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Encyclopedia > Syd Barrett
Syd Barrett

Background information
Birth name Roger Keith Barrett
Born 6 January 1946(1946-01-06)
Cambridge, England
Died 7 July 2006 (aged 60)
Cambridge, England
Genre(s) Psychedelic rock, psych folk, space rock
Occupation(s) Musician
Singer-Songwriter
Instrument(s) Guitar, Vocals, Bass, Slide guitar, Ukelele, Mandolin, Banjo
Years active 1964 - 1974
Label(s) Harvest/EMI
Associated acts Pink Floyd
Stars
Kevin Ayers

Roger Keith "Syd" Barrett (6 January 19467 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. He is most remembered as a founding member of progressive rock pioneers Pink Floyd, providing major musical and stylistic direction in their early work, although he left the group in 1968 amidst speculations of mental illness exacerbated by heavy drug use. is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Psychedelic folk or Psych folk is a music genre that originated in the 1960s through the blending of folk music, Indie folk and psychedelic rock or pop. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For the technique, see Slide (guitar technique). ... Ukulele The ukulele (pronounced OO-koo-LAY-lay, or the Anglicised YOU-ka-LAY-lee), or uke, is a fretted string instrument which is, in its construction, essentially a smaller, four-stringed version of the guitar. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Harvest Records was a record label, formed by EMI in 1969 to promote progressive rock music and to compete with Philips Vertigo label and Deccas Deram labels. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Stars was a short-lived British band in 1972. ... Kevin Ayers (born 16 August 1944 in Herne Bay, Kent) is an English songwriter and major influential force in the early English psychedelic movement. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ...


He was active as a rock musician for about seven years, recording two albums with Pink Floyd and two influential solo albums before going into self-imposed seclusion lasting more than thirty years. His post-rock band life was as an artist and keen gardener, ending with his death in 2006, and a number of biographies have been written about him since the 1980s. During his withdrawal from public life there were numerous speculative, although largely appreciative works about him, most notably his former band Pink Floyd's 1975 album Wish You Were Here. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

Barrett was born at 60 Glisson Road in the English city of Cambridge to a middle-class family. His father, Arthur Max Barrett, was a prominent pathologist, and both he and his wife, Winifred, encouraged the young Roger (as he was known then) in his music. At the age of three, he moved to 183 Hills Road. After his brothers and sisters left home, his mother rented out rooms to lodgers, including a future Prime Minister of Japan.[1] Barrett acquired the nickname "Syd" at the age of 14, a reference to an old local Cambridge drummer, Sid Barrett. Syd Barrett changed the spelling in order to differentiate himself from his namesake.[2] His father died of cancer on 11 December 1961, less than a month before Barrett's 16th birthday. He attended Cambridgeshire High School for Boys, now known as Hills Road Sixth Form College in Cambridge and enrolled in Camberwell art school in South London in 1964 before forming his first band in 1965. During this pre-Pink Floyd time he wrote such tunes as "Effervescing Elephant" to play at local parties.[3][4] For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Emblem of the Office of Prime Minister of Japan Kantei, Official residence of PM The Prime Minister of Japan ) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cambridgeshire High School for Boys was founded as the Cambridge and County School for Boys in 1903. ... Hills Road Sixth Form College (HRSFC) is a state funded co-educational sixth form college in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom. ... Camberwell College of Arts is one of the University of the Arts Londons six constituent colleges, and is one of the worlds foremost art and design institutions. ... South London area South London (known colloquially as South of the River) is the area of London south of the River Thames. ... Barrett was the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett. ...


Pink Floyd years (1964–1968)

Starting in 1964, the band that would become Pink Floyd underwent various line-up and name changes such as "The Abdabs", "The Screaming Abdabs", "Sigma 6" and "The Meggadeaths". In 1965, Barrett joined them as "The Tea Set", and when they found themselves playing a concert with a band of the same name, Barrett came up with the name "The Pink Floyd Sound" (later "The Pink Floyd"). He devised the name "Pink Floyd" by juxtaposing the first names of Pink Anderson and Floyd Council whom he had read about in a sleeve note by Paul Oliver for a 1962 Blind Boy Fuller LP (Philips BBL-7512): "Curley Weaver and Fred McMullen, (...) Pink Anderson or Floyd Council—these were a few amongst the many blues singers that were to be heard in the rolling hills of the Piedmont, or meandering with the streams through the wooded valleys". Pink Anderson and son (Little Pink Anderson) 1960s Pink Anderson (February 12, 1900–October 12, 1974) was a blues singer and guitarist, born on February 12, 1900 in Laurens, South Carolina. ... Floyd Council (September 2, 1911–May 9, 1976) was an American blues musician. ... Paul Oliver is a researcher at the Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development. ... Blind Boy Fuller (born Fulton Allen) was an American blues guitarist and vocalist. ... James Curley Weaver (March 25, 1906 - September 20, 1962) was an American blues musician known as the Georgia Guitar Wizard. // He was born in Covington, Georgia and raised on a farm near Porterdale. ... Pink Anderson and son (Little Pink Anderson) 1960s Pink Anderson (February 12, 1900–October 12, 1974) was a blues singer and guitarist, born on February 12, 1900 in Laurens, South Carolina. ... Floyd Council (September 2, 1911–May 9, 1976) was an American blues musician. ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ...


While Pink Floyd began by playing cover versions of American R&B songs (in much the same vein as contemporaries The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds and The Kinks), by 1966 they had carved out their own style of improvised rock and roll, which drew as much from improvised jazz as it did from British pop-rock, such as that championed by The Beatles. In that year, a new rock concert venue, the UFO, opened in London and quickly became a haven for British psychedelic music. Pink Floyd, the house band,[5] was their most popular attraction, and, after making appearances at the rival Roundhouse, became the most popular musical group of the so-called "London Underground" psychedelic music scene.[6] Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... UFOria The UFO Club was a famous but shortlived club in London during the 1960s, venue of performances by many of the top bands of the day. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... The Roundhouse was built in 1847 as a turntable engine shed for the London and Birmingham Railway at Chalk Farm (near Camden Town), in London, England. ... The UK underground was a countercultural movement in the United Kingdom linked to the underground culture in the United States and associated with the hippy phenomenon. ...


