FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Sword" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sword
Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century
Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century
Look up Sword in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

A sword is a long-edged piece of metal, once used as a cutting and/or thrusting weapon in many civilizations throughout the world. The word sword comes from the Old English sweord, which cognates to Old High German swert, Middle Dutch swaert, Old Norse sverð (cp. modern Scandinavian sværd/sverd/svärd: Danish sværd, Norwegian sverd, Swedish svärd) Old Frisian and Old Saxon swerd and Modern Brennan zwaard, from a Proto-Indo-European root *swer- "to wound, to hurt". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (354x1461, 17 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Sword Longsword ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (354x1461, 17 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Sword Longsword ... The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval and Renaissance periods, approximately 1250 to 1550. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Central New York City. ... Old English redirects here. ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... Linguistically speaking, Middle Dutch is no more than a collective name for closely related languages or dialects which were spoken and written between about 1150 and 1500 in the present-day Dutch-speaking region. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... The North Germanic languages (also Scandinavian languages or Nordic languages) is a branch of the Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia, parts of Finland and on the Faroe Islands and Iceland. ... Old Frisian was the West Germanic language spoken between the 8th and 16th centuries by the people who, from their ancient homes in North Germany and Denmark, had settled in the area between the Rhine and Elbe on the European North Sea coast in the 4th and 5th centuries. ... Old Saxon, also known as Old Low German, is a Germanic language. ... Dutch ( ) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 24 million people, mainly in the Netherlands, Belgium and Suriname, but also by smaller groups of speakers in parts of France, Germany and several former Dutch colonies. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ...


A sword fundamentally consists of a blade and a hilt, typically with one or two edges for striking and cutting, and a point for thrusting. The basic intent and physics of swordsmanship has remained fairly constant down the centuries, but the actual techniques varied among cultures and periods as a result of the differences in blade design and purpose. The names given to many swords in mythology, literature, and history reflect the high prestige of the weapon (see list of swords). A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... For other uses, including articles on self-injury, see Cutting (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Swordsmanship refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... This is a list of sword types found through history all around the world. ...

Contents

History

Bronze Age

Main article: Bronze Age sword
The famed 2500-year-old Sword of Goujian, a first-level protected artifact of the People's Republic of China

Humans have manufactured and used bladed weapons from the Bronze Age onwards. The sword developed from the dagger when the construction of longer blades became possible, from the early 2nd millennium BC. Swords longer than 90 cm were rare and not practical during the Bronze Age as this length exceeds the tensile strength of bronze. It was not until the development of stronger alloys such as steel that longswords became practical for combat. three Bronze Age swords (not to scale): from Hajdusamson, Hungary (ca. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 264 × 598 pixel Image in higher resolution (399 × 904 pixel, file size: 32 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) // Made by Tang, self-processed Original sword is in the Museum of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 264 × 598 pixel Image in higher resolution (399 × 904 pixel, file size: 32 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) // Made by Tang, self-processed Original sword is in the Museum of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou. ... The famed 2500-year-old Sword of Goujian, a first-level protected artifact of the Peoples Republic of China The Sword of Goujian (Traditional Chinese:越王勾踐劍 , Simplified Chinese: 越王勾践剑) is an archaeological artifact of the Spring and Autumn Period found in 1965 in Hubei, China. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Bold text This article is about the weapon. ... The 2nd millennium BC marks the transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age. ... Tensile strength isthe measures the force required to pull something such as rope, wire, or a structural beam to the point where it breaks. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... “Fights” redirects here. ...


The hilt at first simply allowed a firm grip, and prevented the hand from slipping onto the blade when executing a thrust. Bronze Age swords with typical leaf-shaped blades first appear near the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, and in Mesopotamia. Swords from the Nordic Bronze Age from ca. 1400 BC show characteristic spiral patterns. Sword production in China is attested from the Bronze Age Shang Dynasty three Bronze Age swords (not to scale): from Hajdusamson, Hungary (ca. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... Map of the Nordic Bronze Age culture, ca 1200 BC The Nordic Bronze Age (also Northern Bronze Age) is the name given by Oscar Montelius (1843-1921) to a period and a Bronze Age culture in Scandinavian pre-history, ca 1800 BC - 600 BC, with sites that reached as far... Remnants of advanced, stratified societies dating back to the Shang period have been found in the Yellow River Valley. ...


