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Encyclopedia > Tafsir

Part of the series on
Qur'anic exegesis
A tafsir ( (Arabic: تفسير) tafsīr, also transliterated tafseer, Arabic explanation) is Quranic exegesis or commentary. ...


v  d  e
Most famous

Sunni:
Image File history File links Mosque02. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ...

Shi'a: Tafsir ibn Kathir is a classic Sunni Islam tafsir (commentary of the Quran) by Ibn Kathir. ... Tafsir al-Qurtubi is a famous Quran exegesis (Arabic: tafsir) by the famous classical Sunni scholar Al-Qurtubi. ... The commentary on the Quran (Arabic:Al-musammá Jami‘ al-bayan fi ta’wil al-Qur’an), popularly Tafsir al-Tabari is a classic Sunni tafsir by Tabari. ... Tafsir al-Jalalayn (Tafsir of the twin Jalals) is a classical Sunni tafsir of the Quran, composed first by Jalal ad-Din al-Mahalli and then completed by his student Jalal ad-Din as-Suyuti, thus its name. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ...

  • Tafsir al-Mizan — 1892-1981
Sunni tafsir
  • Tanwir al-Miqbas —  ?
  • Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer —  ?
  • Tafsir al-Baghawi — 1116
  • Tafsir of Fakhr al-Din — 1149–1209
  • Dur al-Manthur — 1464-1526
  • Fi zilal al-Qur'an — 1954
  • Tafhim al-Qur'an — 1903-1979
  • Tadabbur-i-Qur’an — 1904–1997
Shi'a tafsir
  • Holy Quran (puya) — ?
  • Majma al-Bayan — d. 1153
  • Nuur al-Thaqalayn — ?
  • al-Safi — 1598 or 9-1680 or 81
Mu'tazili tafsir
  • — ?-1258
  • Al-Kashaf — ?
Terms
*Asbab al-nuzul

A tafsir ( (Arabic: تفسير) tafsīr, Arabic "explanation") is Qur'anic exegesis or commentary. Someone who writes tafsir is a mufassir ( (Arabic: مفسر) mufassir, plural (Arabic: مفسرون) mufassirūn). Al-Mizan fi tafsiril-Quran, popularly known as Tafsir al-Mizan, is a very famous and volumnous tafsir or exegesis of the Quran written by the eminent Shia scholar Allameh Tabatabaei. ... Tanwir al-Miqbas is one of the most prominent Sunni Tafsir, sometimes attributed to Abd-Allah ibn Abbas and hence called Tafsir Ibn Abbas. [edit] External links introduction and text on altafsir. ... Al-Mujam al-Kabeer is a known exegesis on the Quran (Arabic: tafsir), writen by Sunni Islamic scholar al-Tabarani External links http://fadakbooks. ... Tafsir al-Baghawi (Arabic: ‎ ), also known as Maalim at-Tanzeel is a classical Sunni tafsir (Quranic exegesis) by Hasan bin Masood al-Baghawi, written as an abridgement of Tafsir al-Thalabi. ... For other uses, see Tafsir al-Kabir. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... In the Shade of the Quran (Arabic: فی ظِلالِ القران ) is a highly influential commentary on Islams holy book, the Quran, written by the Egyptian Islamic philosopher and leader, Sayyid Qutb, while imprisoned following an attempted assassination of Gamal Abdel Nasser in 1954. ... The Meaning of the Quran (Arabic: Tafhim al-Quran) is a book in six volumes written by the Sunni Islamic scholar Sayyid Abul Ala Maududi (1903-1979). ... Tadabbur-i-Qur’an is a tafsir (exegeses) of the Quran by Amin Ahsan Islahi based on the concept of thematic and structural coherence, which was originally inspired by Allama Hamiduddin Farahi. ... Holy Quran is the name of a well known Shia twelver tafsir, authored by Mahdi Puya. ... [edit] Name Al-Kashshaf an Haqaiq at-Tanzil, The Discoverer of Revealed Truths” [edit] See also List of Sunni books Category: ... Asbāb al-nuzÅ«l, an Arabic term meaning occasions of revelation, is a a secondary genre of Qurānic exegesis (tafsir) directed at establishing the context in which specific verses of the Qurān were revealed. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Exegesis (from the Greek to lead out) involves an extensive and critical interpretation of a text, especially of a holy scripture, such as of the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, the Talmud, the Midrash, the Quran, etc. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ...

