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Encyclopedia > Tacoma, Washington
Tacoma, Washington
Official flag of Tacoma, Washington
Flag

Seal
Nickname: The City of Destiny
Location of Tacoma in Pierce County and Washington State
Location of Tacoma in
Pierce County and Washington State
Coordinates: 47°14′29″N 122°27′34″W / 47.24139, -122.45944
Country United States
State Washington
County Pierce
Government
 - Mayor Bill Baarsma (D)
Area
 - City  62.6 sq mi (162.2 km²)
 - Land  50.1 sq mi (129.7 km²)
 - Water  12.5 sq mi (32.5 km²)
Elevation  243 ft (74 m)
Population (2007)
 - City 201,700 (city proper)
 - Density 3,984.2/sq mi (1,538.3/km²)
  3,806,453(metro area)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
Area code(s) 253
FIPS code 53-70000GR2
GNIS feature ID 1512713GR3
Website: http://www.cityoftacoma.org/

Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is a mid-sized urban port city in Washington, United States. The city is situated on Washington's Puget Sound, in an area 32 miles (51 km) southwest of Seattle, 31 miles (50 km) northeast of the State capital, Olympia, and 58 miles (93 km) northwest of Mount Rainier National Park. According to 2007 Washington State OFM estimates, Tacoma has an estimated population of 201,700.[1] Tacoma stands as the second-largest city in the Puget Sound area, the third-largest in the state, and the seat of government of Pierce County. Image File history File links Tacdtaug05_1. ... Image File history File links Official flag of the city of Tacoma. ... Image File history File links Tacoma_Seal. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Image File history File links Pierce_County_Washington_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Tacoma_Highlighted. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Washington counties This is a list of counties in Washington. ... Pierce County is the second most populous county in the state of Washington. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Bill Baarsma (Democrat) is the mayor of Tacoma, Washington. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... PST is UTC-8 The Pacific Standard Time Zone (PST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) resulting in UTC-8. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... PDT is UTC-7 The Pacific Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-8). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 253 is a telephone dialing code in Washington for the suburbs south of Seattle and of the southern Puget Sound area, centered at Tacoma and extending to include the areas around Gig Harbor, Auburn, and Roy. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Puget Sound For the university in this region, see University of Puget Sound. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Coordinates: , County Incorporated January 28, 1859 Government  - Mayor Mark Foutch Area  - City 48. ... Mount Rainier National Park is a United States National Park located in southeast Pierce County, Washington. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The seat of government is the location of the government for a political entity. ... Pierce County is the second most populous county in the state of Washington. ...


Tacoma adopted its name after the nearby Mount Rainier, which was originally called Mount Tacoma or Mount Tahoma. It is known as the "City of Destiny" because the area was chosen to be the site of the western terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad in the late 1800s. The decision of the railroad was influenced in part because of Tacoma's neighboring Commencement Bay. By connecting the bay with the railroad Tacoma’s motto became “When rails meet sails.” Today Commencement Bay serves the Port of Tacoma, a major player in international trade on the Pacific Coast. For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... Northern Pacific Railway Categories: Stub | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Idaho railroads | Minnesota railroads | Montana railroads | North Dakota railroads | Oregon railroads | Washington railroads | Wisconsin railroads ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Commencement Bay is the body of water on which Tacoma, Washington is located. ... The Port of Tacoma is an independent seaport located in Tacoma , Washington. ... International trade is the exchange of goods and services across international boundaries or territories. ... The Pacific Coast is any coast fronting the Pacific Ocean. ...


Like most central cities, Tacoma suffered a prolonged decline in the mid-20th century as a result of suburbanization, divestment, and federal urban renewal programs. Recently the city has been undergoing a Renaissance of sorts (see below); investing great sums of money in the downtown core to establish the University of Washington, Tacoma; Tacoma Link, the first modern electric light rail service in the state; various art and history museums; and a restored inlet, the Thea Foss Waterway. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Suburbanisation is a term used by many to describe the current social urban dynamic operating within many parts of the developed world and is related to the phenomenon of urban sprawl. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ... The University of Washington, Tacoma (UW, Tacoma, or UWT) is one of the two newest campuses in the University of Washington system, located in Tacoma, south of the main campus in Seattle, Washington, USA. The other satellite campus is in Bothell; both opened in temporary facilities in 1990, and moved... Tacoma Link at the Tacoma Dome Station // Tacoma Link Tacoma Link is a 1. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... This article on a place of local interest appears to contain only a small amount of verifiable information. ...


The city has a long history of blue-collar labor politics owing to the relationship between the people and the railroad.


Tacoma-Pierce County has been named as one of the most livable areas in the country.[2] Tacoma was also recently listed as one of the most walkable cities in the country (19th).[3] In contrast, the city is also ranked as the most stressed-out city in the country in a 2004 survey.[4] However, in 2006, women's magazine Self named Tacoma the "Most Sexually Healthy City" in the United States.

Contents

History

The SR-509 Bridge leading into downtown.

Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by American Indians, predominantly the Puyallup people, who lived in several settlements on the delta of the Puyallup River and called the area where Tacoma would be built "Squa-szucks". It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks. Image File history File links Sr509bridge. ... Image File history File links Sr509bridge. ... Washington State Route 509 is a highway in the state of Washington, U.S.A. It extends just over 35 miles (56. ... A Sioux in traditional dress including war bonnet, about 1908 Native Americans â€“ also Indians, American Indians, First Nations, First Peoples, Indigenous Peoples of America, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerind, Native Canadians (or of other nations) â€“ are those peoples indigenous to the Americas, living there prior to European colonization and... The Puyallup are a Native American tribe from western Washington state, U.S.A. They settled onto reservation lands in what is today Tacoma, Washington, in late 1854, after signing the Treaty of Medicine Creek. ... The Puyallup River in Pierce County, Washington flows about 45 miles from its source on Mount Rainier to Commencement Bay at Tacoma. ... A life sized statue covered in gold of George Vancouver on top of the British Columbia Parliament Buildings Captain George Vancouver RN (June 22, 1757 – May 12, 1798) was an officer of the Royal Navy, best known for his exploration of North America, including the Pacific coast along the modern... Charles Wilkes Charles Wilkes (April 3, 1798 – February 8, 1877) was an American naval officer and explorer. ...


19th Century

In 1852 a Swede named Nicolas Delin constructed a sawmill powered by water on a creek near the head of Commencement Bay, but the small settlement that grew up around it was abandoned during the Indian War of 1855-1856. In 1864, pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad, built a cabin (a replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site), and later sold most of his claim to developer Morton McCarver (1807-1875), who named his project Tacoma City. The name derived from the indigenous name for Mount Rainier, deriving from the Puyallup tacobet, "mother of waters". Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ...


Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. Its early hopes to be the "City of Destiny" were stimulated by its selection in 1873 as the western terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad, thanks to lobbying by McCarver and others. The transcontinental link was effected in 1887, but the railroad built its depot on "New Tacoma", two miles south of the Carr-McCarver development. The two communities subsequently grew together and joined. The population grew from 1,098 in 1880 to 36,006 in 1890. Rudyard Kipling visited Tacoma in 1889 and said Tacoma was "literally staggering under a boom of the boomiest".[5] is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Northern Pacific Railway Categories: Stub | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Idaho railroads | Minnesota railroads | Montana railroads | North Dakota railroads | Oregon railroads | Washington railroads | Wisconsin railroads ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... This article is about the British author. ...


George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start/finish line. George Francis Train (1829 - 1904) was a businessman and an eccentric figure in American history. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city. As described by the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project, on the morning of November 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground." is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ...


The discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1898 led Tacoma's prominence in the region to be eclipsed by the booming development of Seattle. Klondike may refer to one of the following: The Klondike region in the Yukon Territory of Canada Klondike, a popular solitaire card game. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Downtown looking west from the Tacoma Sheraton
Downtown looking west from the Tacoma Sheraton

Image File history File linksMetadata Tacomatwilight. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Tacomatwilight. ...

20th Century

During a thirty day power shortage in the winter of 1929/1930, Tacoma was provided with electricity from the engines of the aircraft carrier USS Lexington. The fourth USS Lexington (CV-2), nicknamed the Gray Lady or Lady Lex, was the second aircraft carrier of the United States Navy. ...


In 1935 Tacoma received national attention when George Weyerhaeuser, the nine-year-old son of prominent lumber industry executive J.P. Weyerhaeuser, was kidnapped[6] while walking home from school. FBI agents from Portland handled the case, in which payment of a demanded ransom of $200,000 secured the release of the victim. Four persons were later apprehended and convicted in connection with the crime. The last to be released was paroled from McNeil Island in 1963; George Weyerhaeuser went on to become Chairman of the Board of the Weyerhaeuser Company. F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Weyerhaeuser Company (NYSE: WY) is an American forest products company based in Federal Way, Washington. ...


In 1951, an investigation by a state legislative committee revealed widespread corruption in Tacoma's government, which had been organized commission-style since 1910. Voters approved a mayor/city-manager system in 1952.


The first local referendums in the U.S. on computerized voting occurred in Tacoma in 1982 and 1987. On both occasions, voters rejected by a 3-1 margin the computer voting systems that local officials sought to purchase. The campaigns, organized by Eleanora Ballasiotes, a conservative Republican, focused on the vulnerabilities of computers to fraud.[7]


In 1998, the city of Tacoma installed a high-speed fiber optic network throughout the community. The municipally owned power company wired the city of 187,000 people, thus making Tacoma America's #1 wired city.


Tacoma struggled with crime in its Hilltop neighborhood in the 1980s and early 1990s.[8] The problems have declined significantly in recent years as many neighborhoods have enacted community policing and other policies. Mayor Bill Baarsma is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition,[9] a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Bill Baarsma (Democrat) is the mayor of Tacoma, Washington. ... The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ...


21st Century

On April 26, 2003, Tacoma's chief of police David Brame shot and killed his wife and then himself in Gig Harbor, Washington.[10] is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 2004, Tacoma was ranked among the top 30 in America's Most Livable Communities in 2004, in an annual survey conducted by the Partners for Livable Communities.


Downtown Renaissance

Beginning in the early 1990s, Tacoma has taken a number of steps to revitalize itself and its image, especially downtown. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 462 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tacoma, Washington Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 462 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tacoma, Washington Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to...


The University of Washington established a branch campus in Tacoma in 1990. The same year, the historic Union Station was restored. The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. It includes a functional glassblowing studio. The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Bridge of Glass and glass blowing building The Museum of Glass is a museum dedicated to glass art located in Tacoma, Washington. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the material. ...


Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003). America's Car Museum is currently breaking ground in Tacoma. The grand glass and steel Tacoma Convention and Trade Center opened in June 2004.[11] The Washington State History Museum is currently located in downtown Tacoma, Washington. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Founded in 1935, Tacoma Art Museum was run by volunteers until the 1970s and has been located in several areas throughout the years. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Americas Car Museum A museum currently breaking ground within the city of Tacoma, Washington. ...


Downtown Tacoma is also host to a thriving theatre district, which is anchored by the 89 year old Pantages Theater. The Broadway Center for the Performing Arts manages the Pantages, as well as the historic Rialto Theater and the Theatre on the Square. Other cultural attractions include the Grand Cinema and the Temple Theatre.


The area around the theatre district has also become the center of Tacoma's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender culture. Two of the city's gay bars are located here as well as the Rainbow Center.[12] The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ...


Interest in living downtown has flourished and downtown Tacoma has seen a significant number of people living downtown. Downtown Tacoma is located primarily between Pacific Avenue and St. ...


Geography

Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet).


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 62.6 square miles (162.2 km²). 50.1 square miles (129.7 km²) of it is land and 12.5 square miles (32.5 km²) of it is water. The total area is 20.01% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ...


Tacoma has its feet in Commencement Bay, with several cities surrounding it. Most of Tacoma has an excellent view of Mt. Rainier.


The city is situated in proximity to several military installations: Fort Lewis (an army base), Madigan Army Medical Center, Fox Island naval center and McChord Air Force Base. Fort Lewis is a census-designated place and U.S. Army post located in Pierce County, Washington. ... McChord Air Force Base (IATA: TCM, ICAO: KTCM) is a United States Air Force base in Pierce County, Washington. ...


Demographics

City of Tacoma
Population by year[13]
1910 83,743
1920 96,965
1930 106,817
1940 109,408
1950 143,673
1960 147,979
1970 154,581
1980 158,501
1990 176,664
2000 193,556
2007 201,700

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. Four years later, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. D3 [September 2004]). Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ...


In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 60.25% White, 12.17% African American, 2.01% Native American, 8.23% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 3.02% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. 7.11% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. Average rents in Tacoma in 2005 were $577 for a one bedroom apartment, and $844 for a two bedroom apartment. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

City of Tacoma

The government of the City of Tacoma operates under a council-manager system. The city council consists of an elected Mayor (Bill Baarsma) and eight elected councilmembers, five from individual city council districts and three others from the city at-large. All serve four-year terms and are elected in odd-numbered years. The council adopts and amends city laws, approves a two-year budget, establishes city policy, appoints citizens to boards and commissions, and performs other actions. The council also meets in "standing committees", which break down the council's work into more defined areas, such as "Environment & Public Works", "Neighborhoods & Housing", and "Public Safety & Human Services". The council meets as a whole most Tuesdays at 5:30pm in the Council Chambers at 747 Market St. Most meetings are open to the public and provide for public input. Bill Baarsma (Democrat) is the mayor of Tacoma, Washington. ...


Normal day-to-day operations of the city government are administered by the city manager, who is appointed by the city council.[14]


Commerce and industry

The Port of Tacoma, on Commencement Bay, is one of the largest seaports in the Pacific Northwest
The Port of Tacoma, on Commencement Bay, is one of the largest seaports in the Pacific Northwest

Tacoma is the home of several international companies, such as Labor Ready, Inc. and the Russell Investment Group. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2033 × 1347 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2033 × 1347 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Port of Tacoma is an independent seaport located in Tacoma , Washington. ... Commencement Bay is the body of water on which Tacoma, Washington is located. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Labor Ready, Inc. ... Downtown Tacoma - Russell Investment Group building, far right, building in the back, maroon and glass Russell Investment Group is an investment services company based in Tacoma, Washington. ...


Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for the "Tacoma Aroma", a distinctive, acrid odor produced by paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. In the late 1990s, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%. This largely eliminated the problem; where once the aroma was ever-present, it is now only noticeable occasionally, primarily when the wind is coming from the west. For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... Odor receptors on the antennae of a Luna moth An odor is the object of perception of the sense of olfaction. ...


U.S. Oil and Refining operates an oil refinery on the tideflats in the Port of Tacoma. Built in Tacoma in 1952, it currently refines 39,000 barrels of petroleum per day. Partial view of USOR with Mt. ... View of Shell Oil Refinery in Martinez, California. ... The Port of Tacoma is an independent seaport located in Tacoma , Washington. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barrel can refer to: Barrels for storage. ...


The Tacoma Mall is the largest shopping center in Tacoma. It is owned by Simon Property Group. Anchor tenants include JC Penney, Sears, Macy's, and Nordstrom. Simon Property Group, Inc. ... J. C. Penney Company, Inc. ... Sears, Roebuck and Company is an American mid-range chain of international department stores, founded by Richard Sears and Alvah Roebuck in the late 19th century. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... This is the page for the department store. ...


Urban form and transport

Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to A Street (one block east of Pacific Avenue) and Sixth Avenue, both beginning in downtown Tacoma. Within the city, numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with Sixth Avenue or Division Street. (West of Division, Sixth Avenue is the lowest-numbered street.) North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to Sixth Avenue. This can lead to confusion, as many named streets intersect streets of the same number in both North and South Tacoma. For example, the intersection of South 11th Street and Union Avenue is just ten blocks south of North 11th Street and Union Avenue. To the east of the Thea Foss waterway and A Street, streets are similarly divided into "East" and "Northeast", with 0 Street East being equivalent to the Pierce-King line. "Northeast" covers a small wedge of Tacoma and unincorporated Pierce County lying across the tideflats from downtown. This numeric system extends to the furthest reaches of Pierce County, except for the Key Peninsula, which retains the north-south streets but chooses the Pierce-Kitsap line as the zero point for east-west streets. In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, Stadium and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 122 KB) Summary Taken from a GIS PDF from the City of Tacomas planning department for the Comprehensive Plan 2001. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... The grid plan is a type of city plan in which streets run at right angles to each other, forming a grid. ... Downtown Tacoma is located primarily between Pacific Avenue and St. ... The Key Peninsula (The KP or The Key to some locals) is a finger of land in Washingtons Puget Sound. ... A single-family home is a separate dwelling in which only members of a single family live. ... Sixth Avenue is a major avenue in Tacoma, Washington, which throughout a large portion of the city provides the division between the north and south numbered streets. ... For the musical group, see Cul de Sac (group). ...


The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5, which links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley, connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies 22 miles north, in the city of SeaTac. Interstate 5 (abbreviated I-5) is the westernmost interstate highway in the continental United States. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Washington State Route 16 is a highway in the state of Washington, U.S.A. It extends just over 27 miles (43 km) from Tacoma in the southeast to Gorst in the northwest. ... The Tacoma Narrows Bridge is a pair of mile-long (1600 meter) suspension bridges with main spans of 2800 feet (850 m), they carry Washington State Route 16 across the Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound between Tacoma and the Kitsap Peninsula, USA. The first bridge, nicknamed Galloping Gertie, was opened... The Kitsap Peninsula, at times called the Indian Peninsula or the Great Peninsula, is the arm of land in Washington state (USA) that lies west of Seattle across Puget Sound and east of the Olympic Peninsula across Hood Canal. ... , Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (IATA: SEA, ICAO: KSEA, FAA LID: SEA), also known as Sea-Tac Airport, is located in SeaTac, Washington, United States at the intersections of Washington State Route 518, Washington State Route 99 and Washington State Route 509. ... SeaTac is a city and outlying suburb of Seattle, located in the southern section of King County in Washington State. ...


Public transport

Light Rail in Tacoma
Light Rail in Tacoma

Tacoma's alternative transportation services include buses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on buses powered by natural gas. Most bus service operates at 30 minute frequencies on weekdays, some routes once an hour, while three heavily-ridden "trunk" routes are served every 15 minutes on weekdays and every half hour on weekends. Image File history File links TacomaLink. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... The Pride of Burgundy, a P&O Ferries car ferry on the Dover-Calais route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and possibly their vehicles, on a relatively short-distance, regularly-scheduled service. ... Pierce Transit, in full the Pierce County Public Transportation Benefit Area Corporation, is the public transit authority of Pierce County, Washington. ... Pierce County is the second most populous county in the state of Washington. ... This article is about the fossil fuel. ...


Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service to and from Seattle seven days a week. (Service to and from Olympia is serviced by Pierce and Intercity Transit.) Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 2.5 km (1.6-mile) free electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. Expansion of the city's rail transit system (either in the form of electric streetcars or light rail) is under consideration by the city of Tacoma and Pierce Transit, and is supported by a local grassroots organization, Tacoma Streetcar. Sound Transit has been the popular name of Washington states Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority since 1996. ... The Sounder at King Street Station Sounder commuter rail is a commuter rail service operated by Sound Transit. ... Coordinates: , County Incorporated January 28, 1859 Government  - Mayor Mark Foutch Area  - City 48. ... Intercity Transit is a public transportation service for the cities of Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater, and Yelm, Washington. ... Tacoma Link at the Tacoma Dome Station // Tacoma Link Tacoma Link is a 1. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... The Tacoma Dome (constructed by Tacoma Dome Associates, led by McGranahan Messenger Architects a design build enity) is an indoor arena located in Tacoma, Washington, USA. Completed in 1983 for $44 millon and opened on April 21, the arena seats 17,100 for basketball. ... The University of Washington, Tacoma (UW, Tacoma, or UWT) is one of the two newest campuses in the University of Washington system, located in Tacoma, south of the main campus in Seattle, Washington, USA. The other satellite campus is in Bothell; both opened in temporary facilities in 1990, and moved... Tacoma Streetcar is a growing popular movement in Tacoma to bring back electric trolley service which helped grow the historic core of the City of Tacoma and nearby neighborhoods. ...


The Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, provides ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. Washington state maintains the largest fleet of passenger and auto ferries in the United States and the third largest in the world. ... Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, Washington is one of the largest urban parks in the United States. ... Tahlequah is a community on the southern end of Vashon Island in Puget Sound, Washington state. ... Vashon-Maury Island, usually known as Vashon Island, is Puget Sounds largest island south of Admiralty Inlet. ... The Rhododendron is the sole Rhododendron Class ferry in the Washington State Ferry System. ...


Greyhound service is also accessible via Tacoma Dome Station. An Amtrak station one block east on Puyallup Avenue serves the Cascades and Coast Starlight routes. Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America , serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Amtrak Cascades consist in Portland, Oregon. ... The Coast Starlight at San Luis Obispo, California. ...


