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Encyclopedia > Sydney
Sydney
New South Wales

The Sydney Opera House and Sydney CBD on Port Jackson
Population: 4,284,379 [1] (1st)
Density: 2058/km² (5330.2/sq mi) (2006)[2]
Established: 26 January 1788
Coordinates: 33°51′35.9″S 151°12′40″E / -33.859972, 151.21111Coordinates: 33°51′35.9″S 151°12′40″E / -33.859972, 151.21111
Area: 12144.6 km² (4689.1 sq mi)
Time zone:

 • Summer (DST) This article is about the local government area. ... Sydney may refer to: Places: Sydney, capital of New South Wales, Australia Sydney, Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia, Canada Sydney (Mornington), an island by the island of Mornington, Wellesley Isles, Queensland, Australia Sydney, North Dakota, United States Sydney, South Africa Sydney, Vanuatu, a village on Tanna, Tafea, Vanuatu Sydney, Florida, United... NSW redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x682, 154 KB) Summary The Sydney Opera House viewed from the water with the city skyline behind taken and uploaded by Matthew Field http://www. ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... A view of the Sydney CBD from Farm Cove Map of the CBD The central business district (CBD) of Sydney, the capital of New South Wales, Australia, extends southwards for about 2 km from Sydney Cove, the point of first European settlement. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... This list of Australian cities by population briefly explains the three different population figures given for Australian cities, and provides rankings for each. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Anniversary Day redirects here. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...

AEST (UTC+10)

AEDT (UTC+11) Time Zone is also a historical computer game. ... UTC+10 time zone Australia (AEST—Australian Eastern Standard Time) Australian Capital Territory**, New South Wales** (except Broken Hill, which observes South Australia time), Queensland, Tasmania** (which observes DST starting on the first weekend of October instead of the last), Victoria** Guam (Chamorro Standard Time via US Law) Federated States... In Australia, the keeping of standard time is divided into three time zones: Australian Eastern Standard Time, Australian Central Standard Time and Australian Western Standard Time. ... as non DST time Federated States of Micronesia Kosrae, Pohnpei, and surrounding area New Caledonia Russia Kuril Islands* Magadan Oblast* Sakha Republic* (eastern portion) Solomon Islands Vanuatu as DST Australia (Australian Eastern Daylight Time) Australian Capital Territory** New South Wales** Tasmania** (where daylight saving time starts on the first weekend...

Location:
LGA: various (38)
County: Cumberland
State District: various (49)
Federal Division: various (22)
Mean Max Temp Mean Min Temp Rainfall
21.6 °C
71 °F
13.7 °C
57 °F
1,214.8 mm
47.8 in
Location of Sydney within Australia
Location of Sydney within Australia

Sydney (pronounced /ˈsɪdniː/) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4.28 million (2006 estimate).[1] It is the state capital of New South Wales, and the site of the first British colony in Australia, established in 1788 at Sydney Cove by Arthur Phillip, leader of the First Fleet from Britain.[3] A resident of the city is referred to as a Sydneysider. “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ... Location of Perth within Australia This article is about the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Port Darwin redirects here. ... Map of Local Government Areas in New South Wales Types of LGAs in New South Wales The Local Government Areas of New South Wales, Australia have been subject to periodic bouts of restructuring and rationalisation by the State Government, involving voluntary and involuntary amalgamation of areas. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 692 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1036 × 898 pixel, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: image/png) I made this image from a free wikipedia image. ... Most of the Western and Central parts of Australia were never divided into counties;  No counties  Has been subdivided into counties Cadastral divisions of Australia refers to the parts of Australia which are divided into the cadastral units of counties, parishes, hundreds, and other divisions for the purposes of land... Cumberland County is a county in the State of New South Wales, Australia. ... State Electoral District is a term used to refer to a voting area within Australian states. ... The New South Wales Legislative Assembly is elected from 93 single-member electorates called districts. ... The Australian House of Representatives is elected from 150 single-member districts called Divisions. ... Download high resolution version (949x607, 20 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... This article is about the unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Image File history File links Sydney_locator-MJC.png Summary Map of Australia locating Sydney. ... Image File history File links Sydney_locator-MJC.png Summary Map of Australia locating Sydney. ... This list of Australian cities by population briefly explains the three different population figures given for Australian cities, and provides rankings for each. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Each jurisdiction of Australia has its own capital, where local judicial, administrative and legislative duties are centred. ... NSW redirects here. ... Sydney Cove is a small bay on the southern shore of Port Jackson (commonly but incorrectly called Sydney Harbour), on the coast of the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Admiral Arthur Phillip RN (11 October 1738 – 31 August 1814) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator. ... The First Fleet is the name given to the 11 ships which sailed from Great Britain on May 13, 1787 to establish the first European colony in New South Wales. ...


Sydney is situated on Australia's south-east coast. The city is built around Port Jackson, which includes Sydney Harbour, leading to the city's nickname, "the Harbour City". It is noted for the Sydney Opera House and the Harbour Bridge, and its beaches. The metropolitan area is surrounded by national parks, and contains many bays, rivers and inlets. It is listed as a beta world city by the Loughborough University group's 1999 inventory.[4] The city has hosted international sporting, political and cultural events, including the 1938 British Empire Games, 2000 Summer Olympics and the 2003 Rugby World Cup. In September 2007, the city hosted the leaders of the 21 APEC economies for APEC Australia 2007, and in July 2008 will host World Youth Day 2008. The main airport serving Sydney is Sydney Airport. For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge located on Port Jackson Port Jackson is the natural harbour of Sydney, Australia, also known as Sydney Harbour and is the largest natural harbour in the world. ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ... Bondi Beach in the suburb of Bondi Manly Beach Sydney is renowned for its beaches and, with its warm climate, attracts people to the beaches almost all year round. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “World city” redirects here. ... Loughborough University is located in the market town of Loughborough, Leicestershire in the East Midlands of England. ... The 1938 British Empire Games was the third British Empire Games, the Commonwealth Games being the modern-day equivalent. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The 2003 Rugby World Cup was the fifth rugby union world cup. ... APEC may refer to: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Action Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour Advanced Placement European Civilization Atlantic Provinces Economic Council This article consisting of a 4-letter acronym or initialism is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... APEC Australia 2007 was composed of a series of political meetings held around Australia between the 21 member economies of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. ... In 1986, Pope John Paul II invited the youth of the Catholic Church to gather in St Peters Square on Palm Sunday to celebrate their faith. ... Sydney (Kingsford Smith) International Airport, or Sydney Airport, is located in Mascot, New South Wales, and is the major airport serving Sydney, Australia. ...


Sydney is one of the most multicultural cities in the world, which reflects its role as a major destination for immigrants to Australia.[5] According to the Mercer cost of living survey, Sydney is Australia’s most expensive city, and the 21st most expensive in the world.[6] The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Exactly when Immigration to Australia began is unknown but estimates typically range from 40,000 - 50,000 years ago,[1] when the ancestors of Australian Aborigines arrived on the continent via the islands of the Malay Archipelago and New Guinea. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Sydney
A map of Sydney in 1789
A map of Sydney in 1789
Sydney circa 1828, looking north over Hyde Park towards the harbour
Sydney circa 1828, looking north over Hyde Park towards the harbour

Radiocarbon dating suggests that the Sydney region has been inhabited by indigenous Australians for at least 30,000 years.[7] When the First Fleet arrived in 1788, 4000 - 8000 Aboriginal people lived in the region. The British called them "Eora"[8], because being asked where they came from, these people would answer: "Eora", meaning in their language: "here", or "from this place". There were three language groups in the Sydney region, which were divided into dialects spoken by smaller clans. The principal languages were Darug (the Cadigal, original inhabitants of the City of Sydney, spoke a coastal dialect of Darug), Dharawal and Guringai. Each clan had a territory; the location of that territory determined the resources available. Although urbanization has destroyed most evidence of these settlements (such as shell middens), Sydney and its environs have rock drawings and carvings because of the nature of the rock, Hawkesbury sandstone.[9] History of Sydney stretches back to prehistoric times. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1384x875, 310 KB) Summary A map of Sydney from 1789 done by a transported convict. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1384x875, 310 KB) Summary A map of Sydney from 1789 done by a transported convict. ... Sydney, about 1828, looking north over Hyde Park, Sydney towards the harbour. ... Sydney, about 1828, looking north over Hyde Park, Sydney towards the harbour. ... A Fig-lined avenue in Hyde Park, Sydney, Australia Hyde Park is a large park in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... Languages Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religions Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including Islam and various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group... The First Fleet is the name given to the 11 ships which sailed from Great Britain on May 13, 1787 to establish the first European colony in New South Wales. ... Portrait of Bennelong, senior man of the Eora / Dharawal tribe The traditional owners of the inner Sydney City region of Australia are the Cadigal people. ... The Darug people are Indigenous Australians, who are traditional custodians of the geographic area that is now Western Sydney. ... The Cadigal, also spelled as Gadigal, are a group of Indigenous Australians who originally inhabited the area that became the Marrickville Local Government Area of Sydney. ... Tharawal (many other spellings) is an Australian Aboriginal language. ... Kuringgai (also spelt Ku-ring-gai, Kuring-gai, Guringai) is a name referring to an Indigenous Australian people of New South Wales. ... A midden, also known as kitchen middens, is a dump for domestic waste. ... Hawkesbury Sandstone is a type of sandstone prevalent in the Sydney region of New South Wales, Australia. ...