By the end of 1966 Pink Floyd had gained a reliable management team in Andrew King and Peter Jenner. The duo soon befriended American expatriate Joe Boyd, who was making a name for himself as one of the more important entrepreneurs on the British music scene. Boyd produced a recording session for the group in January 1967 at Sound Techniques in Chelsea, which resulted in a demo of the single "Arnold Layne". King and Jenner took the song to the recording behemoth EMI, who were impressed enough to offer the band a contract, under which they would be allowed to record an album. The band accepted. By the time the album was released, "Arnold Layne" had reached number 20 on the British singles charts (despite a ban by the BBC) and a follow-up single, "See Emily Play" had done even better, peaking at number 6. Peter Jenner is a British manager of rock bands and acts, and a record producer. ... Joe Boyd (born August 5, 1942) is an American record producer. ... Arnold Layne was the first single released by British Psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, shortly after landing a recording contract with EMI. The song was written by Syd Barrett, Pink Floyds co-founder and original front man. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... See Emily Play was the third single recorded by British psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, written by original frontman Syd Barrett. ...


These first two singles, as well as a third ("Apples and Oranges"), were written by Syd Barrett, who also was the principal visionary/author of their critically acclaimed 1967 debut album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. The album's title was taken from the mystical "Pan" chapter of The Wind in the Willows. Of the 11 songs on The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, Barrett wrote eight and co-wrote another two.[7] The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... For other uses, see The Wind in the Willows (disambiguation). ...


The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was recorded intermittently between January and July 1967 in Studio 2 at Abbey Road Studios. At that same time at Abbey Road the Beatles were recording Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band in Studio 1 and the Pretty Things were recording S.F. Sorrow. When The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was released in August of that year, it became a smash hit in the UK, hitting #6 on the British album charts (the album was not nearly so successful in the USA). However, as the band began to attract a large fanbase, the pressures on Barrett contributed to his experiencing increasing psychiatric illness. For other uses, see Sgt. ... The Pretty Things is a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... S.F. Sorrow is the title of a 1968 LP by British rock group The Pretty Things. ...


Barrett's behaviour became increasingly unpredictable, partly as a consequence of frequent experimentation with psychedelic drugs such as LSD.[6] Many report having seen him on stage with the group, strumming on one chord through the entire concert, or not playing at all[8]. At a show at The Fillmore West in San Francisco, during a performance of "Interstellar Overdrive", Barrett slowly detuned his guitar. The audience seemed to enjoy such antics, unaware of the rest of the band's consternation. Before a performance in late 1967, Barrett apparently crushed Mandrax and an entire tube of Brylcreem into his hair, which subsequently melted down his face under the heat of the stage lighting, making him look like "a guttered candle".[9] Nick Mason later disputed the Mandrax portion of this story, stating that "Syd would never waste good mandies".[10] Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... The Fillmore (also known as the Fillmore Auditorium or, for several years, The Elite Club), is a historic music venue in San Francisco, California made famous by Bill Graham (1931–1991). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Interstellar Overdrive is a psychedelic music composition by Pink Floyd, which appears on their 1967 debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn at almost ten minutes in length. ... Methaqualone1 is an addictive, sedative drug. ... Original Brylcreem Brylcreem (pronounced brill-cream) is a brand name of mens hair groom. ...


Following a disastrous abridged tour of the United States, David Gilmour (a school friend of Barrett's) was asked to join the band as a second guitarist to cover for Barrett as Barrett's erratic behaviour prevented him from performing. For a handful of shows David played and sang while Barrett wandered around on stage, occasionally deigning to join in playing. The other band members soon tired of Barrett's antics and, in January 1968, on the way to a show at Southampton University, the band elected not to pick Barrett up: One person in the car said, "Shall we pick Syd up?" and another person said, "Let's not bother" (Gilmour interview in Guitar World - January 1995). They attempted to retain him in the group as a songwriter, much as The Beach Boys had with Brian Wilson, but this proved impossible. For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... The University of Southampton is a British university, with a reputation for quality research. ... The Beach Boys, originally the Beech Boys, a small team of four brothers from the south of Poland, emigrated to America in the early 1950s in search of a fortune to be made in the Arizonian logging industry. When it soon became evident they had been the victims of... For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ...


There are many stories about Barrett's bizarre and intermittently psychotic behaviour — some are known to be true. According to Roger Waters, Barrett came into what was to be their last practice session with a new song he had dubbed "Have You Got It, Yet?". The song seemed simple enough when he first presented it to his bandmates, but it soon became impossibly difficult to learn: while they were practising it, Barrett kept changing the arrangement. He would then play it again, with the arbitrary changes, and sing "Have you got it yet?". Eventually they realised they never would and that they were simply bearing the brunt of Barrett's idiosyncratic sense of humour.[11] Psychosis is a psychiatric classification for a mental state in which the perception of reality is distorted. ... Have You Got It, Yet? is an unreleased and unrecorded song written by Syd Barrett during the short time in which Pink Floyd was a five-piece. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


Barrett did not contribute any material to the band after A Saucerful of Secrets was released in 1968. Of the songs he wrote for Pink Floyd after The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, only one ("Jugband Blues") made it to the band's second album; one became a less-than-successful single ("Apples and Oranges"), and two others ("Scream Thy Last Scream" and "Vegetable Man") were never officially released. Barrett supposedly spent some time outside the recording studio, waiting to be invited in (he also showed up to a few gigs and glared at Gilmour). Barrett played slide guitar on "Remember a Day" (which had been recorded during the The Piper at the Gates of Dawn sessions) and also played on "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun".[12] His main contribution to the album, "Jugband Blues," is often seen by Pink Floyd fans as Barrett's admission that his days in the band were probably numbered ("It's awfully considerate of you to think of me here/And I'm most obliged to you for making it clear/that I'm not here", the song opens). In March 1968 it was officially announced that he was no longer a member of Pink Floyd. A Saucerful of Secrets is the second album by rock band Pink Floyd, and arguably one of the first progressive rock albums. ... Jugband Blues is a song by British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Scream Thy Last Scream is an unreleased song by the English rock music band Pink Floyd. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Remember a Day is a song by British psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd, and is featured on their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets (1968). ... Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun is a song by British psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd, and is featured on their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets (1968). ... Jugband Blues is a song by British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ...


Solo years (1968–1972)

After leaving Pink Floyd, Barrett distanced himself from the public eye. However, at the behest of EMI and Harvest Records, he did have a brief solo career, releasing two solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett. Much of the material on both albums dates from Barrett's most productive period of songwriting, late 1966 to mid 1967, and it is believed that he wrote few new songs after he left Pink Floyd. Harvest Records was a record label, formed by EMI in 1969 to promote progressive rock music and to compete with Philips Vertigo label and Deccas Deram labels. ... The Madcap Laughs was Syd Barretts first solo album after being replaced in Pink Floyd by his old school friend David Gilmour. ... Barrett was the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett. ...