Tacoma highways

I-5, I-705, SR-16, SR-7, SR-509, SR-512, SR-161, SR-167, SR-410 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Interstate 705 is a short interstate spur route of Interstate 5 located entirely within Tacoma, Washington. ... Washington State Route 16 is a highway in the state of Washington, U.S.A. It extends just over 27 miles (43 km) from Tacoma in the southeast to Gorst in the northwest. ... JUNCTION MILEPOST Lewis County US-12 0 SR-508 0. ... Washington State Route 509 is a highway in the state of Washington, U.S.A. It extends just over 35 miles (56. ... SR-512 is a highway originating at Interstate 5 in Lakewood, WA and ends in Puyallup, WA at SR-167. ... State Route 161, known as Enchanted Parkway within King County, is a numbered state highway in the state of Washington, U.S.A. It extends about 36 miles from Washington State Route 7 just south of Eatonville in the south to Washington State Route 18 at Federal Way in the... Washington State Route 167 connects Interstate 5 in Tacoma with Interstate 405 in Renton. ... Washington State Route 410, formerly U.S. Highway 410, is a 107. ...


Intercity Rail Transportation

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Tacoma. Amtrak train 11, the southbound Coast Starlight, is scheduled to depart Tacoma at 10:31am with service to Olympia-Lacey, Portland, Sacramento, Emeryville, California (with bus connection to San Francisco), and Los Angeles. Amtrak train 14, the northbound Coast Starlight, is scheduled to depart Tacoma at 7:11pm daily with service to Seattle. Amtrak Cascades trains, operating as far north as Vancouver and as far south as Eugene, Oregon, serve Tacoma several times daily in both directions. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Coast Starlight at San Luis Obispo, California. ... Coordinates: , County Incorporated January 28, 1859 Government  - Mayor Mark Foutch Area  - City 48. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Sacramento redirects here. ... The city of Emeryville highlighted within Alameda County Emeryville is a small city located in Alameda County, California, in the United States. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... A view of Union Station familiar to many of downtown Los Angeles visitors. ... Seattle redirects here. ... Amtrak Cascades consist in Portland, Oregon. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... It has been suggested that Track Town, USA be merged into this article or section. ...


Public utilities

Tacoma’s relationship with public utilities extends back to 1893. At that time the city was undergoing a boom in population, causing it to exceed the available amount of fresh water supplied by Charles Wright’s Tacoma Light & Water Company. In response to both this demand and a growing desire to have local public control over the utility system, the city council put up a public vote to acquire and expand the private utility. The measure passed on July 1, 1893, with 3,195 in favor of acquiring the utility system and 1,956 voting against. Since then, Tacoma Public Utilities (TPU) has grown from a small water and light utility to be the largest department in the city’s government, employing about 1,200 people. A public utility is a company that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Wright may be: Charles Wright (cricketer) (1863-1936), Nottinghamshire and England cricketer Charles Wright (poet) (born 1935) Charles Wright (wrestler) (born 1961), professional wrestler See also: Charles Wright (born 1940), leader of Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Tacoma Public Utilities is the public utility service for Tacoma, Washington. ...


Tacoma Power, a division of TPU, provides residents of Tacoma and several bordering municipalities with electrical power generated by eight hydroelectric dams located on the Skokomish River and elsewhere. Environmentalists, fishermen, and the Skokomish Indian Tribe have criticized TPU's operation of Cushman Dam on the North Fork of the Skokomish River; the tribe's $6 billion claim[15] was denied by the U.S. Supreme court[16] in January 2006. The capacity of Tacoma’s hydroelectric system as of 2004 was 713,000 kilowatts, or about 50% of the demand made up by TPU’s customers (the rest is purchased from other utilities). According to TPU, hydroelectricity provides about 87% of Tacoma’s power; coal 3%; natural gas 1%; nuclear 9%; and biomass and wind at less than 1%. Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a municipally-owned cable television and internet service. The residential cost per kilowatt hour of electricity is just over 6 cents. Tacoma Power is a Public utility providing electrical power to Tacoma, Washington and the surrounding areas. ... The Skokomish River is a river which starts by draining the southeast corner of the Olympic Mountains in Mason County, Washington. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... The kilowatt (symbol: kW) is a unit for measuring power, equal to one thousand watts. ... Click! Network is a service of Tacoma Power a public utility in Tacoma, Washington. ...


Tacoma Water provides customers in its service area with water from the Green River Watershed. As of 2004, Tacoma Water provided water services to 93,903 customers. The average annual cost for residential supply was $257.84. Green River may refer to: Canada Green River (Whistler,BC), Runs out of Green Lake and heads toward Pemberton. ...


Tacoma Rail, initially a municipally owned street railway line running to the tideflats, was converted to a common-carrier rail switching utility. Tacoma Rail is self-supporting and employs over 90 people. Tacoma Rail is a public utility in Tacoma, Washington. ...


In addition to municipal garbage collection, Tacoma offers commingled recycling services for paper, cardboard, plastics, and metals. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Parks

Point Defiance Park, one of the largest urban parks in the country, is located in Tacoma. Scenic Five Mile Drive allows access to many of the park's attractions, such as Owen Beach, Camp Six, Fort Nisqually, and the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium. There are many historic structures within the park, such as the pagoda near the park's entrance. Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, Washington is one of the largest urban parks in the United States. ... Fort Nisqually is a living history museum located in Tacoma, Washington, USA, within the boundaries of Point Defiance Park. ... The Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium is located in Tacoma, Washington, USA. The zoo is located on 28 acres (113,000 m²) in Point Defiance Park. ...


Another large park in Tacoma is Wapato Park, which has a lake and walking trails that circle the lake. Wapato is located in the south end of Tacoma, at Sheridan and 72nd St. Titlow Beach, located at the end of 6th Avenue, is a popular scuba diving area. Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts. It contains Wright Park Arboretum and the W. W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory. Titlow Beach is in Tacoma, Washington. ... Scuba diving is swimming underwater while using self-contained breathing equipment. ... Wright Park Arboretum (27 acres) is an arboretum and public park located at 501 South I Street, Tacoma, Washington. ... The W. W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory is a greenhouse located in Wright Park at 316 South G Street, Tacoma, Washington. ...


Historical landmarks

Fireboat No. 1
Fireboat No. 1

Engine House No. 9 is a fire station built in 1907. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Currently, the building houses a pub which brews its own beer. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 333 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tacoma, Washington Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 333 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tacoma, Washington Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Fire station in Kostroma, Russia (1823-26). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Beer barrels outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England. ...


Stadium High School, part of the Tacoma School District and setting for the movie 10 Things I Hate About You. Stadium High School is a 100-year-old high school in Tacoma, Washington and a historic landmark. ... 10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American romantic comedy film that is considered by most parents as innapropriate and immature. ...