The Naue Type II Swords which spread from Southern Europe into the Mediterranean, have been linked by Robert Drews with the Late Bronze Age collapse. (See [1]) The Bronze Age collapse is the name of the Dark Age period of history of the Ancient Middle East extending between the collapse of the Mycenaean kingdoms, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia and Syria, and the Egyptian Empire in Syria and Palestine between 1206 and 1150 BC, down to the...


Iron Age

Iron swords became increasingly common from the 13th century BC.[citation needed] The Hittites, the Mycenaean Greeks,[citation needed] and the Proto-Celtic Hallstatt culture (8th century BC) figured among the early users of iron swords. Iron has the advantage of mass-production due to the wider availability of the raw material. Early iron swords were not comparable to later steel blades; being brittle, they were even inferior to well-manufactured bronze weapons, but the easier production, and the better availability of the raw material for the first time permitted the equipment of entire armies with metal weapons, though Bronze Age Egyptian armies were at times fully equipped with silver weapons. Swords made of iron (as opposed to bronze) appear from the Early Iron Age (ca. ... Vendel sword hilt from the Snartemo III grave in southern Norway. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... This bronze ritual wine vessel, dating from the Shang Dynasty in the 13th century BC, is housed at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution. ... Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire The Hittites were an ancient people from Kaneš who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URU) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite... The Mycenean Period covers the latter part of the Bronze Age on the Greek mainland. ... The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the putative ancestor of all the known Celtic languages. ... The Hallstatt culture was the predominant Central European culture during the local Bronze Age, and introduced the Iron Age. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ...


By the time of Classical Antiquity and the Parthian and Sassanid Empires in Iran, iron swords were common. The Greek xiphos and the Roman gladius are typical examples of the type, measuring some 60 to 70 cm. The late Roman Empire introduced the longer spatha (the term for its wielder, spatharius, became a court rank in Constantinople), and from this time, the term long sword is applied to swords comparatively long for their respective periods. Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the sword. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The spatha was a type of straight sword with a long point, measuring between 0. ... The Spatharius, wielder of a roman short sword (between 0. ... The term long sword is a historic in the sense that it refers to a different kind of sword depending on historical context. ...


Chinese steel swords make their appearance from the 3rd century BC Qin Dynasty. The Chinese Dao (刀 pinyin dāo) is single-edged, sometimes translated as sabre or broadsword, and the Jian (劍 pinyin jiàn) double edged. The 3rd century BC started the first day of 300 BC and ended the last day of 201 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ... Qin Dynasty in 210 BC Capital Xianyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy History  - Unification of China 221 BC  - Death of Qin Shi Huangdi 210 BC  - Surrender to Liu Bang 206 BC The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 206 BC) was preceded by the... Chinese Dao Knife or Sabre Dao (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tao1, knife) is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabres), often called a broadsword in English translation because some varieties have wide blades. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... The term broadsword is used to refer to different types of swords, across many cultures and time periods. ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ...


Middle Ages

The spatha type remained popular throughout the Migration period and well into the Middle Ages. Vendel Age spathas were decorated with Germanic artwork (not unlike the Germanic bracteates fashioned after Roman coins). The Viking Age saw again a more standardized production, but the basic design remained indebted to the spatha. Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Vendel Age (550-793) was the name of a Swedish part of the Germanic Iron Age (or, more generally, the Age of Migrations). ... A bracteate (from the Latin bractea, a thin piece of metal) is a flat, thin, single-sided gold coin produced in Northern Europe predominantly during the Migration Period of the Germanic Iron Age, but the name is also used for later produced coins of silver produced in Central Europe during... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ...


It is only from the 11th century that Norman swords begin to develop the quillons or crossguard. During the Crusades of the 12th to (13th) century, this cruciform type of arming sword remained essentially stable, with variations mainly concerning the shape of the pommel. These swords were designed as cutting weapons, although effective points were becoming common to counter improvements in armour. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Hilt of Szczerbiec silver damascened rapier guard, between 1580 and 1600. ... In a sword, the crossguard (or cross-guard) is a flat bar of metal at right angles to the blade, placed between the blade and the hilt. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... The term arming-sword refers not so much to a sword design as the situation under which the sword was used. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ...