The first album, The Madcap Laughs, was recorded in two distinct sessions, both at Abbey Road Studios: a few tentative sessions took place between May and June 1968 (produced by Peter Jenner), while the bulk of the album was recorded between April and July 1969. The record was produced first by Malcolm Jones, a young EMI executive, and then by David Gilmour and Roger Waters. Jones states in his book "The Making of the Madcap Laughs" that "when Dave came to me and said that Syd wanted him and Roger to do the remaining parts of the album, I acquiesced." A few tracks on the album feature overdubs by members of the band Soft Machine. Barrett also played guitar on the sessions for Soft Machine founder Kevin Ayers' debut LP Joy of a Toy, although his performance on "Religious Experience" was not released until the album was reissued in 2003. For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... Kevin Ayers (born 16 August 1944 in Herne Bay, Kent) is an English songwriter and major influential force in the early English psychedelic movement. ... Joy of a Toy is the debut solo album of Kevin Ayers, a founding member of Soft Machine. ...


The second album, Barrett, was recorded more sporadically than the first, with sessions taking place between February and July 1970. This effort sounds more polished than the first, but Barrett was arguably in a worse state. The album was produced by David Gilmour and featured Gilmour on bass guitar, Rick Wright on keyboard and Humble Pie drummer Jerry Shirley. For the hard rock band of the same name, see Humble Pie (band). ... Jerry Shirley, (born 4 February 1952 in Wattenham Cross, London) drummer for Humble Pie, started a new version of the popular 70s band shortly after the death of Steve Marriott, being the sole surviving member of the band and, therefore, owning all the rights to the name. ...


Despite the numerous recording dates for his two solo albums, Barrett undertook very little musical activity between 1968 and 1972 outside the studio. On 24 February 1970, he appeared on John Peel's BBC radio programme Top Gear playing five songs - only one of which had been previously released. Three would be re-recorded for the Barrett album, while the song "Two of a Kind" was a one-off performance (the song appears on the 2001 compilation The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?) with the lyrics and composition having since been credited to Richard Wright. Barrett was accompanied on this session by David Gilmour and Jerry Shirley who played bass and percussion, respectively. is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named John Peel, see John Peel (disambiguation). ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... Top Gear was a progressive music show in the early years of BBC Radio 1 (from 1967 into the 1970s) hosted variously by Pete Drummond and, most famously, John Peel. ...


Gilmour and Shirley also backed Barrett for his one and only live concert during this period. The gig took place on 6 June 1970 at the Olympia Exhibition Hall, London, and was part of a Music and Fashion Festival. The trio performed four songs, playing for less than half an hour, and because of poor mixing, the vocals were inaudible until part-way through the last number. At the end of the fourth song, Barrett unexpectedly but politely put down his guitar and walked off the stage. is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Barrett made one last appearance on BBC Radio, recording three songs at their studios on 16 February 1971. All three came from the Barrett album, and were presumably aired to encourage people to buy the record. After this session, he would take a hiatus from his music career that lasted more than a year, although in an extensive interview with Mick Rock and Rolling Stone in December, he discussed himself at length, showed off his new 12-string guitar, talked about his American tour with Jimi Hendrix, and stated that he was frustrated in terms of his musical work because of his inability to find anyone good to play with.[13] is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Queen II album cover Mick Rock is a photographer best known for his iconic shots of 1970s glam rock icons such as Queen, David Bowie, Lou Reed and Iggy Pop. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


Later years (1972–2006)

Final recordings

In 1972, Barrett formed a short-lived band called Stars with ex-Pink Fairies member Twink on drums and Jack Monck on bass. Though the band was initially well received, one of their gigs at the Corn Exchange in Cambridge proved to be disastrous (Monck describes just how disastrous it was in a TV interview in 2001 for the BBC Omnibus series documentary 'Crazy Diamond'). A few days after this final show, Twink recalled that Barrett stopped him on the street, showed him a scathing review of the gig they had played, and quit on the spot.[10] Stars was a short-lived British band in 1972. ... The Pink Fairies were a British heavy/progressive/alternative rock group active in the London (Ladbroke Grove) underground and psychedelic scene of the early 1970s . ... John Charles Alder (born 29 November 1944), better known as Twink, is a British musician (drummer), singer and song writer) who was a central figure in the British psychedelic movement, and an actor. ... Jack Monck is a bass guitarist. ... The Cambridge Corn Exchange is a concert venue in Cambridge. ... This article is about the city in England. ...


In August 1974, Peter Jenner convinced Barrett to return to Abbey Road Studios in hope of recording another album. However, little became of the sessions, which lasted three days and consisted of blues rhythm tracks with tentative and disjointed guitar overdubs (the only titled track is "If You Go, Don't Be Slow"). Once again, Barrett withdrew from the music industry. He sold the rights to his solo albums back to the record label, moved into a London hotel and when the money ran out he walked back to Cambridge to live in his mother's basement. Further attempts to bring him back (including one endeavour by The Damned who wanted him to produce their second album) were all fruitless. Until his death, Barrett still received royalties from his work with Pink Floyd from each compilation and some of the live albums and singles that had featured his songs; Gilmour has commented that he (Gilmour) "[made] sure the money [got] to him all right". This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the music group. ...


Withdrawal to Cambridge

According to a 2005 profile by a recent biographer Tim Willis, Barrett, who had reverted to using his original name of Roger, continued to live in his late mother's semi-detached home in Cambridge, and had returned to his original art-form of painting, creating large abstract canvases. He was also said to have been an avid gardener. His main point of contact with the outside world was his sister, Rosemary, who lived nearby. While reclusive, it was his physical health that prompted most concern, being afflicted with stomach ulcers and type 2 diabetes.[14] This article is about Cambridge, England; see also other places called Cambridge. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ... Peptic ulcer is a non-malignant ulcer of the stomach (called gastric ulcer) or duodenum (called duodenal ulcer). ... Diabetes mellitus type 2 or Type 2 Diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM), obesity-related diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes) is a metabolic disorder that is primarily characterized by insulin resistance, relative insulin deficiency, and hyperglycemia. ...


Although Barrett had not appeared or spoken in public since the mid-1970s, time did little to diminish interest in his life and work; reporters and fans still travelled to Cambridge to seek him out, despite his attempts to live a quiet life. Many photos of Barrett being annoyed by paparazzi when walking or biking, from the 1980s until his death in 2006, had been published in various media. For other uses, see Paparazzi (disambiguation). ...


Apparently, Barrett was not happy being reminded about his past as a musician and the other members of Pink Floyd had no direct contact with him. However, he did go to his sister's house in November 2001 to watch the BBC Omnibus documentary made about him – reportedly he found some of it "too noisy", enjoyed seeing Mike Leonard (of Leonard's Lodgers) again (who he called his 'teacher'), and enjoyed hearing "See Emily Play" again.[15] See Emily Play was the third single recorded by British psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, written by original frontman Syd Barrett. ...