In 1770, British sea captain Lieutenant James Cook landed in Botany Bay. Under instruction from the British government, a convict settlement was founded by Arthur Phillip, who arrived at Botany Bay with a fleet of 11 ships on January 20, 1788. This site was soon found to be unsuitable for habitation, owing to poor soil and a lack of reliable fresh water. Phillip founded the colony, further up the coast, at Sydney Cove on Port Jackson on 26 January 1788. He named it after the British Home Secretary, Thomas Townshend, Lord Sydney, in recognition of Sydney's role in issuing the charter authorising Phillip to establish a colony.[citation needed] In April 1789 a disease, thought to be smallpox, killed an estimated 500 to 1000 Aboriginal people between Broken Bay and Botany Bays.[8] There was violent resistance to British settlement, notably by the warrior Pemulwuy in the area around Botany Bay, and conflicts were common in the area surrounding the Hawkesbury River. By 1820 there were only a few hundred Aborigines and Governor Macquarie had begun initiatives to 'civilize, Christianize and educate' the Aborigines by removing them from their clans.[8] This article is about the British explorer. ... For other Botany Bays see Botany Bay (disambiguation) Bicentennial Monument at Botany Bay Botany Bay is a bay in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, a few kilometers south of the central business district. ... A penis colony is a colony used to detain prisoners and generally use them for penal labor in an economically underdeveloped part of the states (usually colonial) territories, and on a far larger scale than a prison farm. ... Admiral Arthur Phillip RN (11 October 1738 – 31 August 1814) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator. ... Sydney Cove is a small bay on the southern shore of Port Jackson (commonly but incorrectly called Sydney Harbour), on the coast of the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... Frognal House by George Shepherd appears in Thomas Irelands History of Kent published c. ... This article is about the disease. ... Broken Bay is a large inlet of the Pacific Ocean located about 50 km north of Sydney on the coast of New South Wales. ... For the Sydney suburb, see Pemulwuy, New South Wales. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Major General Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales Major-General Lachlan Macquarie CB (31 January 1762[1] – 1 July 1824), British military officer and colonial administrator, served as Governor of New South Wales from 1810 to 1821 and had a leading role in the social, economic and architectural development...

Macquarie's tenure as Governor of New South Wales was a period when Sydney was improved from its basic beginnings. Roads, bridges, wharves and public buildings were constructed by British and Irish convicts, and by 1822 the town had banks, markets, well-established thoroughfares and an organised constabulary. The 1830s and 1840s were periods of urban development, including the development of the first suburbs, as the town grew rapidly when ships began arriving from Britain and Ireland with immigrants looking to start a new life in a new country. On 20 July 1842 the municipal council of Sydney was incorporated and the town was declared the first city in Australia, with Charles H. Chambers the first mayor.[10] The first of several gold rushes started in 1851, and the port of Sydney has since seen many waves of people arriving from around the world. Rapid suburban development began in the last quarter of the 19th century with the advent of steam powered tramways and railways. With industrialisation Sydney expanded rapidly, and by the early 20th century it had a population well in excess of one million. The Great Depression hit Sydney badly. One of the highlights of the Depression era, however, was the completion of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932.[11] Image File history File links Garden_Palace_Sydney_1879. ... Image File history File links Garden_Palace_Sydney_1879. ... The Domain is a large open space in Sydney, Australia, immediately east of the central business district. ... Sydneys Garden Palace; an architectural drawing from the 1870s. ... List of Governors of New South Wales See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... A studio photograph of Tasmanian convict Bill Thompson, showing the convict uniform and the use of leg irons. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... your gay, your gay, im your secret admirer and i like your boobs there nice and smooth. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ...


A rivalry has traditionally existed between Sydney and Melbourne since the gold rushes of the 1850s grew the capital of Victoria into Australia's largest and richest city.[12] Sydney overtook Melbourne in population in the early years of the 20th century,[13] and has remained the largest city in Australia since this time. During the 1970s and 1980s Sydney's CBD with the Reserve Bank and Australian Stock Exchange clearly surpassed Melbourne as the nation's financial capital.[14] Throughout the 20th century, especially in the decades immediately following World War II, Sydney continued to expand as large numbers of European and later Asian immigrants populated the metropolitan area. The culture brought about by immigrants was a major factor in the city's diverse and highly cosmopolitan atmosphere. This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... VIC redirects here. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... A view of the Sydney CBD from Farm Cove Map of the CBD The central business district (CBD) of Sydney, the capital of New South Wales, Australia, extends southwards for about 2 km from Sydney Cove, the point of first European settlement. ... The Reserve Bank of Australia came into being on 14 January 1960 to operate as Australias central bank and banknote issuing authority. ... The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) is the primary stock exchange in Australia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Sydney
Image of Sydney taken by NASA RS satellite. The city centre is about a third of the way in on the south shore of the upper inlet, the Parramatta River, directly south of the Sydney Harbour Bridge
Image of Sydney taken by NASA RS satellite. The city centre is about a third of the way in on the south shore of the upper inlet, the Parramatta River, directly south of the Sydney Harbour Bridge

Image of Sydney taken by NASA RS satellite. ... This simulated true-color Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image shows the Sydney metropolitan area on October 12, 2001, and covers an area of 42 by 33 kilometers. ... This simulated true-color Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image shows the Sydney metropolitan area on October 12, 2001, and covers an area of 42 by 33 kilometers. ... RS has different meanings depending on the context: Republika Srpska, one of the two political entities that compose the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ...

Topography

Sydney's urban area is in a coastal basin, which is bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the east, the Blue Mountains to the west, the Hawkesbury River to the north and the Royal National Park to the south. It lies on a submergent coastline, where the ocean level has risen to flood deep river valleys (ria) carved in the hawkesbury sandstone. Port Jackson, better known as Sydney Harbour, is one such ria and is the largest natural harbour in the world.[15] The Sydney area is not affected by significant earthquakes. The urban area has around 70 harbour and ocean beaches, including the famous Bondi Beach. Sydney's urban area covers 1,687 km² (651 sq mi) as at 2001.[16] The Sydney Statistical Division, used for census data, is the unofficial metropolitan area[17] and covers 12,145 km² (4,689 sq mi).[18] This area includes the Central Coast, the Blue Mountains, and national parks and other unurbanised land. Cliff overlooking the Jamison Valley The Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia, are situated approximately 100 kilometres west of Sydney. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Winter at Wattamolla beach. ... In earth science a submergent coastline is a coastline which has experienced a rise in sea level, either due to a global sea level change, or local subsidence. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... Georges River, in the southern suburbs of Sydney (Australia) is a ria, or drowned river valley. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... Bondi Beach (pronounced BOND-eye with a long i, or /bÉ’ndaɪ/) is a popular beach and the name of the surrounding suburb in Sydney, Australia. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Cliff overlooking the Jamison Valley The Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia, are situated approximately 100 kilometres west of Sydney. ...


Geographically, Sydney lies over two regions: the Cumberland Plain, a relatively flat region lying to the south and west of the harbour, and the Hornsby Plateau, a sandstone plateau lying mainly to the north of the harbour and dissected by steep valleys. The parts of the city with the oldest European development are located in the flat areas south of the harbour. The North Shore was slower to develop because of its hilly topography lack of access across the harbour. The Sydney Harbour Bridge was opened in 1932 and linked the North Shore to the rest of the city. The Cumberland Plain is a region in the Sydney Basin of New South Wales, Australia. ... The North Shore or Northern Suburbs refers to those suburbs of Sydney, Australia which are located on the north shore of Sydney Harbour, and between Middle Harbour and the Lane Cove River. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ...


Climate

Climate chart for Sydney
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
103
 
26
19
 
 
117
 
26
19
 
 
131
 
25
18
 
 
127
 
22
15
 
 
123
 
19
12
 
 
128
 
17
9
 
 
98
 
16
8
 
 
82
 
18
9
 
 
69
 
20
11
 
 
77
 
22
14
 
 
83
 
24
16
 
 
78
 
25
18
temperatures in °C
precipitation totals in mm

Sydney has a temperate climate with warm summers and mild winters, and rainfall spread throughout the year.[19] The weather is moderated by proximity to the ocean, and more extreme temperatures are recorded in the inland western suburbs. The warmest month is January, with an average air temperature range at Observatory Hill of 18.6-25.8 °C (65.5-78.4 °F) and an average of 14.6 days a year over 30 °C (86.0 °F). The maximum recorded temperature was 45.3 °C (113.5 °F) on 14 January 1939 at the end of a 4-day heat wave across Australia.[20] The winter is mildly cool, with temperatures rarely dropping below 5 °C (41 °F) in coastal areas. The coldest month is July, with an average range of 8-16.2 °C (46.4-61.2 °F). The lowest recorded minimum in the city[clarify] was 2.1 °C (35.8 °F). Rainfall is fairly evenly divided between summer and winter, but is slightly higher during the first half of the year, when easterly winds dominate.[citation needed] The average annual rainfall, with moderate to low variability, is 1,217 mm (48 in), falling on an average 138 days a year.[21] Snowfall last occurred in the Sydney City area in the 1830s.[22] In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... The observatory photographed in 1874 The observatory today The Sydney Observatory evolved from a fort built on Windmill Hill in the Sydney central area now known as The Rocks, to an astronomical observatory during the nineteenth century. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Heat wave (disambiguation). ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Bondi Beach in Sydney's east. Sydney's hot weather in summer makes its beaches very popular.
Bondi Beach in Sydney's east. Sydney's hot weather in summer makes its beaches very popular.

The city is not affected by cyclones. The El Niño Southern Oscillation plays an important role in determining Sydney's weather patterns: drought and bushfire on the one hand, and storms and flooding on the other, associated with the opposite phases of the oscillation. Many areas of the city bordering bushland have experienced bushfires, notably in 1994 and 2001-02 — these tend to occur during the spring and summer. The city is also prone to severe hail storms and wind storms. One such storm was the 1999 hailstorm, which severely damaged Sydney's eastern and city suburbs. The storm produced massive hailstones of at least 9 cm (3.5 in) in diameter and resulting in insurance losses of around AUD $1.7 billion in less than five hours.[23] The city is also prone to flash flooding from enormous amounts of rain caused by East Coast Lows (a low pressure depression which deepens off the state usually in winter and early spring which can bring significant damage by heavy rain, cyclonic winds and huge swells). The most notable event was the great Sydney flood which occurred on 6 August 1986 and dumped a record 327.6 mm (12.9 in) on the city in 24 hours. This caused major traffic chaos and damage in many parts of the metropolitan area.[24] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2160x1440, 570 KB) Summary A picture of Bondi Beach, New South Wales. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2160x1440, 570 KB) Summary A picture of Bondi Beach, New South Wales. ... Bondi Beach Bondi Beach (with a long i) is a hugely popular beach and suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... Chart of ocean surface temperature anomaly [°C] during the last strong El Niño in December 1997 El Niño and La Niña (also written in English as El Nino and La Nina) are major temperature fluctuations in surface waters of the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean. ... The Black Christmas bushfires were bushfires that burnt for almost three weeks from 25 December 2001 across New South Wales, Australia. ... The 1999 Sydney hailstorm caused more property damage than any other natural disaster in Australian history, causing extensive damage along the east coast of New South Wales. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia 6 countries and territories Kiribati Nauru Tuvalu Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Norfolk Island Inflation 4. ... Flash flooding is rapid flooding of low-lying areas, rivers and creeks that is caused by the intense rainfall associated with a thunderstorm, or multiple training thunderstorms. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Bureau of Meteorology has reported that 2002 through 2005 were the warmest summers in Sydney since records began in 1859. 2004 had an average daily maximum temperature of 23.39 °C, 2005 - 23.35 °C, 2002 - 22.91 °C and 2003 - 22.65 °C. The average daily maximum between 1859 and 2004 was 21.6 °C (70.9 °F). For the first nine months of 2006 the mean temperature was 18.41 °C (65.1 °F); the warmest year previously was 2004 with 18.51 °C (65.32 °F). Since November 2003, there have been only two months in which the average daily maximum was below average: March 2005 (about 1 °C below average)[25] and June 2006 (0.7 °C below average)[26]. The Bureau of Meteorology is an Executive Agency of the Australian Government responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. ...


