FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Symphony No. 2 (Rachmaninoff)

Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27 was written by Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff in 1906-1907. The premiere was conducted by the composer himself in St. Petersburg on 8 February 1908. Its duration is approximately 60 minutes when performed uncut: cut performances can be as short as 40 minutes. Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasilevič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor, one of the last great champions of the Romantic style of European classical music. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


The score is dedicated to Sergei Taneyev, pupil of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Russian composer, teacher, theorist, and author. Sergey I. Taneev. ... Pyotr (Peter) Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian: Пётр Ильич Чайкoвский, Pëtr Il’ič ÄŒajkovskij;  )[1] (7 May [O.S. 25 April] 1840 – 6 November [O.S. 25 October] 1893), was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ...

Contents

History

At the time his Symphony No. 2 in E minor was composed, Rachmaninoff had had two successful seasons as the conductor of Imperial Opera at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. Rachmaninoff considered himself first and foremost a composer and felt that the performance schedule was detracting from his time to compose. He then moved his wife and infant daughter to Dresden, Germany to spend more time composing and to also escape the political tumult that would put Russia on the path to revolution. The family remained in Dresden for three years, spending summers at Rachmaninoff’s in-law’s estate called Ivanovka. It was during this time that Rachmaninoff wrote not only his Second Symphony, but also the tone poem The Isle of the Dead. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasilevič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor, one of the last great champions of the Romantic style of European classical music. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The Bolshoi Theatre of Moscow, Russia The Bolshoi Theatre (Russian: , Bolshoy Teatr, Large Theater) is a theatre and opera company in Moscow, Russia, which gives performances of ballet and opera. ... Location Position of Moscow in Europe Government Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Geographical characteristics Area  - City 1,081 km² Population  - City (2007)    - Density 10,469,000   9684. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... For other uses, see Dresden (disambiguation). ... Arnold Böcklins Isle of the Dead Isle of the Dead (or Island of the Dead; Toteninsel in the original German) is one of the best known paintings by Swiss-German artist Arnold Böcklin, as well as a piece of music by Sergei Rachmaninoff, a film by Val...


Rachmaninoff was not altogether convinced that he was a gifted symphonist. At its premiere, his Symphony No. 1 (conducted by Alexander Glazunov in 1897) was considered an utter disaster; its criticism was so harsh that it sent the young composer into a bout of depression. Even after the success of his Piano Concerto No. 2 (which won the Glinka Award and 1000 rubles in 1904), Rachmaninoff still lacked confidence in his writing. He was very unhappy with the first draft of his Second Symphony but after months of revision, Rachmaninoff finished the work and conducted the premier in 1908 to great success which would earn him another Glinka Award ten months later. The triumph regained Rachmaninoff’s sense of self-worth as a symphonist. Sergei Rachmaninoffs First Symphony in d minor, Op. ... Portrait by Ilya Repin, 1887. ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or sometimes unipolar when compared with bipolar disorder, which is sometimes called manic depression) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ISO 4217 Code RUB User(s) Russia and self-proclaimed Abkhazia and South Ossetia Inflation 10. ...


Revisions

Because of its long length, Symphony No. 2 has been subjected to many revisions, particularly in the 1940s and 1950s, that reduced the piece from nearly an hour to 35 minutes. But as the entire work is so carefully structured, the radical revisions deeply distorted the carefully planned structure of the piece. Today, however, the piece is usually performed in its entirety, with only the omission of a repeat in the first movement.


The manuscript of Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 is owned by the Tabor Foundation, and is on permanent loan to the British Library.[1] British Library Ossulston St entrance, with distinctive red logo. ...


Music

Scoring

The symphony is scored for full orchestra with 3 flutes (the 3rd doubling on piccolo), 3 oboes (the 3rd doubling on cor anglais), 2 clarinets and bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, snare drum, bass drum, timpani, cymbals, glockenspiel and strings This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The piccolo is a small flute. ... The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The cor anglais, or English horn, is a double reed woodwind musical instrument in the oboe family. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family. ... The bassoon is a woodwind instrument in the double reed family that plays in the tenor range and below. ... The horn is a brass instrument that consists of tubing wrapped into a coiled form, now with finger-operated valves to help control the pitch but originally without valves to control the pitch. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium and tuba. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... The tuba is one of the largest of low-brass instruments and is one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra, first appearing in the mid-19th century, when it largely replaced the ophicleide. ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) strethced across the bottom head. ... It has been suggested that vruk be merged into this article or section. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... Sabian Paragon cymbals 10-Inch (25 cm) AA Splash Cymbals (Fr. ... Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... A string instrument (also stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ...


Movements

The symphony is in four movements:

  1. Largo - Allegro moderato
  2. Allegro molto
  3. Adagio
  4. Allegro vivace

The symphony consists of a dramatic sequence that is identified with Russian symphonic tradition. The tradition, established by the Rachmaninoff’s Russian Romantic predecessors, places emphasis on a motif and an “unending and beautiful flow of melody” (e.g. Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5, Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5, and Balakirev's Symphony No. 2) In music, a motif is a perceivable or salient reoccurring fragment or succession of notes that may used to construct the entirety or parts of complete melodies, themes. ... Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky composed his Symphony No. ... Sergei Prokofiev wrote his Symphony No. ... Mily Alexeyevich Balakirev (Russian Милий Алексеевич Бала́кирев) (January 2, 1837 – May 29, 1910) was a Russian composer. ... Mily Balakirev began work on his Symphony No. ...