Contents

Sources of Tafsir

The five traditional sources for commentary of the Qur'an are: This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ...

  1. The Qur'an. This is regarded as the highest form of tafsir, on the belief that the Qu'ran is the word of Almighty God and authoritative when it explains itself. A related Muslim belief is that the Qur'an is c) free of contradiction, and that apparent inconsistencies in its message are inevitably resolved through closer study of the Qur'anic text.
  2. The hadith. Muslims believe that Muhammad was sent, among other reasons, to explain and clarify the Qur'an to people. The accounts of Muhammad's teaching recorded in the hadith collections thus contain much tafsir of the Qur'an, under titles such as "Meaning of Qur'anic verses." An authenticated hadith is regarded the second highest form of tafsir, because the Islamic prophet is explaining it -- but many of these traditions are disputed.
  3. The reports of the Sahaba. The Sahaba, or companions of Muhammad, also interpreted and taught the Qur'an. If Qur'anic explication is absent, and there is no authentic tradition deriving from Muhammad, then a consensus of the companions may be helpful in interpreting a certain verse. Scholars have an obligation to follow that consensus.
  4. The reports of those who learned from the companions. These people grew up in an environment with people who had known the Prophet, so their insight is the next in line of the sources of tafsir. (In addition, the recorded practice of those who lived in the Prophet's city of Medina carry special weight in the Maliki school.)
  5. Reason. A qualified scholar's personal reasoning (deductive logic and personal evaluation of arguments) is the final method of understanding the Qur'an; it exists in conjunction with the other four. See Ijtihad. Early caliphs are strongly associated with this method of tafsir.

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalifah, is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ...

The approaches of tafsir

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Discussion of this nomination can be found on the talk page.

There are various approaches to interpret the Qur'an-- Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...

  • Interpretation of the Qur'an by the Qur'an: Because of the close interrelatedness of the verses of the Qur'an with one another, the Qur'anic verses explain and interpret one another.[1] Many verses or words in the Qur'an are explained or further clarified in other verses of the Qur'an. [2] Tafsir al-Mizan is an example of this kind.
  • Interpretation of the Qur'an by the Hadith: In this approach the most important external aids used in interpreting the meanings of the Qur'an are the hadith — the collected oral traditions upon which Muslim scholars (the ulema) based Islamic history and law. While certain hadith — the hadith qudsi — are thought to reflect noncanonical words spoken by God to Muhammad, Muslims do not consider these to form any part of the Qur'an.
  • Interpretation of the Qur'an by the History: Most commentators considered it extremely important for commentators to explain how the Qur'an was revealed -- when and under which circumstances. Much commentary, or tafsir, was dedicated to history. The early tafsir are considered to be some of the best sources for Islamic history. Famous early commentators include at-Tabari and Ibn Kathir.

(These classic commentaries usually include all common and accepted interpretations; modern fundamentalist commentaries like that written by Sayyed Qutb tend to advance only one of the possible interpretations.) Al-Mizan fi tafsiril-Quran, popularly known as Tafsir al-Mizan, is a very famous and volumnous tafsir or exegesis of the Quran written by the eminent Shia scholar Allameh Tabatabaei. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ulema (, translit: , singular: , translit: , scholar) (Islamic clergy) refers to the educated class of Muslim scholars engaged in the several fields of Islamic studies. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Hadith Qudsi (or Sacred Hadith) are a sub-category of hadith, which are sayings of Muhammad. ... Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari (AD 838-AD 923), Iranian historian and theologian, was born in Amol, Tabaristan (south of the Caspian), and studied in Ray (Rages) , Baghdad, and in Syria and Egypt. ... Ibn Kathir (Arabic : بن كثير ) was an Islamic scholar born in Busra, Syria in 1301 CE. He was taught by the Islamic scholar Ibn Taymiyya in Damascus, Syria. ...