However, the summer of 2007-08 proved to be one of the coolest on record. The Bureau of Meteorology reported that it was the coolest summer in 11 years, the wettest summer in six years, and one of only three summers in recorded history to lack a maximum temperature above 31 °C (88 °F).[27]

Climate Table
  Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Mean daily maximum temperature (°C) 25.8 25.7 24.7 22.4 19.3 16.9 16.2 17.7 19.9 22.0 23.6 25.1 21.6
Mean daily minimum temperature (°C) 18.6 18.7 17.5 14.7 11.5 9.2 8.0 8.9 11.0 13.5 15.5 17.5 13.7
Mean total rainfall (mm) 103.3 117.4 131.2 127.2 123.3 128.1 98.1 81.5 68.7 76.9 83.1 78.1 1217.0
Mean number of rain days 12.1 12.3 13.3 12.0 12.0 11.4 10.3 9.9 10.3 11.5 11.4 11.5 138.0
Source: Bureau of Meteorology

For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ...

Urban structure

This simulated true-color Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image shows the Sydney metropolitan area on October 12, 2001, and covers an area of 42 by 33 kilometers. ...

Hills
District
Canterbury
Bankstown
South-eastern
Sydney
South-western
Sydney
See also: Buildings and architecture of Sydney and Heritage homes of Sydney

Sydney's central business district (CBD) extends southwards for about 3 kilometres (1.25 mi) from Sydney Cove, the point of the first European settlement in the area at the southern end of the bridge known as "The Rocks". Densely concentrated skyscrapers including Sydney Tower which is the city's tallest structure.[28] Other buildings including historic sandstone buildings such as the Sydney Town Hall and Queen Victoria Building are interspersed by several parks such as Wynyard and Hyde Park. The Sydney CBD is bounded on the east side by a chain of parkland that extends from Hyde Park through the Domain and Royal Botanic Gardens to Farm Cove on the harbour. The west side is bounded by Darling Harbour, a popular tourist and nightlife precinct while Central station marks the southern end of the CBD. George Street serves as the Sydney CBD's main north-south thoroughfare. The Eastern Suburbs is a general term which is used to describe the metropolitan area directly to the east and south-east of the Sydney central business district in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Hills District is a general term for the north-western suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... House in Marrickville an inner-city suburb of Sydneys Inner West The Inner West is a general term which is used to describe the metropolitan area directly to the west of the Sydney central business district in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Lower North Shore is an informal term for the lower northern suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia which are located on the north shore of Sydney Harbour. ... Manly Beach The Northern Beaches is a general term used to describe the place in which many people who consider themselves to be elite or just somewhat snobby live. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... The North Shore or Northern Suburbs refers to those suburbs of Sydney, Australia which are located on the north shore of Sydney Harbour, and between Middle Harbour and the Lane Cove River. ... Southern Sydney is an informal, term to describe the local government areas and suburbs which form the southern part of the metropolitan area of Sydney, Australia. ... South-eastern Sydney is a region of Sydney consisting mainly of suburbs located around the foreshores of Botany Bay. ... South-Western Sydney is a general term which is used to describe the metropolitan area in south-west Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sutherland Shire, is a Local Government Area in the Southern Sydney region of Sydney, Australia. ... For other Botany Bays see Botany Bay (disambiguation) Bicentennial Monument at Botany Bay Botany Bay is a bay in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, a few kilometers south of the central business district. ... St. ... Greater Western Sydney is a very general term which is used to describe the region west of the metropolitan area of Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney central business district (CBD) is, commercially, the most important in Australia. ... Bondi Beach (pronounced BOND-eye with a long i, or /bÉ’ndaɪ/) is a popular beach and the name of the surrounding suburb in Sydney, Australia. ... Sydney (Kingsford Smith) International Airport, or Sydney Airport, is located in Mascot, New South Wales, and is the major airport serving Sydney, Australia. ... St. ... A view of the Sydney CBD from Farm Cove Map of the CBD The central business district (CBD) of Sydney, the capital of New South Wales, Australia, extends southwards for about 2 km from Sydney Cove, the point of first European settlement. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Sydney Cove is a small bay on the southern shore of Port Jackson (commonly but incorrectly called Sydney Harbour), on the coast of the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... George Street, the main street of The Rocks The Rocks is a tourist precinct and historic area near the central business district (CBD) of Sydney, Australia. ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest skyscraper by roof height on high rise. ... Sydney Tower (also known as the AMP Tower, AMP Centrepoint Tower, Centrepoint Tower or just Centrepoint) is Sydneys tallest free-standing structure, and the second tallest in Australia (with the Q1 building on the Gold Coast being the tallest). ... The Sydney Town Hall The Sydney Town Hall is a landmark sandstone building located in the heart of Sydney. ... The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB, is a grand Victorian building located in the heart of Downtown Sydney. ... Wynyard Park is a small park in the central business district of Sydney, Australia. ... A Fig-lined avenue in Hyde Park, Sydney, Australia Hyde Park is a large park in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... A Fig-lined avenue in Hyde Park, Sydney, Australia Hyde Park is a large park in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Domain is a large open space in Sydney, Australia, immediately east of the central business district. ... Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney The Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney, Australia, are the largest of three major botanical gardens open to the public in Sydney, along with the Mount Annan Botanic Garden and the Mount Tomah Botanic Garden. ... Farm Cove is a tidal inlet and shallow bay in Sydney Harbour, separated from Sydney Cove by Bennelong Point (site of the Sydney Opera House). ... Darling Harbour is a large recreational pedestrian precinct situated on the western edge of central Sydney, Australia. ... Central Railway Station (also known as Sydney Terminal) is the largest railway station in Australia. ... The start of George Street in the historic Rocks district George Street is the main street of the city of Sydney, Australia. ...


As the site of earliest European settlement in Australia, the CBD contains many other historic buildings such as the Sydney Mint, one of Australia's oldest buildings, Fort Denison, a penal site which was built in the colonial days on a small island situated on the harbour, as well as heritage listed buildings in The Rocks. The area also boasts well known modern architectural sites such as the Sydney Opera House and Martin Place. The Sydney Mint, in Sydney, Australia, is the oldest public building in Australia. ... Fort Denison in Sydney Harbour with the Sydney skyline Fort Denison , is a former defensive facility occupying a small island located north of the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney Harbour. ... George Street, the main street of The Rocks The Rocks is a tourist precinct and historic area near the central business district (CBD) of Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Martin Place Martin Place is a pedestrian mall in the business district of Sydney, Australia. ...

Chatswood's high-rise commercial district.
Chatswood's high-rise commercial district.

Although the CBD dominated the city's business and cultural life in the early days, other business/cultural districts have developed in a radial pattern since World War II. As a result, the proportion of white-collar jobs located in the CBD declined from more than 60 per cent at the end of World War II to less than 30 per cent in 2004.[citation needed] Together with the commercial district of North Sydney, joined to the CBD by the Harbour Bridge, the most significant outer business districts are Parramatta[29] in the central-west, Penrith[30] in the west, Bondi Junction in the east, Liverpool[31] in the southwest, Chatswood to the north, and Hurstville to the south. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixel Image in higher resolution (2103 × 1395 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixel Image in higher resolution (2103 × 1395 pixel, file size: 1. ... Chatswoood area Chatswood skyline Chatswood is a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... North Sydneys high-rise commercial district. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Penrith is a suburb in the City of Penrith in western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Bondi Junction is a suburb of Sydney, Australia, about 5 kilometres east of the central business district. ... Liverpool is a suburb in south-western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Chatswoood area Chatswood skyline Chatswood is a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Memorial Square, Forest Road, Hurstville Memorial Square mosaic, Forest Road, Hurstville Miles Franklin statue and mural in MacMahon Street Hurstville is a suburb in southern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ...


The extensive area covered by urban Sydney is formally divided into more than 300 suburbs (for addressing and postal purposes), and administered as 38 local government areas. There is no city-wide government, but the Government of New South Wales and its agencies have extensive responsibilities in providing metropolitan services.[32] The City of Sydney itself covers a fairly small area comprising the central business district and its neighbouring inner-city suburbs. In addition, regional descriptions are used informally to conveniently describe larger sections of the urban area. These include Eastern Suburbs, Hills District, Inner West, Canterbury-Bankstown, Lower North Shore, Northern Beaches, Northern Suburbs, North Shore, St George, Southern Sydney, South-eastern Sydney, South-western Sydney, Sutherland Shire and Western Sydney. However, many suburbs are not conveniently covered by any of these categories. “Suburbia” redirects here. ... The form of the Government of New South Wales is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... This article is about the local government area. ... An inner city is the central area of a major city. ... The Eastern Suburbs is a general term which is used to describe the metropolitan area directly to the east and south-east of the Sydney central business district in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Hills District is a general term for the north-western suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... House in Marrickville an inner-city suburb of Sydneys Inner West The Inner West is a general term which is used to describe the metropolitan area directly to the west of the Sydney central business district in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Lower North Shore is an informal term for the lower northern suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia which are located on the north shore of Sydney Harbour. ... Manly Beach The Northern Beaches is a general term used to describe the place in which many people who consider themselves to be elite or just somewhat snobby live. ... The North Shore or Northern Suburbs refers to those suburbs of Sydney, Australia which are located on the north shore of Sydney Harbour, and between Middle Harbour and the Lane Cove River. ... St. ... Southern Sydney is an informal, term to describe the local government areas and suburbs which form the southern part of the metropolitan area of Sydney, Australia. ... South-eastern Sydney is a region of Sydney consisting mainly of suburbs located around the foreshores of Botany Bay. ... South-Western Sydney is a general term which is used to describe the metropolitan area in south-west Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sutherland Shire, is a Local Government Area in the Southern Sydney region of Sydney, Australia. ... Western Sydney is a very general, informal, term which is used to describe the western parts of the metropolitan area of Sydney, Australia. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ...