Fireboat No. 1 was built in 1929 for the Port of Tacoma by the Coastline Shipbuilding Company. After 54 years of service in waterfront fire protection, harbor security patrols, search and rescue missions, and water pollution control, Fireboat No. 1 was put up on a permanent dry berth at a public beach near Tacoma’s Old Town neighborhood. She is one of only five fireboats designated as a National Historic Landmark. Visitors are able to walk around her exterior, but her interior is closed to the public. Fire Boat No. ... Waterfront, by definition is the land alongside a body of water, or the dockland district of a town. ... For other uses, see Harbor (disambiguation). ... Search and Rescue (acronym SAR) is an operation mounted by emergency services, often well-trained volunteers, to find someone believed to be in distress, lost, sick or injured either in a remote or difficult to access area, such as mountains, desert or forest (Wilderness search and rescue), or at sea... Raw sewage and industrial waste flows into the U.S. from Mexico as the New River passes from Mexicali, Baja California to Calexico, California Water pollution is a large set of adverse effects upon water bodies such as lakes, rivers, oceans, and groundwater caused by human activities. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...

  • William Ross Rust House - Colonial / Classic Revival (1905) - Ambrose J. Russell (Architect), Charles Miller (Contractor)

Murray Morgan Bridge - 1911 steel lift bridge across the Thea Foss Waterway The William Ross Rust House is a registered landmark, both locally and nationally. ... Murray Morgan bridge from the Thea Foss Waterway The Murray Morgan Bridge, also known as the 11th Street or City Waterway bridge, was a lift bridge in Tacoma, Washington. ... This article on a place of local interest appears to contain only a small amount of verifiable information. ...


Schools & Universities

Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. The district contains 36 elementary schools, eleven middle schools, five high schools, one alternative high school, and one school of the arts (SOTA). Tacoma Public Schools is the main school district for Tacoma, Washington, USA. Logo of Tacoma Public Schools // District facts Square miles . ... The Tacoma School of the Arts is the only arts school in the greater Tacoma, Washington area. ...


Henry Foss High School operates an International Baccalaureate program. Sheridan Elementary School operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese). Mount Tahoma High School opened a brand new building in South Tacoma in the fall of 2004. Stadium High School and Wilson High School were remodeled/refurbished and reopened in September 2006. Lincoln High School will reopen in the fall of 2007 after a $75 million renovation and expansion.[17] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tacoma Public Schools is the main school district for Tacoma, Washington, USA. Logo of Tacoma Public Schools // District facts Square miles . ... Stadium High School is a 100-year-old high school in Tacoma, Washington and a historic landmark. ... Woodrow Wilson High School is located in Tacoma, Washington, on 6th Avenue and Orchard. ...


Private schools in the area include the Annie Wright School and Bellarmine Preparatory School (Tacoma). Annie Wright School is a preschool-12th grade independent school of about 450 students. ... Bellarmine Prepatory School Bellarmine Prepatory School is a Catholic high school in the Jesuit tradition in Tacoma, Washington. ...


Tacoma's institutions of higher learning include the University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, Bates Technical College, University of Washington, Tacoma, Pacific Lutheran University, The Evergreen State College, Clover Park Technical College and Pierce College. The University of Puget Sound (often called UPS or just Puget Sound) is a private liberal arts college located in the North End of Tacoma, Washington, in the United States. ... // Education Established in 1965, Tacoma Community College (TCC) has won national recognition for its outstanding academic Information Technology Building on TCCs main campus programs. ... Bates Technical College is an accredited, publicly-supported college that is a part of Washington States 34-member community and technical college college system. ... The University of Washington, Tacoma (UW, Tacoma, or UWT) is one of the two newest campuses in the University of Washington system, located in Tacoma, south of the main campus in Seattle, Washington, USA. The other satellite campus is in Bothell; both opened in temporary facilities in 1990, and moved... The university is located near Tacoma, Washington Pacific Lutheran University is located in the Parkland suburb of Tacoma, Washington. ... The Evergreen signature clock tower The Evergreen State College is an accredited public liberal arts college and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. ... Clover Park Technical College (CPTC) is located in Lakewood, Washington, 42 miles south of Seattle. ... For the college of the same name in Los Angeles, California, see Los Angeles Pierce College. ...


Cultural Attractions

Tacoma hosts part of the annual four-part Daffodil Parade, which takes place every April in Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner, and Orting. The Daffodil Festival is a regional festival and parade, held in Pierce County, Washington, every April. ... Sumner is a city located in Pierce County, Washington. ... Orting is a city located in Pierce County, Washington. ...


The Tacoma farmers' market runs every May through September, every Thursday, in the Theatre District. For the free-jazz group, see Farmers Market (band). ...


Mass media and local blogs

The city's major daily newspaper is The News Tribune, a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers since 1986. Its circulation is about 128,000 (144,000 on Sundays), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883. Between 1907 and 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune. The Tacoma News Tribune is a newspaper in Tacoma, Washington. ... The McClatchy Company (NYSE: MNI) is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California that operates a number of newspapers and websites. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


Local papers include the Tacoma Weekly, the Tacoma Daily Index and the South Sound weekly entertainment newspaper Weekly Volcano.


A sample of local blogs that typically report on events and happenings in Tacoma include Exit 133, In-Tacoma.net, KevinFreitas.net, The South Tacoma Way, BIA Blog, The Flying Turtle Post Intelligencer, Cassioposa.net, ErikEmery.com, Grit City, ThriceAllAmerican.com, and Spew, several of which have excerpts published via an RSS feed to Feed Tacoma.


Professional sports teams

Club Sport Founded League Venue
Tacoma Rainiers Baseball 1960 Pacific Coast League Cheney Stadium
Tacoma Jazz Basketball 2005 International Basketball League Tacoma Dome
Tacoma Tide Soccer 2006 USL Premier Development League Curtis Senior High School