Commentators feel fairly sure of the exact circumstances prompting some verses, such as surat Iqra, or many parts, including ayat 190-194, of surat al-Baqarah. In other cases (eg surat al-Asr), the most that can be said is which city the Prophet was living in at the time (dividing between Makkan and Madinan suras.) In some cases, such as surat al-Kawthar, the details of the circumstances are disputed, with different traditions giving different accounts. Surat al-Alaq, Iqra, or al-Qalam (The Clot, Read, or The Pen) is the 96th sura of the Quran. ... Surat al-Baqarah (the Cow) is the second, and the longest, sura of the Quran, with 286 ayat. ... Surat Al-`Asr (The Declining Day, Eventide, The Epoch, Time) is the 103rd sura of the Quran. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... The Makkan suras are the chronologically earlier suras of the Quran that were revealed at Makka. ... The Madinan suras of the Quran are those suras which were revealed at Madina, after Muhammads hijra from Makka, when the Muslims were establishing a state rather than being, as at Makka, an oppressed minority. ... Surat al-Kawthar (Arabic: سورة الكوثر ) (Abundance) is the 108th sura of the Quran, and the shortest. ...

  • Theologies approach: Theologists are divided into myriad of sects; and each group clung to the verse that seems to support its belief and try to explain away what was apparently against it.

The seed of sectarian differences was sown in academic theories or, more often than not, in blind following and national or tribal prejudice; but it is not the place to describe it even briefly. However, such exegesis should be called adaptation, rather than explanation. There are two ways of explaining a verse - One may say: "What does the Qur’an say?" Or one may say: "How can this verse be explained, so as to fit on my belief? " The difference between the two approaches is quite clear. The former forgets every preconceived idea and goes where the Qur’an leads him to. The latter has already decided what to believe and cuts the Qur’anic verses to fit on that body; such an exegesis is no exegesis at all.[3]

  • Philosophic approach: The philosophers try to fit the verses on the principles of Greek philosophy (that was divided into four branches: Mathematics, natural science, divinity and practical subjects including civics). If a verse was clearly against those principles it was explained away. In this way the verses describing metaphysical subjects, those explaining the genesis and creation of the heavens and the earth, those concerned with life after death and those about resurrection, paradise and hell were distorted to conform with the said philosophy. That philosophy was admittedly only a set of conjectures - unencumbered with any test or proof; but the Muslim philosophers felt no remorse in treating its views on the system of skies, orbits, natural elements and other related subjects as the absolute truth with which the exegesis of the Qur'an had to conform.[4]
  • Scientific approach:Some people who are deeply influenced by the natural and social sciences followed the materialists of Europe or the pragmatists. Under the influence of those anti-Islamic theories, they declared that the religion's realities cannot go against scientific knowledge. one should not believe except that which is perceived by any one, of the five senses; nothing exists except the matter and its properties. What the religion claims to exist, but which the sciences reject -like The Throne, The Chair, The Tablet and The Pen - should be interpreted in a way that conforms with the science; as for those things which the science is silent about, like the resurrection etc., they should be brought within the purview of the laws of matter; the pillars upon which the divine religious laws are based - like revelation, angel, Satan, prophethood, apostleship, Imamah (Imamate) etc. - are spiritual things, and the spirit is a development of the matter, or let us say, a property of the matter; legislation of those laws is manifestation of a special social genius, who ordains them after healthy and fruitful contemplation, in order to establish a good and progressive society. They believe one cannot have confidence in the traditions, because many are spurious; only those traditions may be relied upon which are in conformity with the Book. As for the Book itself, one should not explain it in the light of the old philosophy and theories, because they were not based on observations and tests - they were just a sort of mental exercise which has been totally discredited now by the modem science. [5]
  • Sufistic: It's an interpretation of the Qur’an which includes attribution of esoteric or mystic meanings to the text by the interpreter. In this respect, its method is different from the conventional exegesis of the Qur’an, called tafsir. Esoteric interpretations do not usually contradict the conventional (in this context called exoteric) interpretations; instead, they discuss the inner levels of meaning of the Qur'an. A hadith from Mohammad which states that the Qur’an has an inner meaning, and that this inner meaning conceals a yet deeper inner meaning, and so on (up to seven levels of meaning), has sometimes been used in support of this view [8], [9]. Islamic opinion imposes strict limitations on esoteric interpretations specially when interior meaning is against exterior one.[6]