As steel technology improved, single-edged weapons became popular throughout Asia. Derived from the Chinese Jian or dao, the Korean hwandudaedo are known from the early medieval Three Kingdoms. Production of the Japanese tachi, a precursor to the katana, is recorded from ca. 900 AD (see Japanese sword). For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... Chinese Dao Knife or Sabre Dao (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tao1, knife) is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabres), often called a broadsword in English translation because some varieties have wide blades. ... The hwandudaedo, also known as haedonggum, is an ancient Korean sword from the Three Kingdoms era (4th to mid-7th centuries) which is said to have legendary powers. ... The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until... Tachi forged by Bishu Osafune Sukesada, 12th year of the Eishô era, a day in February (1515, Muromachi). ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ... Gyeonhwon formally establishes the kingdom of Hubaekje in southwestern Korea. ... Katana of the 16th or 17th Century, with its saya. ...


Late Middle Ages and Renaissance

Main articles: Longsword and Zweihänder

From around 1300 to 1500, in concert with improved armour, innovative sword designs evolved more and more rapidly. The main transition was the lengthening of the grip, allowing two-handed use, and a longer blade. By 1400, this type of sword, at the time called langes Schwert (longsword) or spadone, was common, and a number of 15th and 16th century Fechtbücher offering instructions on their use survive. Another variant was the specialized armour-piercing swords of the estoc type. The longsword became popular due to its extreme reach and cutting and thrusting abilities. The estoc became popular because of its ability to thrust into the gaps between plates of armor. The grip was sometimes wrapped in wire or coarse animal hide to provide a better grip and to make it harder to knock a sword out of the user's hand. The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval and Renaissance periods, approximately 1250 to 1550. ... 16th century zweihanders, image (c) John Clements. ... For other uses, see Armour (disambiguation). ... Events Henry IV quells baron rebellion and executes The Earls of Kent, Huntingdon and Salisbury for their attempt to have Richard II of England restored as King Jean Froissart writes the Chronicles Medici family becomes powerful in Florence, Italy Births December 25 - John Sutton, 1st Baron Dudley, Lord Lieutenant of... The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval and Renaissance periods, approximately 1250 to 1550. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... fol. ... An estoc is a type of sword common in the 16th century. ... The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval and Renaissance periods, approximately 1250 to 1550. ... An estoc is a type of sword common in the 16th century. ...


In the 16th century, the large Doppelhänder (called the Zweihänder today; both German names refer to the use of both hands) concluded the trend of ever-increasing sword sizes (mostly due to the beginning of the decline of plate armor and the advent of firearms), and the early Modern Age saw the return to lighter, one-handed weapons. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... 16th century zweihanders, image (c) John Clements. ... The term Modern Times is used by historians to loosely describe the period of time immediately following what is known as the Early Modern Times. ...


The Japanese katana reached the height of its development at about this time. In the 15th and 16th centuries, samurai increasingly found a need for a sword to use in closer quarters, leading to the creation of the modern katana. For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ...


The sword in this time period was the most personal weapon, the most prestigious, and the most versatile for close combat, but it came to decline in military use as technology changed warfare. However, it maintained a key role in civilian self-defense.


Modern Age

Some think the rapier evolved from the Spanish espada ropera in the 16th century. The rapier differed from most earlier swords in that it was not a military weapon but a primarily civilian sword. Both the rapier and the Italian schiavona developed the crossguard into a basket-shaped guard for hand protection. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the shorter smallsword became an essential fashion accessory in European countries and the New World, and most wealthy men and military officers carried one. Both the smallsword and the rapier remained popular dueling swords well into the 18th century. For the UK Surface-to-air missile system, see Rapier missile. ... 19th century French Navy officer sabre A backsword is a sword having a blade with only one edge. ... For the UK Surface-to-air missile system, see Rapier missile. ... The espada ropera (sword of the robe) was a sword developed in the mid-15th century in Spain. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The schiavona was a renaissance sword that became popular in Italy in 16th and 17th century. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Smallsword is a sword intermediate in historical period between the rapier and the classical épée, ancestor to the modern sporting épée. ... The European dueling sword in the narrow sense is a basket and cage hilted weapon in use specifically in duels from the late 17th to the 19th century. ...


