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Encyclopedia > Symphony No. 7 (Mahler)

The Symphony No. 7 in E minor by Gustav Mahler was written from 1904 to 1906. E minor is a minor scale based on E, consisting of the pitches E, F-sharp, G, A, B, C, D# and E (harmonic minor scale). ... Gustav Mahler Gustav Mahler (7 July 1860 – 18 May 1911) was a Bohemian-Austrian composer and conductor. ...


The symphony is sometimes known as The Song of the Night, though this nickname is not as common as the other Mahler symphonies, Titan, Resurrection, Tragic and Symphony of a Thousand. SYMPHONY is an acronym standing for Single- or Multi-Process Optimization over Networks. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ...


The piece is written for an orchestra consisting of four flutes, piccolo, four clarinets, bass clarinet, three bassoons, double bassoon, tenor horn, four French horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, triangle, cymbals, tambourine, tamtam, bells, cowbells, mandolin, guitar, two harps and strings (violins, violas, cellos and double basses). This article is about the musical instrument. ... A Yamaha piccolo. ... A bass clarinet, which sounds an octave lower than the more common Bâ™­ soprano clarinet. ... A typical Bass clarinet The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family. ... A Fox Instruments bassoon. ... Contrabassoon The contrabassoon or double bassoon is a larger version of the bassoon sounding an octave lower. ... Known in the US as alto horn, in Germany as althorn, and in the UK as tenor horn, this brass instrument pitched in Eb has a conical bore (gradually widening), and normally uses a deep, cornet-like mouthpiece. ... The horn is a brass instrument consisting of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba. ... A lip-reed aerophone with a predominantly cylindrical bore, the trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... The tuba is the largest of the low-brass instruments and is one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra, first appearing in the mid-19th century, when it largely replaced the ophicleide. ... Timpani, or kettledrums, are musical instruments in the percussion family. ... A bass drum is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. ... The triangle is an idiophonic musical instrument of the percussion family. ... It is also possible that you want to know about the Cymbalum instrument. ... Kocek with tambourine 19th c. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The bells of St Savas A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... A guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... The harp is a chordophone which has its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... A string instrument (also stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... Violin The violin is a stringed musical instrument that has four strings tuned a perfect fifth apart. ... The viola (in French, alto; in German Bratsche) is a stringed musical instrument which serves as the middle voice of the violin family, between the upper lines played by the lighter violin (soprano register) and the lower lines played by the heavier cello (bass) and double bass. ... A cello The violoncello, or as it is more commonly to refered to as the cello or cello (pronounced Cheh-loh), is a stringed instrument and a member of the violin family. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ...


Mahler began work on his seventh symphony in 1904, before he had completed his sixth. He wrote the two Nachtmusik movements first, and the other three movements in the following year. The orchestration was completed in 1906, though Mahler continued to make small changes between rehearsals before the premiere in 1908. For the use of the term orchestration in computer science, see orchestration (computers) Orchestration or arrangement is the study and practice of arranging music for an orchestra or musical ensemble. ...


The work is in five movements:

  1. Langsam--Allegro - the first movement features the tenor horn playing the first melody. Because the tenor horn is not a standard orchestral instrument, a trombone is sometimes used instead. This movement is in sonata form.
  2. Nachtmusik I - a musical recreation of Rembrandt’s Night Watch. Mahler had spent considerable time at the Rijksmuseum on his first trip to the Netherlands in 1904.
  3. Scherzo - Mahler marked this movement Schattenhaft (shadowy), and it is sometimes said that considering scherzo means joke, this movement is remarkably lacking in humour.
  4. Nachtmusik II
  5. Rondo-Finale - the last movement has been seen by many as something of a let-down. It has been accused of superficiality, dodging questions set by the previous movements. Formally, it is a rondo.

The piece has several motifs in common with the sixth symphony, including the major chord turning into a minor chord which crops up throughout the sixth. In musical terminology, tempo (Italian for time) is the speed or pace of a given piece. ... Known in the US as alto horn, in Germany as althorn, and in the UK as tenor horn, this brass instrument pitched in Eb has a conical bore (gradually widening), and normally uses a deep, cornet-like mouthpiece. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A lip-reed aerophone with a predominantly cylindrical bore, the trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... Sonata form refers to both the standard layout of an entire musical composition and more specifically to the standardized form of the first movement. ... Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (July 15, 1606 – October 4, 1669) is generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history and the most important United Provinces (Netherlands) painter of the seventeenth century. ... Night Watch or Nightwatch can refer to: Night Watch, a painting by Rembrandt Night Watch, a novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series Night Watch, a novel in Sergey Lukyanenkos Watch trilogy Night Watch, a fictional intelligence organization in the science fiction television series Babylon 5 Nightwatch, an album... The Rijksmuseum Rembrandt van Rijn: The Night Watch 1642 Johannes Vermeer: Milkmaid 1658-1660 Frans Hals: Portrait of a Young Couple The Rijksmuseum (IPA: ; Dutch for State Museum) is the national museum of the Netherlands, located in Amsterdam on the Museumplein. ... A scherzo (plural scherzi) is a name given to a piece of music or a movement from a larger piece such as a symphony. ... Rondo, and its French equivalent rondeau, is a word that has been used in music in a number of ways, most often in reference to a musical form, but also in reference to a character-type that is distinct from the form. ...