Esoteric interpretations are found mainly in Sufism and in the sayings (hadiths) of Shi'a Imams and the teachings of the Isma'ili sect. But the Prophet and the lmams gave importance to its exterior as much as to its interior; they were as much concerned with its revelation as they were with its interpretation. [7] Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ... Genesis (Hebrew: ‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Paradise, by Jan Bruegel The word paradise is derived from the Avestan word pairidaeza (a walled enclosure), which is a compound of pairi- (around), a cognate of the Greek peri-, and -diz (to create, make), a cognate of the English dough. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown. ... A Gothic angel in ivory, c1250, Louvre An angel is a supernatural being found in many religions. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... An esoteric interpretation of the Qur’an is an interpretation of the Qur’an which includes attribution of esoteric or mystic meanings to the text by the interpretater and in this aspect its method is different from the conventional exegesis of the Qur’an called tafsir. ... Interpretation, or interpreting, is an activity that consists of establishing, either simultaneously or consecutively, oral or gestural communications between two or more speakers who are not speaking (or signing) the same language. ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān literally the recitation; also called Al Qurān Al Karīm or The Noble Quran; or transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... Mysticism from the Greek μυστικός (mustikos) an initiate (of the Eleusinian Mysteries, μυστήρια (musteria) meaning initiation[1]) is the pursuit of achieving communion or identity with, or conscious awareness of, ultimate reality, the divine, spiritual truth, or God through direct experience, intuition, or insight; and the belief that such experience is one... Exegesis (from the Greek to lead out) involves an extensive and critical interpretation of a text, especially of a holy scripture, such as of the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, the Talmud, the Midrash, the Quran, etc. ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān literally the recitation; also called Al Qurān Al Karīm or The Noble Quran; or transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Exoteric knowledge is knowledge that is publicly available, in contrast with esoteric knowledge, which is kept from everyone except the initiated. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other people named Muhammad, see Muhammad (disambiguation). ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān literally the recitation; also called Al Qurān Al Karīm or The Noble Quran; or transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition that found a home in Islam and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to Allah, divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam only with regards to the aspect of political leadership. ... The Ismaili (Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmâiliyân) branch of Islam is the second largest Shia community, after the Twelvers who are dominant in Iran. ...


Genres of Tafsir

Part of a series on the
Qur'an

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Qur'an reading
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Origin and development
Tafsir
Qur'an and Sunnah
Views on the Qur'an
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  • Asbāb al-nuzūl: defining the "occasions of revelation" of the suras.
  • Naskh: dealing with the abrogation of one Qur'anic verse by another.

