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Fantasy media For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art, literature, film, television, and music that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of either plot, theme, setting, or all three. ...

Genre studies Fantastic art is a loosely defined art genre. ... Many anime TV series, movies, and OAVs fall into the fantasy genre. ... Fantasy art is a genre of art that depicts magical or other supernatural themes, ideas, creatures or settings. ... The definition of a fantasy author is somewhat diffuse, and a matter of opinion - Jules Verne considered H. G. Wells to be a fantasy author - and there is considerable overlap with science fiction authors and horror fiction authors. ... Fantasy Comics A number of fantasy comics abound on the web. ... Fantasy fiction magazines Magazines which publish fantasy fiction primarily, as opposed to other sorts of fiction, or fantasy comics or other forms of visual art (though most have published poetry, illustration and other art, and some have published at least some kinds of cartoons. ... In theory fantasy films are films with fantastic themes, usually involving magic or exotic fantasy worlds, as distinct from science fiction films or horror films. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... A fantasy opera may be defined as an opera whose libretto falls under the rubric of fantasy. ...

Fantasy subculture The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The modern fantasy genre has spawned many new subgenres with no clear counterparts in the mythology or folklore upon which the tradition of fantasy storytelling is based, although inspiration from mythology and folklore remains a consistent theme. ... There are many elements that show up throughout the fantasy genre in different guises. ... This article is about the word, for other meanings see Quest (disambiguation) A quest is a journey towards a goal with great meaning and is used in mythology and literature as a plot device. ... This article is about artifacts in fantasy and roleplaying. ... Many fantasy stories and worlds call their main sapient humanoid species races rather than species. ... A fantasy world is a type of fictional universe in which magic or other similar powers work. ... For creatures that are wholly fictional creations, see Category:Fictional species. ...

Categories It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lovecraftian horror. ... Tolkien fandom is an international, informal community of fans of the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, especially of the Middle-earth legendarium which includes The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit and The Silmarillion. ... Tolkienology is a term used by Tolkien fans to describe the study of the works of J. R. R. Tolkien treating Middle-earth as a real world and using academic techniques to determine if chronicler Tolkien has left enough clues to come to some fitting conclusions. ...

  • Fantasy
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This article is about a fantasy sub-genre. For information on the game company, see Sword & Sorcery.

Sword and sorcery (S&S) is a fantasy sub-genre featuring swashbuckling heroes in violent conflict with a variety of villains, chiefly wizards, witches, evil spirits, and other supernatural creatures. The Sword & Sorcery imprint is used by White Wolf to publish its d20 material. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... A genre is a division of a particular form of art according to criteria particular to that form. ... It has been suggested that Mageborn be merged into this article or section. ... This article is part of the Witchcraft series. ... The supernatural (Latin: super- exceeding + nature) refers to forces and phenomena which are beyond ordinary scientific understanding. ...


The subgenre has old roots. Ultimately—like much fantasy—it draws from mythology and Classical epics such as Homer's Odyssey, but its immediate progenitors are the swashbuckling tales of Alexandre Dumas (The Three Musketeers (1844), etc.) and Rafael Sabatini (e.g., Scaramouche (1921), itself rooted in the Italian commedia dell'arte) - although these all lack the supernatural element - and early fantasy fiction such as E. R. Eddison's The Worm Ouroboros (1922) and Lord Dunsany's The Fortress Unvanquishable, Save for Sacnoth (1910). In addition, many early S&S writers, such as Robert E Howard and Clark Ashton Smith, were heavily influenced by the Middle Eastern tales of the Arabian Nights, whose stories of magical monsters and evil sorcerers was a major influence on the genre to be. But S&S proper really began in the pulp fantasy magazines, most notably Weird Tales. Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: Οδύσσεια, Odússeia) is the second of the two great Greek epic poems ascribed to Homer, the first of which is the Iliad. ... Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ... DArtagnan and the Musketeers The Three Musketeers (Les Trois Mousquetaires) is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Rafael Sabatini (April 29, 1875 - February 13, 1950) was an author of novels of romance and adventure. ... Scaramouche is a historical novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1921 and subsequently adapted into a play by Barbara Field and into feature films in 1923 starring Ramón Novarro and 1952 with Stewart Granger. ... Karel Dujardins set his closely-observed scene of a travelling troupes makeshift stage against idealized ruins in the Roman Campagna: dated 1657 (Louvre Museum) Commedia dellarte (Italian: comedy of professional artists also interpreted as comedy of humors), also known as Extemporal Comedy, was a form of improvisational theater... Eric Rucker Eddison (November 24, 1882 - August 18, 1945) was an English civil servant and author. ... The Worm Ouroboros (1922) is a heroic high fantasy novel by Eric Rucker Eddison. ... Lord Dunsany of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. ... Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar. ... Pulp magazines, often called simply the pulps, were inexpensive text fiction magazines widely published in the 1920s through the 1950s. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ...

