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Encyclopedia > Tabloid
Newspaper sizes in August 2005. Le Monde is in the Berliner format. The Guardian was (until September 2005) in the British broadsheet format, whereas the Daily Mail is a tabloid, and The Times a "compact". Berliner Zeitung and Neues Deutschland are of sizes between broadsheet and Berliner. A piece of white A4 paper is placed in front for scale.
Newspaper sizes in August 2005. Le Monde is in the Berliner format. The Guardian was (until September 2005) in the British broadsheet format, whereas the Daily Mail is a tabloid, and The Times a "compact". Berliner Zeitung and Neues Deutschland are of sizes between broadsheet and Berliner. A piece of white A4 paper is placed in front for scale.

A tabloid is a newspaper industry term which refers to a smaller newspaper format per spread; to a weekly or semi-weekly alternative newspaper that focuses on local-interest stories and entertainment, often distributed for free (often in a smaller, tabloid-sized newspaper format); or to a newspaper that tends to emphasize sensational crime stories, gossip columns repeating scandalous innuendos about the personal lives of celebrities and sports stars, and other so-called "junk food news" (often in a smaller, tabloid-sized newspaper format). As the term "tabloid" has become synonymous with down-market newspapers in some areas, some papers refer to themselves as "Compact" newspapers instead. Supermarket tabloids are national weekly magazines in the United States, printed on newsprint in tabloid format, specalizing in celebrity news, gossip, astrology, and bizarre (some would say apocryphal) stories about ordinary people. ... Comparison of the most common paper sizes. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 406 KB) Newspaper sizes in 2005-08 (August 2005). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 406 KB) Newspaper sizes in 2005-08 (August 2005). ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... For the song by the Thievery Corporation, see Le Monde (song). ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in September September 28 : Constance Baker Motley September 25 : M. Scott Peck September 25 : Don Adams September 20 : Simon Wiesenthal September 14 : Robert Wise September 10 : Hermann Bondi September 8 : Donald Horne September 7 : Moussa Arafat... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Berliner Zeitung, founded in 1945, is an East German center-left daily newspaper based in Berlin. ... Neues Deutschland is a German newspaper. ... A comparison of different paper sizes A4 is a standard paper size, defined by the international standard ISO 216 as 210×297 mm (roughly 8. ... Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... Gossip column A gossip column is an article in a newspaper or magazine written by a gossip columnist. ... Junk food news refers to news stories that sensationalize, personalize or homogenize relatively inconsequential trivia in the mass media. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ...


The tabloid newspaper format is particularly popular in the United Kingdom. A tabloid format newspaper is roughly 17 by 11 inches (430 mm × 280 mm) per spread. This is the smaller of two standard newspaper sizes; the larger newspapers, traditionally associated with 'higher-quality' journalism, are called broadsheets (although some British 'quality' papers have recently adopted the tabloid format; The Guardian being the exception by adopting the Berliner format). A third major format for newspapers is the Berliner, which is sized between the tabloid and the broadsheet. An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ...

Contents

History

The word "Tabloid" comes from the name given by a pharmaceutical company to a painkiller sold in compressed tablet. The connotation of tabloid was soon applied to other small items and to the "compressed" journalism that condensed stories into a simplified, easily-absorbed format. The label of "tabloid journalism" (1901) preceded the smaller sheet newspapers that contained it (1918).


An early pioneer of tabloid journalism was Alfred Harmsworth (1865-1922), who amassed a large publishing empire of halfpenny papers by rescuing failing stolid papers and transforming them to reflect the popular taste, which yielded him enormous profits. Harmsworth used his tabloids to influence public opinion, for example, by bringing down the wartime government of Prime Minister Herbert Henry Asquith in the Shell Crisis of 1915. Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe (July 15, 1865, Dublin - August 14, 1922, London) was an influential and successful newspaper owner. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Right Honourable Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852–15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... The Poo Crisis of 1915 brought down the government of the United Kingdom (then engaged in World War I) because it was widely perceived that the production of artillery shells for use by the British Army was inadequate. ...


International use

Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ...