Economy

Sydney Central Business District at Night
Sydney Central Business District at Night
Main article: Economy of Sydney

The economic sectors in Sydney, measured by numbers of people employed, include property and business services, retail, manufacturing, and health and community services.[33] Since the 1980s, jobs have moved from manufacturing to the services and information sectors. Sydney provides approximately 25 percent of the country's total GDP.[34] The Australian Securities Exchange and the Reserve Bank of Australia are located in Sydney, as are the headquarters of 90 banks and more than half of Australia's top companies, and the regional headquarters for around 500 multinational corporations.[34] Of the ten largest corporations in Australia (based on revenue)[35], four have headquarters in Sydney (Caltex Australia, the Commonwealth Bank, Westpac, and Woolworths). Fox Studios Australia has large movie studios in the city. The Sydney Futures Exchange (SFE) is one of the Asia Pacific's largest financial futures and options exchanges, with 64.3 million contracts traded during 2005. In global terms it is the 12th largest futures market in the world and the 19th largest including options.[36] The economy of Sydney plays an important part in trading, finance and distribution. ... GDP is an acronym which can stand for more than one thing: (in economics) an abbreviation for Gross Domestic Product. ... The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) is the primary stock exchange in Australia. ... The Reserve Bank of Australia came into being on 14 January 1960 to operate as Australias central bank and banknote issuing authority. ... multinational corporation (or transnational corporation) (MNC/TNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ... Caltex is a petrol company. ... The Commonwealth Bank of Australia (ASX: CBA) is one of the largest financial institutions in Australia, founded in 1911 by the Australian Government. ... Westpac Banking Corporation ASX: WBC NZX: WBC, usually called Westpac, is the fourth largest bank in Australasia, after the National Australia Bank, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and ANZ and one of the largest banks in the South Pacific. ... Woolworths Limited is a major Australian company with extensive retail interest throughout Australia and New Zealand. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... A film studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ... The Sydney Futures Exchange (SFE) is both a futures exchange and options exchange located in Australia. ... Map showing general definition of Asia-Pacific The term Asia-Pacific or APAC generally applies to littoral East Asia, Southeast Asia and Australasia near the Pacific Ocean, plus the states in the ocean itself (Oceania). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


The city has the highest median household income of any major city in Australia (US$42,559 PPP). As of 2004, the unemployment rate in Sydney was 4.9 percent.[37] According to The Economist Intelligence Unit's Worldwide cost of living survey, Sydney is the sixteenth most expensive city in the world, while a UBS survey ranks Sydney as 18th in the world in terms of net earnings.[38] As of 20 September 2007, Sydney has the highest median house price of any Australian capital city at $559 000.[39] Sydney also has the highest median rent prices of any Australian city at $450 a week. A report published by the OECD in November 2005, shows that Australia has the Western World's highest housing prices when measured against rental yields.[40] Sydney has been classified as a "Beta" global city by the Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network.[41] 2006 Median household income (PPP, US$) Highlights Most people (90%) live in a state where the median household income is US$39,000. ... 2006 Median household income (PPP, US$) Highlights Most people (90%) live in a state where the median household income is US$39,000. ... Unemployment rates in the United States. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... For other uses, see The Cost of Living. ... UBS can refer to: UBS AG, a banking group Unbundled Bitstream Services United Building Society - the name of several financial institutions in different countries around the world. ... Homes in Monterey County, California, are some of the most expensive in the Unites States. ... ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia 6 countries and territories Kiribati Nauru Tuvalu Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Norfolk Island Inflation 4. ... “World city” redirects here. ...


Sydney's has shopping centres and retail outlets throughout the city. Shopping locations in the central business district include the Queen Victoria Building, the pedestrian mall on Pitt Street, and international luxury boutiques in the quieter, northern end of Castlereagh St. Oxford Street in Paddington and Crown Street, Woollahra are home to boutiques selling more niche products, and the main streets of Newtown and Enmore cater more towards students and alternative lifestyles. Many of the large regional centres around the metropolitan area also contain large shopping complexes, such as Parramatta in Western Sydney, Bondi Junction in the Eastern Suburbs and Chatswood on the North Shore, most of which are Westfield brand shopping centres. The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB, is a grand Victorian building located in the heart of Downtown Sydney. ... Pitt Street is a major street in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Oxford Street, Darlinghurst Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in Sydney, Australia, running from Whitlam Square on the south-east corner of Hyde Park in the central business district of Sydney to Bondi Junction in the Eastern Suburbs. ... Paddington is an inner-city, eastern suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Woollahra is a suburb in the Municipality of Woollahra in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Newtown is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Enmore is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bondi Junction is a suburb of Sydney, Australia, about 5 kilometres east of the central business district. ... Chatswoood area Chatswood skyline Chatswood is a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Westfield Group is a multinational company that owns shopping centres in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ...


Sydney received 7.8 million domestic visitors and 2.5 million international visitors in 2004.[42]


Demographics

Significant overseas born populations[43]
Country of Birth Population (2006)
United Kingdom 175,165
Mainland China 109,143
New Zealand 81,064
Vietnam 62,144
Lebanon 54,501
India 52,974
Philippines 52,087
Italy 44,562
Hong Kong 36,867
South Korea 32,125
Greece 32,021
South Africa 28,429
Fiji 26,929
Malaysia 21,213
Indonesia 20,560
Iraq 20,217

The 2006 census reported 4,119,190 residents in the Sydney Statistical Division,[44] of which 3,641,422 lived in Sydney's urban area.[45] Inner Sydney was the most densely populated place in Australia with 4,023 persons per square kilometre.[46] The statistical division is larger in area than the urban area, as it allows for predicted growth. A resident of Sydney is commonly referred to as a "Sydneysider".[47] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... ... The Australian census is run by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. ...

Freedom Arch in Cabramatta, a suburb home to a large proportion of Sydney's Vietnamese population
Freedom Arch in Cabramatta, a suburb home to a large proportion of Sydney's Vietnamese population

In the 2006 census, the most common self-described ancestries identified for Sydney residents were Australian, English, Irish, Scottish and Chinese. The Census also recorded that one per cent of Sydney's population identified as being of indigenous origin and 39.4 per cent were born overseas. The three major sources of immigrants are the United Kingdom, China and New Zealand.[44] Significant numbers of immigrants also came from Vietnam, Lebanon, Italy, India and the Philippines. Most Sydneysiders are native speakers of English; many have a second language, the most common being Arabic (predominately Lebanese), Chinese languages (mostly Mandarin or Cantonese), and Italian.[44] Sydney has the seventh largest percentage of a foreign born population in the world, ahead of cities such as the highly multicultural London and Paris.[48] Cabramatta shops Cabramatta is a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales (NSW), Australia, It is part of the Local Government Areas in Australia Local Government Area of the City of Fairfield, 32 km south-west of the Sydney CBD. It is predominantly populated by Vietnamese people, but many other Asian... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Languages Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religions Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including Islam and various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group... Exactly when Immigration to Australia began is unknown but estimates typically range from 40,000 - 50,000 years ago,[1] when the ancestors of Australian Aborigines arrived on the continent via the islands of the Malay Archipelago and New Guinea. ... Australian English (AuE, AusE, en-AU) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... This article is on all of the Northern Chinese dialects. ... This article is on all of the Yue dialects. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


The median age of a Sydney resident is 34, with 12 per cent of the population over 65 years.[37] 15.2 per cent of Sydney residents have educational attainment equal to at least a bachelor's degree,[49] which is lower than the national average of 19 per cent.[citation needed] A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ...


According to the 2006 census, 64 per cent of the Sydney residents are identified as Christians, 3.7 per cent as Buddhists, 3.9 per cent as Muslims, 1.7 per cent as Hindus, 0.9 per cent as Jews and 14.1 per cent as having no religion.[43] This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Islam in Australia is the second largest minority religion after Buddhism. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ...


Ancestry

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics:

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... The Irish people (Irish: Muintir na hÉireann, na hÉireannaigh, na Gaeil) are a Western European ethnic group who originate in Ireland, in north western Europe. ... This article is about Welsh people who are considered to be an ethnic group and a nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... Demographics of the Isle of Man Culture of the Isle of Man Flag of the Isle of Man Categories: | | ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... This article or section should be merged with Hellenes Greeks in Ancient History In Latin literature, Græci (or Greeks, in English) is the name by which Hellenes are known. ... A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular...

Culture

Main article: Culture of Sydney

Sydney hosts many different festivals and some of Australia's largest social and cultural events. These include the Sydney Festival, Australia's largest arts festival which is a celebration involving both indoor and free outdoor performances throughout January; the Biennale of Sydney, established in 1973; the Big Day Out, a travelling rock music festival which originated in Sydney; the Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras along Oxford Street; the Sydney Film Festival and many other smaller film festivals such as the short film Tropfest and Flickerfest. Australia's premier prize for portraiture, the Archibald Prize is organised by the Art Gallery of New South Wales. The Sydney Royal Easter Show is held every year at Sydney Olympic Park, the final of Australian Idol takes place on the steps of the Opera House, and Australian Fashion Week takes place in April/May. Also, Sydney's New Years Eve and Australia Day celebrations are the largest in Australia. Art Gallery of NSW The culture of Sydney is diverse and multicultural. ... Sydney Festival is Australias largest and most attended annual cultural event running for three weeks every January since it was first held in 1976. ... The Big Day Out (BDO) is an annual music festival that tours Australia and New Zealand which originated in Sydney in 1992. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Performers in the 2006 Sydney Mardi Gras The Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras is an annual gay pride parade and festival for the LGBT community in Sydney, Australia. ... Oxford Street, Darlinghurst Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in Sydney, Australia, running from Whitlam Square on the south-east corner of Hyde Park in the central business district of Sydney to Bondi Junction in the Eastern Suburbs. ... The Sydney Film Festival is a non-competitive film festival that started in 1954. ... The Tropfest short film festival is held in Sydney, Australia each year. ... Marcus Willss winning painting in 2006, The Paul Juraszek Monolith, was based on this print by an earlier Marcus, Marcus Gheeraerts The Archibald Prize is regarded as the most important portraiture prize, and is the most prominent of all arts prizes, in Australia. ... The Sydney Royal Easter Show logo. ... For the current Australian Idol season, see Australian Idol (season 6). ... New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, home of the New York City Opera Bolshoi Theatre. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... New Years Eve is a celebration held the day before New Years Day, on December 31, the final day of the year. ... Anniversary Day redirects here. ...