Mahler conducted the premiere of his seventh symphony in Prague in 1908. A few weeks later he conducted it in Munich and he also gave it in the Netherlands. Both the audience and the performers at the premiere were confused by the work, and it was not well received. It remains one of Mahler's least appreciated works, often accused of incoherence. For the 2005 Steven Spielberg film, see Munich (film). ...


The opening horn motif of the second movement was well known in Britain for much of the 1980s and 1990s thanks to it being used in television advertisements for Castrol, a brand of engine oil (sound sample in ogg format, 15 seconds, 48 KB). The 1980s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1980 and 1989, however in a pop cultural sense The Eighties sometimes includes at least some aspects of 1979 and 1990, or more or less the era between the end of the Disco era of the 1970s and... The 1990s refers to the years 1990 to 1999; the last decade of the 20th Century, but in an economical sense The Nineties is often considered to span from the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 to the 9/11 attacks in 2001. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... Ogg is a patent-free, fully open multimedia bitstream container format designed for efficient streaming and file compression (storage). ...


Joe Monzo believes that Mahler was influenced by the program of the Sinfonia Domestica of Richard Strauss -- which Mahler conducted at the time he was composing his 7th Symphony -- to incorporate a "hidden program" in the 1st movement of this work, in which the different themes characterize respectively Mahler, his daughter Maria, and his wife Alma Mahler. Monzo also posits a strong two-way influence between the contemporary work of Arnold Schoenberg and Mahler, which is revealed in the similarites between Mahler's 7th and Schoenberg's Kammersymphonie (Chamber Symphony No. 1) composed in 1906. Monzo has also made a CD of the Mahler movement revealing his interpretation of the work, which is based on what he has been able to learn of Mahler's own conducting style. Joe Monzo Joe Monzo (born January 5, 1962) is an American microtonal composer and tuning-theorist who has authored books and multiple webpages on music theory. ... Richard Strauss (June 11, 1864 – September 8, 1949) was a German composer of the late Romantic era, particularly noted for his tone poems and operas. ... Alma Mahler Alma Maria Mahler (August 31, 1879 – December 11, 1964), noted in her native Vienna for her beauty and intelligence, was the wife, successively, of one of the centurys leading composers (Gustav Mahler), architects (Walter Gropius), and novelists (Franz Werfel). ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 For the American music critic and journalist, see Harold Charles Schonberg. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Premieres

Prague (Czech: Praha, see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (Česká filharmonie in Czech language) is based in Prague and is probably the most famous and respected orchestra in the Czech Republic. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,500,000 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ... Sir Henry Joseph Wood (3 March 1869 - 19 August 1944) was a British orchestral conductor, the founder of the famous Promenade Concerts. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... Frederick Stock (1872 - 1942) was a U.S. (German-born) conductor. ...

Reference

  • Mahler 7th/1 - an analytical reduction score, speculations on the "hidden program", and CD of a computer realization, of the 1st movement of Gustav Mahler's 7th Symphony, by Joe Monzo

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gustav Mahler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2273 words)
Mahler became one of a generation of Jewish intellectuals who had lost their religious identity and taken root in the Austro-German culture they felt they were bound to be a part of.
Mahler was the last in a line of Viennese symphonists extending from the First Viennese School of Joseph Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Franz Schubert to Bruckner and Johannes Brahms; he also incorporated the ideas of Romantic composers like Robert Schumann and Felix Mendelssohn.
Mahler avoided numbering it as a symphony due to his superstitious fear of the curse of the ninth.
Symphony No. 7 (Mahler) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (432 words)
The Symphony No. 7 in E minor by Gustav Mahler was written from 1904 to 1906.
The symphony is sometimes known as The Song of the Night, though this nickname is not as common as the other Mahler symphonies, Titan, Resurrection, Tragic and Symphony of a Thousand.
Mahler conducted the premiere of his seventh symphony in Prague in 1908.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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