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Encyclopedia > Syracuse University
Syracuse University

Motto: Suos Cultores Scientia Coronat (Latin: "Knowledge crowns those who seek her.")
Established: 1870
Type: Private
Endowment: $1.1 billion
Chancellor: Nancy Cantor
Faculty: 1,353
Students: 19,082[1]
Location: Syracuse, NY, U.S.
Campus: Urban and Suburban
Colors: Orange
Nickname: The Orange
Mascot: Otto the Orange
Affiliations: Association of American Universities, Big East, Historic and symbolic ties to the United Methodist Church, but independent in its governance[2][3][4]
Website: www.syr.edu

Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. The city is near the geographic center of New York state, about 250 miles northwest of New York City. Syracuse was founded as a seminary by the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1832, as a college in 1850 and as a university in 1870. Since 1920, the university has defined itself as nonsectarian.[5] The campus is mostly residential, featuring an eclectic mix of buildings, ranging from nineteenth-century Romanesque structures to state-of-the-art contemporary buildings. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Nancy Cantor is the 11th chancellor and president of Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Syracuse University Logo. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Logo version of Otto the Orange Otto the Orange is the mascot for the Syracuse Orange, the athletic teams of Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York, USA. Otto is an anthropomorphic orange, wearing a large blue hat and blue pants. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... This article is about the state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ...

Contents

Profile

Admission to Syracuse is competitive. For the Class of 2012, there were 22,000 applicants for 3,000 seats in the Freshman class. The university has 897 full-time instructional faculty and 107 part-time faculty, and its libraries have over 3.16 million volumes. In fall 2006, the university had over 12,000 full-time undergraduate students and over 1,000 part-time undergraduate students, as well as almost 4,000 full-time graduate and law students and 2,000 part-time graduate and law students. In 2005/2006, the university granted over 2,600 Bachelors degrees; almost 2,000 Masters degrees; over 300 Juris Doctors degrees; and over 160 Doctoral degrees. U.S. News & World Report ranks Syracuse University 48th among national universities in the United States. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


History

Genessee Wesleyan Seminary

In 1832, the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary was founded by the Genesee Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Lima, New York, south of Rochester. The Rev. Dr. Samuel Luckey was elected the first Principal of the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, and was transferred from the New York Annual Conference of the M.E. Church to the Genessee Conference. He remained in this office until 1836, when he was elected by the M.E. General Conference as the Editor of The Christian Advocate and Journal, an important denominational periodical. The Genesee Wesleyan Seminary was the name of two institutions on the same grounds in Lima, New York. ... The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... Lima, New York refers to two locations south of the City of Rochester, New York in Livingston County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ...


The institution is said to have "opened most favorably," with a total enrollment the first year (1831-32) of 341, with 170-180 students attending at any one time. The Agents of the seminary solicited funds for the erection of handsome buildings. In 1880, Bishop Matthew Simpson of the M.E. Church described the seminary's early years thus "no other institution in the church accomplishing apparently more in the education of active and useful young men and young women." The early years of the institution was said to be ones of "great prosperity." This was especially true under the administrations of the Rev. Schuyler Seager. Seager was born 8 July 1807 in Simsbury, Connecticut. He joined the Genesee Conference in 1833. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1836. That same year he was appointed Teacher of Moral Science and Belles-Lettres in the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. He was chosen as Principal of the seminary in 1837. After entering pastoral ministry in 1844, he returned to the seminary in 1854, again as Principal. In 1856-57 he was made Principal of the Genesee Model School in Lima, New York, an offshoot of the seminary.


Genessee College

In 1850 it was resolved to enlarge the institution from a seminary into a college, or to connect a college with the seminary. The Rev. Dr. Benjamin Franklin Tefft was elected President of this endeavor. The name was chosen as Genesee College. However, the location was thought by many not to be sufficiently central. Its difficulties were compounded by the next set of technological changes: the railroad that displaced the Erie Canal as the region's economic engine bypassed Lima completely. In 1866, after several hard years, the trustees of the struggling college decided to seek a locale whose economic and transportation advantages could provide a better base of support. As Genesee College began looking for a new home, the bustling community of Syracuse, ninety miles to the east, was engaged in a search of its own. The rail age had expanded the prosperity brought by the Erie Canal, and the city was booming, but its citizens yearned for something more:

"What gives to Oxford and Cambridge, England, to Edinburgh, Scotland, to New Haven, Connecticut, their most illustrious names abroad?" asked one local writer. "Their Universities," he answered. "Syracuse has all the advantages: business, social, and religious – let her add the educational and she adds to her reputation, her desirability."[6]

After a year of dispute between the Methodist ministers, Lima and contending cities across the state, it was resolved to remove the college to Syracuse, New York to become the nucleus of Syracuse University. The college, its libraries, the students and faculty, and the college's two secret societies all relocated to Syracuse.


Founding of Syracuse University

”Had it been up to Andrew Dickson White, things might have taken a different turn. White was a prominent citizen of…Syracuse who happened also to be the president of Cornell. He wanted his university to reside on the Hill and took the matter to founder Ezra Cornell. But Ezra, who had other ideas, built Cornell on his own farmland…and Syracuse University came to make its home on the Hill.” [7]
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On March 24, 1870, the state of New York granted Syracuse University its charter and Bishop Jesse Truesdell Peck (who had earlier committed $25,000 for the institution's endowment) was elected the first president of the Board of Trustees.[8] George F. Comstock, a member of the new University's Board of Trustees, had offered the school, as part of the negotiations that brought it to Syracuse, fifty acres of farmland on a hillside to the southeast of the city center. From the beginning, Comstock intended Syracuse University and the hill to develop as an integrated whole; a contemporary account described the latter as "a beautiful town...springing up on the hillside and a community of refined and cultivated membership...established near the spot which will soon be the center of a great and beneficent educational institution."[9]

The "Old Row"

By the end of the 1880's, the University had resumed construction on the south side of University Place. Holden Observatory (1887) was followed by two Romanesque Revival buildings – von Ranke Library (1889), now Tolley Administration Building, and Crouse College (1889). Together with the Hall of Languages, these first buildings formed the basis for the "Old Row," a grouping which, along with its companion Lawn, established one of Syracuse's most enduring images.[10] The emphatically linear organization of these buildings along the brow of the hill follows a tradition of American campus planning which dates to the construction of the "Yale Row" in the 1790's.[11] At Syracuse, the Old Row continued to provide the framework for its growth well into the twentieth century. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1394x1112, 886 KB) Summary Onondaga Historical Society. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1394x1112, 886 KB) Summary Onondaga Historical Society. ...

Stephen Crane served as Captain of the University's baseball team before dropping out after a semester of study. He would later write the Great American Novel "The Red Badge of Courage".
Stephen Crane served as Captain of the University's baseball team before dropping out after a semester of study. He would later write the Great American Novel "The Red Badge of Courage".