Contents


Defining S&S

The term was coined in 1961 when the author Michael Moorcock published a letter in the fanzine Amra, asking for a name for the sort of fantasy-adventure story written by Robert E. Howard, and proposing "epic fantasy". Fritz Leiber replied in the journal Ancalagon (6 April 1961) suggesting "sword-and-sorcery as a good popular catchphrase for the field". He expanded on this in the July 1961 issue of Amra, commenting: Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939) is a prolific British writer of both science fiction and science fantasy. ... Robert E. Howard Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936) was a writer of fantasy and historical adventure pulp stories published mainly in Weird Tales magazine in the 1930s. ... Fritz Reuter Leiber Jr. ...

"I feel more certain than ever that this field should be called the sword-and-sorcery story. This accurately describes the points of culture-level and supernatural element and also immediately distinguishes it from the cloak-and-sword (historical adventure) story—and (quite incidentally) from the cloak-and-dagger (international espionage) story too!" (Fritz Leiber, Amra, July 1961)

Sword-and-sorcery has often been used as a catch-all phrase for a certain type of low grade fantasy that certainly influenced Dungeons & Dragons and other fantasy role-playing games. Until quite recently, sword-and-sorcery was an oft used derogatory term amongst writers and readers of the fantasy genre. Magazines such as Black Gate and Flashing Swords have recently attempted to revive the genre to the state that it enjoyed during the pulp era of the twenties and thirties. Fritz Reuter Leiber Jr. ... For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ... This article is about traditional role-playing games. ... Black Gate, vol 1, issue 2 Black Gate is a glossy, quarterly science fiction and fantasy magazine founded in 2000 and published by New Epoch Press. ...


Many attempts have been made to redefine precisely what defines S&S as a clear sub-genre. Although many debate the finer points, the general consensus is that S&S is characterized by a strong bias toward fast-paced, action-rich tales set within a quasi-mythical or fantastical framework. Unlike high or epic fantasy, the stakes tend to be personal, and the danger is not to the world as a whole. High fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy fiction that is set in invented or parallel worlds. ...


Seminal S&S

Seminal S&S books and series include:

Other pulp fantasy fiction - such as Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter of Mars and Leigh Brackett's Sea Kings of Mars - have a similar feel to S&S, but, because alien science replaces the supernatural, it is usually described as science fantasy or Sword and Planet. Robert E. Howard Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936) was a writer of fantasy and historical adventure pulp stories published mainly in Weird Tales magazine in the 1930s. ... Conan the Barbarian (also known as Conan the Cimmerian, from the name of his homeland, Cimmeria) is a literary character created by Robert E. Howard in a series of fantasy pulp stories published in Weird Tales in the 1930s. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ... Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893-August 14, 1961) was a poet, sculptor, painter and author of fantasy, horror and science fiction short stories. ... Zothique is an imagined future continent figuring in a series of tales by Clark Ashton Smith, and also the title of the cycle of tales which take place there. ... Catherine Lucile Moore (January 24, 1911 – April 4, 1987) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Catherine Lucile Moore (January 24, 1911 - April 4, 1987) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Henry Kuttner (April 7, 1915 - February 4, 1958) was a science fiction author born in Los Angeles, California. ... Fritz Reuter Leiber Jr. ... Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser are two seminal sword-and-sorcery heroes created by, and based on, Fritz Leiber (1910–1992) and Harry Otto Fischer (1910–1986). ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939) is a prolific British writer of both science fiction and science fantasy. ... Stormbringer (Lancer, 1967) Elric of Melniboné is a fictional character created by Michael Moorcock. ... Science Fantasy was a British science fiction and fantasy magazine of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Karl Edward Wagner (4 December 1945-13 October 1994) was an American writer of horror, science fiction, and heroic fantasy, who was born in Knoxville, Tennessee and originally trained as a psychiatrist. ... A literary character created by Karl Edward Wagner in a series of sword and sorcery novels and short stories between 1970 and 1985. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he produced works in many genres. ... A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, McClurg, 1917 In 1911, Edgar Rice Burroughs, now better known as the creator of the character Tarzan, began his writing career with A Princess of Mars, a rousing tale of pulp adventure on the planet Barsoom or Mars. ... Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915 - March 18, 1978), was a writer of fantasy and science fiction, mystery novels and - best known to the general public - Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... For the magazine of the same name see Science Fantasy (magazine) Science fantasy is the merging of science fiction and fantasy, two popular genres of writing. ... Sword and Planet is a subgenre of speculative fiction that features rousing adventure stories set on other planets, and usually featuring Earthmen as protagonists. ...