As the wearing of swords fell out of fashion, canes took their place in a gentleman's wardrobe. Some examples of canes—those known as sword canes or swordsticks—incorporate a concealed blade. The French martial art la canne developed to fight with canes and swordsticks and has now evolved into a sport. For the US TV series, see Cane (TV series). ... A swordstick or cane-sword is a cane incorporating a concealed blade. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Weapon stubs | Stick fighting | Fencing | Mêlée weapons ...


Towards the end of its useful life, the sword served more as a weapon of self-defense than for use on the battlefield, and the military importance of swords steadily decreased during the Modern Age. Even as a personal sidearm, the sword began to lose its preeminence in the early 19th century, paralleling the development of reliable handguns. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ...

The hilt of the 18th century smallsword used by Captain John Paul Schott in the American Revolutionary War.
The hilt of the 18th century smallsword used by Captain John Paul Schott in the American Revolutionary War.

Swords continued in use, but were increasingly limited to military commissioned officers' and non-commissioned officers' ceremonial uniforms, although most armies retained heavy cavalry until well after World War I. For example, the British Army formally adopted a completely new design of cavalry sword in 1908, almost the last change in British Army weapons before the outbreak of the war. The last units of British heavy cavalry switched to using armoured vehicles as late as 1938. Swords and other dedicated melee weapons were used occasionally by various countries during World War II, but typically as a secondary weapon as they were outclassed by contemporaneous firearms. Image File history File links Small Sword c 1750–1770 This small sword was carried by Capt. ... Image File history File links Small Sword c 1750–1770 This small sword was carried by Capt. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Smallsword is a sword intermediate in historical period between the rapier and the classical épée, ancestor to the modern sporting épée. ... This article is about military actions only. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ... For other uses, see Uniform (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The 1908 Pattern Cavalry Troopers Sword (and the 1912 Pattern, the equivalent for officers) was the last service sword issued to the cavalry of the British Army. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) is a military vehicle, equipped with protection against hostile attacks and often mounted weapons. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A firearm is a kinetic energy weapon that fires either a single or multiple projectiles propelled at high velocity by the gases produced by action of the rapid confined burning of a propellant. ...


Terminology

Hilt of a sword
Hilt of a sword
Full Sword in scabbard
Full Sword in scabbard

The sword consists of the blade and the hilt. The term scabbard applies to the cover for the sword blade when not in use. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... A scabbard is a sheath for holding a sword or other large blade. ...


Image:Sword_parts.svg Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Blade

Three of poo types of attacks can be performed with the blade: striking, cutting, and thrusting. The blade can be double-edged or single-edged, the latter often having a secondary "false edge" near the tip. When handling the sword, the long or true edge is the one used for straight cuts or strikes, while the short or false edge is the one used for backhand strikes. Some hilt designs define which edge is the 'long' one, while more symmetrical designs allow the long and short edges to be inverted by turning the sword of one's hand on the hilt. For other uses, including articles on self-injury, see Cutting (disambiguation). ...


The blade may have grooves known as fullers for lightening the blade while allowing it to retain its strength and stiffness, similar to the effect produced by a steel I-beam used in construction. The blade may taper more or less sharply towards a point, used for thrusting. The part of the blade between the Center of Percussion (CoP) and the point is called the foible (weak) of the blade, and that between the Center of Balance (CoB) and the hilt is the forte (strong). The section in between the CoP and the CoB is the middle. The ricasso or shoulder identifies a short section of blade immediately forward of the guard that is left completely unsharpened, and can be gripped with a finger to increase tip control. Many swords have no ricasso. On some large weapons, such as the German Zweihänder, a metal cover surrounded the ricasso, and a swordsman might grip it in one hand to wield the weapon more easily in close-quarter combat. The ricasso normally bears the maker's mark. On Japanese blades this mark appears on the tang (part of the blade that extends into the hilt) under the grip. Prussian bayonet, with a prominent fuller A Fuller is a rounded or beveled groove on the flat side of a blade, such as a sword, knife, or bayonet (shown). ... A statically determinate beam, bending under an evenly distributed load. ... The center of percussion is the point on a bat, racquet, sword or other long thin object where a perpendicular impact will produce translational and rotational forces which perfectly cancel each other out at some given pivot point. ... This replica gladius has no ricaso. ... 16th century zweihanders, image (c) John Clements. ... The tang of a sword or fixed-blade knife is that part of the blade extending into and usually through the grip that is fastened to it. ...

