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Encyclopedia > Syringe

A syringe nowadays nearly always means a medical syringe, but it can mean any of these:

  • A simple hand-powered piston pump consisting of a plunger that can be pulled and pushed along inside a cylindrical tube (the barrel), which has a small hole on one end, so it can suck liquid in and then squirt it out by the same hole. The word "syringe" came from the Greek συριγξ = "tube" (see also Syrinx).
  • In former times the word "syringe" also meant big two-handed pumps of this type used e.g. as early firefighting water pumps.
  • Nowadays the word "syringe" is restricted to smaller devices, used to transfer small amounts of liquids or gases to or from otherwise inaccessible areas, including particularly hypodermic syringes used with a needle for injection.
  • As a result, jet injectors are sometimes called syringes.
  • Distinguish from syrinx. Also, some people use "syringes" as the plural of "syrinx".

One medical survival of the word "syringe" for uses other than injection, is in "syringing an ear out", i.e. washing unwanted matter out of the external ear canal. An electrically driven pump (electropump) for waterworks near the Hengsteysee, Germany. ... According to Bulfinchs Mythology, Syrinx (Greek Συριγξ) was a nymph and a follower of Artemis, known for her chastity. ... Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... An injection is a method of putting liquid into the body with a hollow needle and a syringe which is pierced through the skin long enough for the material to be forced into the body. ... A jet injector is a type of medical injecting syringe that uses a high-pressure narrow jet of the injection liquid instead of a hypodermic needle to penetrate the epidermis. ... The word syrinx has a number of meanings: A nymph in Greek mythology; see syrinx. ... A pierced human ear. ...

Contents

Medical syringes

A typical medical syringe with needle
A typical medical syringe with needle
Insulin syringes are marked in insulin "units".
Insulin syringes are marked in insulin "units".
The threads of the Luer lock tip of this 12ml disposable syringe keep it securely connected to a tube or other apparatus.
The threads of the Luer lock tip of this 12ml disposable syringe keep it securely connected to a tube or other apparatus.

Hypodermic syringes are used with hypodermic needles to inject liquid or gases into body tissues, or to remove from the body. Injecting of air into a blood vessel is undesirable, as it may cause an air embolism; preventing embolisms by removing air from the syringe is the reason for the familiar image of holding a hypodermic syringe upside down, tapping it, and expelling a small amount of liquid before an injection into the bloodstream. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 623 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Syringe fitted with needle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 623 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Syringe fitted with needle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 735 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1681 × 1372 pixel, file size: 678 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) mbbradford I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 735 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1681 × 1372 pixel, file size: 678 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) mbbradford I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Download high resolution version (1974x741, 89 KB)10ml Terumo (r) syringe with Luer lock tip. ... Download high resolution version (1974x741, 89 KB)10ml Terumo (r) syringe with Luer lock tip. ... Different bevels on hypodermic needles. ... An injection is a method of putting liquid into the body with a hollow needle and a syringe which is pierced through the skin long enough for the material to be forced into the body. ... A liquid will usually assume the shape of its container A liquid is one of the main states of matter. ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... Layers of Atmosphere (NOAA) Air redirects here. ... f you all The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ... An air embolism, or more generally gas embolism, is a medical condition caused by gas bubbles in the bloodstream (embolism in a medical context refers to any large moving mass or defect in the blood stream). ... Layers of Atmosphere (NOAA) Air redirects here. ... Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are present in the blood and help carry oxygen to the rest of the cells in the body Blood is a circulating tissue composed of fluid plasma and cells (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets). ...


