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Encyclopedia > Syriacs
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Syriacs (ܣܘܪܝܝܐ Suryoye/Suryāye)
Total population: estimation, between 5 - 7 million.
Significant populations in: Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Germany, Sweden, Netherlands, Belgium, France, United States, Canada, Australia
Language: Syriac, Turoyo, Assyrian Neo-Aramaic
Religion: Syriac Orthodox Church, Syriac Catholic Church, Assyrian Church of the East, Chaldean Catholic Church, Maronite Catholic Church, Melkite Greek Catholic Church
Related ethnic groups: Arameans, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Maronites

Syriacs (in Syriac: ܣܘܪܝܝܐ Suryoye/Suryāye) is a term used to coin all Assyrians, Chaldeans, and the Maronite people of the Middle East. They for a large part continue to speak Aramaic languages, were converted to Christianity in the first centuries AD, and share the Syriac language (a dialect of Aramaic once spoken in Edessa in what is now Şanlıurfa, Turkey) as a language of liturgy and literature. Image File history File links Stop_hand. ... Syriac is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... Turoyo is a Modern West Syriac language, a dialect of Aramaic. ... Assyrian Neo-Aramaic is a modern Eastern Aramaic or Syriac language. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... The Syriac Catholic Church or Syrian Catholic Church is a Christian church in the Levant in full communion with the pope having practices and rites in common with the Jacobites. ... The Holy Apostolic and Catholic Assyrian Church of the East is a Christian church that traces its origins to the See of Babylon, said to be founded by Saint Thomas the Apostle. ... The Chaldean Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris (autonomous ritual church) particular church of the Catholic Church, maintaining full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... The coat of arms of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church The Melkite Greek Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris particular Church in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church and the Pope of Rome. ... The Aramaeans, or Arameans, were a Semitic, seminomadic and pastoralist people who originated and had lived in upper Mesopotamia and Syria. ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... Map showing the location of Tel Kaif, Iraq and the neighboring areas. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... Map showing the location of Tel Kaif, Iraq and the neighboring areas. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܐܶܝܢܘܪܡ in Syriac, Mâruniyya مارونية in Arabic) are members of an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Aramaic is a Semitic language with a four-thousand year history. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus as recounted in the New Testament. ... Syriac is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... Edessa is the historical name of a town in northern Mesopotamia. ... The mosque built on the site where, according to Muslim tradition, the Prophet Abraham was born. ...


Biblically they are believed to be the descendants of Aram, the grandson of Noah. This also the view that can be found among the early Syriac church fathers between the fourth and 13th century AD. The Assyrians on the other hand are believed to be descended from his brother Ashur. The Bible (tanak/h in hebrew language) (sometimes The Holy Bible, The Book, Good Book, Word of God, The Word, or Scripture), from Greek (τα) βιβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the classical name for the Hebrew Bible of Judaism or the combination of the Old Testament and New Testament of Christianity... The term Aram can refer to: Aram is the name of the Armenian Patriarch, whose name was given to the people he led, the Armenians. ... Noah or Nóach (circa 2104 BCE according to the chronology of the Hebrew Bible/Tanakh) (Rest, Standard Hebrew נוֹחַ (Nóaḥ), Tiberian Hebrew (); Arabic نوح ()), is a Biblical figure who, according to Genesis, built an ark to save his family and each species of the worlds animals from the Deluge... This article concerns the Assyrian people. ... Asshur, son of Shem, the son of Noah. ...

Contents


Language

Originally the Syriac people spoke modern Aramaic languages in everyday life, for example Turoyo; was spoken in Tur Abdin, a region comprising Midyat and its surrounding villages, in the Mardin Province of Turkey. Other examples are Western Neo-Aramaic, Assyrian Neo-Aramaic, and Chaldean Neo-Aramaic. Nowadays many Syriacs speak Arabic (in the Middle East) and languages of their adopted nations. Speakers of modern Aramaic languages still exist today and are estimated at around one million worldwide. Aramaic is a Semitic language with a 3,000-year history. ... Turoyo is a Modern West Syriac language, a dialect of Aramaic. ... Tur Abdin is a hilly region of south east Turkey incorporating the eastern half of Mardin Province, and Sirnak Province west of the Tigris, on the border with Syria. ... Map showing the location of Mardin Province of Turkey View from Mardin to the Mesopotamian plains The old town of Midyat, second city of the province Mardin Province is a province of Turkey with a population of 835,173 (2000)¹. The capital of the Mardin Province is Mardin. ... Western Neo-Aramaic is a Modern Aramaic language. ... Assyrian Neo-Aramaic is a modern Eastern Aramaic or Syriac language. ... Chaldean Neo-Aramaic is a modern Eastern Aramaic or Syriac language. ... Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


The Genocide

Main article: Syriac Genocide

In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, at least one million Syriacs were slaughtered in the Ottoman Empire. The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40...