United States

This style of journalism and newspaper publishing has been exported to various other countries, including the United States. The daily tabloids in the United States—which date back to the founding of the New York Daily News in 1919—are generally much less overheated and less oriented towards scandal and sensationalism than their British counterparts. With the exception of the supermarket tabloids (see below), which have little mainstream credibility, the word "tabloid" in the U.S. can refer more to format than to content. The tabloid format is used by a number of respected and indeed prize-winning American papers. Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Supermarket tabloids are national weekly magazines in the United States, printed on newsprint in tabloid format, specalizing in celebrity news, gossip, astrology, and bizarre (some would say apocryphal) stories about ordinary people. ...


However, since its initial purchase by Rupert Murdoch in 1976, the New York Post has become the exemplar of the brash British-style tabloid in the US, and its competition with the Daily News has become newspaper legend. Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ...


Prominent US tabloids include nationally the Metro, locally, the Philadelphia Daily News, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Rocky Mountain News in Denver, the Boston Herald, the New York Observer, Newsday on New York's Long Island and The Examiner, which is a free newspaper published in San Francisco, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore. (Newsday co-founder Alicia Patterson was the daughter of Joseph Patterson, founder of the New York Daily News.) The Philadelphia Daily News is a tabloid newspaper that began publishing on March 31, 1925, under founding editor Lee Ellmaker. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... The Rocky Mountain News is a daily morning tabloid-format newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ... The Boston Herald is a tabloid format newspaper, though not a tabloid in the traditional sense, and is the smaller of the two big dailies in Boston, Massachusetts (the other being The Boston Globe). ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Alicia Patterson Alicia Patterson (born October 15, 1906 in Chicago, Illinois - July 2, 1963 in New York) was an American journalist who was co-founder and longtime publisher and editor of the Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper Newsday. ... Joseph Medill Patterson (January 6, 1879 - May 26, 1946) was an American journalist and publisher and the older brother of fellow publisher Cissy Patterson. ...


Europe

The biggest tabloid (and newspaper in general) in Europe, by circulation, is Germany's Bild-Zeitung, with around 4 million copies (down from above 5 million in the 1980s). Although its paper size is bigger, its style was copied from the British tabloids. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Bild-Zeitung (often abbreviated Bild, lit. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


In the UK, three previously broadsheet daily newspapers—The Independent, The Times, and The Scotsman—have switched to tabloid size in recent years, although they call it "compact" to avoid the down-market connotation of that word. Similarly, when referring to the down-market tabloid newspapers the alternative term "red-top" (referring to their traditionally red-coloured mastheads) is increasingly used, to distinguish them from the up-market compact newspapers. For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ...


In the Netherlands, several newspapers have started publishing tabloid versions of their newspapers, including one of the major 'quality' newspapers, NRC Handelsblad, with NRC•Next in 2006. Two free tabloid newspapers were also introduced in the early 2000s, 'Metro and Sp!ts, mostly for distribution in public transportation. In 2007 a third and fourth free tabloid appeared, 'De Pers' and 'DAG'. NRC Handelsblad is a Dutch evening newspaper. ... 5th of July 2006 edition of nrc. ... For other newspapers with the same name, see Metro (newspaper). ... De Pers (literal translation: The Press) is a freely distributed Dutch language newspaper in the Netherlands, with a circulation of around 500,000. ...


In France the Nice Matin, a popular Southern France newspaper changed from Broadsheet to Tabloid on April 8 2006. They changed the printing format in one day after test results showed that 74% liked the Tabloid format compared to Broadsheet.


Other countries

In the People's Republic of China, Chinese tabloids have exploded in popularity since the mid-1990s and have tested the limits of press censorship by taking editorial positions critical of the government and by engaging in critical investigative reporting. Chinese tabloid refers to a newspaper format that became extremely popular in the Peoples Republic of China in the mid-1990s. ...