  • In the case of a rat-tail tang, the maker welds a thin rod to the end of the blade at the crossguard; this rod goes through the grip (in 20th century and later construction). This occurs most commonly in decorative replicas, or cheap sword-like objects. Traditional sword-making does not use this construction method, which does not serve for traditional sword usage as the sword can easily break at the welding point.
  • In traditional construction, the swordsmith forged the tang as a part of the sword rather than welding it on. Traditional tangs go through the grip: this gives much more durability than a rat-tail tang. Swordsmiths peened such tangs over the end of the pommel, or occasionally welded the hilt furniture to the tang and threaded the end for screwing on a pommel. This style is often referred to as a "narrow" or "hidden" tang. Modern, less traditional, replicas often feature a threaded pommel or a pommel nut which holds the hilt together and allows dismantling.
  • In a "full" tang (most commonly used in knives and machetes), the tang has about the same width as the blade, and is generally the same shape as the grip. In European or Asian swords sold today, many advertised "full" tangs may actually involve a forged rat-tail tang.

From the 18th century onwards, swords intended for slashing, i.e., with blades ground to a sharpened edge, have been curved with the radius of curvature equal to the distance from the swordman's body at which it was to be used. This allowed the blade to have a sawing effect rather than simply delivering a heavy cut. European swords, intended for use at arm's length, had a radius of curvature of around a meter. Middle Eastern swords, intended for use with the arm bent, had a smaller radius. Sword-like object (SLO) is a term originally coined by the Historical Armed Combat Association, and used by sword enthusiasts to describe cheap, non-functional, or inaccurate sword replicas, typically built as purely decorative pieces and impossible to wield the way a true sword is wielded. ... A swordsmith is a smith or blacksmith whose expertise is working on swords. ... For other uses, see peen. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Look up ARM in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about an authentication, authorization, and accounting protocol. ... In mathematics, curvature refers to any of a number of loosely related concepts in different areas of geometry. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


Hilt

The hilt is the collective term of the parts allowing the handling and control of the blade, consisting of the grip, the pommel, and a simple or elaborate guard, which in post-Viking Age swords could consist of only a crossguard (called cruciform hilt). The pommel, in addition to improving the sword's balance and grip, can also be used as a blunt instrument at close range. It may also have a tassel or sword knot. See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... In a sword, the crossguard (or cross-guard) is a flat bar of metal at right angles to the blade, placed between the blade and the hilt. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ...


The tang consists of the extension of the blade structure through the hilt. The tang of a sword or fixed-blade knife is that part of the blade extending into and usually through the grip that is fastened to it. ...


Scabbard

The scabbard is a protective cover often provided for the sword blade. Over the millennia, scabbards have been made of many materials, including leather, wood, and metals such as brass or steel. The metal fitting where the blade enters the leather or metal scabbard is called the throat, which is often part of a larger scabbard mount, or locket, that bears a carrying ring or stud to facilitate wearing the sword. The blade's point in leather scabbards is usually protected by a metal tip, or chape, which on both leather and metal scabbards is often given further protection from wear by an extension called a drag, or shoe. A scabbard is a sheath for holding a sword or other large blade. ...


Typology

Swords can fall into categories of varying scope. The main distinguishing characteristics include blade shape (cross-section, taper, and length), shape and size of hilt and pommel, age, and place of origin. This is a list of sword types found through history all around the world. ...


For any other type than listed below, and even for uses other than as a weapon, see the article Sword-like object. Sword-like object (SLO) is a term originally coined by the Historical Armed Combat Association, and used by sword enthusiasts to describe cheap, non-functional, or inaccurate sword replicas, typically built as purely decorative pieces and impossible to wield the way a true sword is wielded. ...


Single-edged and double-edged swords

As noted above, the terms longsword, broad sword, great sword, and Gaelic claymore are used relative to the era under consideration, and each term designates a particular type of sword. The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval and Renaissance periods, approximately 1250 to 1550. ... The term broadsword is used to refer to different types of swords, depending on when the term is used, and on what period is being talked about. ... The term great sword refers to any of a number of large two-handed swords used in medieval Europe. ... For other uses, see Claymore (disambiguation). ...