Diaspora

Due to severe persecutions starting from the 19th century, and even more so in the early 20th, Syriacs have started to migrate to countries in the Western world and form a diaspora. Communities have been formed in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and a number of other locations. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The term Western world or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... Look up Diaspora in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term diaspora (Ancient Greek διασπορά, a scattering or sowing of seeds) is used (without capitalization) to refer to any people or ethnic population forced or induced to leave their traditional ethnic homelands; being dispersed throughout other parts of the world, and the... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ...


The Name

The name ܣܘܪܝܝܐ (in West Syriac pronounced as Suryoyo, in East Syriac as Suryaya) means Syria was the Greek name of Aram when it was under Assyrian control and was rendered Syria the Greeks. Traditionally, in English the people have been referred to as Syrians, but since the foundation of the Syrian Arab Republic, this name has become ambiguous. For this reason, the Holy Synod of the Syrian Orthodox Church, stated that the English language name of the church should be Syriac Orthodox Church. See Aram-Naharaim and Arameans. ... Assyria in earliest historical times referred to a region on the Upper Tigris river, named for its original capital, the ancient city of Ashur. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ...


Religious Affiliations

Main article: Syriac Christianity

The Syriacs are in majority affiliated to one of the following churches: Syriac Christianity is a culturally and linguistically distinctive community within Eastern Christianity. ...

The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... The Syriac Catholic Church or Syrian Catholic Church is a Christian church in the Levant in full communion with the pope having practices and rites in common with the Jacobites. ... The Holy Apostolic and Catholic Assyrian Church of the East is a Christian church that traces its origins to the See of Babylon, said to be founded by Saint Thomas the Apostle. ... The Chaldean Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris (autonomous ritual church) particular church of the Catholic Church, maintaining full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... The coat of arms of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church The Melkite Greek Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris particular Church in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church and the Pope of Rome. ...

Ethnicity

The question of ethnic identification is hotly debated among the Syriac people in diaspora. In the Middle East, the majority of them do refer themselfs as Assyrians. Others refer to themselves according to their religious affilliations (Chaldeans and Maronites), or use the Syriac name Suryoye/Suraye (in English: Syriacs, in Turkish: Süryaniler, in Swedish: Syrianer). This article concerns the Assyrian people. ... Map showing the location of Tel Kaif, Iraq and the neighboring areas. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ...


See also


This is a list of well known Syriacs: Ephrem the Syrian See also List of Assyrians Categories: | ...

Syriacs ܣܘܪܝܝܐ Suryoye / Suraye
Self-identifications : Arameans · Assyrians · Chaldeans · Lebanese · Syriacs
Languages : Aramaic : Classical Syriac · Assyrian Neo-Aramaic · Bohtan Neo-Aramaic · Chaldean Neo-Aramaic · Hértevin · Koy Sanjaq Surat · Mlahsö · Senaya · Turoyo Non-Aramaic : Cypriot Maronite Arabic · Garshuni
Churches : Assyrian Church of the East · Chaldean Catholic Church · Maronite Catholic Church · Melkite Greek Catholic Church · Syriac Catholic Church · Syriac Orthodox Church

  Results from FactBites:
 
Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2055 words)
Syriac is a member of the Afro-Asiatic language family, the Semitic language sub-family, the West Semitic language branch, and the Aramaic language group.
Western Middle Syriac is the official language of the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Syrian Catholic Church, the Maronite Church, the Malankara Syrian Orthodox Church, the Mar Thoma Church and the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church.
Grammar of the dialects of vernacular Syriac: as spoken by the Eastern Syrians of Kurdistan, north-west Persia, and the Plain of Mosul: with notices of the vernacular of the Jews of Azerbaijan and of Zakhu near Mosul.
Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2055 words)
At its broadest definition, Syriac is often used to refer to all Eastern Aramaic languages spoken by various Christian groups; at its most specific, it refers to the classical language of Edessa, which became the liturgical language of Syriac Christianity.
Syriac literature is by far the most prodigious of the various Aramaic languages.
Syriac words, as with those in other Semitic languages, are built out of triliteral roots, permutations of three Syriac consonants.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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