The University grew rapidly. It offered programs in the physical sciences and modern languages, and, in 1873, Syracuse added an architecture program, one of the first in the U.S. and the first program in architecture to be associated with a school of fine arts. In 1874, Syracuse created the nation's first bachelor of fine arts degree and in 1876, the school offered its first post-graduate courses in the College of Arts and Sciences; its first doctoral program was added in 1909. One of the nation's first university schools of journalism (now the Newhouse School of Public Communications) was established at Syracuse in 1934. Stephan Crane photo from 1900 magazine This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Stephan Crane photo from 1900 magazine This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... For the U.S. Continental Congress delegate, see Stephen Crane (delegate). ... The Great American Novel is the concept of a novel that perfectly represents the spirit of life in the United States at the time of its publication. ... The Red Badge of Courage (1895) is an impressionistic novel by Stephen Crane about the meaning of courage, as it is discovered by Henry Fleming, a recruit in the American Civil War. ...


Coeducation

Coeducation at Syracuse traced its roots to the early days of the Genessee Seminary and College where suffragists like Frances Willard and Belva Lockwood distinguished themselves nationally. However, the progressive "co-ed" policies initiated at Genessee would soon find controversy at the new university in Syracuse.[12] Colleges and universities admitted few women students in the 1870’s. In fact, administrators and faculty members gave women a rather reluctant welcome. They argued women had inferior minds and could not master mathematics and the classics. In this controversy, Dr. Erastus O. Haven, Syracuse University chancellor and former president of the University of Michigan and Northwestern University, maintained that women should receive the advantages of higher education. He enrolled his daughter, Frances, at Syracuse, where she was initiated in the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. Incidentally, Dr. Frank Smalley, a professor at the University, first coined the word sorority with respect to Gamma Phi Beta.

Chancellor Day, John Archbold and the transformation of Syracuse University

The transformation of Syracuse University from a small liberal arts oriented university into a major comprehensive university capable of competing with other prestigious institutions were due to the efforts of two iconic men. Chancellor James Day and John Archbold. James Roscoe Day was educated at Bowdoin College and was serving the Calvary Church in New York City where he befriended Archbold. Together, the two dynamic figures would oversee the first of two great periods of campus renewal in Syracuse's history.[13]


John Dustin Archbold was a capitalist, philanthropist, and President of the Board of Trustees at Syracuse University. He was known as John D. Rockefeller’s right hand man and successor at the Standard Oil Company. He was a close friend of Syracuse University Chancellor James R. Day, and gave almost $6,000,000 to the University over his lifetime.

"Mr. Archbold’s place in the oil industry is second to that of John D. Rockefeller. That is the verdict of those best able to judge… He is the president of the board of trustees of Syracuse University, an institution which has prospered so remarkably since his connection with it that its student roll has increased from hundreds to over 4,000, including 1,500 young women, placing it in the ranks of the foremost institutions of learning in the United States." -Men Who Are Making America (1917)[14]

Post War Growth and the Genesis of a Major Research University

After World War II, Syracuse University experienced major growth. Enrollment quintupled in the four years after the war and Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

"The velocity with which the university sped through its change into a major research institution was astounding. By the end of the 1950s, Syracuse ranked twelfth nationally in terms of the amount of its sponsored research, and it had over four hundred professors and graduate students engaging in that investigation."[15]

In 1966, Syracuse was admitted to the prestigious Association of American Universities (AAU)- an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education.


Bombing of Pan Am Flight 103

SU's Flight 103 Memorial
SU's Flight 103 Memorial

On December 21, 1988, 35 Syracuse University students were among the 270 fatalities and among 189 American fatalities in the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. The students were returning from a study-abroad program in Europe. That evening, Syracuse University went on with a basketball game. The university was severely criticized for going on with the game, just hours after the attack. The conduct of university officials in making the decision was also brought to the attention of the NCAA. The day after the bombing, the university's chancellor then, Dr. Melvin Eggers, himself criticized for allowing the game to be played, said on nationwide television that he should have canceled the event. Lingering memories of this public relations disaster were likely to have influenced the NCAA cancellation of all football games set for the weekend following the September 11, 2001 attacks.[16] [17] Download high resolution version (855x641, 141 KB)Syracuse Universitys Pan Am Flight 103 memorial. ... Download high resolution version (855x641, 141 KB)Syracuse Universitys Pan Am Flight 103 memorial. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... PA 103 redirects here. ... Lockerbie is a small town with a population of about 4500 (as of 2004), located in the Dumfries and Galloway region in south-western Scotland. ... This article is about the sport. ... NCAA redirects here. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


The school later dedicated a memorial to the students killed on Flight 103. Every year, during the fall semester, the university holds an event known as "Remembrance Week" to commemorate the students. Every December 21, a service is held in the university's chapel by the university's chaplains at 2:03 p.m. (19:03 UTC), marking the exact moment in 1988 the plane was bombed. The University also maintains a link to this tragedy with the "Remembrance Scholars" program, when 35 senior students receive scholarships during their final year at the University. With the "Lockerbie Scholars" program, two graduating students from Lockerbie Academy study at Syracuse for one year. is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ...


Campus

Crouse College, a 19th-century Romanesque building which houses the university's visual arts and music programs
Crouse College, a 19th-century Romanesque building which houses the university's visual arts and music programs

The university is set on a mostly residential campus, which features an eclectic mix of buildings, ranging from nineteenth-century Romanesque structures to contemporary buildings designed by renowned architects such as I.M. Pei. The center of campus, with its grass quadrangle, landscaped walkways, and outdoor sculptures, offers students the amenities of a traditional college experience. The university overlooks Downtown Syracuse, a medium-sized city. The school also owns a Sheraton Hotel and a golf course on campus, as well as properties in New York City, Washington, D.C. and a 30 acre (121,000 m²) conference center in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1345 KB) Summary donlelel - Syracuse University,Syracuse,NY,USA Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Syracuse University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1345 KB) Summary donlelel - Syracuse University,Syracuse,NY,USA Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Syracuse University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... The AXA Towers in Downtown Syracuse are perhaps the best-known buildings in Syracuse, after the Carrier Dome. ... The Sheraton hotel brand is owned by Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Stream on the hike to the top of Ampersand Mountain The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... The areas highlighted in YELLOW and GREEN are those which are considered to be a bona fide part of Upstate New York from the perspective of New York City. ...


Main Campus

The stairway to the Hall of Languages, the main building of the College of Arts and Sciences, and the oldest building on campus. The monument to the faculty and students lost in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 is located in the foreground. Syracuse Universitys Stairway to the Hall of Languages. ... Syracuse Universitys Stairway to the Hall of Languages. ... Spiral (double helix) stairway in the Vatican Museum Stairs, staircase, stairway, stairwell, and flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ... PA 103 redirects here. ...