Entertainment and performing arts

The Waifs' concert at the Turbine Hall on Cockatoo Island for the Cockatoo Island Festival

Sydney has a wide variety of cultural institutions. Sydney's iconic Opera House has five theatres capable of hosting a range of performance styles; it is the home of Opera Australia—the third busiest opera company in the world, and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.[51] Other venues include the Sydney Town Hall, City Recital Hall, the State Theatre and the Wharf Theatre. Image File history File linksMetadata Cockatoo_Island_Festival_audience. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cockatoo_Island_Festival_audience. ... The Waifs is a folk rock band from Western Australia. ... Cockatoo Island at night. ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Opera Australia is Australias major opera company, formed by the merger of the Australian Opera and the Victorian State Opera companies in 1996. ... Sydney Symphony Orchestra, now known as the Sydney Symphony, is a symphony orchestra based in Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney Town Hall The Sydney Town Hall is a landmark sandstone building located in the heart of Sydney. ... City Recital Hall, or City Recital Hall Angel Place, in Sydney, Australia, NSW is a purpose built concert venue with the capacity for 1238 guests seated over three tiers of sloped seating. ... 1831 The first jetty in the area of Pier 4/5 (Sydney Theatre Company’s Wharf) was constructed and called ‘Pitman’s Wharf’. 1919 Work on STC’s Wharf, Pier 4/5, is completed by H.D Walsh. ...

Sydney Opera House Concert Hall
Sydney Opera House Concert Hall

The Sydney Dance Company under the leadership of Graeme Murphy during the late 20th century has also gained acclaim. The Sydney Theatre Company has a regular roster of local plays, such as noted playwright David Williamson, classics and international playwrights. The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sydney Dance Company is one of Australias most successful and well-known dance companies. ... Graeme Murphy (born November 1950) is one of Australias most well known dance choreographers and formed the Sydney Dance Company in 1976 with fellow dancer and collaborator Janet Vernon. ... The Sydney Theatre Company (STC) is one of Australias most well-known and notable theatre companies operating from the Wharf Theatre near The Rocks area of Sydney, as well as the Sydney Theatre and the Sydney Opera House. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... For the magician, see David Williamson (magician). ...

Giraffes at the world famous Taronga Zoo
Giraffes at the world famous Taronga Zoo

In 2007, New Theatre (Newtown) celebrated 75 years of continuous production in Sydney. Other important theatre companies in Sydney include Company B and Griffin Theatre Company. From the 1940s through to the 1970s the Sydney Push, a group of authors and political activists whose members included Germaine Greer, influenced the city's cultural life. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x908, 354 KB)Giraffes in the Taronga Zoo, Sydney, Australia. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x908, 354 KB)Giraffes in the Taronga Zoo, Sydney, Australia. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. ... Giraffes in front of Sydneys skyline. ... The New Theatre is an independent theatre company in the inner western Sydney suburb of Newtown, Australia. ... Company B is a renowned Australian theatre company based at the iconic Belvoir St Theatre in Sydney. ... Griffin Theatre Company is Australias leading new writing theatre. ... The Sydney Push was a predominantly left-wing intellectual sub-culture in Sydney from the late 1940s to the early 70s. ... Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ...

Luna Park, Sydney's premier theme park
Luna Park, Sydney's premier theme park

The National Institute of Dramatic Art, based in Kensington, boasts internationally famous alumni such as Mel Gibson, Judy Davis, Baz Luhrmann and Cate Blanchett. Sydney's role in the film industry has increased since the opening of Fox Studios Australia in 1998. Prominent films which have been filmed in the city include Moulin Rouge!, Mission Impossible II, Star Wars episodes II and III, Superman Returns, Dark City, Dil Chahta Hai, Happy Feet and The Matrix. Films using Sydney as a setting include Finding Nemo, Strictly Ballroom, Mission Impossible II, Muriel's Wedding, and Dirty Deeds. As of 2006, over 229 films have been set in, or featured Sydney.[52] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 727 KB) Sumari Luna Park, Sydney, Australia Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Sydney Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 727 KB) Sumari Luna Park, Sydney, Australia Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Sydney Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... For other places with the same name, see Luna Park (disambiguation). ... The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... Kensington is a suburb in Randwick City, in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney. ... Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, AO (born January 3, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American-Australian actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ... Judy Davis (born 23 April 1955) is an Academy Award-nominated and 3-time Emmy Award-winning Australian actress. ... Baz Luhrmann (born Mark Anthony Luhrmann on September 17, 1962) is an Oscar and Golden Globe-nominated Australian film director, screenwriter, and producer. ... Catherine Élise Cate Blanchett (born May 14, 1969) is an Australian actress and stage director. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Moulin Rouge is a 2001 Academy Award-winning jukebox musical film directed by Baz Luhrmann. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... This article is about the series. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002) is the fifth Star Wars science fiction movie released and the second part of the prequel trilogy which began with Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... For the video game of the same name, see Superman Returns (video game). ... Dark City is a 1998 science fiction film noir written by Alex Proyas, Lem Dobbs and David S. Goyer, and directed by Proyas. ... Dil Chahta Hai (Hindī: दिल चाहता है, Urdū: دل چاہتا ہے, English: The Heart Desires, but billed as Do Your Thing) is a 2001 Hindi movie. ... Happy Feet is an Academy Award-winning Australian-produced 2006 computer-animated comedy-drama film, directed and co-written by George Miller. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Finding Nemo is a 2003 computer-animated American family film. ... Strictly Ballroom is the name of a 1986 play and its 1992 film adaptation. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... Muriels Wedding is a 1994 Australian film written and directed by P. J. Hogan. ... Dirty Deeds is a 2002 film shot in Australia. ...


Sydney's most popular nightspots include Kings Cross, Oxford Street, Darling Harbour, Circular Quay and The Rocks which all contain various bars, nightclubs and restaurants. Star City Casino, is Sydney's only casino and is situated around Darling Harbour. There are also many traditional pubs, cafes and restaurants in inner city areas such as Newtown, Balmain and Leichhardt. Sydney's main live music hubs include areas such as Newtown and Annandale. It once had a thriving live music scene in the 1970s and 1980s, nurturing acts such as AC/DC, Midnight Oil and INXS. Other popular nightspots tend to be spread throughout the city in areas such as Bondi, Manly and Parramatta. Kings Cross intersection in the 1950s Kings Cross is an inner-city locality of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Oxford Street, Darlinghurst Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in Sydney, Australia, running from Whitlam Square on the south-east corner of Hyde Park in the central business district of Sydney to Bondi Junction in the Eastern Suburbs. ... Darling Harbour is a large recreational pedestrian precinct situated on the western edge of central Sydney, Australia. ... Categories: Suburbs of Sydney | Incomplete Sydney suburbs ... George Street, the main street of The Rocks The Rocks is a tourist precinct and historic area near the central business district (CBD) of Sydney, Australia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Newtown is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Balmain is a suburb in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Leichhardt is a suburb in the Municipality of Leichhardt in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Newtown is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Annandale is a suburb of Sydney, Australia, located in the Inner West; Glebe lies to its east, Leichhardt to its west, Stanmore to its south and its northern end terminates at the back of Rozelle Bay, part of Sydney Harbour. ... This article is about the band. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... INXS (pronounced In Excess) are an Australian rock group. ... Bondi is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Manly is a suburb in Local Government Area of Manly Council on Northern Beaches of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Tourism

Art Gallery of New South Wales
Main article: Tourism in Sydney
See also: List of attractions in Sydney, List of museums in Sydney, and List of markets in Sydney

Sydney has several popular museums. The biggest are the Australian Museum (natural history and anthropology), the Powerhouse Museum (science, technology and design), the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the Museum of Contemporary Art and the Australian National Maritime Museum. Fort Denison in Sydney Harbour with the city skyline. ... The following is a list of cultural attractions in Sydney, Australia:. Sydney Harbour Bridge Sydney Opera House Luna Park Sydney Sydney Chinatown Sydney Mint Sydney Tower Sydney Aquarium Taronga Zoo Bondi Beach IMAX Theater Queen Victoria Building Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney Monorail Port Jackson Darling Harbour Fox Studios Australia Sydney... Sydney is home a large amount of cultural institutions, museums and historic sites, some of which are known worldwide. ... Markets in Sydney offer an extensive range of produce, new and second-hand merchandise. ... The Australian Museum is the oldest museum in Australia, centering on natural history and anthropology, with collections centering on vertebrate and invertebrate zoology, as well as minerology, palaeontology, and anthropology. ... Powerhouse entry The Powerhouse Museum is Sydneys museum of science and technology. ... The Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW) located in The Domain in Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, is the most important public gallery in Sydney and the second largest in Australia after the National Gallery of Victoria. ... MCA in Sydney The Museum of Contemporary Art (abbreviated MCA) in Sydney, Australia is an Australian museum solely dedicated to exhibiting, interpreting and collecting contemporary art, both from across Australia and around the world. ... HMAS Onslow and HMAS Vampire at the Australian National Maritime Museum Admiralty Pattern anchors from training ship NSS Vernon (1839) modified for mooring, now Merchant Navy memorial Exhibits in the Tasman Light gallery include a Fresnel lens from a lighthouse on Tasman Island, southern Tasmania, and a Royal Australian Navy...