His sister, Rosemary Breen, insists that Barrett neither suffered from mental illness nor received treatment for it at any time since they resumed regular contact in the 1980s.[16] She allowed that he did spend some time in a private "home for lost souls" — Greenwoods in Essex — but claimed there was no formal therapy programme there. Some years later, Barrett apparently agreed to sessions with a psychiatrist at Fulbourn psychiatric hospital in Cambridge, but Breen claimed that neither medication nor therapy was considered appropriate in her brother's case.[16] A lost soul attacking the player in Doom 2 The Lost Soul is one of the many creatures that can be found throughout the Doom series of computer games. ... For other uses, see Psychiatrist (disambiguation). ... A psychiatric hospital (also called, at various places and times, mental hospital or mental ward, historically often asylum, lunatic asylum, or madhouse), is a hospital specialising in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Therapy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Death and aftermath

Barrett died on Friday 7 July 2006 at his home in Cambridge.[17] He died of pancreatic cancer,[18][19] but this was usually reported as "complications from diabetes."[20] The occupation on his death certificate was given as "retired musician."[21] is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Pancreatic cancer is a malignant tumor within the pancreatic gland. ...


In 2006, his home, located in St. Margaret's Square, was placed on the market and reportedly attracted considerable interest.[22] After over 100 viewings, many by fans, his house was sold to a French couple who bought the house simply because they liked it—reportedly they knew nothing about Barrett.[23] His other possessions were auctioned for £120,000.[24] NME produced a tribute issue to Barrett the week after with a photo of the songwriter on the cover. For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ...


According to a local Cambridge newspaper, Barrett left approximately £1.25 million to his two brothers and two sisters. This income was apparently largely acquired via royalties from Pink Floyd compilations and live recordings to feature songs he had written whilst with the band.[25]


A tribute concert was held at the Barbican Centre, London on 10 May 2007 with Robyn Hitchcock, Captain Sensible, Damon Albarn, Chrissie Hynde, Kevin Ayers and his Pink Floyd bandmates performing.[26] Barbican Arts Centre and lakeside terrace Interior - concert hall foyer; library and gallery above Interior - concert hall with orchestra The Barbican Arts Centre opened in 1982, after a long and at times painful gestation which dated right back to the area having been badly bombed during World War II. Situated... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Robyn Rowan Hitchcock (born March 3, 1953) is a singer-songwriter, psych folk artist, and occasional actor. ... Captain Sensible, performing live with The Damned in 2006. ... Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... Chrissie Hynde (born Christine Ellen Hynde, 7 September 1951, Akron, Ohio) is an American rock musician, best known as the leader of the band The Pretenders. ... Kevin Ayers (born 16 August 1944 in Herne Bay, Kent) is an English songwriter and major influential force in the early English psychedelic movement. ...


Legacy

Wish You Were Here sessions

Barrett had one noted reunion with the members of Pink Floyd in 1975 during the recording sessions for Wish You Were Here. Barrett attended the Abbey Road session unannounced, and watched the band record "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" — as it happened, a song about him. By that time, Barrett had become quite overweight, had shaved off all of his hair, including his eyebrows, and his ex-bandmates did not at first recognise him (one of the photographs in Nick Mason's book Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd appears to have been taken that day; it is captioned: Syd Barrett at Abbey Road Studios, 5th June 1975). Eventually, they realised who he was and Roger Waters was so distressed that he was reduced to tears. A reference to this reunion appears in the film Pink Floyd The Wall (1982), where the character 'Pink,' played by Bob Geldof, shaves off his eyebrows (and body hair) after succumbing to the pressures of life and fame. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Shine On You Crazy Diamond is an epic nine-part Pink Floyd composition with lyrics written by Roger Waters, in tribute to former band member Syd Barrett, and music written by Waters, Richard Wright, and David Gilmour. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Robert Frederick Xenon Geldof[1], KBE[2], known as Bob Geldof (born 5 October 1951) [3], is an Irish singer, songwriter, actor and political activist. ...


In an interview for the 2001 BBC Omnibus documentary Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond (later released on DVD as The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story), the story is told in full. Rick Wright spoke about the session, saying: "One thing that really stands out in my mind, that I'll never forget; I was going in to the "Shine On" sessions. I went in the studio and I saw this guy sitting at the back of the studio, he was only as far away as you are from me. And I didn't recognize him. I said, 'Who's that guy behind you?' 'That's Syd'. And I just cracked up, I couldn't believe it... he had shaven all his hair off... I mean, his eyebrows, everything... he was jumping up and down brushing his teeth, it was awful. And, uh, I was in, I mean Roger was in tears, I think I was; we were both in tears. It was very shocking... seven years of no contact and then to walk in while we're actually doing that particular track. I don't know – coincidence, karma, fate, who knows? But it was very, very, very powerful". In the same documentary, Nick Mason stated: "When I think about it, I can still see his eyes, but... it was everything else that was different". In that same interview, Roger Waters has said: "I had no idea who he was for a very long time". David Gilmour stated : "None of us recognised him. Shaved...shaved bald head and very plump". The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story is a documentary released on 24 March 2003 by the BBC as part of the Omnibus series and originally called Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond. ... Richard Wright, also known as Rick Wright (born July 28, 1945), is the keyboard player of Pink Floyd. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ...


Compilations

In 1988, EMI Records released an album of Barrett's studio outtakes and previously unreleased material recorded from 1968 to 1970 under the title Opel. The disc was originally set to include the unreleased Barrett Pink Floyd songs "Scream Thy Last Scream" and "Vegetable Man", which had been remixed for the album by Malcolm Jones. However, the two songs were pulled (reportedly by the remaining members of Pink Floyd) before Opel was finalized. Opel is a 1988 compilation consisting of eight original songs, plus different takes of previously released songs, recorded by former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett between 1968 and 1970. ... Scream Thy Last Scream is an unreleased song by the English rock music band Pink Floyd. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In 1993 EMI issued another release, Crazy Diamond, a box set of all three albums, each loaded with further out-takes from his solo sessions that illustrated vividly Barrett's inability or refusal to play a song the same way twice. penise This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


EMI also released The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me? in the UK on April 16, 2001, and in the US on September 11, 2001. This was the first time his song "Bob Dylan Blues" was ever officially released, taken from a demo tape that David Gilmour had kept after an early 1970s recording session. Gilmour still has the tape, which also contains the unreleased "Living Alone" from the Barrett sessions.[27] is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


A number of bootleg LPs, CDs and other recordings of Barrett's live and solo material exist. This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ...