The Quad, the center of the Main Campus. Located at the west end is Hendricks Chapel, with the Carrier Dome to its left. Link Hall would be immediately behind the photographer. Download high resolution version (856x642, 100 KB)The Syracuse University Quad. ... Download high resolution version (856x642, 100 KB)The Syracuse University Quad. ... The Carrier Dome is a 50,000-seat [1] domed sports stadium located on the campus of Syracuse University in the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse, New York, USA. It is home to the Syracuse Orange football, basketball, and lacrosse teams. ...

The former Dunk & Bright Furniture The Warehouse, shown here after SU's renovation, will permanently house the Communications Design and Advertising Design programs from the College of Visual and Performing Arts and temporarily house SU's School of Architecture.
The former Dunk & Bright Furniture The Warehouse, shown here after SU's renovation, will permanently house the Communications Design and Advertising Design programs from the College of Visual and Performing Arts and temporarily house SU's School of Architecture.

Also called "North Campus," the Main Campus contains nearly all academic buildings and residence halls. Its centerpiece is "The Quad", which is surrounded by academic buildings, especially those of the College of Arts and Sciences. Most of the roads of the Main Campus are traffic-restricted during weekdays. Some university buildings lie outside of this area, particularly in the urban area north of the campus around Marshall Street. To the south of the main campus is Oakwood Cemetery, of the rural cemetery type that was popular during the epoch. To the east lies Thornden Park, one of the largest parks within the city proper. Medical complexes, along with Interstate 81 border it to the west. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixels, file size: 670 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixels, file size: 670 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... The Warehouse before its renovation The Warehouse upon completion The Warehouse in Downtown Syracuse, New York is a former storage warehouse of the Syracuse-based Dunk and Bright Furniture Company. ... Marshall Street in August 2003, filled with students and their families. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Thornden Parks main entrance at the intersection of Ostrom Avenue, Madison Street, and Comstock Place Thornden Park is the second-largest park in Syracuse, New York, after Burnet Park. ... Interstate 81 (abbreviated I-81) is an interstate highway in the eastern part of the United States. ...


Approximately 5,000 students live in the sixteen residence halls on the Main Campus. Most residence halls are co-ed by room, and all are smoke-free. Some still have gender-specific floors. North campus housing includes singles, open doubles, split (wall-segmented) doubles, and multi-person suites. Residence hall height ranges from three to twenty-one floors.


The North Campus represents a large portion of the University Hill neighborhood. Buses run to South Campus, as well as Downtown Syracuse and other locations in the city. Prior to 2008, OnTrack provided service to Downtown and the Carousel Center mall from a station near the Carrier Dome. [18] University Hill is a neighborhood in Syracuse, New York, located directly east of downtown, on one of the few hills in Syracuse. ... The AXA Towers in Downtown Syracuse are perhaps the best-known buildings in Syracuse, after the Carrier Dome. ... OnTrack is a Syracuse, New York commuter train line. ... Carousel Center as seen from the south Carousel Center is a 1. ...


A few block walk from Main Campus on East Genessee St, the Syracuse Stage building includes two proscenium theatres. The Storch is used primarily by the Drama Department and the Archbold, which is used primarily by Syracuse Stage, a professional regional theatre. The building also includes a black box space, classroom and rehearsal spaces, the Sutton Pavilion, two dance studios, faculty offices and a scene and costume shop. Syracuse Stage is a professional non-profit theatre company in Syracuse, New York, U.S.A. Its artistic director is Robert Moss. ... The interior of the Auditorium Building in Chicago built in 1887. ... Regional theatres (also called resident theatres) in the United States are professional theatre companies outside of New York City that produce their own seasons. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


South Campus

After World War II, a large undeveloped hill owned by the university was used to house returning veterans in military-style campus housing. During the 1970s, this housing was replaced by permanent two-level townhouses for two or three students each, or for graduate family housing. There are also three small freshman-only residence halls which feature open doubles and a kitchen on every floor. South Campus is also home to the Institute for Sensory Research, Tennity Ice Pavilion, Goldstein Student Center, Skytop Office Building (for administration) and the InnComplete Pub, a graduate student bar. Just north are the headquarters of SU Athletics located in the Manley Athletics Complex. Approximately 2,500 students live on the South Campus, which is connected to the main campus by frequent bus service. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A veteran refers to a person who is experienced in a particular area, particularly referring to people in the armed forces. ...


Downtown

In December 2004 the university announced that it had purchased or leased twelve buildings in Downtown Syracuse. There are two programs, Communications Design and Advertising Design, from the College of Visual and Performing Arts that reside permanently in the newly renovated facilities, fittingly called The Warehouse, which was renovated by Gluckman Mayner Architects. Both programs were chosen to be located in the downtown area because of their history of working on projects directly with the community. Hundreds of students and faculty have also been affected by the temporary move of the School of Architecture downtown for the $12 million renovation of its campus facility, Slocum Hall. The Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems is scheduled for completion in 2006. The Paul Robeson Performing Arts Company and the Community Folk Art Center will also be located downtown. The AXA Towers in Downtown Syracuse are perhaps the best-known buildings in Syracuse, after the Carrier Dome. ... The Warehouse before its renovation The Warehouse upon completion The Warehouse in Downtown Syracuse, New York is a former storage warehouse of the Syracuse-based Dunk and Bright Furniture Company. ... Gluckman Mayner Architects is an architecture firm located in New York City with Richard Gluckman and David Mayner in partnership since 1998. ...


On March 31, 2006, the university and the city announced the beginning of an initiative to connect the main campus of the university with the arts and culture areas of downtown Syracuse and the university's new presence at The Warehouse [19]. The Connective Corridor project, supported by a combination of public and private funds, had an international design competition. The Warehouse also houses a contemporary art space that commissions, exhibits and promotes the work of local and international artists in a variety of media. South Campus Syracuse South Campus is one of the oldest and most revered campuses at the university. It is known for its beautiful scenery and superior maintenance.


Rome, New York

Since 2005, the university has offered classes for a Masters of Science in Computer Engineering in Rome, New York. [20]. A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ... Computer engineering (or Computer Systems Engineering) encompasses broad areas of both electrical engineering and computer science[1]Computer engineers are electrical engineers that have additional training in the areas of software design and hardware-software integration. ... Rome is a city in Oneida County, New York, United States. ...


Former campuses

Triple Cities: Located in Endicott, New York, this former branch campus of Syracuse University, founded in 1946, became SUNY Harpur College in 1950 and later moved across the Susquehanna River to Vestal and became the State University of New York at Binghamton. It is now called Binghamton University. Endicott is a village in Broome County, New York, USA. The population was 13,038 at the 2000 census. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... Country United States State New York County Broome Established 1823 Town Supervisor Pete Andreasen Area    - City 136. ... Overlooking center of campus. ... Overlooking center of campus. ...