Sport and outdoor activities

Born in Sydney, Dally Messenger is regarded as one of the greatest rugby league players in the history of the sport.
Born in Sydney, Dally Messenger is regarded as one of the greatest rugby league players in the history of the sport.

Sport in Sydney is an important part of the culture. The area is well endowed with open spaces and access to waterways, and has many natural areas even within the city centre. Within the Sydney central business district are the Chinese Garden of Friendship, Hyde Park, The Domain and the Royal Botanical Gardens. The metropolitan area contains several national parks, including the Royal National Park, the second oldest national park in the world and several parks in Sydney's far west which are part of the World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area.[53] Image File history File links Dally_Messenger_in_action. ... Image File history File links Dally_Messenger_in_action. ... The Sydney Cricket Ground at the 4th Australia vs India test, 2004 Sport is an important part of the culture of the Australian state of New South Wales. ... The Chinese Garden of Friendship A Fig-lined avenue in Hyde Park Sydney is well endowed with open spaces, and has many natural areas, and open spaces, even within the city centre. ... A view of the Sydney CBD from Farm Cove Map of the CBD The central business district (CBD) of Sydney, the capital of New South Wales, Australia, extends southwards for about 2 km from Sydney Cove, the point of first European settlement. ... Chinese Garden of Friendship Entrance to the Garden The Chinese Garden of Friendship (Chinese: è°Šå›­) is a Chinese garden in Darling Harbour and close to Chinatown in Sydney, Australia. ... A Fig-lined avenue in Hyde Park, Sydney, Australia Hyde Park is a large park in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Domain is a large open space in Sydney, Australia, immediately east of the central business district. ... The Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney, Australia, are the largest of three major botanical gardens open to the public in Sydney, along with the Mount Annan Botanic Garden and the Mount Tomah Botanic Garden. ... This article is about national parks. ... Winter at Wattamolla beach. ... The Greater Blue Mountains Area was inscribed on the World Heritage List at the 24th Session of the World Heritage Committee, held in Cairns from 27 November to 2 December 2000. ...


One of the most popular sports in Sydney is Rugby League. The sport was brought from England to Sydney before expanding to the rest of Australia. The city is home to nine of the sixteen teams in the National Rugby League domestic competition. These are Canterbury Bulldogs, Cronulla Sharks, Manly Sea Eagles, Penrith Panthers, Parramatta Eels, South Sydney Rabbitohs, St George Illawarra Dragons, Sydney Roosters and Wests Tigers. Despite the final of the 2008 Rugby League World Cup being held in Brisbane, Sydney will host eight World Cup games including one of the Semi-Finals. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... NRL redirects here. ... Canterbury Leagues Club, Belmore The Bulldogs (formerly Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs) are a team in the National Rugby League (NRL), the premier rugby league football competition in Australia. ... The Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks are an Australian professional rugby league team based in Cronulla in the Sutherland Shire, south of Sydney. ... The Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles are a team in the National Rugby League (NRL), the premier rugby league football competition in Australia. ... The Penrith Panthers is an Australian professional rugby league football team. ... The Parramatta Eels is an Australian professional rugby league football club based in the Sydney suburb of Parramatta. ... The South Sydney Rabbitohs, also known as Souths, SSFC or The Rabbits, are an Australian professional rugby league team based in Sydney, New South Wales. ... The St. ... The Sydney Roosters are a professional rugby league club based in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, Australia. ... Wests Tigers is a rugby league football club in the National Rugby League (NRL), the premier rugby league competition in Australasia. ... The 2008 Rugby League World Cup will be the 13th World Cup, an international tournament for rugby league, that is scheduled to take place between 25 October and 22 November 2008 in Australia. ...

Randwick Racecourse hosts many of Sydney's horseracing events
Randwick Racecourse hosts many of Sydney's horseracing events

Sydney is home to the Australian Football League's Sydney Swans and the A-League's Sydney FC. The city is represented by two teams in the National Basketball League, netball's Sydney Swifts and is the base for New South Wales teams in the Super 14 (NSW Waratahs) and Pura Cup (Blues) competitions. Large sporting events, such as the NRL Grand Final, are regularly held at the ANZ Stadium, the main stadium for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Other events in Sydney include the start of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, the Golden Slipper horse race, and the City to Surf foot race. Randwick Racecourse (, ) is a racecourse in the east of Sydney, New South Wales. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... Sydney Swans is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney, New South Wales. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Sydney FC, founded in 2004, is an Australian association football (soccer) club based in Sydney and competes in Australias premier competition, the A-League. ... The National Basketball League is Australias top-level professional basketball competition. ... The Sydney Swifts are an Australian netball team, playing in the national Commonwealth Bank Trophy. ... The Super 14 is the largest rugby union football club championship in the southern hemisphere, consisting of four state teams from Australia (Queensland, New South Wales, ACT, and Western Australia), five New Zealand franchises, each of which is comprised by a number of provinces (the resulting teams are based in... The New South Wales Waratahs (referred to as the Waratahs or simply the Tahs) are an Australian rugby union team, representing New South Wales in the Super 14 (formerly Super 12) competition. ... The Pura Cup (formerly known as the Sheffield Shield) is the domestic first class cricket competition in Australia. ... The New South Wales Blues are an Australian first class cricket team based in Sydney, New South Wales. ... The National Rugby League (NRL) is the premier rugby league competition in Australia and New Zealand. ... Telstra Stadium, formerly Stadium Australia, is a multi-purpose stadium located in Homebush, Sydney, Australia which opened in March 1999. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Map of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race route. ... The STC Golden Slipper is a horse race for two year old thoroughbred horses held in Sydney, Australia at Rosehill Gardens Racecourse. ... City to Surf is a popular road running event held annually in both Sydney and Perth, Australia. ...


Media

Main article: Media in Sydney

Sydney has two main daily newspapers. The Sydney Morning Herald is a broadsheet, and is Sydney's newspaper of record with extensive coverage of domestic and international news, culture and business. It is also the oldest extant newspaper in Australia, having been published regularly since 1831. The Herald's competitor, The Daily Telegraph, is a News Corporation-owned tabloid. Both papers have tabloid counterparts published on Sunday, The Sun-Herald and the Sunday Telegraph, respectively. Media in Sydney is internationally influential, with many Australian companies which are located and headquaterd within Sydney. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Daily Telegraph is a tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Nationwide News, part of News Corporation. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ... This article is about the newspaper size. ...

Seven Network broadcasting dishes in Epping.
Seven Network broadcasting dishes in Epping.

The three commercial television networks (Seven, Nine and Ten), as well as the government national broadcast services (ABC and SBS) each have a presence in Sydney. Historically, the networks have been based in the northern suburbs, but the last decade has seen several move to the inner city. Nine has kept its headquarters north of the harbour, in Willoughby. Ten has its studios in a redeveloped section of the inner-city suburb of Pyrmont, and Seven also has headquarters in Pyrmont, production studios at Epping as well as a purpose-built news studio in Martin Place in the CBD. The ABC has a large headquarters and production facility in the inner-city suburb of Ultimo and SBS has its studios at Artarmon. Foxtel and Optus both supply pay-TV over their cable services to most parts of the urban area. The five free-to-air networks have provided digital television transmissions in Sydney since January 2000. Additional services recently introduced include the ABC's second channel ABC2 (Channel 22), SBS's world news service SBS2 (Channel 33), an on-air program guide (Channel 4), a news, sport, and weather items channel (Channel 41), ChannelNSW: Government and Public Information (Channel 45)[54], Australian Christian Channel (Channel 46), MacquarieBank TV (Channel 47), SportsTAB (Channel 48), Expo Home Shopping (Channel 49), and Federal parliamentary broadcasts (Channel 401 to 408) The Seven Network is an Australian television network, owned by the Seven Media Group. ... Epping is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Seven Network is an Australian television network, owned by the Seven Media Group. ... The Nine Network, or Channel Nine, is an Australian television network based in Willoughby, a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney. ... Network Ten, or Channel Ten, is one of Australias three major commercial television networks. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... The Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) is one of two government funded Australian public broadcasting radio and television networks, the other being the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). ... Willoughby is a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Sydney as seen from Pyrmont at dusk Pyrmont is a former 19th century slum[1] inner-city suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Epping is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Martin Place Martin Place is a pedestrian mall in the business district of Sydney, Australia. ... Ultimo is a suburb in central Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Artarmon is a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Foxtel is a subscription television company in Australia, formed through a joint venture between Telstra and News Corporation. ... Optus Television is the cable television division of Australian telecommunications company Optus. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new...


Many AM and FM government, commercial and community radio services broadcast in the Sydney area. The local ABC radio station is 702 ABC Sydney (formerly 2BL). The talkback radio genre is dominated by the perennial rivals 2GB and 2UE. Popular music stations include Triple M, 2Day FM and Nova 96.9, which generally targets people under 40. In the older end of the music radio market, Vega and MIX 106.5 target the 25 to 54 age group, while WS-FM targets the 40 to 54 age group with their Classic Hits format mostly focusing on the 70's & 80's. Triple J (national), 2SER and FBi Radio provide a more independent, local and alternative sound. There are also a number of community stations broadcasting to a particular language group or local area. Amplitude modulation (AM) is a technique used in electronic communication, most commonly for transmitting information via a radio carrier wave. ... In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) conveys information over a carrier wave by varying its frequency. ... ABC Local Radio is a network of publicly-owned radio stations in Australia, operated by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. ... 702 ABC Sydney is a ABC radio station in Sydney, Australia. ... Talk radio is radio format which features discussion of topical issues. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... 2UE is a commercial radio station in Sydney, Australia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the radio station network. ... Not to be mixed up with Today FM in Ireland. ... Nova 96. ... Vega FM is a network of Australian commercial radio stations operated by DMG Radio Australia. ... MIX 106. ... 2WS or WSFM is a major FM band radio station broadcasting in Sydney, Australia. ... Classic hits is a popular music radio format, a variation on the classic rock theme that provides most of the playlist of classic rock with an addition of contemporaneous R&B and pop hits as well, striking a balance between the mostly 70s-focused classic rock genre and the more... Double J redirects here. ... 2SER is a community radio station in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, broadcasting on the frequency 107. ... FBi Radio is an independent, community radio station in Sydney, Australia. ...