For years the "off air" recordings of the BBC sessions with Barrett's Pink Floyd circulated, until an engineer who had taken a tape of the early Pink Floyd gave it back to the BBC—who played it during a tribute to John Peel on their website. During this tribute, the first Peel programme (Top Gear) was aired in its entirety. This show featured 1967 live versions of "Flaming", "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun", and a brief 90-second snippet of the instrumental "Reaction in G". For other persons named John Peel, see John Peel (disambiguation). ...


Creative impact and technical innovation

Barrett's first acoustic guitar
Barrett's first acoustic guitar

Barrett wrote most of the Pink Floyd's early material. He was also an innovative guitarist, using extended techniques and exploring the musical and sonic possibilities of dissonance, distortion, feedback, the echo machine, tapes and other effects; his experimentation was partly inspired by free improvisation guitarist Keith Rowe. One of Barrett's trademarks was playing his guitar through an old echo box while sliding a Zippo lighter up and down the fret-board to create the mysterious, otherworldly sounds that became associated with the group. Barrett was known to have used Binson delay units to achieve his trademark echo sounds. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixels, file size: 453 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixels, file size: 453 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Extended technique is a term used to describe unconventional, unorthodox or improper techniques of playing musical instruments or singing. ... In music, a consonance (Latin consonare, sounding together) is a harmony, chord, or interval considered stable, as opposed to a dissonance, which is considered unstable. ... For other uses, see Distortion (disambiguation). ... Audio feedback (also known as the Larsen effect after the Danish scientist, Søren Larsen, who first discovered its principles) is a special kind of feedback which occurs when a sound loop exists between an audio input (for example, a microphone or guitar pickup) and an audio output (for example... An echo machine is the early name for a sound processing device used with electronic instruments to repeat the sound to produce a simulated echo. ... Keith Rowe (born March 16, 1940 in Plymouth, England) is an English free improvisation guitarist and painter. ... A Zippo Lighter is a refillable, metal lighter manufactured by the Zippo Manufacturing Company. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Barrett brought the guitar in a new direction. His free-form sequences of sonic carpets pioneered a new way to play the rock guitar.[28] He played several different guitars during his tenure with Pink Floyd, including an old Harmony hollowbody electric, a Harmony acoustic, a Fender acoustic, a Danelectro 59 DC, several different Fender Telecasters, and a white Fender Stratocaster used in late 1967. However, a silver Telecaster Esquire with mirrored discs glued to the body was the guitar he was most often associated with and the guitar Barrett himself "felt most close to."[13] The Harmony Company is an American musical instrument manufacturer that was in its heyday the largest stringed instrument manufacturer in the country. ... 59-DC guitars were manufactured by Danelectro (the DC stands for double cutaway). This guitar made a comeback in the late 1990s with the 59-DC reissue and later with the 59-DC PRO. The 59-DC has two pickups and has the Coke Bottle Style classic headstock, hollowed body... The Fender Telecaster, also known as a Tele, is typically a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. ... Stratocaster redirects here. ... The Fender Esquire is a solid body electric guitar manufactured by Fender, and was the first guitar sold by Fender in 1950. ...


Musical and pop culture influence

Many artists have acknowledged Barrett's influence on their work. Paul McCartney, Pete Townshend, Marc Bolan, and David Bowie were early fans; Jimmy Page, Brian Eno, and The Damned all expressed interest in working with him at some point during the 1970s. Bowie recorded a cover of "See Emily Play" on his 1973 album Pin Ups. Townshend called Barrett legendary. Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Marc Bolan (born Mark Feld; 30 September 1947 - 16 September 1977), was an English singer, songwriter and guitarist whose hit singles, fashion sensibilities and stage presence with T Rex in the early 1970s helped cultivate the glam rock era and made him one of the most recognisable stars in British... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an iconic English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... For the Scottish football (soccer) player, see Jimmy Page (footballer). ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... This article is about the music group. ... See Emily Play was the third single recorded by British psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, written by original frontman Syd Barrett. ... Pin Ups is a 1973 covers album by David Bowie. ...


Barrett's decline had a profound effect on Roger Waters's songwriting, and the theme of mental illness would permeate Pink Floyd's later albums, particularly 1973's Dark Side of the Moon and 1975's Wish You Were Here which was a deliberate and affectionate tribute to Barrett, the song "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" being specifically about him. This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1987, an album of Barrett cover songs called Beyond the Wildwood was released. The album collected songs from Barrett's Pink Floyd albums and his solo albums. Artists appearing were UK and USA indie bands including The Shamen, Opal, The Soup Dragons, and Plasticland. Beyond The Wildwood - A Tribute To Syd Barrett is a tribute album consisting of music written by Pink Floyds original guitarist, vocalist and primary songwriter Syd Barrett. ... In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by (real or perceived) independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... The Shamen were an experimental electronic music band, initially formed in Aberdeen, Scotland by Colin Angus (b. ... Opal were an American alternative/psychedelic band in the 1980s. ... The Soup Dragons were a Scottish indie rock band of the late 1980s and early 1990s, named after a character in the 1970s childrens TV show The Clangers. ... Plasticland is an American Neo-Psychedelic and Garage rock (revival) band, formed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1980 with two members of Arousing Polaris, Glenn Rehse and John Frankovic. ...


Other artists that have written tributes to Barrett include his contemporary Kevin Ayers, who wrote "Oh Wot a Dream" in his honour (Barrett provided guitar to an early version of Ayers' song "Religious Experience: Singing a Song in the Morning"). Barrett fan Robyn Hitchcock has covered many of his songs live and on record, and has paid homage to his forebear with the songs "The Man Who Invented Himself" and "(Feels Like) 1974". The Television Personalities' track "I Know Where Syd Barrett Lives" from their 1981 album And Don't the Kids Love It is another tribute. (The Television Personalities became the subject of controversy and derision when, as they had been selected as the opening act on David Gilmour's About Face tour in the early 1980s, lead singer Dan Treacy decided to read aloud Barrett's real home address to the audience of thousands. Gilmour removed them from the tour immediately afterwards.)[29] Kevin Ayers (born 16 August 1944 in Herne Bay, Kent) is an English songwriter and major influential force in the early English psychedelic movement. ... Robyn Rowan Hitchcock (born March 3, 1953) is a singer-songwriter, psych folk artist, and occasional actor. ... Television Personalities is an English post-punk group with a varying line up. ... Television Personalities is an English post-punk group with a varying line up. ...


Johnny Depp has shown interest in a biographical film based on Barrett's life.[30] John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Poster for Man on the Moon (1999), a biopic A biographical picture— often shortened to biopic— is a film that dramatizes the life of an actual person or people. ...


Barrett is also portrayed briefly in the opening scene of Tom Stoppard's play Rock 'n' Roll (2006), performing Golden Hair. His life and music, including the disastrous Cambridge Corn Exchange concert and his later reclusive lifestyle, are a recurring motif in the work. Barrett died during the play's run in London. Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Rock n Roll is a play by Tom Stoppard that premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 2006. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ...