A Mushaf is a Arabic word that literarly means cover, as in a book cover. ... Sura (sometimes spelled as Surah) ( ) is an Arabic term literally meaning to enclose something, or to surround it with a wall. ... Ayah ( ‎ , plural Ayat ‎ ) is the Arabic word for sign or miracle. ... Quran reading is the reading (tartil, tajwid, or taghbir) aloud, reciting, chanting, or singing of portions of the Quran. ... TajwÄ«d (تجويد) is an Arabic word meaning proper pronunciation during recitation, as well as recitation at a moderate speed. ... Tarteel (Arabic: ترتيل ) is an Arabic term that is wide in meaning but is commonly translated in reference to the Quran as recitation. ... A manzil (منزل, plural manazil, منازل) is one of seven parts of roughly equal length into which the Quran is divided for the purpose of reciting the entire text in one week. ... A juz (جزء, plural ajza, اجزاء) is one of thirty parts of roughly equal length into which the Quran is divided for the purpose of reciting the entire text in one month. ... A hizb (حزب , plural ahzab,احزاب) is one half of a juz and thus comprises roughly one 60th of the text of the Quran. ... Hafiz or Hafez (Arabic: حافظ قرآن حافظ), literally meaning guardian, is a term used by Muslims for people who have completely memorized the Quran. ... It has been suggested that Qari be merged into this article or section. ... Definition - Revenue per Available Seat Mile. ... Translations of the Qurán are interpretations of the holy book of Islam in languages other than Arabic. ... This is a sub-article to Translation of the Quran. ... Regarding the origin and development of the Quran, Islamic scholars proceed with the assumption that the Quran is exactly the same today as when it was revealed to the Islamic prophet Muhammad. ... The Madinan suras of the Quran are those suras which were revealed at Madina, after Muhammads hijra from Makka, when the Muslims were establishing a state rather than being, as at Makka, an oppressed minority. ... The Makkan suras are the chronologically earlier suras of the Quran that were revealed at Makka. ... Some of the Quranic verses are said to be revealed pertaining to some specific person. ... Justice, truth-telling, various virtues and sins the prohibition of purjury in the Quran are repeated many times: // And eat up not one another’s property unjustly (in any illegal way e. ... Asbāb al-nuzÅ«l, an Arabic term meaning occasions of revelation, is a a secondary genre of Qurānic exegesis (tafsir) directed at establishing the context in which specific verses of the Qurān were revealed. ... Naskh, an Arabic word meaning abrogation, is a technical term for a major genre of Islamic exegesis dealing with the problem of seemingly contradictory verses in the Quran. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Tahrif (Arabic: ‎ corruption, forgery; the stem-II verbal noun of the consonantal root , to make oblique) is an Arabic term used by Muslims with regard to words, and more specifically with regard to what Jews and Christians are supposed to have done to their respective Scriptures. ... Bakkah (Arabic: ‎) is a place mentioned in surah 3:96 of the Quran. ... A tree diagram of the Quranic initial letters, labelled with the respective numbers of occurrences. ... An esoteric interpretation of the Qur’an is an interpretation of the Qur’an which includes attribution of esoteric or mystic meanings to the text by the interpretater and in this aspect its method is different from the conventional exegesis of the Qur’an called tafsir. ... Quran and Sunnah is an often quoted Islamic term regarding the sources of Islam. ... Ibn Baz was a follower of the Muslim scholars Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab and Ibn Taymiyya; he belonged to that current of Muslim thought sometimes called Salafism and sometimes called Wahabbism. ... This is a sub-article to Quran and Islamic view of miracles. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This is a sub-article to Shia Islam and Quran The Shia view of the Quran has some differences from the Sunni view. ... This is a sub-article to Criticism of Islam and Quran. ... Quran desecration means insulting the Quran, the holy book of Islam, by defiling or disfacing it. ... There are two verses named Surah of Wilaya and Nurayn that are claimed to be included in the Quran. ... For the novel by Salman Rushdie, see The Satanic Verses. ... Tanazzulat, or descents (Arabic تنزلات, plural of Tanazzul, تنزل), refers to the act of descent of the pre-existing Quran through different Realms. ... The Qisas al-anbiya (قصص الأنبياء) or Stories of the Prophets refers to various collections of tales adapted from the Quran. ... Beit Al Quran, Hoora Beit Al Quran (Arabic: بيت القرآن) means House of Quran in Arabic. ... Asbāb al-nuzÅ«l, an Arabic term meaning occasions of revelation, is a a secondary genre of Qurānic exegesis (tafsir) directed at establishing the context in which specific verses of the Qurān were revealed. ... Sura (sometimes spelt Surah , plural Suwar ) is an Arabic term literally meaning something enclosed or surrounded by a fence or wall. ... Naskh, an Arabic word meaning abrogation, is a technical term for a major genre of Islamic exegesis dealing with the problem of seemingly contradictory verses in the Quran. ...

Prohibited Tafsir

Muslims believe that it is prohibited to perform Qur'anic interpretation using solely one's own opinion. This, they base on an authenticated hadith of Muhammad which states that it is prohibited. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The Qur'an, the utmost authority on Islam asserts that the word was sent to all of mankind and it is up to the whole of mankind to receive it and sincerely ponder upon its meaning. Islam acknowledges no "clergy" nor monopolisation of "The Word of God", Islam only acknowledges the "knowledgeable" ones from among a community of people, the "Ulama" or scholars. In the Qur'an, God exhorts mankind to "think" and "ponder" and "realise" for themselves, thereby awakening true belief inside each and every human being.