In Canada, many of the Sun Media newspapers are in tabloid format. There is also The Province, which is a tabloid in British Columbia, and has no connections to Sun Media. The Canadian publisher Black Press publishes newspapers in both tabloid (10 1/4" wide by 14 1/2" deep) and what it calls "tall tab" format, where the latter is 10 1/4" wide by 16 1/4" deep, larger than tabloid but smaller than the broadsheets it also publishes.[1] Sun Media Corporation is the owner of several widely read Canadian tabloid newspapers. ... The Province is a daily newspaper published in British Columbia by the Pacific Newspaper Group Inc, a CanWest Global Communications Company. ... Black Press is a publication newspapers in the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia in Canada and the states of Washington and Hawaii in the United States. ...


When a tabloid is defined as "roughly 17 by 11 inches" and commonly "half the size of a broadsheet," confusion can arise because "Many broadsheets measure roughly 29½ by 23½ inches", half of which is roughly 15" x 12" not 17" x 11". Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ...


In Oman, TheWeek is a free, 48-page, all-colour, independent weekly published from Muscat in the Sultanate of Oman. Oman’s first free newspaper was launched in March 2003 and has now gone on to gather what is believed to be the largest readership for any publication in Oman. Ms Mohana Prabhakar is the managing editor of the publication. TheWeek is audited by BPA Worldwide, which has certified its circulation as being a weekly average of 50,300. TheWeek is a free, 48-page, all-colour, independent weekly published from Muscat in the Sultanate of Oman. ...


In Georgia, weekly The FINANCIAL switched to compact format in 2005 and doubled number of pages. English language newspaper is published on high quality paper and distributed free of charge among bankers, top decision-makers. Other newspapers publishing in Georgian language tested compact format early in 1990s. The FINANCIAL is an English language newspaper published in Republic of Georgia. ...


In Russia and Ukraine major English language newspapers like Moscow Times, Kiev Post, use compact format.


In Argentina, one of the country's two main newspapers, Clarín, is a tabloid and in the Southern Philippines, a new weekly tabloid, The Mindanao Examiner, now includes media services, such as photography and video production, into its line as a source to finance the high cost of printing and other expenses. It is also into independent film making. Clarín is a major newspaper in Buenos Aires, Argentina. ...


In Australia - The Advertiser, Herald Sun, Daily Telegraph, The Courier Mail (All News Ltd papers), The West Australian The Herald Sun is a newspaper in Melbourne, Australia, that is published by The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd, a subsidiary of Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... The Daily Telegraph is a tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Nationwide News, part of News Corporation. ... The Courier-Mail is the only daily newspaper published in Brisbane, Australia. ... The West Australian (often simply called The West) is Perths only locally edited daily newspaper, and is owned by ASX-listed West Australian Newspapers Limited. ...


In India - Mid-Day and Afternoon are the leading tabloids. Mid-Day is particularly known for publishing sensationalizing stories about celebrities. Mid-day is an afternoon newspaper in India with editions in Mumbai (Bombay) and Delhi. ...


As a weekly alternative newspaper

The more recent usage of the term 'tabloid' refers to weekly or semi-weekly newspapers in tabloid format. Many of these are essentially straightforward newspapers, publishing in tabloid format, because subway and bus commuters prefer to read smaller-size newspapers due to lack of space. These newspapers are distinguished from the major daily newspapers, in that they purport to offer an "alternative" viewpoint, either in the sense that the paper's editors are more locally-oriented, or that the paper is editorially independent from major media conglomerates.


Other factors that distinguish "alternative" weekly tabloids from the major daily newspapers are their less-frequent publication, and that they are usually free to the user, since they rely on ad revenue. As well, alternative weekly tabloids tend to concentrate on local- or even neighbourhood-level issues, and on local entertainment in the bars and local theatres.


Alternative tabloids can be positioned as upmarket (quality) newspapers, to appeal to the better-educated, higher-income sector of the market; as middle-market (popular); or as downmarket (sensational) newspapers, which emphasize sensational crime stories and celebrity gossip. In each case, the newspapers will draw their advertising revenue from different types of businesses or services. An upmarket weekly's advertisers are often organic-grocers, boutiques, and theatre-companies while a downmarket's may have those of trade-schools, super-markets, and adult-services, both usually contain ads from local bars, auto-dealers, movie theaters, and a classified-ads section.[2] It has been suggested that high end be merged into this article or section. ... Middle Market Newspaper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... Downmarket products are goods targeted at lower-income consumers. ...