Certain areas in Sydney are also being used for tests of digital radio broadcasting[55], which the government plans to roll out in the future to replace the existing analogue AM and FM networks in much the same way as they are doing with analogue and digital television at present.


Governance

Sydney's Local Government Areas
Sydney's Local Government Areas
The Town Hall, seat of the City Council
The Town Hall, seat of the City Council

Apart from the limited role of the Cumberland County Council from 1945–1964, there has never been an overall governing body for the Sydney metropolitan area; instead, the metropolitan area is divided into local government areas (LGAs). These areas have elected councils which are responsible for functions delegated to them by the New South Wales State Government, such as planning and garbage collection. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 692 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1036 × 898 pixel, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: image/png) I made this image from a free wikipedia image. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 692 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1036 × 898 pixel, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: image/png) I made this image from a free wikipedia image. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3072, 3433 KB) Summary Sydney Town Hall, Sydney, Australia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3072, 3433 KB) Summary Sydney Town Hall, Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney Town Hall The Sydney Town Hall is a landmark sandstone building located in the heart of Sydney. ... Cumberland County is a county in the State of New South Wales, Australia. ... Local Government Area (abbreviated LGA) is a term used in Australia (and especially by the Australian Bureau of Statistics) to refer to areas controlled by each individual Local Government. ... The form of the Government of New South Wales is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ...


The City of Sydney includes the central business area and some adjoining inner suburbs, and has in recent years been expanded through amalgamation with adjoining local government areas, such as South Sydney. It is led by the elected Lord Mayor of Sydney and a council. The Lord Mayor, however, is sometimes treated as a representative of the whole city, for example during the Olympics. This article is about the local government area. ... This is a list of the Mayors and Lord Mayors of the City of Sydney Local Government Area, Sydney, Australia. ...


Most citywide government activities are controlled by the state government. These include public transport, main roads, traffic control, policing, education above preschool level, and planning of major infrastructure projects. Because a large proportion of New South Wales' population lives in Sydney, state governments have traditionally been reluctant to allow the development of citywide governmental bodies, which would tend to rival the state government. For this reason, Sydney has always been a focus for the politics of both State and Federal Parliaments. For example, the boundaries of the City of Sydney LGA have been significantly altered by state governments on at least four occasions since 1945, with expected advantageous effect to the governing party in the New South Wales Parliament at the time.[56] The Commonwealth of Australia is a federative constitutional monarchy under a parliamentary democracy. ... NSW redirects here. ...


The 38 LGAs commonly described as making up Sydney are:

Different organisations have varying definitions of which councils make up Sydney. The Local Government Association of New South Wales considers all LGAs lying entirely in Cumberland County as part of its 'Metro' group, which excludes Camden (classed in its 'Country' group).[57] The Australian Bureau of Statistics defines a Sydney Statistical Division (the population figures of which are used in this article) that includes all of the above councils as well as Wollondilly, the Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury, Gosford and Wyong.[58] The Municipality of Ashfield is a Local Government Area of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Auburn Council is a Local Government Area in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, about 15 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district. ... Facade of Bankstowns Town Hall Bankstown Rail Bridge 1946. ... Baulkham Hills Shire is a local government area in the north western region of Australia. ... For the state electoral district, see Electoral district of Blacktown. ... The City of Botany Bay is the name of the local government area which encompasses suburbs adjacent to the Botany Bay (such as Botany, New South Wales) (before 1996, it was known as the Municipality of Botany). ... Burwood Council is a Local Government Area in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Camden Council is a Local Government Area in New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Campbelltown is a Local Government Area in south-western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, located about 55 km south west of the Sydney central business district. ... Canada Bay is a Local Government Area of New South Wales, Australia and located in the metropolitan area of Sydney. ... The City of Canterbury, previously the Municipality of Canterbury, is a Local Government Area in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Fairfield is a Local Government Area in the south-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Holroyd is a Local Government Area and suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, located in the Western Sydney region. ... Hornsby Shire is a vast Local Government Area in the North Shore region of Sydney, Australia. ... The Municipality of Hunters Hill is the smallest Local Government Area in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Hurstville is a Local Government Area within Sydney, Australia. ... The former Kogarah Post Office in 1915. ... Ku-ring-gai Council is a Local Government Area in the North Shore region of Sydney. ... Lane Cove council office The Municipality of Lane Cove is a Local Government Area located about 10km north-west of the central business district of Sydney, Australia, in the south-west corner of the North Shore. ... The Municipality of Leichhardt is a Local Government Area in the inner-west of Sydney, in state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Liverpool is a Local Government Area in southwest of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Manly Council is a Local Government Area on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Marrickville is a Local Government Area (LGA) in the Inner West region of Sydney, Australia. ... The Municipality of Mosman is a Local Government Area on the North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... North Sydney Council is a Local Government Area on the North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Parramatta is a Local Government Area in western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Penrith is a Local Government Area in western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Pittwater Council is a Local Government Area on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Randwick is a Local Government Area in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Rockdale is a Local Government Area in southern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Ryde is a Local Government Area in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Strathfield Municipal Council is a Local Government Area of New South Wales, Australia, near Sydney. ... The Sutherland Shire, is a Local Government Area in the Southern Sydney region of Sydney, Australia. ... This article is about the local government area. ... Warringah is a local council area in the Northern Beaches region of Sydney, Australia. ... Waverley Council is a Local Government Area in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The City of Willoughby is a Local Government Area on the North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Municipality of Woollahra is a Local Government Area in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Cumberland County is a county in the State of New South Wales, Australia. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ...


Education

The University of Sydney established in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia
The University of Sydney established in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia
Main article: Education in Sydney

Sydney is home to some of Australia's most prominent universities, and is the site of Australia's first university, the University of Sydney, established in 1850.[59] There are five other public universities operating primarily in Sydney: the University of New South Wales, Macquarie University, the University of Technology, Sydney, the University of Western Sydney, and the Australian Catholic University (two out of six campuses). Other universities which operate secondary campuses in Sydney include the University of Notre Dame Australia and the University of Wollongong. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 205 KB) Summary Main Quadrangle of the University of Sydney. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 205 KB) Summary Main Quadrangle of the University of Sydney. ... The University of Sydney (colloquially Sydney Uni) is the oldest university in Australia. ... Sydney is home to Australias oldest university and is one of the countrys main educational centres. ... The University of Sydney (colloquially Sydney Uni) is the oldest university in Australia. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of New South Wales, also known as UNSW or colloquially as New South, is a university situated in Kensington, a suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Macquarie University is an Australian university located in Sydney. ... The UTS tower on Broadway UTS tower The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), is a university in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The University of Western Sydney (UWS) is a large, multi-campused and comprehensive metropolitan University with 35,000 students and 2,500 staff members. ... Australian Catholic University The Australian Catholic University, or ACU National, is a Roman Catholic, public, multi-campus, multi-state university, based in eastern Australia, open to all staff and students regardless of their religious beliefs. ... The University of Notre Dame Australia is a private Roman Catholic university established in 1990 in the Western Australian port city of Fremantle, . While the University of Notre Dame Australia has strong collegial links[1] with the American University of Notre Dame located in South Bend, Indiana, they are separate... The University of Wollongong is a large University with approximately 21,000 students in the city of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. ...


There are four multi-campus government-funded Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institutes in Sydney, which provide vocational training at a tertiary level: the Sydney Institute of Technology, Northern Sydney Institute of TAFE, Western Sydney Institute of TAFE and South Western Sydney Institute of TAFE. For the Texas educational association, see Texas Association of Future Educators. ... A blacksmith is a traditional trade. ... TAFE New South Wales Sydney Institute[1] (formerly The Sydney Institute of Technology) is the institute of Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges serving the inner Sydney area. ... The Northern Sydney Institute is the TAFE NSW Institute servicing the northern suburbs of Sydney. ... TAFE NSW Western Sydney Institute is one of the largest Institutes of TAFE NSW. They annually enrol more than 90,000 students in around 1000 vocational areas. ... TAFE NSW South Western Sydney Institute Each year, more than 79,000 students enrol at colleges in South Western Sydney Institute, with approximately 2000 students each semester studying with the Institute in overseas locations. ...


Sydney has public, denominational and independent schools. Public schools, including pre-schools, primary and secondary schools, and special schools are administered by the New South Wales Department of Education and Training. There are four state-administered education areas in Sydney, that together co-ordinate 919 schools.[citation needed] Of the 30 selective high schools in the state, 25 are in Sydney.[60] State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ... A parochial school (or faith school) is a type of private school which engages in religious education in addition to conventional education. ... The New South Wales Department of Education and Training (DET) runs primary schools, secondary schools and Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... This is a complete list of school education areas in New South Wales as of mid-2005. ... Sydney Boys High School, a NSW Selective School Selective schools in New South Wales are government high schools operated by the New South Wales Department of Education and Training that have accepted their students based upon their academic merit. ...


Infrastructure

Circular Quay, the main ferry terminal in Sydney
Circular Quay, the main ferry terminal in Sydney
Sydney Monorail, Liverpool and Pitt Streets
Sydney Monorail, Liverpool and Pitt Streets

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Categories: Suburbs of Sydney | Incomplete Sydney suburbs ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 3235 KB) Monorail, Pitt Street, Sydney, Australia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 3235 KB) Monorail, Pitt Street, Sydney, Australia. ... Liverpool Street is an important east-west throughfare in the southern portion of the Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... Pitt Street is a major street in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...

Health systems

The Government of New South Wales operates the public hospitals in the Sydney metropolitan region. Management of these hospitals and other specialist health facilities is coordinated by 4 Area Health Services: Sydney South West (SSWAHS), Sydney West (SWAHS), Northern Sydney and Central Coast (NSCCAHS) and the South Eastern Sydney and Illawarra (SESIAHS) Area Health Services. There are also a number of private hospitals in the city, many of which are aligned with religious organisations. The form of the Government of New South Wales is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ...