S&S Heroines

Red Sonja, a modern archetypal example of the female sword and sorcery hero.
Red Sonja, a modern archetypal example of the female sword and sorcery hero.

Despite the early work of C. L. Moore and others, S&S has had a strongly masculine bias. Female characters were generally distressed damsels to be rescued or protected. Marion Zimmer Bradley's Sword and Sorceress anthology series (1984 onwards) attempted to redress the balance. Bradley encouraged female writers and protagonists: the stories feature skillful swordswomen and powerful sorceresses. The series was immensely popular and Bradley was editing the final volume at the time of her death. Today, active female characters who participate equally with the male heroes in the stories are a regular feature in modern S&S stories, though they are also relied upon for sex appeal. Download high resolution version (400x613, 70 KB) This is a magazine cover. ... Download high resolution version (400x613, 70 KB) This is a magazine cover. ... Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 - September 25, 1999) was a prolific author of largely feminist fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and was a steadfast encourager of equality (and quality) in writing. ... The Sword and Sorceress series is a series of fantasy anthologies edited by Marion Zimmer Bradley. ... ...


Introduced as a minor character in a non-fantasy historical story by Robert E. Howard, "The Shadow of the Vulture," Red Sonya of Rogatine would later inspire a fantasy heroine named Red Sonja, who first appeared in the comic book series Conan the Barbarian written by Roy Thomas and illustrated by Barry Windsor-Smith. Red Sonja received her own comic book title and eventually a series of novels by David C. Smith and Richard Tierney, as well as an unsuccessful film, Red Sonja (1985), directed by Richard Fleischer. A popular misconception (which even extends to the credits of the movie) holds that Robert E. Howard invented the character of Red Sonja in a Conan story. Red Sonja #1 with art by John Cassaday and José Villarrubia Red Sonja, warrior woman out of majestic Hyrkania, is a fantasy sword and sorcery heroine created by Roy Thomas and Barry Smith and first appearing in Conan the Barbarian #23 (Marvel Comics). ... Red Sonja #1 with art by John Cassaday and José Villarrubia Red Sonja, warrior woman out of majestic Hyrkania, is a fantasy sword and sorcery heroine created by Roy Thomas and Barry Smith and first appearing in Conan the Barbarian #23 (Marvel Comics). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Conan the Barbarian (also known as Conan the Cimmerian, from the name of his homeland, Cimmeria) is a literary character created by Robert E. Howard in a series of fantasy pulp stories published in Weird Tales in the 1930s. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Unity #0 for Valiant Comics cover by Barry Windsor-Smith // Biography Barry Windsor-Smith (formerly known as Barry Smith), born 1949 in Forest Gate, London, is a British cartoonist, comics-author, and painter best known for his work in American comic books. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sword and sorcery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (836 words)
Sword and sorcery (SandS) is a fantasy sub-genre featuring swashbuckling heroes in violent conflict with a variety of villains, chiefly wizards, witches, evil spirits, and other supernatural creatures.
Magazines such as Black Gate and Flashing Swords have recently attempted to revive the genre to the state that it enjoyed during the pulp era of the twenties and thirties.
Sword and Sorcery, a website dedicated to the genre and its history.
Fanzing 10 - September 1998 - Classics Revisited (673 words)
Sword Of Sorcery #1 gives us an adaptation of Leiber's "The Price Of Pain Ease." This exciting story introduces us to our two main characters, Fafhrd The Barbarian & The Gray Mouser, and involves them in taking refuge from a brawl in a seemingly vacated luxurious palace.
Sword Of Sorcery #3 is titled "Betrayal." No credits are given, but we learn in a later issue it's O'Neil & Chaykin again.
Sword Of Sorcery #5 credits Denny O'Neil and Fritz Leiber for the first story "The Sunken Land." The truly inspired art is by Walt Simonson and Al Milgron.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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