp?filename=L00000000001&page=1&epage=1>. Retrieved on 2008-01-16 
  10. ^ 1935 Philippine Constitution, Article XIV, Section 3, Chanrobles Law Library, <http://www.chanrobles.com/1935constitutionofthephilippines.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-12-20 
  11. ^ a b Manuel L. Quezon III, Quezon’s speech proclaiming Tagalog the basis of the National Language, quezon.ph, <http://www.quezon.ph/?page_id=1024>. Retrieved on 2007-12-20 
  12. ^ 1973 Philippine Constitution, Article XV, Sections 2-3, Chanrobles Law Library, <http://www.chanrobles.com/1973constitutionofthephilippines.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-12-20 
  13. ^ a b c 1987 Philippine Constitution, Article XIV, Sections 6-9, Chanrobles Law Library, <http://www.chanrobles.com/article14language.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-12-20 

is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikipedia
Tagalog language edition of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wiktionary
Tagalog language edition of Wiktionary, the free dictionary/thesaurus
Wikibooks
Wikibooks has a book on the topic of
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1058x1058, 477 KB) aa Wikipedia logo, version 1058px square, no text Wikipedia logo by Nohat (concept by Paullusmagnus); compare Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: Arabic language Talk:Anarcho-capitalism Talk:Algorithm Talk:Anno Domini Talk:The... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... There are over 170 languages in the Philippines; almost all of them belong to the Austronesian language family. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... A national language is a language (or language variant, i. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Philippine English is the variety of English used in the Philippines by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. ... A regional language is a language spoken in a part of a country, be it may be a small area, a federal state or province, or a wider area. ... Bicolano or Bikol is an Austronesian language used in the Philippines particularly on the Bicol Peninsula on the island of Luzon. ... Cebuano, also known as Sinugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 people (according to Ethnologue). ... Hiligaynon language test of Wikipedia at Wikimedia Incubator Hiligaynon (or Ilonggo) is an Austronesian language spoken in Western Visayas in the Philippines. ... To view the Ilokano edition of this Wikipedia article, select from the in other languages Ilokano (variants: Ilocano, Iluko, Iloco, and Iloko) is the third most-spoken language of the Republic of the Philippines. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kinaray-a is an Austronesian language spoken mainly in the Antique Province in the Philippines. ... Maguindanao is an Austronesian language spoken in the provinces of Cotabato, South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, and Zamboanga del Sur in the Philippines. ... Maranao is an Austronesian language spoken in the provinces of Lanao del Norte and Lanao del Sur in the Philippines. ... The Pangasinan language (Pangasinan: salitan Pangasinan; Spanish: idioma pangasinense) belongs to the Malayo-Polynesian languages branch of the Austronesian languages family. ... Tausug is spoken in Sulu province in the Philippines. ... Wáray-Wáray or Waráy (commonly spelled as Waray; also referred to as Winaray or L(in)eyte-Samarnon) is a language spoken in the provinces of Samar, Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Leyte (eastern portion), and Biliran in the Philippines. ... An international auxiliary language (sometimes abbreviated as IAL or auxlang) is a language used (or to be used in the future) for communication between people from different nations who do not share a common native language. ... Arabic redirects here. ... A language family is a group of languages related by descent from a common proto-language. ... The Borneo-Philippines languages (or Outer Hesperonesian or Outer Western Malayo-Polynesian languages) are a branch of the Austronesian family which include the languages of the Philippines, much of Borneo, the northern peninsula of Sulawesi, and Madagascar, as outlined in Wouk and Ross (2002). ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Bikol languages are a group of Central Philippine languages spoken in the Bicol Region of the Philippines. ... Inland Bikol are people living in the mainland or valley, and a form of Bikol. ... Pandan Bikol or Northern Catanduanes Bicolano is one of the three language groups forming the macrolanguage Bikol. ... The Visayan languages of the Philippines, along with Tagalog and Bikol, are part of the Central Philippine language family. ... Aklan is a language branch of the province of Aklan in the Philippines that is compsed of Aklanon and Malaynon languages http://www. ... Bisakol are two kinds of major dialects of the Philippines which comprises Bisaya (or Visayan) and Bikolano from the province of Bicol. ... The Batanic languages (sometimes called ‘Bashiic’ or ‘Ivatanic’ or ‘Vasayic’) are four closely related languages which together form a subgroup of the Austronesian language family. ... The Sambalic languages are part of the Central Luzon language family. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tagalog (Filipino) (1129 words)
Tagalog is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines and functions as its lingua franca.
Tagalog is a non-tonal language with a relatively small number of phonemes.
Tagalog is considered to be a Category II language in terms of difficulty for speakers of English.
Tagalog language – FREE Tagalog language Information | Encyclopedia.com: Find Tagalog language Research (802 words)
Austronesian language of the Philippines, spoken as a first language by about 17 million people on the island of Luzon and by at least half a million immigrant Filipinos.
With vocabulary enrichment from other Philippine languages, it has been made the basis of Pilipino, the national language; widely used in education and the media, Pilipino is now understood by more than 60% of the Philippine population.
Though a script ultimately of South Asian origin was in use for Tagalog in the 16th century (Indic writing systems), all recent literature in the language has utilized adaptations of the Latin alphabet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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