Utica: Located in Utica, New York and also founded in 1946, UC was founded as a branch campus for returning WWII veterans. This campus remained part of Syracuse University until 1995. Utica College still offers degrees conferred by Syracuse University and continues to have a very similar academic structure. It is officially mentioned in SU's Charter's Article 1, Section 3: "Utica College shall be represented by the President, appointed ex officio, and by the dean of the college, and another representative selected by the college." Utica, New York is a city in the state of New York, and the county seat of Oneida County. ... Utica College Utica College (or UC) is located in Utica, New York. ...


Thompson Road: In 1947, Syracuse University acquired a portion of the former US Naval War Plant on Thompson Road in East Syracuse. The L.C. Smith College of Applied Science was relocated to the Thompson Road campus, and the University's relatively short-lived Institute for Industrial Research was also located there. The University sold the property to Carrier Corporation in 1952.


Libraries

The Carnegie Library
The Carnegie Library
Carnegie Reading Room
Carnegie Reading Room

Syracuse University's main library is the Ernest S. Bird Library, which opened in 1971. Its seven levels contain 2.3 million books, 11,500 periodicals, 45,000 linear feet (13.71 linear kilometers) of manuscripts, and 3.6 million microforms. Download high resolution version (819x614, 126 KB)Syracuse Universitys Carnegie Library. ... Download high resolution version (819x614, 126 KB)Syracuse Universitys Carnegie Library. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x605, 58 KB) Summary http://archives. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x605, 58 KB) Summary http://archives. ... A roll of microfilm Microfiche Microforms are processed films that carry images of documents to users for transmission, storage, reading and printing. ...


Prior to Bird Library's opening, the Carnegie Library served as the main library. It was opened in 1907, and now contains the mathematics and science libraries, as well as several classrooms. It was funded by a $150,000 matching gift by Andrew Carnegie. It replaced the library in what is now the Tolley Administration Building. Several other departments also have their own libraries. Andrew Carnegie (properly pronounced , but commonly or )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Mellon University, and Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company, which was later merged...


Special collections

Many of the landmarks in the history of recorded communication between people are in the university's collection, from cuneiform tablets and papyri to several codices dating from the 11th century, to the invention of printing. The collection also includes works by Galileo, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Voltaire, Ben Jonson, Sir Isaac Newton, Descartes, Sir Francis Bacon, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Hobbes, Thomas Malthus, Jeremy Bentham and Goethe among others. In addition, the collection includes the personal library of Leopold Von Ranke. Making sensational headlines at the time, the university had outbid the Prussian government for all 19 tons of Von Ranke's prized personal library which put Syracuse on the bibliothecal map. Other collections of note include Rudyard Kipling first editions and an original second leaf of the Gutenberg Bible. Look up Cuneiform in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Galileo can refer to: Galileo Galilei, astronomer, philosopher, and physicist (1564 - 1642) the Galileo spacecraft, a NASA space probe that visited Jupiter and its moons the Galileo positioning system Life of Galileo, a play by Bertolt Brecht Galileo (1975) - screen adaptation of the play Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... For other uses, see Voltaire (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... René Descartes René Descartes (IPA: , March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Cartesius, worked as a philosopher and mathematician. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... Hobbes redirects here. ... Thomas Robert Malthus FRS (13 February 1766 – 23 December 1834),[1] was a political economist and British demographer. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... Leopold Von Ranke in 1877. ...


The university also has a large audio archive. Holdings total approximately 340,000 recordings in all formats, primarily cylinders, discs and magnetic tapes. Some of the voices to be found include Thomas Edison, Amelia Earhart, Albert Einstein, and Oscar Wilde. Edison redirects here. ... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared dead 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ...


Art collection

Job
Job

SU has an impressive permanent art collection of over 45,000 objects from artists such as Picasso, Rembrandt, Hopper, Tiffany and Wyeth. Art lovers can enjoy seeing more than 100 important paintings, sculptures and murals displayed in public places around campus. Notable sculptures on campus include Anna Hyatt Huntington's Diana, Jean-Antoine Houdon's George Washington, Antoine Bourdelle's Herakles, James Earle Fraser's Lincoln, Malvina Hoffman's The Struggle of Elemental Man and Ivan Mestrovic's Moses, Job and Supplicant Persephone. SUART Galleries Download high resolution version (434x646, 42 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Ivan Mestrovic File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (434x646, 42 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Ivan Mestrovic File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington (American sculptor, 1876 - 1973) was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Jean-Antoine Houdon (March 20, 1741 - July 15, 1828) was a French sculptor. ... Antoine Bourdelle (October 30, 1861 _ October 1, 1929) was a French sculptor and teacher. ... End of the Trail James Earle Fraser (November 4, 1876 – October 11, 1953) was an American sculptor, born in Winona, Minnesota. ... Tibetan for Lhasa, Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois Malvina Hoffman (1885 – 1966) Biography Malay Woman, Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois Malvina Hoffman was an American sculptor, born in New York City on June 15, 1885, the daughter of concert pianist Richard Hoffman. ... Ivan Meštrović (August 15, 1883 – January 16, 1962) was a Croatian sculptor. ...


Historic Buildings

Four sets of buildings on the campus have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. These are: the Comstock Tract Buildings, Crouse Memorial College, the Hall of Languages, and the Pi Chapter House of Psi Upsilon Fraternity. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Organization

Yates Castle, the former home of the Schools of Education and Journalism (demolished)
Bridge to Yates Castle
Bridge to Yates Castle
The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
Crouse College of Visual and Performing Arts
Crouse Staircase
Crouse Staircase
Setnor Auditorium
Supplicant Persephone
Supplicant Persephone

Image File history File linksMetadata Yts-stairs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Yts-stairs. ... Image File history File links Bridgeteacherscollege. ... Image File history File links Bridgeteacherscollege. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x722, 79 KB) Summary Source: Syracuse University Archives, http://archives. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x722, 79 KB) Summary Source: Syracuse University Archives, http://archives. ... Image File history File links CROUSE4A.JPG Summary Syracuse University Archives. ... Image File history File links CROUSE4A.JPG Summary Syracuse University Archives. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (918x725, 241 KB) Summary Source: Syracuse University Archives, www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (918x725, 241 KB) Summary Source: Syracuse University Archives, www. ... Download high resolution version (433x638, 87 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Ivan Mestrovic File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (433x638, 87 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Ivan Mestrovic File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

School of Architecture

The Syracuse University School of Architecture, founded in 1873, is the fourth oldest program of its type in the United States and is traditionally located in Slocum Hall- a building completed in 1918 and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Bachelor of Architecture program is ranked third nationally and number one on the East Coast , according to the 2007 survey of the Design Futures Council. The School of Architecture at Syracuse University is a nationally-renowned institution offering Bachelors and Masters degrees in architecture that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). ...


College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences, was established in 1870 as Syracuse University's founding college. Today, The College remains at the center of undergraduate learning at Syracuse, where all University students take classes. It includes 3,400 students and 530 faculty in a university of 12,500 total undergraduate students and 1,360 total faculty.