One strict definition of a sword restricts it to a straight, double-edged bladed weapon designed for both slashing and thrusting. However, general usage of the term remains inconsistent and it has important cultural overtones, so that commentators almost universally recognize the single-edged swords such as Asian weapons (dāo 刀, katana 刀) as "swords", simply because they have a prestige akin to their European counterparts. Chinese Dao Knife or Sabre Dao (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tao1, knife) is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabres), often called a broadsword in English translation because some varieties have wide blades. ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ...


Europeans also frequently refer to their own single-edged weapons as swords — generically backswords, including sabres. Other terms include falchion, scimitar, cutlass, dussack, Messer or mortuary sword. Many of these refer to essentially identical weapons, and the different names may relate to their use in different countries at different times. A machete as a tool resembles such a single-edged sword and serves to cut through thick vegetation, and indeed many of the terms listed above describe weapons that originated as farmers' tools used on the battlefield. 19th century French Navy officer sabre A backsword is a sword having a blade with only one edge. ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ... French naval cutlass of the 19th Century A cutlass is a short, thick saber or slashing sword, with a straight or slightly curved blade sharpened on the cutting edge, and a hilt often featuring a solid cupped or basket-shaped guard. ... A dussack (also dusack, dysack, tesak, tuseckn, thuseckn, disackn, or dusägge) is a type of antiquated German practice weapon that originated around the 16th century. ... fighting with a messer and a hungarian shield (Gladiatoria fechtbuch fol. ... A mortuary sword is a kind of backsword which was used after 1625 by the dragoons during the English civil wars. ... modern factory-made Machete For other uses, see Machete (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tool (disambiguation). ...


Single-handed

  • Bronze Age swords, length ca. 60 cm, leaf shaped blade.
  • Iron Age swords like the xiphos, gladius and jian 劍, similar in shape to their Bronze Age predecessors.
  • Spatha, measuring ca. 80–90 cm.
  • The classical arming sword of Medieval Europe, measuring up to ca. 110 cm.
  • The late medieval Swiss baselard and the Renaissance Italian cinquedea and German Katzbalger essentially re-introduce the functionality of the spatha, coinciding with the strong cultural movement to emulate the Classical world.
  • The cut & thrust swords of the Renaissance, similar to the older arming sword but balanced for increased thrusting.
  • Light dueling swords, like the rapier and the smallsword, in use from Early Modern times.
  • The Japanese short sword, or wakizashi
  • The ida of the Yoruba tribe of West Africa. It can also be regarded as a two-handed sword.
  • The Indian tulwar
  • The Arabian scimitar, the similar Persian shamshir.
  • The East Indian kris, with a wavy double-edged blade.
  • The Fillipino itak, (image) used by pre-Spanish Filipinos or Austronesians as a primary weapon in protecting its boundaries.

three Bronze Age swords (not to scale): from Hajdusamson, Hungary (ca. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the sword. ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... The spatha was a type of straight sword with a long point, measuring between 0. ... The term arming-sword refers not so much to a sword design as the situation under which the sword was used. ... late baselard or Swiss sword (ca. ... The Cinquedea is a civilian short sword (or long dagger). ... A replica of a katzbalger A Katzbalger is a short renaissance arming sword, notable for its sturdy build and a distinctive s-shaped or figure-8 shaped guard. ... A side-sword was a type of war sword used by infantry during the Renaissance of Europe. ... For the UK Surface-to-air missile system, see Rapier missile. ... The Smallsword is a sword intermediate in historical period between the rapier and the classical épée, ancestor to the modern sporting épée. ... The early modern period is a term used by historians to refer to the period in Western Europe and its first colonies, between the Middle Ages and modern society. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ida is a kind of sword used by the Yoruba people of West Africa. ... The Yoruba (Yorùbá in Yoruba orthography) are a large ethno-linguistic group or ethnic nation in Africa; the majority of them speak the Yoruba language (èdèe Yorùbá; èdè = language). ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... A talwar or tulwar is a type of saber from Mughal India dating back to at least the 17th century. ... Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... bolo or itàk A bolo is a kind of machete, used particularly in the jungles of Indonesia, the Philippines, and in the sugar fields of Cuba. ...