The barrel of a syringe is made of plastic or glass, and usually has graduated marks indicating the volume of fluid in the syringe. Glass syringes may be sterilized in an autoclave, however, modern medical syringes are made from plastic because it is cost-effective to dispose of them, which further reduces the risk of spreading blood-borne diseases. The re-use of needles and syringes has been associated with the spread of diseases, especially HIV and Hepatitis among IV drug users. Traditional wooden barrels in Cutchogue Modern stainless steel beer barrels—also called casks or kegs—outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England For other uses, see Barrel (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ... A fluid is defined as a substance that continually deforms (flows) under an applied shear stress regardless of the magnitude of the applied stress. ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ... Sterilization (or sterilisation) is the elimination of all transmissible agents (such as bacteria, prions and viruses) from a surface, a piece of equipment, food or biological culture medium. ... Front loading autoclaves are common Stovetop autoclaves need to be monitored carefully and are the simplest of all autoclaves Multiple large autoclaves are used for processing substantial quantities of laboratory equipment prior to reuse, and infectious material prior to disposal. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lets talk about risk control strategies, anyone with more information and willing to share, please do so. ... A blood-borne disease is one that can be spread by contamination by blood. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... Hepatitis (plural hepatitides) implies injury to liver characterised by presence of inflammatory cells in the liver tissue. ...


Disposable medical syringes are sometimes used without a needle for orally administering liquid medicines to young children or animals because the dose can be measured accurately, and it is easier to squirt the medicine into the subject's mouth instead of coaxing the subject to drink out of a measuring spoon.


Standard U-100 insulin syringes

Syringes for insulin users are designed for standard U-100 insulin. The dilution of insulin is such that 1ml of insulin fluid has 100 standard "units" of insulin. Since insulin vials are typically 10ml, each vial has 1000 units. Insulin (from Latin insula, island, as it is produced in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas) is a polypeptide hormone that regulates carbohydrate metabolism. ...


Insulin syringes are made specifically for self injections and have friendly features:

  • shorter needles, as insulin injections are subcutaneous (under the skin) rather than intramuscular,
  • finer gauge needles, for less pain, and
  • markings in insulin units to simplify drawing a measured dose of insulin.

The subcutis is the layer of tissue directly underlying the cutis. ...

Multishot needle syringes

There are needle syringes designed to reload from a built-in tank (container) after each injection, so they can make several or many injections on a filling. These are not used much in human medicine because of the risk of cross-infection via the needle. An exception is the personal insulin autoinjector used by diabetic patients. Insulin (from Latin insula, island, as it is produced in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas) is a polypeptide hormone that regulates carbohydrate metabolism. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ...


Controls

In certain jurisdictions, the sale or possession of hypodermic syringes may be controlled or prohibited without a prescription, due to its potential use with illegal intravenous drugs. An intravenous drug (IV drug) is a drug administered intravenously, either by an intravenous drip or a syringe. ...


Non-medical laboratory uses

Laboratory grease used to lubricate ground glass joints and stopcocks are sometimes loaded in syringes for easy application
Laboratory grease used to lubricate ground glass joints and stopcocks are sometimes loaded in syringes for easy application

Medical-grade disposable hypodermic syringes are often used in chemistry laboratories for its convenience and low cost. They are often used for measuring and transferring solvents and reagents where a high precision is not required. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 172 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This page left intentionally (mostly) blank. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 172 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This page left intentionally (mostly) blank. ... A reflux set-up with conically-tapered ground glass joints connecting the Graham condenser with the vacuum adapter (top) and two-necked flask. ... A stopcock is a valve used to restrict or isolate the flow through a pipe of a liquid or gas. ...


The polyethylene construction of these disposable syringes usually makes them rather chemically resistant. There is, however, a risk of the contents of the syringes leaching plasticizers from the syringe material. Non-disposable glass syringes may be preferred where this is a problem. Glass syringes may also be preferred where a very high degree of precision is important (i.e. quantitative chemical analysis), because their engineering tolerances are lower and the plungers move more smoothly. In these applications, the transfer of pathogens is usually not an issue. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... test for anions carbonate-add dilute acid,result:effervescence, carbon dioxide produced ... Tolerance in Final Fantasy is an allowance, given as a permissible range, in the nominal dimension or value specification of a manufactured object. ... A pathogen (literally birth of pain from the Greek παθογένεια) is a biological agent that can cause disease to its host. ...