School of Education

Syracuse University's School of Education, founded in 1906, a national leader in improving and informing educational practice for diverse communities, is committed to the principle that diverse learning communities create the conditions that both enrich the educational experience and provide opportunities for all to realize their full potential. The School of Education pioneered the inclusion movement in the United States, making way for all learners to participate fully in mainstream classrooms and other inclusive learning environments. In addition to its Undergraduate Program, the School has several unique Graduate Programs, including Programs in Higher Education, Cultural Foundations of Education, and Instructional Design and Development.


L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science

The L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science, founded in 1901, offers 35 bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs. U.S. News & World Report ranks the overall graduate program in ECS in the top third of schools of engineering that grant degrees through the Ph.D.


In 1958, the Institute for Sensory Research was established under the direction of Dr. Jozef Zwislocki (now Distinguished Research Professor of Neuroscience and a member of the National Academy of Sciences), who developed a community of faculty, staff, and students that is world-renowned for multidisciplinary studies of the structure and function of sensory systems. From this community, the undergraduate program in bioengineering was established in 1971. Carl Rozenswieg is the University's current dean and administration. ECS's computer engineering and bioengineering programs, both established in 1971, are the second-oldest programs of their kind in the nation.


The Center for Advanced Technology in Computer Applications and Software Engineering was created in 1984 under the leadership of Dr. Bradley J. Strait, professor of electrical engineering who served as dean of the college from 1981-1984 and 1989-1992. The Northeast Parallel Architectures Center, an interdisciplinary center for high performance computing followed in 1987, and the Center for Hypersonics, supported by NASA to focus on studies in air and space travel, was created in 1993. Among its recent achievements, the College unveiled a $4.5 million environmental systems complex in Fall 2001. This facility provides sophisticated research and teaching facilities for programs in environmental, chemical, civil, and mechanical engineering programs.


In May 2001, a consortium of colleges and universities, led by the College, was awarded $15.9 million by the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Research to fund the establishment of the New York Environmental Quality Systems Center at Syracuse University. Also in 2001, the College received a $3 million grant from NASA and the State of New York to establish the Advanced Interactive Discovery Environment for Engineering Education, a state-of-the-art virtual learning environment.


School of Information Studies

The Syracuse School of Information Studies, is a leading center for innovative programs in information management, information policy, information science, information systems, information technology, and information services. The School of Information Studies offers professional degree programs at the undergraduate and master's levels as well as a research degree at the doctoral level. The School of Information Studies traces its origin to 1896, with the first library science course offerings at Syracuse University. Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies is a center for research and education in the policy, systems, service, and technology aspects of information science and library science. ... Information management is the cibai collection and lancau management of information from one or more sources and distribution to fuck one or more audiences who have a stake in that information or a right to that information. ... Not to be confused with informatics or information theory. ... Information System (example) An Information System (IS) is the system of persons, data records and activities that process the data and information in a given organization, including manual processes or automated processes. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information Technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... Library science is an interdisciplinary science incorporating the humanities, law and applied science to study topics related to libraries, the collection, organization, preservation and dissemination of information resources, and the political economy of information. ...


The American Library Association accredited the degree in 1908, while the program was still part of the College of Liberal Arts and an independent School of Library Science was established in 1915. Anticipating the coming of the information age, and recognizing libraries as part of a broader information landscape, the faculty renamed the school in 1974. Educating students for a variety of careers in the information economy, the school offered the country's first master's degree in information resources management (1980), and later began a graduate program in telecommunications and network management (1993). ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... A university computer lab containing many desktop PCs The transition of communication technology: Oral Culture, Manuscript Culture, Print Culture, and Information Age Information Age is a term that has been used to refer to the present economic era. ... Information management is the cibai collection and lancau management of information from one or more sources and distribution to fuck one or more audiences who have a stake in that information or a right to that information. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ...


Today the School of Information Studies's graduate programs are highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report: #1 for Information Systems, #2 for Digital Librarianship, #3 for Library and Information Science, and #4 for School Library Media [21]. The School has also helped University of Mysore, India, to set up the International School of Information Management (ISiM). U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... International School of Information Management, is an I-School in University of Mysore Karnataka, India International School of Information Management (ISiM), is an elite school for Information and Knowledge Management, the first of its kind in Asia. ...


Martin J. Whitman School of Management

The original College of Business Administration was founded in 1919. The school was renamed to the Martin J. Whitman School of Management in 2003, in honor of SU alumnus and benefactor Martin J. Whitman. The school is home to an average of 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students each year. The Martin J. Whitman School of Management is Syracuse Universitys (SU) business school. ... Martin J. Whitman is an American investment advisor and a strong critic of the direction of recent changes in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in the U.S. He is founder, Co-Chief Investment Officer, and Portfolio Manager of the Third Avenue Value Fund. ...


A new state-of-the-art building for the Whitman School of Management was opened in January of 2005. Covering 160,000 square feet, the new building includes 22 state-of-the-art classrooms, 40 undergraduate graduate breakout rooms, a 200-seat auditorium, a three-story, a 4,000-square-foot Grand Hall, an Investment Research Center, and a cafe.


The undergraduate program is currently ranked #41 among business schools nationwide by the US News & World Report 2008. The school offers several fields of study, including: accounting, finance, marketing, supply chain management, entrepreneurship, and retail management. The entrepreneurship program is ranked #9 by the US News & World Report 2008, and #13 by both the Entrepreneur Magazine and The Princeton Review 2007. The supply chain management program was ranked #10 in the nation by Supply Chain Management Review. Also, the Joseph I. Lubin School of Accounting was named #10 in the nation by The Chronicle of Higher Education [22].


College of Law

Founded in 1895, the College of Law is one of only four law schools in Upstate New York (the other three being Albany, Buffalo, and Cornell). It was accredited by the American Bar Association in 1923 and is a charter member of the Association of American Law Schools. As of the 2007-2008 academic year, 675 students were enrolled in the College of Law. Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Syracuse University College of Law (SUCOL), founded in 1895, is a professional school of Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. ... The areas highlighted in YELLOW and GREEN are those which are considered to be a bona fide part of Upstate New York from the perspective of New York City. ... Albany Law School is an ABA accredited law school based in Albany, New York. ... Since its founding in 1887, the University at Buffalo Law School (also known as UB Law, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law, SUNY at Buffalo School of Law or University of Buffalo Law School) is the State University of New York systems only law school. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) is a non-profit organization of 166 law schools in the United States. ...


The College of law has been ranked in the top 10 by U.S. News and World Report for its trial and appellate advocacy program and is an emerging leader in the relatively novel field of National Security Law. In addition, the law school is one of the few privileged law schools that edits an official American Bar Association publication, The Labor Lawyer. The College of Law is home to the New York State Science & Technology Law Center and the New York Prosecutors Training Institute. It also maintains a chapter of the prestigious Order of the Coif, of which only 80 of the more than 190 ABA accredited law schools are a member of.


