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Encyclopedia > Sympathetic strings

Sympathetic strings are strings on musical instruments which begin resonating, not due to any external influence such as picking or bowing, but due to another note (or frequency). The effect is most often heard when the fundamental frequency of the string is in unison or an octave lower or higher than the catalyst note, although it can occur for other intervals such as a fifth with less effect. A musical instrument is a device that has been constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... In physics, resonance is the tendency of a system to absorb more oscillatory energy when the frequency of the oscillations matches the systems natural frequency of vibration (its resonant frequency) than it does at other frequencies. ... The fundamental tone often referred to simply as the fundamental, is the lowest frequency in a harmonic series. ... In music, an octave (sometimes abbreviated 8ve or 8va) is the interval between one musical note and another with half or double the frequency. ... In music theory, an interval is the relationship between two notes or pitches, the lower and higher members of the interval. ...


Musical instruments make use of sympathetic strings to enhance their sound. Some have resonating strings added which exist solely to provide the effect and are not played at all. Common examples of this would be the sitar and the harp, and less common would be specially-fitted guitars. Other instruments such as the piano do not have additional strings, but make use of the effect by allowing their regular strings to vibrate sympathetically when they are not being played directly, particularly when the damper pedal is used. Resonant strings are thin auxiliary strings found on many (Asian) Indian musical instruments, as well as some Western Renaissance-era instruments. ... Premla Shahane playing a sitar, 1927 A sitar The sitar is a Hindustani classical instrument. ... The harp is a chordophone which has its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... The acoustic archtop guitar, used in Jazz music, features steel strings The guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... This article is about the modern musical instrument. ...


Other instruments that have sympathetic strings include:


  Results from FactBites:
 
Resonating Strings and the Sympitar (1118 words)
Sympathetic strings have been used on instruments for hundreds of years, and by many different cultures.
There is an internal damping mechanism for the sympathetic strings, operated by a small lever protruding from the upper left side of the sound-hole.A small movement of this lever with the thumb of the right hand easily turns the sympathetic strings on or off.
Replacement of sympathetic strings is accomplished by threading the new string in through it's tiny hole in the main bridge, then pulling it through the neck with a special tool.
String Instruments World Musical Instruments String musical instruments include a wide variety of instruments, some ... (2224 words)
String instruments come in a variety of shapes and sizes, from the Oud to the Sitar to the Harp.
A bow is drawn across the strings which causes them to resonate, and the bridges are moveable to adjust the tone.
The hammered dulcimer is played by striking the strings with small hammers, with the dulcimer resting either on the lap or on a table or stand.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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