Used with a long needle or cannula, syringes are also useful for transferring fluids through rubber septa when atmospheric oxygen or moisture are being excluded. Examples include the transfer of air-sensitive or pyrophoric reagents such as phenylmagnesium bromide and n-butyllithium respectively. Glass syringes are also used to inject small samples for gas chromatography (1 μl) and mass spectrometry (10 μl). Syringe drivers may be used with the syringe as well. A cannula (pl. ... Look up septum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... General Name, Symbol, Number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, Period, Block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... Dew on a spider web Moldy bread Moisture generally refers to the presence of water, often in trace amounts. ... A pyrophoric substance is a substance that ignites spontaneously, that is, its autoignition temperature is below room temperature. ... Phenylmagnesium bromide, with the simplified formula C6H5MgBr, is a a magnesium-containing organometallic compound. ... An organolithium reagent is a carbon nucleophile similar to a Grignard reagent. ... Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC), or simply gas chromatography (GC) is a type of chromatography in which the mobile phase is a carrier gas, usually an inert gas such as helium or nitrogen, and the stationary phase is a microscopic layer of liquid on an inert solid support. ... Mass spectrometry (also known as mass spectroscopy (deprecated)[1] or informally, mass-spec and MS) is an analytical technique used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of ions. ...

25ml re-usable glass hypodermic syringe, and inch cube for scale.
25ml re-usable glass hypodermic syringe, and inch cube for scale.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Cooking

Some culinary uses of syringes are injecting liquids (such as gravy) into other foods, or for the manufacture of candies, such as Fruit Gushers. Food from plant sources Food is any substance normally eaten or drunk by living organisms. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A wide range of candies on display on a market in Barcelona, Spain. ... A box of Gushers and two of its packets. ...


Syringes may also be used when cooking meat to enhance flavor and texture by injecting juices inside the meat, and in baking to inject filling inside a pastry. Cooking is the act of preparing food for ingestion. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Baking Baking is the technique of prolonged cooking of food by dry heat acting by conduction, and not by radiation, normally in an oven, but also in hot ashes, or on hot stones. ... Pastry is the name given to various kinds of dough made from ingredients such as flour, butter, shortening, baking powder and/or eggs that are rolled out thinly and used as the base for baked goods. ...


Others

Syringes are used to refill ink cartridges with ink. An ink cartridge is a replaceable component of an ink-jet printer that contains the ink (and sometimes the print-head itself) that is spread on paper during printing. ... An ink is a liquid containing various pigments and/or dyes used for coloring a surface to render an image or text. ...


Sometimes a large hypodermic syringe is used without a needle for very small baby mammals to suckle from in artificial rearing. Subclasses Subclass Allotheria* Order Docodonta (extinct) Order Multituberculata (extinct) Order Palaeoryctoides (extinct) Order Triconodonta (extinct) Order Volaticotheria (extinct) Subclass Prototheria Order Monotremata Subclass Theria Infraclass Trituberculata (extinct) Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals are a class of vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in females for the nourishment of... Breastfeeding an infant Breastfeeding is the process of a woman feeding an infant or young child with milk from her breasts, usually directly from the nipples. ...


To administer enemas or douches, there are bulb syringes where a bulb is fitted with a nozzle, liquid is pumped into it, the nozzle is inserted into the rectum or vagina and the bulb is pressed upon for injection. This 2qt (about 2 liters) enema bag, or fountain syringe, equipped with a rectal nozzle, is to be filled with water or a solution, then suspended near the patient using the hook. ... A douche (IPA: ) is a device used to introduce a stream of water into the body for medical or hygienic reasons, or the stream of water itself. ... Rocket Nozzle A nozzle is a mechanical device designed to control the characteristics of a fluid flow as it exits from an enclosed chamber into some medium. ... The rectum (from the Latin rectum intestinum, meaning straight intestine) is the final straight portion of the large intestine in some mammals, and the gut in others, terminating in the anus. ... The vagina, (from Latin, literally sheath or scabbard ) is the tubular tract leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental mammals and marsupials, or to the cloaca in female birds, monotremes, and some reptiles. ...