Mental state

There has been much speculation concerning the psychological well-being of Syd Barrett. Many believe he suffered from schizophrenia.[31][11] [32] A diagnosis of bipolar disorder has also been considered.[33] For other uses, see Bipolar. ...


Barrett's use of psychedelic drugs, especially LSD, during the 1960s is well documented. Some believe that Barrett's drug use was responsible for, or at least contributed to, his mental illness. In an article published in 2006, Gilmour was quoted as saying: "In my opinion, his breakdown would have happened anyway. It was a deep-rooted thing. But I'll say the psychedelic experience might well have acted as a catalyst. Still, I just don't think he could deal with the vision of success and all the things that went with it."[34] For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Many stories of Barrett's erratic behaviour off stage as well as on are also well-documented. In Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey, author Nicholas Schaffner interviewed a number of people who knew Barrett before and during his Pink Floyd days. These included friends Peter and Susan Wynne-Wilson, artist Duggie Fields (with whom Barrett shared a flat during the late 1960s), June Bolan and Storm Thorgerson, among others. The iconic cover of Pink Floyds album The Dark Side of the Moon. ...


"For June Bolan, the alarm bells began to sound only when Syd kept his girlfriend under lock and key for three days, occasionally shoving a ration of biscuits under the door."[35] A claim of cruelty against Barrett committed by the groupies and hangers-on who frequented his apartment during this period was described by writer and critic Jonathan Meades. "I went [to Barrett's flat] to see Harry and there was this terrible noise. It sounded like heating pipes shaking. I said, 'What's up?' and he sort of giggled and said, 'That's Syd having a bad trip. We put him in the linen cupboard.'"[36] Storm Thorgerson responded to this claim by stating "I do not remember locking Syd up in a cupboard. It sounds to me like pure fantasy, like Jonathan Meades was on dope himself."[37] Jonathan Meades in Abroad Again in Britain Jonathan (Turner) Meades (born 21 January 1947, Salisbury, England) is a British writer on food, architecture, and culture, as well as an author and broadcaster. ...


However, in the book Crazy Diamond: Syd Barrett and the Dawn of Pink Floyd, authors Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson included quotes from a story told to them by Thorgerson that underscored how volatile Barrett could be. "On one occasion, I had to pull him off Lynsey (Barrett's girlfriend at the time) because he was beating her over the head with a mandolin."[38]


According to Gilmour in an interview with Nick Kent, the other members of Pink Floyd approached psychiatrist R.D. Laing with the 'Barrett problem'. After hearing a tape of a Barrett conversation, Laing declared him incurable.[39][40] Nick Kent (born December 24, 1951) is a British rock critic. ... R.D.Laing. ...


Gilmour also proposed, in an interview with the National Post's John Geiger, that the stroboscopic lights used in their shows combined with the drugs could have had a seriously detrimental effect on Barrett's mental health if he was a photo-epileptic who suffered partial seizures. When partial seizures occur in the temporal lobes patients are often misdiagnosed with schizophrenia or psychosis.[41] The National Post is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ... John E. Geiger (born 1875 - died ?) was an American rower who competed in the 1900 Summer Olympics. ... Photosensitive epilepsy is a form of epilepsy in which seizures are triggered by visual stimuli that form patterns in time or space, such as flashing lights, bold, regular patterns, or regular moving patterns. ... For other uses, see Psychosis (disambiguation). ...


After Barrett died, his sister, Rosemary Breen, spoke to biographer Tim Willis for The Sunday Times. She insisted that Barrett neither suffered from mental illness nor received treatment for it at any time since they resumed regular contact in the 1980s.[16] She allowed that he did spend some time in a private "home for lost souls" — Greenwoods in Essex — but claimed there was no formal therapy programme there. Some years later, Barrett apparently agreed to sessions with a psychiatrist at Fulbourn psychiatric hospital in Cambridge, but Breen claimed that neither medication nor therapy was considered appropriate in her brother's case.[16] The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... A lost soul attacking the player in Doom 2 The Lost Soul is one of the many creatures that can be found throughout the Doom series of computer games. ... For other uses, see Psychiatrist (disambiguation). ... A psychiatric hospital (also called, at various places and times, mental hospital or mental ward, historically often asylum, lunatic asylum, or madhouse), is a hospital specialising in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Therapy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


His sister denied he was a recluse or that he was vague about his past: "Roger may have been a bit selfish — or rather self-absorbed — but when people called him a recluse they were really only projecting their own disappointment. He knew what they wanted but he wasn’t willing to give it to them." Barrett, she said, took up photography, and sometimes they went to the seaside together. "Quite often he took the train on his own to London to look at the major art collections — and he loved flowers. He made regular trips to the Botanic Gardens and to the dahlias at Anglesey Abbey, near Lode. But of course, his passion was his painting", she said.[42][16] For the town, see Recluse, Wyoming. ... Species 30 species, 20,000 cultivars Dahlia is a genus of bushy, summer- and autumn-flowering, tuberous perennial plants native to Mexico, where they are the national flower. ... The house at Anglesey Abbey Anglesey Abbey is a country house, formerly a priory, in the village of Lode, 5 Â½ miles (8. ... Lode Mill Lode is a small village in East Cambridgeshire on the southern edge of The Fens. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ...


Discography

Singles with Pink Floyd

Arnold Layne was the first single released by British Psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, shortly after landing a recording contract with EMI. The song was written by Syd Barrett, Pink Floyds co-founder and original front man. ... Candy and a Currant Bun was the B-side to Pink Floyds first single, Arnold Layne. ... See Emily Play was the third single recorded by British psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, written by original frontman Syd Barrett. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn track listing Chapter 24 (Track 9) The Scarecrow (Track 10) Bike (Track 11) The Scarecrow is a song on Pink Floyds debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967), though it first appeared as the B-side of their second... Apples and Oranges is the fourth single by Pink Floyd and the final one written by Syd Barrett released in 1967. ... Paint Box was released by the psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd in 1967 as a B-side to the single Apples and Oranges, and was written by keyboardist Rick Wright. ...

Albums with Pink Floyd

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is the second album by rock band Pink Floyd, and arguably one of the first progressive rock albums. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... London 1966/1967 is an album by the Psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd. ...