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise. The Tacoma Rockets of the WHL were lost to relocation, and the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League closed due to financial woes. The Tacoma Dome still hosts traveling sports and other events, such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was renovated (and renamed Key Arena). The Tacoma Dome also hosted the 1988 and 1989 Women's NCAA Final Four. In 2007, the Tacoma Dome will host four home games of the Tacoma Jazz, who recently replaced the Tacoma Jets on the IBL schedule. Class-Level Triple-A Minor League affiliations Pacific Coast League Pacific Conference - Northern Division Major League affiliation Seattle Mariners (1995-Present) Oakland Athletics (1980-1994) New York Yankees (1978-1979) Minnesota Twins (1972-1977) Chicago Cubs (1966-1971) San Francisco Giants (1960-1965) Current uniform Name Tacoma Rainiers (1995-Present... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... Cheney Stadium, in Tacoma, Washington, is the home field for the Tacoma Rainiers minor-league baseball team of the AAA Pacific Coast League. ... . The Tacoma Jazz are an expansion franchise in the IBL. This is not the first attempt at a Tacoma franchise in the league, the Tacoma Thunder played for two seasons in the league and were replaced by a franchise named the Tacoma Jets, who never took to the courts, having... This article is about the sport. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Basketball League is a U.S.-based professional basketball summer league featuring teams from the West Coast and the Midwest. ... The Tacoma Dome (constructed by Tacoma Dome Associates, led by McGranahan Messenger Architects a design build enity) is an indoor arena located in Tacoma, Washington, USA. Completed in 1983 for $44 millon and opened on April 21, the arena seats 17,100 for basketball. ... Tacoma Tide is an American soccer team, founded in 2006. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada, forming part of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... Curtis Senior High School is located in University Place, Washington. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Kelowna Rockets are a junior ice hockey team playing in the Western Hockey League. ... The Western Hockey League is one of the three hockey Major Junior Tier I leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... West Coast Hockey League was a minor league in ice hockey in United States from 1995 to 2003. ... The Tacoma Dome (constructed by Tacoma Dome Associates, led by McGranahan Messenger Architects a design build enity) is an indoor arena located in Tacoma, Washington, USA. Completed in 1983 for $44 millon and opened on April 21, the arena seats 17,100 for basketball. ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... An indoor soccer game in Mexico. ... The Tacoma Stars were a franchise in the original Major Indoor Soccer League. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (or simply Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... KeyArena at Seattle Center is located north of downtown Seattle, USA on the grounds of Seattle Center (the site of 1962s Century 21 Exposition, a Worlds Fair). ... KeyArena is located north of downtown Seattle on the grounds of Seattle Center (the site of 1962s Century 21 Exposition, a Worlds Fair). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... . The Tacoma Jazz are an expansion franchise in the IBL. This is not the first attempt at a Tacoma franchise in the league, the Tacoma Thunder played for two seasons in the league and were replaced by a franchise named the Tacoma Jets, who never took to the courts, having... The Tacoma Jets were an International Basketball League team based in Tacoma, Washington. ...


Noteworthy Tacomans

Sports

Jeffrey Guy Conine (born June 27, 1966 in Tacoma, Washington) is a first baseman/outfielder in Major League Baseball for the New York Mets. ... Toby Hall was born on October 21, 1975 in Tacoma, Washington. ... Not to be confused with John Lester. ... Earl Roderick Anthony (April 27, 1938 - August 14, 2001) was a left-handed American professional bowler. ... Johnny Bumphus (born August 17, 1960 in Tacoma, WA), is a former boxer who was world junior welterweight champion. ... Ronald Charles (Ron) Cey (born February 15, 1948 in Tacoma, Washington, a graduate of Mount Tahoma High School) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1971-82), Chicago Cubs (1983-86) and Oakland Athletics (1987). ... Jeff Durgan is a retired U.S. soccer defender who played professionally for the New York Cosmos and seven times for the U.S. national team. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Megan Quann. ... Jon Kitna (born September 21, 1972 in Tacoma, Washington) is an American football player at the quarterback position in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions. ... Lawyer Milloy (born November 14, 1973 in St. ... Mark Peterson is a retired U.S. soccer forward. ... Leo Randolph (born February 27, 1958 in Tacoma, Washington) was an American boxer, who won the Flyweight Gold medal at the 1976 Summer Olympics. ... Ahmad Rashad Ahmad Rashad (born Bobby Moore November 19, 1949 in Portland, Oregon, raised in Tacoma, Washington) is an Emmy award-winning sportscaster (mostly with NBC Sports) and former American football wide receiver for the St. ... Sugar Ray Seales, born in the Virgin Islands on April 9, 1952, was the only American boxer to win a gold medal in the 1972 Olympics. ... Jeff Stock (born August 1, 1960) is a retired U.S. soccer defender who spent five seasons in the North American Soccer League and two in the Western Soccer Alliance. ... Philip David (Phil) Sykes (born July 24, 1970 in Tacoma, Washington) is a former field hockey defender from the United States, who was a member of the national team that finished twelfth at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Marcus Trufant (born December 25, 1980 )is an American football cornerback who currently plays for the Seattle Seahawks. ...

The arts

Visual arts

  • Glass artist Dale Chihuly
  • Poster artist Lance Kagey of Beautiful Angle
  • Poster artist Tom Llewellyn of Beautiful Anlge
  • Grunge culture designer Art Chantry

Dale Chihuly. ...

Music

Botch was a mathcore band from Tacoma, Washington, that formed in 1993 and disbanded in 2002. ... Jerry Fulton Cantrell Jr. ... This article is about the grunge band. ... Neko Case (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (born September 8, 1970 in Alexandria, Virginia) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her solo career and as a member of The New Pornographers. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Girl Trouble are a long-running rock band from Washington, USA, formed in 1983, when three musicians from Tacoma, WA joined forces as well as one from Spokane, WA (Kendall). ... Junkyard Jane is an early third millennium southeast swampabilly and northwest blues band which consists of vocalist Leanne Trevalyan, guitarist Billy Stoops, bassist Alex Featherstone and drummer Tom Sunderland. ... The singer/songwriter Vicci Martinez is an entertainer. ... Jerry Miller (born July 10, 1943 in Tacoma, Washington) is an American musician, a guitarist and vocalist for the 1960s San Francisco band Moby Grape. ... Moby Grape was an American roots rock and psychedelic rock group of the 1960s that was known for having all five members contribute to singing and songwriting and that collectively merged elements of jazz, country, and blues together with rock. ... The band Seaweed was a group active throughout the 1990s. ... The Sonics were a member of the wave of Pacific Northwest American garage rock groups in the early and mid-1960s, pioneered by The Kingsmen and The Wailers . ... The Wailers were an American rock band from Tacoma, Washington, often considered the first garage rock group. ...

Performing arts

Bennett in Sudden Fear Actor Bruce Bennett (born, and originally credited as, Herman Brix) was a movie and television actor, born May 16, 1906, in Tacoma, Washington. ... Bill Brochtrup (born March 7, 1963) is an American film and television actor. ... Dyan Cannon (born Samille Diane Freisen on January 4, 1937) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated American film and television actress, director, screenwriter, editor, and producer. ... Elinor Donahue (born April 19, 1937 in Tacoma, Washington) is an American actress. ... Roman Heart (born on April 11, 1986 in Tacoma, Washington as Garrett Rubalcaba), is an American gay pornographic actor (porn star) who makes pornographic movies. ... Pamela Reed (born April 2, 1949 in Tacoma, Washington) is an American actress. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Blair Underwood (born August 25, 1964, in Tacoma, Washington) is an American television and film actor. ...

Writing

Richard Gary Brautigan (January 30, 1935 – September 14 (?),[1] 1984) was an American writer, best known for the novel Trout Fishing in America. ... Geography Club is Hartingers first novel. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Gary Larson (b. ... Mark Lindquist is an American novelist and attorney. ... Jeff Smiths book, Foods From Greece Jeff Smith (January 22, 1939 – July 7, 2004) was the author of a dozen best-selling cookbooks and the host of The Frugal Gourmet, a popular American cooking show that began in Tacoma, Washington and aired on PBS from 1988 to 1997. ...