There are fountain syringes where the liquid is in a bag or can and goes to the nozzle via a pipe. In earlier times, clyster syringes were used for that purpose. A normal clyster syringe (in front) and the nozzle for a syringe designed for self-administration (in the back). ...


Historical Timeline

  • 9th century: The Iraqi/Egyptian surgeon Ammar ibn 'Ali al-Mawsili' technically invented the first such syringe in the 9th century using a hollow glass tube and suction to remove cataracts from patients' eyes, a practice that remained in use up until at least 1230 and which came into renewed use in the 20th century.
  • About 1650: Blaise Pascal invented the syringe (not necessarily hypodermic) as an application of what is now called Pascal's law.
  • 1760: Forms of intravenous injection and infusion began.
  • 1853: Charles Gabriel Pravaz and Alexander Wood first developed a medical hypodermic syringe with a needle fine enough to pierce the skin.
  • 1956: New Zealand pharmacist and inventor Colin Murdoch granted New Zealand and Australian patents for a disposable plastic syringe.
  • 1974: First US patent for a plastic disposable syringe received by African American inventor, Phil Brooks, U.S. patent #3,802,434 received on April 9, 1974.

Surgeon may refer to: a practitioner of surgery the moniker of British electronic music producer and DJ, Anthony Child; see Surgeon (musician) This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Cataract is also used to mean a waterfall or where the flow of a river changes dramatically. ... Blaise Pascal (pronounced ), (June 19, 1623–August 19, 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. ... In the physical sciences, Pascals law or Pascals principle states that the fluid pressure at all points in a connected body of an incompressible fluid at rest, which are at the same absolute height, are the same, even if additional pressure is applied on the fluid at some... An intravenous drip in a hospital Intravenous therapy or IV therapy is the administration of liquid substances directly into a vein. ... Injection has multiple meanings: In mathematics, the term injection refers to an injective function. ... An infusion is a beverage made by steeping a flavoring substance in hot or boiling water. ... Alexander Wood (1817-1884) was a Scottish physician from Edinburgh, who co-invented the hypodermic needle with French surgeon Charles Pravaz. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Phillip (Phil) Brooks (born 26 October 1978), better known by his ring name CM Punk, is an American professional wrestler. ...

See also

  • A jet injector injects without a needle, by squirting the injection fluid so fast that it makes a hole in the skin.
  • A syrette is like a syringe except that it has a closed flexible tube (like that used for toothpaste) instead of a rigid tube and piston.

A jet injector is a type of medical injecting syringe that uses a high-pressure narrow jet of the injection liquid instead of a hypodermic needle to penetrate the epidermis. ... The Syrette is a device for injecting liquid through a needle. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Syringe

  Results from FactBites:
 
syringe: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (3156 words)
Glass syringes may be sterilized in an autoclave, however, modern medical syringes are made from plastic because it is cost-effective to dispose of them, which further reduces the risk of spreading blood-borne diseases.
Syringes may also be used when cooking meat to enhance flavor and texture by injecting juices inside the meat, and in baking to inject filling inside a pastry.
To administer enemas or douches, there are bulb syringes where a bulb is fitted with a nozzle, liquid is pumped into it, the nozzle is inserted into the rectum or vagina and the bulb is pressed upon for injection.
Syringe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1144 words)
Nowadays the word "syringe" is restricted to smaller devices, used to transfer small amounts of liquids or gases to or from otherwise inaccessible areas, including particularly hypodermic syringes used with a needle for injection.
Hypodermic syringes are used with hypodermic needles to inject liquid or gases into body tissues, or to remove from the body.
The barrel of a syringe is made of plastic or glass, and usually has graduated marks indicating the volume of fluid in the syringe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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