Compilations with Pink Floyd (featuring his work)

Relics is a compilation album by Pink Floyd released in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... A Nice Pair is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... Masters of Rock is a little-known compilation album of early Pink Floyd music, concentrating on singles from 1967 to 1968. ... Works is a Pink Floyd compilation album released in 1983 by their former American label, Capitol Records, to compete with their then-current album The Final Cut. ... Shine On is a nine CD box set by Pink Floyd which was released in 1992 to coincide with Pink Floyds 25th Anniversary as a recording and touring band. ... Alternate uses: Echoes (disambiguation) Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Oh, By the Way is a compilation box set by Pink Floyd. ...

Solo albums

The Madcap Laughs was Syd Barretts first solo album after being replaced in Pink Floyd by his old school friend David Gilmour. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barrett was the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Appears On

  • Joy of a Toy by Kevin Ayers (November 1969) Plays guitar on "Religious Experience: Singing A Song In The Morning" - bonus track on remastered 2003 CD.

Joy of a Toy is the debut solo album of Kevin Ayers, a founding member of Soft Machine. ... Kevin Ayers (born 16 August 1944 in Herne Bay, Kent) is an English songwriter and major influential force in the early English psychedelic movement. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...

Solo compilations

Syd Barrett is a 1974 double-album pairing of Syd Barretts two solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, both originally released in 1970. ... The Madcap Laughs was Syd Barretts first solo album after being replaced in Pink Floyd by his old school friend David Gilmour. ... Barrett was the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett. ... Opel is a 1988 compilation consisting of eight original songs, plus different takes of previously released songs, recorded by former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett between 1968 and 1970. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... penise This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Solo radio session recordings

  • The Peel Session (1 July, 1991): Recorded for John Peel's BBC radio show "Top Gear" with David Gilmour and Jerry Shirley backing. Contains the otherwise unrecorded "Two of a Kind".
  • The Radio One Sessions (March, 2004): The album contains the five songs of from The Peel Session and bootleg-quality recordings of three songs broadcast on the Bob Harris radio show in 1971. [44]

Alternate cover Syd Barrett: The Peel Session reissue cover The Peel Session is a collection of recordings by Syd Barrett released in 1987. ... The Radio One Sessions is a live album by early Pink Floyd Guitarist Syd Barrett. ...

Solo singles

Octopus is a song by Syd Barrett, and appeared on his first solo album, The Madcap Laughs. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...

Other

  • A Treeful of Secrets

Filmography

Tonite Lets All Make Love in London is a 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the swinging London. It features live perfomance by Pink Floyd and footage of John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsburg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine, and many...

References

  1. ^ "Seeing Pink - a Floyd gazetteer of Cambridge", Cambridge Evening News, 17 October 2007. Retrieved on 2007-11-02. 
  2. ^ Mason, Nick. Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004) ISBN 978-0-29784-387-0.
  3. ^ Bloomberg.com Pink Floyd Founder `Syd' Barrett Dies of Diabetes (Update2) Accessed July 2006
  4. ^ The Australian[dead link] Obituary - Accessed July 2006
  5. ^ Exploring 20th century London. 20th Century London: Youth Culture & Fashion. Retrieved on 2007-05-11.
  6. ^ a b Palacios, Julian. Lost In The Woods: Syd Barrett and the Pink Floyd (Boxtree, 1997) ISBN 0-7522-2328-3
  7. ^ EMI Records Ltd., "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" insert
  8. ^ Economist.com. Syd Barrett, obituary. Retrieved on 2007-06-18.
  9. ^ Schaffner, Nicholas. Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey (Delta, 1991) ISBN 0-385-30684-9, p. xv
  10. ^ a b Willis, Tim. Madcap: The Half-Life of Syd Barrett, Pink Floyd's Lost Genius (Short Books, 2002) ISBN 1-904095-24-0
  11. ^ a b DiLorenzo, Kris. "Syd Barrett: Careening Through Life." Trouser Press February 1978 pp. 26-32 [1]
  12. ^ 1993 Guitar World interview with David Gilmour
  13. ^ a b Rock, Mick. "The Madcap Who Named Pink Floyd" Rolling Stone December 1971 [2]
  14. ^ Gilmore, Mikal. "The Madness and Majesty of Pink Floyd", Rolling Stone, 2007-04-05. 
  15. ^ "You shone like the sun", The Observer, 2002-10-06. Retrieved on 2007-02-17. 
  16. ^ a b c d e Willis, Tim. "My lovably ordinary brother Syd", The Sunday Times, 2007-07-16. Retrieved on 2007-05-12. 
  17. ^ "Seeing Pink - a Floyd gazetteer of Cambridge", Cambridge Evening News, 17 October 2007. Retrieved on 2007-11-02. 
  18. ^ Watkinson, Mike and Pete Anderson. Crazy Diamond: Syd Barrett and the Dawn of "Pink Floyd" (Omnibus Press, 1993) ISBN 0-7119-8835-8. as excerpted on Pinkfloydz.com
  19. ^ Klosterman, Chuck. "Off-Key", New York Times, 31 December 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-17. 
  20. ^ NME News. "Pink Floyd legend Syd Barrett dies". New Musical Express Online July 11, 2006 [3]
  21. ^ "Pink Floyd founder dies aged 60", Daily Mail, 2006-07-12. Retrieved on 2007-08-14. 
  22. ^ "Syd Barrett's home on the market", BBC News, 11 September 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-17. 
  23. ^ "Making tracks: Visiting England's semi-secret rock shrines", The Guardian, 4 August 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-06. 
  24. ^ "Syd's poem auctioned for £4,600", Cambridge Evening News, 29 June 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-14. 
  25. ^ "Barrett leaves £1.25m", Cambridge Evening News, 11 November 2006. Retrieved on 2008-04-25. 
  26. ^ "Floyd play at Barrett tribute gig", BBC NEWS, 11 May 2007. Retrieved on 2007-09-17. 
  27. ^ Parker, David. Random Precision: Recording the Music of Syd Barrett 1965-1974 (Cherry Red, 2003) ISBN 1901447251
  28. ^ Denyer, Ralph (1992). The Guitar Handbook. London: Dorling Kindersley Ltd. ISBN 0-679-74275-1, p 23
  29. ^ Schaffner, p. 123
  30. ^ Douglas, Edward (29 June 2005). In the Future: Chocolate Factory Cast & Crew. Coming Soon.net. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.
  31. ^ Greene, Andy. "Syd Barrett (1946-2006): Founding frontman and songwriter for Pink Floyd dead at 60." Rolling Stone Jul 11, 2006 [4]
  32. ^ Schizophrenia Daily News Blog. "Syd Barrett, Founder of Pink Floyd band, Sufferer of Schizophrenia, Passed Away this Week." July 12, 2006 [5]
  33. ^ BetweenPlanets.co.uk. Syd Barrett Obituary: "A Movement is Completed in Six Stages." July 12, 2006.
  34. ^ "Syd Barrett, the swinging 60", The Independent, 7 January 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-17. 
  35. ^ Schaffner, p. 77
  36. ^ Schaffner, p. 110
  37. ^ Schaffner, p. 110
  38. ^ Watkinson, p. 83
  39. ^ Kent, Nick. Syd Barrett feature. New Musical Express, April 13, 1974.
  40. ^ Schaffner, pp. 106-107
  41. ^ "Shine on", The National Post, 12 July 2006, p. A11. Retrieved on 2007-02-17. 
  42. ^ Willis, Tim. "You shone like the sun", The Observer, 2002-10-06. Retrieved on 2007-07-27. 
  43. ^ Chart Positions
  44. ^ Strange Fruit Records Radio One Sessions Info