Transport

Main article: Public transport in Sydney

Most Sydney residents travel by car through the system of roads, and motorways. The most important trunk routes in the urban area form the nine Metroad systems, which includes the 110 km (68 mi) Sydney Orbital Network. Sydney is also served by extensive train, taxi, bus and ferry networks. A motorway (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, and some Commonwealth nations) is both a type of road and a classification. ... A63(T) trunk road A trunk road, trunk highway, or strategic road is a major road—usually connecting one or more cities, ports, airports, etc. ... A Metroad route marker as used in Sydney and Brisbane Metroads are the primary road routes serving the Sydney and Brisbane metropolitan areas in Australia. ... The Sydney Orbital Network is a 110-km motorway ring-road in the city of Sydney, Australia. ...

Sydney trains are run by CityRail, a corporation of the New South Wales State Government. Trains run as suburban commuter rail services in the outer suburbs, then converge in an underground city loop service in the central business district. In the years following the 2000 Olympics, CityRail's performance declined significantly.[61] In 2005, CityRail introduced a revised timetable and employed more drivers.[62] A large infrastructure project, the Clearways project, is scheduled to be completed by 2010.[63][64][65] In 2007 a report found Cityrail performed poorly compared to many metro services from other world cities. [66] Sydney has one privately operated light rail line, the Metro Light Rail, running from Central Station to Lilyfield along a former goods train line. There is also a small monorail which runs in a loop around the main shopping district and Darling Harbour. Sydney was once served by an extensive tram network, which was progressively closed in the 1950s and 1960s. Most parts of the metropolitan area are served by buses, many of which follow the pre-1961 tram routes. In the city and inner suburbs the state-owned Sydney Buses has a monopoly. In the outer suburbs, service is contracted to many private bus companies. Construction of a network of rapid bus transitways in areas not previously well served by public transport began in 1999, and the first of these, the Liverpool-Parramatta Rapid Bus Transitway opened in February 2003. Sydney Ferries, another State government-owned organisation, runs numerous commuter and tourist ferry services on Sydney Harbour and the Parramatta River. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2188x1572, 417 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sydney CityRail Millennium train EDi Rail CityRail fleet User:LudBob Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2188x1572, 417 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sydney CityRail Millennium train EDi Rail CityRail fleet User:LudBob Metadata This file contains additional information... The Millennium train M Set is CityRails (Sydney) newest member of the electric fleet (4th generation train), manufactured by EDi Rail, in Newcastle. ... Central Railway Station (also known as Sydney Terminal) is the largest railway station in Australia. ... This article is about railways in Sydney in general. ... This article is on the commuter rail network centred on Sydney, Australia. ... The form of the Government of New South Wales is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... The CityRail Clearways Project is a $1. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Metro Light Rail, owned by Connex, operates one light rail line in inner Sydney, Australia. ... Central Railway Station (also known as Sydney Terminal) is the largest railway station in Australia. ... Lilyfield is a small inner-western suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Sydney Monorail The Sydney Monorail is a monorail that operates in the centre of Sydney. ... Darling Harbour is a large recreational pedestrian precinct situated on the western edge of central Sydney, Australia. ... Sydney, the largest city in Australia, once had the largest tram system in Australia, the second largest in the Commonwealth (after London), and one of the largest in the world. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... This article is about state ownership. ... The State Transit Authority of New South Wales (STA) is an agency of the Government of New South Wales based in Sydney, Australia operating bus and ferry services. ... This article is about high-capacity bus transit systems. ... The Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway (or T-Way) is a bus rapid transit route in Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, running between Liverpool railway station and Parramatta railway station. ... Two ferries- Narrabeen (rear) and Alexander (foreground) Sydney Ferries is a state owned corporation of the New South Wales Government providing passenger ferry services in Sydney Harbour and on the Parramatta River. ... The Parramatta River, New South Wales, Australia, is the main tributary of Sydney Harbour, along with the smaller Lane Cove and Duck Rivers. ...


Sydney Airport, located in the suburb of Mascot, is Sydney's main airport, and is one of the oldest continually operated airports in the world [67]. The smaller Bankstown Airport mainly serves private and general aviation. There are light aviation airfields at Hoxton Park and Camden. RAAF Base Richmond lies to the north-west of the city. The question of whether Sydney needs a second airport has raised much controversy. A 2003 study found that Sydney Airport can manage as Sydney's sole international airport for 20 years with a significant increase in airport traffic predicted.[68] The resulting expansion of the airport would have a substantial impact on the community, including additional aircraft noise affecting residents. Land has been acquired at Badgerys Creek for a second airport, the site acting as a focal point of political argument.[69] Sydney (Kingsford Smith) International Airport, or Sydney Airport, is located in Mascot, New South Wales, and is the major airport serving Sydney, Australia. ... Mascot, New South Wales, Australia is a suburb of Sydney. ... Sydney Metropolitan Airport - Bankstown (formerly Bankstown Airport (IATA: BWU, ICAO: YSBK) is a general aviation airport and business park located in Bankstown, 22 km from the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... A general aviation scene at Kemble Airfield, England. ... Hoxton Park is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Camden in New South Wales, Australia, is a historic town and Sydney Suburb 65 km southwest of the Sydney CBD and near the city of Campbelltown. ... RAAF Base Richmond is one of Australias oldest surviving air force bases. ... An International airport is an airport where flights from other countries land and/or take off. ... Aircraft noise is defined as sound produced by any aircraft on run-up, taxiing, take off, over flying or landing. ... Badgerys Creek is a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...


Utilities

Water storage and supply for Sydney is managed by the Sydney Catchment Authority, which is an agency of the NSW Government that sells bulk water to Sydney Water and other agencies. Water in the Sydney catchment is chiefly stored in dams in the Upper Nepean Scheme, the Blue Mountains, Woronora Dam, Warragamba Dam and the Shoalhaven Scheme.[70] Historically low water levels in the catchment have led to water use restrictions and the NSW government is investigating alternative water supply options, including grey water recycling and the construction of a seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant at Kurnell.[71] Sydney Water also collects the wastewater and sewage produced by the city. The Sydney Catchment Authority (SCA) is an agency of the Government of New South Wales that manages Sydneys catchments and supplies bulk water to businesses and other agencies. ... Sydney Water is a corporation owned by the Government of New South Wales that provides drinking water, wastewater and some stormwater services to Sydney, Illawarra and the Blue Mountains. ... The Upper Nepean Scheme is a series of dams in the catchments of the Cataract, Cordeaux, Avon and Nepean rivers of New South Wales. ... The Blue Mountains Dams are a series of 6 dams in the Blue Mountains which supply water to the Blue Mountains and Sydney. ... Woronora Dam is a dam on the Woronora River in New South Wales. ... Warragamba Dam Spillway Warragamba Dam is the structure that provides the major water supply for Sydney, Australia, situated approximately 65 km to the west of Sydney in the Burragorang Valley. ... The Shoalhaven Scheme is a dual-purpose water supply and hydro-electric power generation scheme in New South Wales. ... Level 5 water restrictions in Goulburn in 2006. ... Water supply is the process of self-provision or provision by third parties of water of various qualities to different users. ... Greywater, sometimes spelled graywater, grey water or gray water and also known as sullage, is non-industrial wastewater generated from domestic processes such as washing dishes, laundry and bathing. ... Reverse osmosis (RO) is a separation process that uses pressure to force a solution through a membrane that retains the solute on one side and allows the pure solvent to pass to the other side. ...


Three companies supply natural gas and electricity to Sydney: Energy Australia, AGL and Integral Energy. Numerous telecommunications companies operate in Sydney providing terrestrial and mobile telecommunications services. EnergyAustralia is a large Australian electricity supplier, primarily focussed on supplying the Sydney, Newcastle and Central Coast areas of New South Wales. ... AGL Energy Limited (ASX: AGK) is an Australian company involved in generating and selling electricity and natural gas. ... Integral energy is the amount of energy required to remove water from an initial water content to water content of (where ). It is calculated by integrating the water retention curve, soil water pontential with respect to : It is proposed by Minasny and McBratney (2003) as alternative to available water capacity. ...

A panorama of Sydney Harbour at night, with the Sydney Opera House on the left, the central business district in the image centre and Sydney Harbour Bridge on the right
A panorama of Sydney Harbour at night, with the Sydney Opera House on the left, the central business district in the image centre and Sydney Harbour Bridge on the right
A panorama of Sydney Harbour during the day, with the Sydney Opera House on the right and Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Royal Botanic Gardens and the central business district are to the left

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (9000x2025, 4269 KB)Sydney Harbour Bridge as seen from the North Shore suburb of Kirribilli. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (9000x2025, 4269 KB)Sydney Harbour Bridge as seen from the North Shore suburb of Kirribilli. ... This article is an overview of the term Panorama. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x311, 326 KB) Summary Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House seen from Mrs Macquaries Point. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x311, 326 KB) Summary Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House seen from Mrs Macquaries Point. ... This article is an overview of the term Panorama. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. ... Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney The Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney, Australia, are the largest of three major botanical gardens open to the public in Sydney, along with the Mount Annan Botanic Garden and the Mount Tomah Botanic Garden. ...

See also

New South Wales portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_New_South_Wales. ...

References

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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Angus & Robertson is a bookstore chain in Australia. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian government organisation responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian government organisation responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New South Wales Department of Planning (DOP) is a department of the Government of New South Wales with responsibility for the administration of the states planning system and the assessment of major development applications. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New South Wales Department of Planning (DOP) is a department of the Government of New South Wales with responsibility for the administration of the states planning system and the assessment of major development applications. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New South Wales Department of Planning (DOP) is a department of the Government of New South Wales with responsibility for the administration of the states planning system and the assessment of major development applications. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The form of the Government of New South Wales is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New South Wales Department of Education and Training (DET) runs primary schools, secondary schools and Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is on the commuter rail network centred on Sydney, Australia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Sydney Travel Information | Lonely Planet Destination Guide (372 words)
Sydney is Australia's oldest city, the economic powerhouse of the nation and the country's capital in everything but name.
Although it's come a long way from its convict beginnings, Sydney still has a rough and ready energy, and offers an invigorating blend of the old and the new, the raw and the refined.
When To Go Sydney is comfortable to visit at any time of year, but unless you enjoy humidity, broken by the odd torrential downpour, keep away in summer.
Sydney Travel Guide | Fodor's Online (427 words)
Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of world cities that generate a sense of excitement from the air.
Even at the end of a marathon flight across the Pacific, there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, crossing the branching fingers of the harbor, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance.
Sydney's panache and appetite for life are unchallenged in the Australian context.
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