Major Mufassireen

Major Tafsirs of the Qur'an include:

  • Ibn Kathir: "Tafsir ibn Kathir" - A classic tafsir, considered a summary of the earlier Tafseer by Ibn Jarir (at-Tabari). It is especially popular because it uses 'hadith' to explain each verse and chapter of the Qur'an.
  • Fakhr al-Din al-Razi: "Mafatīh ul-Ghayb" also known as "Tafsir Kabir" - A voluminous work covering many aspects including science and medicine. Ibn Taymiyyah once critically said of this tafsir that it "contains everything but tafsir".
  • Qazi Abu Saud al-Hanafi: "Irshad ul Aql as-Saleem ila Mazaya al-Qur'an al-Kareem" also known as "Tafsir Abu Saud".
  • Imam Abu Abdullah al-Qurtubi: "al-Jāmi' li Aḥkām il-Qur'an" by the famous Maliki jurist of Cordoba. This 10-volume tafsir is a commentary on the Qur'anic verses dealing with legal issues. Although the author was a Maliki, he also presents legal opinions of other major schools of Islamic jurisprudence; thus it is popular with jurists from all of the schools of Islamic law. One volume of this tafsir was translated into English by Aisha Bewley.
  • Qaḍi Abu Bakr ibn al-Arabi: "Aḥkam al-Qur'an" - Known as 'Qaḍi ibn al-Arabi' (ibn Arabi the judge) to distinguish him from the famous Sufi ibn Arabi, he was a Maliki jurist from Andalusia (Muslim Spain) His tafsir was published in 3 volumes and contains commentary on the legal rulings of the Qur'an according to the Maliki school.
  • ‘Allama Mahműd Alusi al-Hanafi: "Tafsir Ruh ul-Ma'ani fi Tafsir il-Qur'an al-Azim wa Saba' al-Mathani" - Also known as Ruh ul Ma'ani.
  • Ismail Hakki Bursevi: "Ruh al-Bayan" - 10-volume Arabic work by the founder of the Hakkiyye Jelveti Sufi order.
  • "Tafsir al-Baghawi" - A popular tafsir amongst Sunni Muslims.
  • "Tafsir al-Baydawi" - Shortened version of the above tafsir printed in 2 volumes. In Turkey it is often published with marginal notes by an unknown Turkish Sheikh called 'Konyawi' in 7 volumes.
  • "Tafsir ibn Atiyyah" - A tafsir popular in North West Africa.
  • "Tafsir ibn al-Jawzi" - Written by the great Hanbali polymath.
  • "Tafsir an-Nasafi" - Written by the great Hanafi theologian Nasafi and published in 2 volumes.
  • "Tafsir Abu Hayyan" also called "Bahr al-Muhit" - This tafsir is in several volumes and contains many stories that some commentators consider to be unreliable. However, it is popular in North Africa as it originated from Andalusia.
  • "Tafsir al-Jalalayn" - The great Shafi Sheikh Jalal ud-Din Siyuti wrote 2 tafsirs - one named "Jalalayn" and the other "ad-Durr al-Manthur". Both are published (the second in several volumes) and the Jalalayn is very popular with Muslims all over the world due to its simplicity.