The law school offers joint degree programs with, among others, the top-ranked Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and the highly regarded S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. It offers a special first year program in international law and summer internship/externship opportunities in London, Amsterdam, and Geneva. Students may also qualify for specialized certifications in such areas of study as Corporate Law, Estate Planning, Family Law, and Property Law.


The College of Law is located on the edge of the Syracuse University Hill adjacent to the Carrier Dome in Ernest I. White and Winifred MacNaughton Halls. Its library is called the H. Douglas Barclay Law Library. The library is a congressionally designated depository for federal materials and also houses a collection of former Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson's artifacts and documents. Robert Houghwout Jackson (February 13, 1892–October 9, 1954) was United States Attorney General (1940–1941) and an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court (1941–1954). ...


Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, founded in 1924, was the first school to offer a graduate professional degree in public administration and the first to bring together the social sciences for public administration education. Maxwell is consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the nation's top graduate school for public affairs[23]. The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs is a leading public policy school in the United States, and a part of Syracuse University. ...


S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Syracuse University established one of the nation's first schools of journalism, now known as the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, in 1934. Newhouse alumni include Ted Koppel, Steve Kroft, Bob Costas, Fred Silverman, Marv Albert, Matt Park, Len Berman, Mike Tirico, Maria Sansone, Pete Yorn, Mark Tinker, Matt Singer, and many other distinguished alumni. The S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications is a communications school at Syracuse University. ... Photo by Bob DAmico/ABC Ted Koppel, anchor of the ABC News program Nightline. ... Steve Kroft is an American journalist. ... Robert Quinlan Costas (born March 22, 1952) is an American sportscaster, on the air for the NBC network since the early 1980s. ... Silverman, Time, 1977 Fred Silverman (born September 13, 1937 in New York City) is an American television executive and producer. ... Marv Albert (born Marvin Philip Aufrichtig on June 12, 1940, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American television and radio sportscaster, honored for his work as a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame and is commonly referred to as the voice of basketball. ... Len Berman on WNBC in 2005. ... Mike Tirico is the lead broadcaster for ESPNs presentation of Monday Night Football. ... Maria Sansone (born February 26, 1981 in Erie, Pennsylvania) is the host of The 9, a vlog that is currently part of Yahoo! TV. Each weekday Sansone reports on nine of the most interesting things found on the web. ... Peter (Pete) Yorn (b. ... Mark Tinker (born January 16, 1951) is an American television producer and director. ... Matt Singer Matt Singer is the host and figurehead of IFC News. ...


College of Visual and Performing Arts

Founded in 1873, VPA contains the School of Art and Design, Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies, Department of Drama, Setnor School of Music, and Department of Transmedia. Together, these five areas offer a total of 36 undergraduate programs and 26 graduate programs. The college is located in seven different buildings on campus and in the University’s downtown Syracuse building, the Warehouse. Origins of the college date to 1873, when the College of Fine Arts opened at SU. The college was the first degree-conferring institution of its kind in the United States. Its first alumnus graduated in 1875 with a bachelor of painting degree.


Graduate School

Founded in 1911, the Syracuse University Graduate School oversees all academic policy, graduate degree and certificate program modification and development, and the professional development programs for graduate study at Syracuse University.


College of Human Ecology

Founded in 1918, the former College of Human Services and Health Professions offers bachelor's (B.S.), master's (M.A., M.S.W.) and doctoral (Ph.D.) degrees in Social Work, Child and Family Studies, Hospitality and Food Service Management, Marriage and Family Therapy, Health and Wellness, Nutrition, Sport Management and Selected Studies, as well as a certificate of advanced study in Human Services Management.


On December 6, 2007, the college took on an identity change, changing the name of the school from the College of Human Services and Health Professions to the College of Human Ecology. [3]


University College (Continuing Education)

University College offers a variety of degree programs, certificates, and noncredit courses in formats tailored to the busy schedules of part-time students. Courses are offered in the evenings, on weekends, online, and through short residency programs. During the summer, courses are offered during the daytime. In addition to serving the academic needs of students pursuing their degrees part-time, UC also offers award-winning workforce training programs and sponsors community service programs.


College of Medicine

Founded in 1872, the SU College of Medicine was (along with Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Michigan) among the first to institute a graded medical instruction program, with definite pre-clinical and clinical years. In the 1890s it was again (along with Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Penn, and a few others) among the first in America to organize its curriculum according to the so-called "German model," with intense scientific and especially laboratory training for students in the first two years, and rigorous clinical training on rounds thereafter. The school was sold to the State of New York in 1950 and is now SUNY Upstate Medical University. Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution — or part of such an institution — that teaches medicine. ... The Health Science Center Syracuse, better known as the State University of New York Upstate Medical University, is a college of health-related professions on University Hill in Syracuse, New York, USA. It includes the College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Health Professions, and College of Graduate Studies. ...


College of Environmental Science and Forestry

The College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF), founded in 1922, operates its academic campus adjacent to Syracuse University. It was established as the New York State College of Forestry at Syracuse University. The residential-life program for ESF students is operated by SU. ESF students live in SU housing, have full access to SU libraries, and students at both schools have full access to courses. Students take part in joint commencement exercises, and ESF students may participate in all SU student activities excepting NCAA sports. The State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY ESF) is a specialized doctoral-granting institution of the State University of New York. ...


SU Abroad

The university has offered multiple study abroad programs dating since 1911. SU Abroad, formerly known as the Division of International Programs Abroad (DIPA), currently offers programs in Beijing, Florence, Hong Kong, London, Madrid, Strasbourg, Santiago, Berlin, and Istanbul. [24] SU Abroad offers a wide range of courses, often integrating coursework and fieldtrips with the host city.


Since 1959, SU Florence has been hosted in the Villa Rossa, a building constructed by a noble family, the Gigliucci, in 1892. The Villa Rossa houses the administrative offices, eleven classrooms, the computer lab, a student lounge and study areas. The garden area, recently renovated, is now connected to the garden of the Villino, home of the SU Florence library.[25] The Villino, which was built in 1884, covers 420 square meters on four floors. While the building serves primarily as the home of the library, it also houses an audio-visual room a faculty and TA lounge, and the media lab and slide library.


Established in 1975, SU’s London center is widely regarded as the city’s most comprehensive study abroad program. Faraday House was renovated to include new classrooms and faculty offices, an auditorium, student and faculty common rooms, a writing center, computer clusters, design and multimedia studios, and wireless Internet access.[26]


Students in the Madrid program choose from three pre-semester seminars ("Mare Nostrum," "Eurovision," and "Azahar"), in which they tour different countries throughout Europe. Following these two-week courses, the students return to Madrid, where they spend the remainder of the semester. Most students live with a Spanish host family.[27]


Student life

Athletics

Main article: Syracuse Orange

Syracuse University's sports teams are officially known as the Orange, although the former (until 2004) names of Orangemen and Orangewomen are still affectionately used. The school's mascot is Otto the Orange. The teams all participate in NCAA Division I in the Big East Conference, except for the women´s ice hockey team, at the College Hockey America. The men's and women's basketball teams, the football team, and both the men's and women's lacrosse teams play in the Carrier Dome. Other sports facilities are located at the nearby Manley Field House. Syracuse University Logo. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... College Hockey America is a college athletic conference with teams ranging geographically from New York to Alabama and Minnesota. ... The Carrier Dome is a 50,000-seat [1] domed sports stadium located on the campus of Syracuse University in the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse, New York, USA. It is home to the Syracuse Orange football, basketball, and lacrosse teams. ...