First movement

The first movement is brooding and mysterious; dramatically intense and “alternates between stormy conflict and serene vision.” The cellos and double basses introduce the melodic motto in the “slow…dense texture” of the Largo. In the Allegro moderato Rachmaninoff finishes the remainder of the movement in sonata form. Towards the end of the movement another theme emerges, this one in G Major, carried mostly by the strings. The piece ends with the same motif as the Largo in an “understated coda.” Alternate meaning: Cello web browser A cropped image to show the relative size of a cello to a human (Uncropped Version) The cello (also violoncello or cello) is a stringed instrument and part of the violin family. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... In musical terminology, tempo (Italian for time) is the speed or pace of a given piece. ... In musical terminology, tempo (Italian for time) is the speed or pace of a given piece. ... This article is about tempo in music. ... Sonata form is a musical form that has been used widely since the early Classical period. ... In musical terminology, tempo (Italian for time) is the speed or pace of a given piece. ... Coda sign Coda (Italian for tail; from the Latin cauda), in music, is a passage which brings a movement or a separate piece to a conclusion through prolongation. ...


Second movement

In the structure of the traditional Russian romantic symphony, the scherzo precedes the slow movement (est. by Borodin and Balakirev). Rachmaninoff’s second movement scherzo is “vigorous to the point of abandon.” The first motif is carried out largely by the horn section. There is a second motif that relates to the first movement, becoming the “motto” motif for the whole work. The brass chorale at the end of the scherzo is chilling and it derives from the Dies irae, a Gregorian chant for the dead that haunts many of Rachmaninoff’s works and held great influence over his creative life (i.e. Isle of the Dead and Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini.) A scherzo (plural scherzi) is a name given to a piece of music or a movement from a larger piece such as a symphony. ... Borodin is a blogger pseudonym and the last name of several Russian people: Borodin, a Political Philosophy Blogger. ... The horn is a brass instrument that consists of tubing wrapped into a coiled form, now with finger-operated valves to help control the pitch but originally without valves to control the pitch. ... For the Polish death metal band Dies Irae, see Dies Irae (band). ... For information on the calendar, see: Gregorian Calendar For the music style, see: Gregorian chant For medieval usage see: Gregorian reform For the music group see: Gregorian (music group) For the University in Rome: Gregorian University This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ...


Third movement

This theme, again related to the work’s motif, sings through primarily in the first violin in an extremely Romantic-style melody, echoed by a solo clarinet and the oboe section. The symphony reaches its emotional climax in this movement, after an interlude of English horn and violin solo passages followed by a clarinet reverie that is reminiscent of the first movement, further developing the work’s “motto.” At the end of the Adagio, the motif is heard in its original form which again links it back to the first movement. The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... Look up Climax in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cor anglais The cor anglais or English horn is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In musical terminology, tempo (Italian for time) is the speed or pace of a given piece. ...


Fourth movement

In the Russian symphonic tradition, the motifs and themes of the preceding movements are collectively “summed-up” in the finale. The final movement is grand and sweeping, set in sonata form, carrying with it the essence of the work. There are several ideas present in the Finale: the opening triplet theme, the marching melody, and the return to the Romantic string melody of the third movement.


Selected Recordings

Nikolai Sokoloff (1886–1965), was a Russian-American conductor and violinist. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Nikolay Semyonovich Golovanov ( [o. ... The Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra of Moscow Radio is one of the most prestigious orchestras in Russia. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Dimitris Mitropoulos (Greek: Δημήτρης Μητρόπουλος) (March 1, 1896 – November 2, 1960) was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer who spent most of his career in the United States. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Kurt Sanderling (born September 19, 1912) was a conductor (he announced his retirement in 2002). ... The St. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ... Eugene Ormandy in the 1950s Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899 – March 12, 1985) was a conductor and violinist. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Andr Previn (born April 6, 1929) is a prominent pianist, orchestral conductor, and composer. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is an English music company comprising the major record company, EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Brook Green in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based on Charing Cross Road, London. ... Eugene Ormandy in the 1950s Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899 – March 12, 1985) was a conductor and violinist. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... RCAs logo as seen today on many products. ... Yuri Khatuevich Temirkanov (born December 10, 1938) is a Russian conductor. ... The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is an English orchestra based in London. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is an English music company comprising the major record company, EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Brook Green in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based on Charing Cross Road, London. ... Vladimir Ashkenazy Vladimir Davidovich Ashkenazy (sometimes transliterated Ashkenazi) (Russian: Влади́мир Дави́дович А́шкенази) (born July 6, 1937) is a conductor and, more notably, a pianist. ... The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest in Dutch) is the best known and most respected orchestra in the Netherlands, and is generally considered to be among the worlds finest. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Russian conductor Dmitri Kitajenko was music director of the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra for 14 years before taking up the same position with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra (1990-1998) and the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra (1990-1996). ... The Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra is an orchestra based in Moscow, Russia. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Melodiya (Russian: Μелодия) was the state-owned major record company/label of the Soviet Union. ... Evgeny Fyodorovich Svetlanov (September 6, 1928 - May 3, 2002) was a conductor and composer. ... The State Academic Symphony Orchestra of the Russian Federation is one of the premier orchestras in Russia. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mikhail Vasilievich Pletnev (Михаил Васильевич Плетнев) (born 14 April 1957) is a pianist, conductor, and composer. ... The Russian National Orchestra is an orchestra based in Moscow, Russia. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ...

References

  1. ^ Geoffrey Norris, "Lost symphony in a Co-op bag". Telegraph, 15 March 2007.

External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m