Criminal

Theodore Robert Ted Bundy (November 24, 1946 – January 24, 1989) is one of the most infamous serial killers in U.S. history. ... Joseph Edward Duncan III (born February 25, 1963) is an alleged American serial killer, and convicted sex offender and murderer who received national attention after being arrested in connection with the kidnapping of Shasta Groene, age eight, and her brother Dylan, age nine. ... Locations of the 15 sniper attacks numbered chronologically. ... Lee Boyd Malvo (alias John Lee Malvo or Malik Malvo) (born February 18, 1985), along with John Allen Muhammad, was arrested on October 24, 2002 in connection with the Beltway sniper attacks. ... John Allen Muhammad (b. ... The Bushmaster XM-15 is a semi-automatic rifle available in cartridges such as . ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Political and business

Fred Crisman (July 22, 1920 - December 10, 1975) was a writer, educator, minor political provocateur, broadcaster and self-described disruption agent from Tacoma, Washington. ... John D. Ehrlichman as Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs, May 13, 1969. ... Thea Foss was the real-life person on which the famed Tugboat Annie series was based. ... The Puyallup are a Native American tribe from western Washington state, U.S.A. They settled onto reservation lands in what is today Tacoma, Washington, in late 1854, after signing the Treaty of Medicine Creek. ... Robert (Bob) Satiacum (1929-1991) was Puyallup tribal leader, and an advocate of native treaty fishing rights. ...

Tacoma in pop culture

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1024, 576 KB) The Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington Image taken by Maccoinnich File links The following pages link to this file: Tacoma, Washington Museum of Glass User:Maccoinnich ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1024, 576 KB) The Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington Image taken by Maccoinnich File links The following pages link to this file: Tacoma, Washington Museum of Glass User:Maccoinnich ... Bridge of Glass and glass blowing building The Museum of Glass is a museum dedicated to glass art located in Tacoma, Washington. ...

In music

Frank Zappa referenced Tacoma in the song "Jewish Princess", in the line "with a garlic aroma that could level Tacoma", a reference to sulfur smell often associated with the city. Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ...


Neko Case's "Thrice All American" is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. Furnace Room Lullaby, the album on which it appears, also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way". Neko Case (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (born September 8, 1970 in Alexandria, Virginia) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her solo career and as a member of The New Pornographers. ...


Nirvana's "Polly" was written about a girl who was raped while returning from a punk rock show in Tacoma.[19] This article is about the American rock band. ... Polly is a song by the American rock band Nirvana. ...


Tacoma is mentioned in the Steve Miller Band's "Rock 'N Me" ("I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A."). The Steve Miller Band (1967-present) is a Blues & Classic Rock band, led by rock singer, Steve Miller on guitar and lead vocals. ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Tacoma is mentioned in Sir Mix-a-Lot's "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned, (sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn") and in "Jump on It" ("What's up, Tacoma, what's up? What's up, Tacoma, what's up? Tacoma, jump on it, jump on it, jump on it.") Anthony Ray (born August 12, 1963), known as Sir Mix-a-Lot, is a Grammy Award-winning rapper and producer, originally from Seattle, Washington, U.S.. // Sir Mix-a-Lot worked together with Miami bass icon DJ Magic Mike, Mudhoney, Metal Church (on a cover of Black Sabbaths Iron...


Tacoma is mentioned in Luna's "Rhythm King" ("Headed for Tacoma, driving too fast, Nixon's in a coma, and I hope it's gonna last.") Luna was a Dream Pop/Indie Pop band formed in 1991 by Dean Wareham after the breakup of Galaxie 500, with Stanley Demeski and Justin Harwood (Demeski formerly of The Feelies and Harwood formerly of New Zealand band The Chills). ...


Tacoma is mentioned in Norwegian punk rock band Turbonegro's "He's a Grungewhore."[20] Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Norwegian band Euroboys referenced the city in their instrumental "Girlfriend in Tacoma". Euroboys are a Norwegian band. ...


Tacoma is mentioned in folk singer David Rovics's "After the Revolution.". David Rovics sings at the A16 rally in Washington DC in early 2005. ...


"Tacoma Trailer" is the name of an instrumental song by Leonard Cohen. Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ...


Tacoma is mentioned in the E-40/The Click song "Out my Body" ("Ran up on her, from Tacoma. Damn that hooch had miles on her.")


Tacoma is the prime subject of the Jason Webley song, "How Big Is Tacoma?" Jason Webley in 2006 at the Oregon Country Fair Jason Webley is a musician who began as a busker, playing accordion in the streets of Seattle, but has since moved in-doors and on stage, playing venues and festivals all across the world. ...


In film

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington". This article is about the year. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer. ... Volunteers is a 1985 movie starring Tom Hanks, John Candy, Rita Wilson, and Gedde Watanabe. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ...


Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the wedge-shaped Bostwick Building downtown. Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. 10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American romantic comedy film that is considered by most parents as innapropriate and immature. ... This article is about the year. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... Stadium High School is a 100-year-old high school in Tacoma, Washington and a historic landmark. ... Seattle redirects here. ... DVD case cover for I Love You to Death I Love You to Death is a 1990 crime/comedy film, directed by Lawrence Kasdan. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Kevin Delaney Kline (born October 24, 1947) is an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor. ...


The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) featured several Tacoma locations, including a North Tacoma home, Downtown Tacoma, and Wright Park's Seymour Botanical Conservatory. The Hand That Rocks the Cradle is a 1992 thriller starring Rebecca De Mornay as a vengeful nanny out to destroy a naïve woman and steal her family. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Prefontaine (1997) was filmed in large part at the University of Puget Sound, with the school's Baker Stadium standing in for University of Oregon's famed Hayward Field grandstand and track. Prefontaine is a 1997 film documenting the life of American long-distance track athlete Steve Prefontaine. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The University of Puget Sound (often called UPS or just Puget Sound) is a private liberal arts college located in the North End of Tacoma, Washington, in the United States. ... Baker Stadium and Peyton Field is a 3,500-seat stadium located on the campus of the University of Puget Sound in the North End of Tacoma, Washington. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... Hayward Field, one of the most historic track and field stadiums in the United States, has been the home to the University of Oregon Track and Field teams of the NCAA since 1919. ...


The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. Tugboat Annie is a 1933 movie starring Marie Dressler and Wallace Beery as a comically quarrelsome middle-aged couple who operate a tugboat. ... Reagan redirects here. ...


Get Carter (2000) featured a Tacoma location.[21] For the 2000 remake with Sylvester Stallone see Get Carter (2000 film) Get Carter is a 1971 British crime film, directed by Mike Hodges and starring Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a gangster who sets out to avenge the death of his brother. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Elsewhere

  • The classic comic strip Motley's Crew has a character named after the city called Tacoma Motley, who was Mike Motley's daughter-in-law. The comic strip ran from 1976 to 2000 and was featured in local and national newspapers.
  • Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma," as well as his last finished novel So the Wind Won't Blow it All Away.
  • Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine.[22]
  • Tacoma was 36th in “50 Smart Places to Live,” a ranking by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine (2006)
  • Tacoma was featured on the popular video website YouTube after postings of a riot in which police used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse a PMR protest against sending Strykers to Iraq.[23]
  • David Eddings mentions Tacoma numerous times in his 1st novel "High Hunt" (Putnam, Published 1973)

Motleys Crew was a comic strip by Ben Templeton and Tom Forman about a middle aged blue-collar factory worker named Mike Motley, his wife Mabel Motley, their children Truman and Tacoma Motley, their lovely grandchildren, and his brother- and sister-in-law Abel and Buffy (who happened to... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Richard Gary Brautigan (January 30, 1935 – September 14 (?),[1] 1984) was an American writer, best known for the novel Trout Fishing in America. ... This article is about the automaker. ... The best selling North American pickup truck, the Ford F-Series. ... The Toyota Tacoma is a compact pickup truck manufactured by the Toyota Motor Company since 1995. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... Port Militarization Resistance (PMR) is a movement which began in 2004 in the City of Olympia, Washington. ... The Stryker is a family of eight-wheeled all wheel drive (AWD) armored combat vehicles (ACVs) produced by General Dynamics Land Systems, in current use by the US Army. ...