Ibn Kathir (Arabic : بن كثير ) was an Islamic scholar born in Busra, Syria in 1301 CE. He was taught by the Islamic scholar Ibn Taymiyya in Damascus, Syria. ... Tafsir ibn Kathir is a classic Sunni Islam tafsir (commentary of the Quran) by Ibn Kathir. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (1149–1209) was a well-known Persian theologian and philosopher from Ray. ... Taqi al-Din Ahmad Ibn Taymiyyah (Arabic: )(January 22, 1263 - 1328), was a Sunni Islamic scholar born in Harran, located in what is now Turkey, close to the Syrian border. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... For the Maliki scholar, see Ibn al-Arabi. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... // The Hanafi (Arabic حنفي) school is the oldest of the four schools of thought (Madhhabs) or jurisprudence (Fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... // The Hanafi (Arabic حنفي) school is the oldest of the four schools of thought (Madhhabs) or jurisprudence (Fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Tabatabai is a nesbat that denotes that the titled individual has a both a mother and father that are Seyyed, ie, trace their geneology straight back to the Islamic prophet Muhammad. ... Al-Mizan fi tafsiril-Quran, popularly known as Tafsir al-Mizan, is a very famous and volumnous tafsir or exegesis of the Quran written by the eminent Shia scholar Allameh Tabatabaei. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Jelveti is the name of a Sufi order that was founded by the Turkish saint Aziz Mahmud Hudayi. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... For other uses, see Sheikh (disambiguation). ... The Tariqa ash Shadhiliya is the Sufi order founded by Abu-l-Hassan ash-Shadhili. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... For other uses, see Sheikh (disambiguation). ... The Salafee Imâm became well-known with the title Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyyah because his father was the principal of the al-Jawziyyah school in Damascus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // The Hanafi (Arabic حنفي) school is the oldest of the four schools of thought (Madhhabs) or jurisprudence (Fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ... Tafsir al-Jalalayn (Tafsir of the twin Jalals) is a classical Sunni tafsir of the Quran, composed first by Jalal ad-Din al-Mahalli and then completed by his student Jalal ad-Din as-Suyuti, thus its name. ... Shafii is one of the four schools of Fiqh or religious law within Sunni Islam. ... For other uses, see Sheikh (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...

Modern Mufassireen

  • Mufti Muhammad Shafi'i: A detailed and comprehensive commentary of the Quran written in Urdu, and has been translated to English. The author is the father of Mufti Taqi Usmani. Popular among Muslims, it is published in 8 volumes, and addresses many modern issues. All 8 volumes are available in English here.
  • Maulvi Abdul Qadeer Siddiqui: Tafseer-e-Siddiqui (in Urdu). Written early last century by the former dean of theology of Osmania University. As a professor of Arabic and theology, he attempted to bring the Quranic Arabic to Urdu as well as address some critical current issues.
  • Ahmed Raza Khan Barelvi: Kanzul Iman (in Urdu). Written by the founder of the Barelvi School of thought in India. This tasfeer is written from a traditional Non-Wahhabi point of view defending the current beliefs and practicing against that of the Wahhabi movement.
  • Sayyed Qutb: In the Shade of the Qur'an - Many praise it as a modern tafsir of the Qur'an. However, many critics including some Wahhabi and Salafi scholars say that Qutb had little Islamic knowledge and did tafsir in his own opinion. It has also been attacked for not containing the classical tafsir style (using the above mentioned sources).
  • Amin Ahsan Islahi: Tadabbur-i Qur'an - written by Indian/Pakistani scholar. Based on idea of the nazm (thematic and structural coherence) in the Qur'an.
  • Muhammad Al-Ghazzali, a recent Egyptian scholar who died in 2001 (not the Imam Al-Ghazali): "A Thematic Commentary on the Qur'an" - A tafsir that tries to explore the themes that weave through the entire Qur'an as well as the main theme of each surah.
  • Mirza Basheerud Deen Mahmood: Tafseer e Kabeer[10]. Written by the second successor and son of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian, founder of the Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam, a controversial sect. It is the most detailed commentary on the Qur'an in modern times. Abdul Majid Daryabadi wrote in praise of this Tafseer in his paper, Siqe Jadeed, Luknow, 18 Nov, 1965. Translations have been published in Arabic, Urdu and English.
  • Bediuzzaman Said Nursi Isharatul I'jaz, and the Risalei Nur. The former written in Arabic (translated into Arabic and English) in the classical exegesis style, with special emphasis to combining linguistical nuances with theological depth. Consists of one volume only, addressing the exegesis of the first chapter and part of the second chapter of the Quran. The latter, Risale-i Nur, written mainly in Turkish, is a larger work, with four main volumes. It consists of extensive exegesis of certain verses and explanation of the fundamentals of how to approach the Quran. This work is written in a more accessible style to the general public and is translated to many languages. [11] Nursi also wrote Muhakamat in Arabic (also translated into Turkish) which outlines in a sophisticated manner the hermeneutics of the Quran. Mathnawi al Nuriya, written in Arabic (abridged Turkish translation and also a non-academic English rendition is available),can also be considered an exegetical work in that it contains his deep reflections on different verses of the Quran. Born toward the end of Ottoman State, Nursi, an erudite exegete and theologian, died in 1960 in modern Turkey.

Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Bahrul Uloom Hazrat Maulana Abdul Qadeer Siddiqui Hasrat (1870-1962) aka Qadeer Pia (Qadeer the Beloved) by his disciples. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Image:Omsania University. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Barelwi (Hindi: बरैल्वि, Urdu: بریلوی) is a movement within Sunni Islam that was started by Ahmed Rida Khan of Bareilly, India (hence the term Barelwi). ... Wahhabism (sometimes spelled Wahabbism or Wahabism) is a movement of Islam named after Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab (1703–1792). ... Categories: Islam-related stubs | 1906 births | 1966 deaths | Muslim philosophers ... Wahhabism (sometimes spelled Wahabbism or Wahabism) is a movement of Islam named after Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab (1703–1792). ... This article is on the beliefs of the followers of the Salaf. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Haruniyeh tomb, named after Harun al-Rashid. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community (Arabic: الجماعة الأحمدية; transliterated: ) is based on the Ahmadiyya movement founded in 1889 by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian (1835-1908). ... Ahmadi Muslims are followers of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad. ... Abdul Majid Daryabadi (1892-1977) was a famous Indian Muslim writer and exegete of the Quran. ...

Tafsir in other languages

Tafsir was almost always written in Arabic but during the 20th century with the emergence of modern states, the need was felt by Muslims to write commentaries in local languages so that those who do not know Arabic can still have access to the meaning of the Qur'an. Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ...


The following are a list of tafsirs that have been written in non-Arabic languages.

  • Bangla/Bengali Maariful Quran.
  • Elmalili tefsir: Published in 10 volumes it remains the most popular tafsir in the Turkish language.
  • Omer Bilmen: Author of an 8-volume tafsir written in the first half of XX. century. The language used is an old form of Turkish that many Turks find difficult to understand.
  • Konyali Tefsir. A voluminous tafsir written in simple Turkish language but less popular than the Elmalili tafsir.

Turkish () is a Turkic language, spoken mainly in Turkey, with smaller communities of speakers in Bulgaria,[3] the Republic of Macedonia,[4] Uzbekistan,[5] Cyprus,[6] Greece,[7] as well as by several million emigrants in Western Europe. ... Malayalam (മലയാളം ) is the language spoken predominantly in the state of Kerala, in southern India. ... Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... The Kerala Nadvathul Mujahideen (KNM) was formed on 20 April 1950 in Kerala, south India, under the leadership of the scholars of the Islahi Movement in Kerala. ...

Sources

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4]
  5. ^ [5]
  6. ^ [6]
  7. ^ [7]

See also

  • Asbab al-nuzul
  • Ma'ariful Qur'an, an eight-volume English translation of the famous commentary of the Holy Qur'an by Justice Mufti Taqi Usmani, originally compiled in Urdu by his father, Mufti Muhammad Shafi. The latter work could be considered to be the best of the available English commentaries of the Qur'an, as Shaykh Faraz Rabbani and others state.

Asbāb al-nuzūl, an Arabic term meaning occasions of revelation, is a a secondary genre of Qurānic exegesis (tafsir) directed at establishing the context in which specific verses of the Qurān were revealed. ... Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, is a scholar and researcher of Islamic law and translator of several Arabic works to the English language. ...

External links

  • Tafseer Ibn Kathir
  • English Tafsir Maariful Quran
  • English Tafsir Maariful Quran in US
  • Bangla Tafsir Maariful Quran
  • Tafsir from the Hadith themselves
  • Sayyed Qutb - In the Shade of the Qur'an
  • Various Tafsirs
  • Salafi/Wahhabi Tafsir
  • Audio Tafsir of the Qur'an in English from a Sunni standpoint
  • Altafsir.com
  • Al-Mizan - Allamah Tabatabai's tafsir of the qur'an
  • Tafsir of selected verses
  • Audio Tafseer of selected Chapters of Quran
  • Quran based Tafsir
  • Tafhim al-Qur'an

 
 

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