Archbold Stadium and the Carrier Dome

Thanks to a $600,000 gift by Syracuse University trustee and Standard Oil President, John D. Archbold, what was publicized as the “Greatest Athletic Arena in America” opened in 1907. Designed to resemble the Roman Coliseum and to never become outdated, Archbold Stadium became a trademark of Syracuse football. The stadium formed a massive oval, 670 feet (204 m) long and 475 feet (145 m) wide. It was 100 feet (30 m) longer and only 22 feet (7 m) thinner than the Carrier Dome and more than 6 million Orange football fans passed through its gates. Image File history File linksMetadata Jarchbold. ... Standard Oil was a predominant integrated oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. ... Archbold Stadium was a multi-purpose stadium in Syracuse, New York. ...


From 1907 to 1978, Archbold Stadium was the home of SU football. Archbold opened up with a bang when the Orange defeated Hobart 28-0. It went out in style 71 years later with an improbable victory over second-ranked Navy 20-17. Syracuse posted a record of 265-112-50 at Archbold and it housed many great teams. It was home of the 1913 squad who was invited to play in the prestigious Rose Bowl and outscored its opponents 331 to 16. The 1959 team also called Archbold home en route to SU’s only National Championship. The men's basketball team achieved their only national championship in 2003.


In 1978, SU fans said good-bye forever to the historic stadium. Archbold was demolished to make way for the new on-campus facility, the Carrier Dome, which opened in 1980. The Carrier Dome is the largest dome college stadium anywhere.[citation needed] The roof of the Dome is inflatable, with several air compressors working round the clock to maintain its structure. It has a seating capacity of 50,000. It is the only domed college stadium in the northeastern U.S.. The Carrier Dome is a 50,000-seat [1] domed sports stadium located on the campus of Syracuse University in the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse, New York, USA. It is home to the Syracuse Orange football, basketball, and lacrosse teams. ... The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States of America defined by the US Census Bureau. ...


Colgate Weekend

Football history at Syracuse was drastically altered in 1900, when Cornell University temporarily broke its athletic relationship with the university over concerns of violent behavior. In its stead, the games with Colgate University took on greater importance. Colgate weekend was "celebrated in conjunction with the fall football contest between the Orange and the Red Raiders...[and] featured the more sedate decorating contests and parades- as well as the scalping of captured underclassmen, the dumping of Orange paint into Hamilton's Taylor Lake and the retaliatory dumping of red paint onto cars outside Archbold, the stealing of the ATO cannon, and the decorations of the Saltine Warrior statute." [28] As the rivalry became heated, so did the chaos surrounding the event:

"In 1947, because so much damage was done to buildings, and because several students were hurt, Colgate, Cornell, and Syracuse negotiated the 'Cazenovia Pact' at the Lincklaen Inn in Cazenovia, New York. The administrators of those schools agreed to ban the use of paint, and damage to property and physical violence were outlawed."[29]

Rowing

The Syracuse Navy (Rowing Team)
The Syracuse Navy (Rowing Team)

Founded in 1873, the Men's heavyweight is one of the University's oldest and most prestigious athletics program. In 1959, Syracuse went on to represent the United States in the Pan American Games, where they beat the Canadian boat to take the world championship in the sport. Notable coaches to pass through Syracuse included legendary rowing pioneer James Ten Eyck, Ned Ten Eyck and Loren Schoel. Image File history File links History17. ... Image File history File links History17. ...


Fraternities and sororities

The Brothers of Delta Kappa Epsilon
Psi Upsilon House
Psi Upsilon House

The Syracuse University fraternity and sorority system offers organizations under the Panhellenic Council, the Interfraternity Council, the Latino Greek Council, the National Multicultural Greek Council, and the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Image File history File linksMetadata Gafc-dekemen. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Gafc-dekemen. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... The National Multicultural Greek Council (NMGC) is an umbrella council for thirteen Multicultural Greek Letter Organizations established in 1998. ... Not to be confused with National Panhellenic Conference. ...


SU currently recognizes the following active IFC social fraternities on campus:

The earliest fraternities chartered at the university were: Delta Kappa Epsilon (1871), Zeta Psi (1875), Psi Upsilon (1875), and Phi Kappa Psi(1884). In the early 20th century, other fraternities were chartered, including Phi Gamma Delta(1901), Sigma Chi (1904), Alpha Chi Rho (1905), Sigma Phi Epsilon (1905), Sigma Alpha Epsilon (1907), Delta Tau Delta (1910), Zeta Beta Tau (1911), Acacia (1911), Pi Kappa Alpha (1913), and Sigma Alpha Mu (1913). In the interwar years, new fraternities inlcluded Theta Chi (1928) and Phi Iota Alpha (1931). Post-WWII fraternities include Alpha Epsilon Pi (1947) (rechartered 2002), Alpha Tau Omega (1950), Tau Kappa Epsilon (1962), Delta Chi(1967), Phi Beta Sigma (1975), and Theta Nu Xi (2003). Alpha Chi Rho (ΑΧΡ) is a mens collegiate fraternity founded on June 4, 1895 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut by the Reverend Paul Ziegler, his son Carl Ziegler, and Carls friends William Rouse, Herbert T. Sherriff and William A.D. Eardeley. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) (commonly known as ATO, Taus, Alpha Taus) is an American social fraternity that annually ranks among the top ten national fraternities for numbers of chapters and total number of members. ... Delta Chi (ΔΧ) (del-ta kai) or D-Chi is an international college social fraternity formed on October 13, 1890 at Cornell University initially as a professional fraternity for law students. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class who, upon hearing that some but not all of them had been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon), instead... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 107 chapters and 7 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Phi Kappa Theta (ΦΚΘ) is a national social fraternity with over 50 chapters and colonies at universities across the United States. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Mu (ΣΑΜ) also known as Sammy is a college fraternity founded at the City College of New York in 1909. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (ΤΚΕ or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA: , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity founded on January 10th, 1899 at Illinois Wesleyan University with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... ZBT redirects here. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class who, upon hearing that some but not all of them had been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon), instead... Phi Iota Alpha (ΦΙΑ), established December 26, 1931, is the oldest Latino fraternity in existence and works to motivate people, develop leaders, and create innovative ways to unite the Latino community. ...