Neighborhoods

Tacoma with a view of Mount Rainier.
Tacoma with a view of Mount Rainier.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3164x2112, 5604 KB) Created By The USGS can be found at http://vulcan. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3164x2112, 5604 KB) Created By The USGS can be found at http://vulcan. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... The Hilltop Neighborhood is a historically African American neighborhood in the Tacoma, Washington Central District. ... Downtown Tacoma is located primarily between Pacific Avenue and St. ... The Stadium District is a neighborhood of the north end of Tacoma, Washington, USA. It is named after Stadium High School, a historic landmark. ... The Port of Tacoma is an independent seaport located in Tacoma , Washington. ... Salishan is a diverse but impoverished neighbourhood of Tacoma, Washington, originally created as World War II housing project. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The North Slope is a neighborhood of the north end of Tacoma, Washington, located south of Yakima Hill. ... Old Tacoma is a neighborhood of the north end of Tacoma, Washington, more commonly known as Old Town. ... The Proctor District is a neighborhood in the north end of Tacoma, Washington. ... Prospect Hill is a neighborhood of the north end neighborhood of Tacoma, Washington. ... Ruston is a town located in Pierce County, Washington. ... Ruston Way is a road that runs along Commencement Bay in the north end of Tacoma, Washington from the city of Ruston, through Old Tacoma, until it becomes Schuster Parkway and continues on until downtown. ... Skyline is a neighborhood located in the north end of Tacoma, Washington. ... The Stadium District is a neighborhood of the north end of Tacoma, Washington, USA. It is named after Stadium High School, a historic landmark. ... Yakima Hill is a neighborhood in the north end of Tacoma, Washington. ... Northeast Tacoma is a neighbourhood in Tacoma, Washington. ... Browns Point is an unincorporated area bordered by Tacoma on the east and Puget Sound on all other sides. ... Fern Hill is a neighborhood located in the southern part of Tacoma. ... The Lincoln International Business District is a neighborhood in Tacoma, WA, near historic Lincoln High School. ...

Sister cities

Tacoma has ten sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... County Møre og Romsdal District Sunnmøre Municipality NO-1504 Administrative centre Ã…lesund Mayor (2003) Arve Tonning (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 388 98 km² 93 km² 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... The roof terrace of Palacio de Valle in southern Cienfuegos at night. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Davao refers to several places in Mindanao in the Philippines. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ...   (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chou; BUC: Hók-ciÅ­; EFEO: Fou-Tcheou; also seen as Foochow or Fuchow) is the capital and the largest prefecture-level city of Fujian (福建) province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... George is the administrative capital of the Western Cape Province, South Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Gunsan is a city in North Jeolla Province, South Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Keelung City (Traditional Chinese: 基隆; Hanyu Pinyin: JÄ«lóng; Tongyong Pinyin: Jilóng; Wade-Giles: Chi-lung; POJ: Ke-lâng) is a provincial city of Taiwan, Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Qiryat Motzkin (קרית מוצקין; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Motzkin) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Kitakyushu , literally North KyÅ«shÅ«) is a city located in Fukuoka prefecture, KyÅ«shÅ«, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Abbreviation: Central City (中市) City nickname: The cultural city Capital District West Dist. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Nickname: Motto: Muy Noble y Muy Leal (Very Noble and Very Loyal) Location of the Commune of Valdivia Coordinates: Country Chile Region Los Lagos Province Valdivia Founded as Santa María la Blaca de Valdivia Founded 9 February 1552 Government  - Mayor Bernardo Berger Fett Area  - City 1,016 km²  (392. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Vladivostok (Russian: ) is the administrative center of Primorsky Krai, Russia, situated close to the Russo-Sino border and North Korea. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tacoma, Washington

Coordinates: 47.241371° N 122.459389° W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Government and statistics

Business and industry

Arts and events

History

Puget Sound For the university in this region, see University of Puget Sound. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.ofm.wa.gov
  2. ^ http://www.mostlivable.org/cities/tacoma/home.html
  3. ^ http://www.prevention.com/article/0,5778,s1-2-171-749-6707-1,00.html
  4. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/West/01/10/life.stress.reut/
  5. ^ Caroline Denyer Gallacci, The City of Destiny and the South Sound: An Illustrated History of Tacoma and Pierce County [Carlsbad, CA: Heritage Media Corp., 2001], p. 49
  6. ^ http://www.fbi.gov/libref/historic/famcases/weyer/weyer.htm
  7. ^ Ronnie Dugger, "Counting Votes," New Yorker, November 7, 1988
  8. ^ "Off-Duty Soldiers Trade Gunfire At a House Linked to Drug Sales", The New York Times, September 27, 1989, p. A23
  9. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members.
  10. ^ The (Tacoma) News Tribune's coverage of the Brame tragedy, including audio of 911 calls and dozens of news articles
  11. ^ http://www.tacomaconventioncenter.com
  12. ^ http://www.rainbowcntr.org
  13. ^ http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027.html
  14. ^ http://www.cityoftacoma.org/Page.aspx?nid=54
  15. ^ "Court Ends Fight Over Dams", Foundation for Water and Engergy Education, quoting the Tacoma News Tribune
  16. ^ Docket for 05-434
  17. ^ "History intact at renovated Lincoln High", The News Tribune, March 22, 2007.
  18. ^ "Prosecutors expect grand jury to reach Duncan decision soon", KOMOTV.com, January 9, 2007
  19. ^ Azerrad, M. (1993). Come as You Are: The Story of Nirvana. Virgin Publishing. ISBN 0-863-69746-1
  20. ^ http://www.nomorelyrics.net/song/189553.html
  21. ^ http://www.filminamerica.com/Movies/GetCarter/
  22. ^ http://www.bestplaces.net/docs/studies/stress1.aspx
  23. ^ Enzinna, Wes, The Revolution Will Be You-Tubed, 21 March 2007

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Tacoma, Washington (1534 words)
The city is situated on a peninsula on the southern end of Washington's Puget Sound, in an area 51 km (32 miles) southwest of Seattle, 50 km (31 miles) northeast of the State capitol, Olympia, and 93 km (58 miles) northwest of Mount Rainier National Park.
Tacoma was also recently listed as one of the most walkable cities in the country (19th) [3].
Tacoma is the county seat of Pierce County, located on Commencement Bay and the Tacoma Narrows.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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