As a sensational, gossip-filled newspaper

Wikinews has related news:
An interview with gossip writer Michael Musto on the art of celebrity journalism

The term "tabloid" can also refer to a newspaper that tends to emphasize sensational crime stories, gossip columns about the personal lives of celebrities and sports stars, and junk food news. Often, tabloid newspaper allegations about the sexual practices, drug use, or private conduct of celebrities is borderline defamatory; in many cases, celebrities have successfully shown that tabloid stories have defamed them, and sued for libel. It is this sense of the word that led to some entertainment news programs to be called tabloid television. Basically, tabloid newspapers are considered by many as rubbish - absolute nonsense unworthy of reading. Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... Gossip column A gossip column is an article in a newspaper or magazine written by a gossip columnist. ... Junk food news refers to news stories that sensationalize, personalize or homogenize relatively inconsequential trivia in the mass media. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... A WNYW-TV full screen segment intro from 2005. ...


Tabloid newspapers in Britain, collectively called the "tabloid press", tend to be simply and sensationally written, and to give more prominence than broadsheets to celebrities, sports, crime stories and even hoaxes; they also more readily take a political position (either left-wing or right-wing) on news stories, ridiculing politicians, demanding resignations and predicting election results. The term red top [3] refers to tabloids with red nameplates, such as The Sun, the Daily Star, the Daily Mirror[citation needed] and the Daily Sport, and distinguishes them from the black top[citation needed] Daily Express and Daily Mail. Red top newspapers are usually simpler in writing style, dominated by pictures, and directed at the more sensational end of the market. Tabloid newspapers are sometimes pejoratively called the gutter press. For the 1998 movie, see Celebrity (1998 movie). ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Belgian and Dutch street name plates on the border Name plate on a bridge in Krakow, Poland A name plate is an item that displays someone’s name. ... The Sun is a tabloid daily newspaper published in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland with the highest circulation of any daily English-language newspaper in the world, standing at 3,154,881 copies daily in early 2006 [1], (compared to USA Today, the best-selling US newspaper... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The Daily Sport is a tabloid newspaper published in the United Kingdom by Sport Newspapers. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ...


Most major supermarket tabloids in the U.S. are published by American Media, Inc., including The National Enquirer, Star, The Globe, National Examiner, ¡Mira!, Sun, Weekly World News and Radar. Supermarket tabloids are national weekly magazines in the United States, printed on newsprint in tabloid format, specalizing in celebrity news, gossip, astrology, and bizarre (some would say apocryphal) stories about ordinary people. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the technology tabloid website, see The Inquirer. ... Star Magazine is a magazine specializing in celebrity gossip and scandals. ... The Globe is a supermarket tabloid published in North America. ... A Supermarket Tabloid owned my American Media Corporation. ... A Supermarket Tabloid owned by American Media Inc. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton on the cover of the Weekly World News. ... Look up radar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.bcnewsgroup.com/BlackPress/advertising/ratecards/2007_Island_Retail.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.twindx.com/uploaded/Daily%20Express.jpg
  3. ^ "News International red tops sweep the board"

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

External links

Look up Tabloid in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tabloid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (907 words)
A tabloid is a newspaper format particularly popular in the United Kingdom.
The phrase tabloid press is used to refer to newspapers focusing on less "serious" content, especially celebrities, sports, sensationalist crime stories and even hoaxes, though in recent years several "mainstream" newspapers have begun printing in the tabloid format (see below and supermarket tabloid).
In its traditional sense, tabloids tend to emphasise sensational stories and are reportedly prone to create their news if they feel that the subjects cannot, or will not, sue for libel.
Tabloid - Free Encyclopedia (304 words)
A tabloid is both a paper size and a term for the style of the newspapers that — especially in the United Kingdom — tend to use that format.
Tabloid is the smaller of the two standard newspaper sizes; the larger newspapers are called broadsheets.
Tabloids tend to emphasise sensationalal stories and are reportedly prone to create their news if they feel that the subjects cannot, or will not, sue for libel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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