The Sisters of Kappa Kappa Gamma
The Sisters of Kappa Kappa Gamma

SU currently recognizes the following active Panhellenic social sororities on campus: Image File history File linksMetadata 19C-kappa. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 19C-kappa. ...

The first sororities chartered at the university were Alpha Phi (1872), Gamma Phi Beta (1874), Kappa Alpha Theta (1889), Pi Beta Phi (1896), and Delta Delta Delta (1896). In the early 20th century, new sororities included Delta Gamma (1901), Alpha Xi Delta (1904), Alpha Chi Omega (1906), and Alpha Epsilon Phi (1919), and Phi Sigma Sigma (1927). Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Epsilon Phi (ΑΕΦ) is a sorority and member of the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on September 30, 1872. ... Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Phi Sigma Sigma (ΦΣΣ) was the first collegiate nonsectarian sorority, meaning that there was to be no judgment regarding religion or background. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Sigma Delta Tau (ΣΔΤ), a national sorority and member of the National Panhellenic Conference, was founded March 25, 1917 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ...

The National Pan-Hellenic Council includes the following fraternities and sororities:

The Latino Greek Council includes the following fraternities and sororities: Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ...

The Multicultural Greek Council includes the following fraternities and sororities: Omega Phi Beta Sorority(ΩΦΒ) is a Latino oriented Greek letter intercollegiate sorority founded on March 15, 1989 on the University at Albany in Albany, New York. ... On December 1, 1987 at Binghamton University, Founding Mothers Cynthia Santiago-Guzman, Adriana Zamora-Tirado, Carmen Ibeth Garcia-Quinones and Carol Elizabeth Torres created an organization that would not only serve as a voice for women in an academic setting, but would also provide sincere sisterhood and unconditional support while... Lambda Pi Chi Sorority(ΛΠΧ) () is a U.S.-based Latina based Greek letter intercollegiate sorority founded on April 16, 1988 at Cornell University. ... Phi Iota Alpha (ΦΙΑ), established December 26, 1931, is the oldest Latino fraternity in existence and works to motivate people, develop leaders, and create innovative ways to unite the Latino community. ...

Flower: Orchid Gem: Diamond Mascot: Phoenix Motto: Sisterhood, Service & Cultural Diversity Homepage: http://www. ... Delta Lambda Phi (ΔΛΦ) is a national social fraternity for gay, bisexual, and progressive men. ... ΝΑΦ (Nu Alpha Phi, also known as NAPhi, Nappies) is an Asian-Interest fraternity based in the United States. ... Mu Sigma Upsilon Sorority, Inc. ...

Alma Mater

The SU Alma Mater was written by Junius W. Stevens (1895) in 1893 and is based on the then-popular song Annie Lisle. It was first sung under the title "Song of Syracuse" by the University Glee and Banjo Club on March 15, 1893. The song includes three verses, but only the first verse is commonly sung. Annie Lisle is the name of an 1857 ballad by Boston, Massachusetts songwriter H. S. Thompson and published by Oliver Ditson & Co. ...


According to the 1997-1998 "Syracuse University Student Handbook," author Junius W. Stevens recalled "while I was walking home across the city an idea for the song came to me. I had often noticed how the setting sun lighted up the walls of Crouse College long after dusk had fallen over the city and valley. As I walked through the empty streets, the words of a song took shape in my mind. By the time I reached home, the song was finished."

Where the vale of Onondaga
Meets the eastern sky
Proudly stands our Alma Mater
On her hilltop high.
Flag we love! Orange! Float for aye-
Old Syracuse, o'er thee,
Loyal be thy sons and daughters
To thy memory.


When the evening twilight deepens and the shadows fall,
Linger long the golden sunbeams on the western wall.
Flag we love, Orange,
Float for aye,
Old Syracuse o'er thee!
Loyal be thy sons and daughters
To thy memory


When the shades of life shall gather, dark the heart may be,
Still the ray of youth and love shall linger long o'er thee'.
Flag we love, Orange,
Float for aye,
Old Syracuse o'er thee!
Loyal be thy sons and daughters
To thy memory

The university also has a fight song entitled "Down the Field," commonly played after SU scores in athletic matches.

Down down the field goes old Syracuse
Just watch those backs hit the line and go thro'
Down down the field they go marching
Fighting for the Orange staunch and true
Rah rah rah!
Vict'ry's in sight for old Syracuse
Each loyal son knows he ne'er more will lose lose
So we'll fight, yes we'll fight and with all our might
For the glory of old Syracuse

Alumni

This is a list of notable individuals associated with Syracuse University. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Syracuse University

The list of the Chancellors of Syracuse University that have served since 1873. ... The Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) is located at Syracuse University. ...

References

  1. ^ 2006-2007 Enrollment
  2. ^ Syracuse University. International Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges, and Universities (IAMSCU). Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  3. ^ Syracuse University: Government and Community Relations - University United Methodist Church. Syracuse University. Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  4. ^ United Methodist schools score high in rankings. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  5. ^ Chronology. Syracuse University. Retrieved on 2007-12-24.
  6. ^ W. Freeman Galpin, Syracuse University: The Pioneer Years (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press,, 1952)
  7. ^ Gorney, Jeffrey, Syracuse University: an architectural guide (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2006)
  8. ^ Greene, John Robert, The Hill: An Illustrated Biography of Syracuse University 1870-Present (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press,2000 )
  9. ^ Gorney, Jeffrey, Syracuse University: an architectural guide (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2006)
  10. ^ Ibid.
  11. ^ Ibid.
  12. ^ Gorney, Jeffrey, Syracuse University: an architectural guide (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2006)
  13. ^ Greene, John Robert, The Hill: An Illustrated Biography of Syracuse University 1870-Present (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press,2000 )
  14. ^ Forbes, B. C. (1917). Men who are making America. New York: B.C. Forbes Pub. P.440
  15. ^ Greene, John Robert, Syracuse University: The Tolley Years 1942-1969 (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press,1996 )
  16. ^ Deppa, Joan, Media and Disasters: Pan Am 103; New York; University Press, 1994.
  17. ^ Yen, Marianne, "A Tragic End to the Semester." The Washington Post, December 23, 1988, page A07
  18. ^ [1]Map
  19. ^ SU News
  20. ^ [2]Rome Campus
  21. ^ School of Information Studies at Syracuse University ranks #1 in US News & World Report
  22. ^ Fast Facts: Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University. syr.edu. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  23. ^ U.S. News and World Report Public Affairs Graduate School Rankings
  24. ^ SU Abroad - Your Place In The World
  25. ^ SU Abroad: Florence
  26. ^ SU Abroad: London
  27. ^ SU Abroad: Madrid
  28. ^ Greene, John Robert, The Hill: An Illustrated Biography of Syracuse University 1870-Present (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press,2000 )
  29. ^ Greene, John Robert, Syracuse University: The Tolley Years 1942-1969 (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press,1996 )

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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