is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Two issues of Guitar World featuring Jimmy Page, and Jimi Hendrix on the covers, and the accompanying CDs (May 2005, October 2005) Guitar World is a monthly music magazine devoted to guitarists. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Persondata
NAME Barrett, Roger Keith
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Barrett, Syd
SHORT DESCRIPTION English musician
DATE OF BIRTH January 6, 1946
PLACE OF BIRTH Cambridge, England
DATE OF DEATH July 7, 2006
PLACE OF DEATH Cambridge, England
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... KCNC-TV is the CBS owned-and-operated television station (O&O) in Denver, Colorado. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and the most popular station in the UK. As well as having most listeners nationally, it ranks first in all regions above local radio stations. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ... Rado Bob Klose (born 1944; sometimes referred to as Bob Close or Brian Close in various publications) is a English musician and photographer. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is the second album by rock band Pink Floyd, and arguably one of the first progressive rock albums. ... Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ... Atom Heart Mother is a 1970 (see 1970 in music) progressive rock album by Pink Floyd. ... Alternate cover U.S./Canadian releases cover Meddle is an album by English progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... The Final Cut is a rock album by Pink Floyd recorded at several studios in the UK from July to December 1982. ... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Tonite Lets All Make Love in London is a 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the swinging London. It features live perfomance by Pink Floyd and footage of John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsburg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine, and many... Music from the Film More (often referred to simply as More) is Pink Floyds first full-length soundtrack. ... Zabriskie Point is a soundtrack album to the Michelangelo Antonioni film of the same name. ... Obscured by Clouds is a rock album by Pink Floyd based on their soundtrack for the French film La Vallée. ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd live double album from the David Gilmour-led era of the band which was recorded over five nights at the Nassau Coliseum in Long Island, New York in August 1988 and mixed at Abbey Road Studios in September 1988. ... P•U•L•S•E (pronounced and sometimes written as Pulse) is a live double CD by Pink Floyd, released on May 29, 1995[1], and is considered widely by many fans to be the best live album released by Pink Floyd, despite the departure of former band leader Roger... For other works based on the Pink Floyd album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Relics is a compilation album by Pink Floyd released in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... A Nice Pair is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... Masters of Rock is a little-known compilation album of early Pink Floyd music, concentrating on singles from 1967 to 1968. ... A Collection of Great Dance Songs is a compilation album by Pink Floyd released against the will of Roger Waters on November 23, 1981 (see 1981 in music) on Harvest/EMI in the UK and Columbia Records in the US originally. ... Works is a Pink Floyd compilation album released in 1983 by their former American label, Capitol Records, to compete with their then-current album The Final Cut. ... Shine On is a nine CD box set by Pink Floyd which was released in 1992 to coincide with Pink Floyds 25th Anniversary as a recording and touring band. ... For Céline Dions album by the same name, see The Early Singles. ... Alternate uses: Echoes (disambiguation) Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... Oh, By the Way is a compilation box set by Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the A Momentary Lapse of Reason concert tour. ... La Carrera Panamericana is a 1992 video of the Carrera Panamericana automobile race in Mexico. ... P•U•L•S•E (pronounced and sometimes written as Pulse) is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the October 20, 1994 concert at Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, in The Division Bell tour, which is currently available on DVD. There was considerable delay in the release of the... The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story is a documentary released on 24 March 2003 by the BBC as part of the Omnibus series and originally called Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond. ... London 66-67 is a little-known and unauthorised EP of Pink Floyd music, containing two lost tracks, a longer version of Interstellar Overdrive and Nicks Boogie. These tracks were originally recorded for Peter Whiteheads film Tonite Lets All Make Love In London on January 11 and... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Steve ORourke, Pink Floyd manager and keen racing driver, sadly passed away in Miami, Florida, USA, in October 2003. ... The following is a list of people who have contributed to works by the English rock band Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd are pioneers in the live music experience, renowned for their lavish stage shows that combine over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. ... Pigs are heavily featured in the artwork and stage shows of the progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Dark Side of the Rainbow logo from The Synchronicity Arkive Dark Side of the Rainbow (also known as Dark Side of Oz or The Wizard of Floyd) is the name used to refer to the act of listening to the 1973 Pink Floyd album The Dark Side of the Moon... The official program advertising The Man portion of the shows. ... Give Birth to a Smile is a song written by Roger Waters, performed by Pink Floyd, from Waters and Ron Geesins album Music from The Body. All the Pink Floyd members play in the song although they are not mentioned in the album booklet. ... {{ Album infobox | | Name = Music from The Body | Type = LP/CD | Artist = Roger Waters | Cover = Roger_Waters_The_Body. ... The Division Bell album cover The Publius Enigma is a puzzle connected with Pink Floyds 1994 album The Division Bell. ... 19367 Pink Floyd is a minor planet that has been named in honor of the English musical group Pink Floyd. ... The Madcap Laughs was Syd Barretts first solo album after being replaced in Pink Floyd by his old school friend David Gilmour. ... Barrett was the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett. ... Alternate cover Syd Barrett: The Peel Session reissue cover The Peel Session is a collection of recordings by Syd Barrett released in 1987. ... The Radio One Sessions is a live album by early Pink Floyd Guitarist Syd Barrett. ... Syd Barrett is a 1974 double-album pairing of Syd Barretts two solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, both originally released in 1970. ... Opel is a 1988 compilation consisting of eight original songs, plus different takes of previously released songs, recorded by former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett between 1968 and 1970. ... penise This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Octopus is a song by Syd Barrett, and appeared on his first solo album, The Madcap Laughs. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Stars was a short-lived British band in 1972. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Syd Barrett - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4281 words)
Barrett was born in Cambridge, England, to a well-off middle-class family.
Barrett wrote most of the Floyd's early material, and was the principal visionary/author of their critically acclaimed 1967 debut album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.
Barrett supposedly spent some time outside the recording studio, waiting to be invited in (he also showed up to a few gigs and glared at Gilmour), it's possible that his contributions to the album were included as a concession to him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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