Two-handed

Katana of the 16th or 17th century, with its saya.
Katana of the 16th or 17th century, with its saya.
  • The Japanese samurai sword, or katana, tachi and nodachi
  • The Indian Khanda
  • The longsword (and bastard sword/hand-and-a-half sword) of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.
  • The 16th century Doppelhänder or Zweihänder (German for "double-hander" or "two-hander").
  • The Chinese anti-cavalry sword, zhanmadao of the Song Dynasty.
  • The Scottish Highland claymore, (or claidheamh mór-gàidhlig, great sword); in use until the 18th century.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1388x1768, 78 KB) fr: Katana, Musée Zwinger à Dresde. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1388x1768, 78 KB) fr: Katana, Musée Zwinger à Dresde. ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ... Tachi forged by Bishu Osafune Sukesada, 12th year of the Eishô era, a day in February (1515, Muromachi). ... A nodachi ) is a large two-handed Japanese sword. ... The Khanda Sikh Khanda on Stamp designed by Stacey Zabolotney Issued By Canada Post in November 2000 . ... The Longsword is a type of European sword used during the late medieval and Renaissance periods, approximately 1250 to 1550. ... 16th century zweihanders, image (c) John Clements. ... The zhanmadao (斬馬刀) (zhǎn mǎ dāo) (lit. ... For other uses, see Claymore (disambiguation). ... A claymore that is a replica of one used in the film Highlander. ...

Punishment devices

  • Real swords can be used to administer various physical punishments: to perform either capital punishment by decapitation (the use of the sword, an honorable weapon on military men, was regarded as privilege) or non-surgical amputation. In Scandinavia, where beheading has been the traditional means of capital punishment, noblemen were beheaded with sword and commoners with an axe.
  • Similarly paddle-like sword-like devices for physical punishment are used in Asia, in western terms for paddling or caning, depending whether the implement is flat or round.
  • The shinai, a practice sword, is also used in Japan as a spanking implement, more common in prized private extracurricular schools (illustrated in these 1975 and 1977 articles [2] & [3]) than the US school paddling; in fact hundreds of cases of illegal corporal punishment were reported from public schools as well.

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Corporal punishment. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Partial hand amputation Amputation is the removal of a body extremity by trauma or surgery. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Corporal punishment. ... For activities involving paddles, see canoeing. ... This article is about the physical punishment. ... A Shinai made from bamboo A shinai (Japanese: ) is a practice weapon used primarily in kendo and is used as if it were a sword. ... This article is about the use of spanking as discipline. ...

Symbolism

The sword can symbolize violence, combat or military intervention. Jesus' statement "For all who draw the sword will die by the sword"(NIV) uses the term in this sense. In Islam, the Arabic expression Jihad bis saif 'struggle by the sword' means 'holy' war for Islam. Another example of this metaphorical significance comes in the adage The pen is mightier than the sword, attributed to Edward Bulwer-Lytton. In the moral anecdote about the tyrant Damocles, the sword suspended above a leader is a metaphor for the ever present danger that accompanies power. For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... “Fights” redirects here. ... Jihad, sometimes spelled Jahad, Jehad Jihaad or Djehad, (Arabic: ‎ ) is an Islamic term, from the Arabic root (to exert utmost effort, to strive, struggle), which connotes a wide range of meanings: anything from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith to a political or military struggle to further the... An illustration of Cardinal Richelieu holding a sword, by H. A. Ogden, 1892, from The Works of Edward Bulwer Lytton The pen is mightier than the sword is an adage coined by Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839 for his play Richelieu; Or the Conspiracy. ... Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (May 25, 1803 - January 18, 1873) was an English novelist, playwright, and politician. ... In Richard Westalls Sword of Damocles, 1812, the pretty boys of Ciceros anecdote have been changed to maidens for a neoclassical patron, Thomas Hope. ...


In the following cases, the sword stands for arms in general, and has often been retained as a symbol even after it had in operational practice been replaced with firearms.

  • Swords form a suit in Latin suited playing cards which include the Italian suited Tarot decks (replaced by spades in the French deck of modern playing cards and in modern French suited Tarot or Tarock decks.) In divinitory Tarot, the sword is often interpreted as representing air, as well as intelligence. It can also represent fire and will, and the military/noble classes of society. In the Tarot deck the uninverted swords represent ill fortune with the Ten of Swords being the worst.
  • The sword often functions as a symbol of masculinity and particularly -since its form lends itself to this, especially in erect position- as a phallic symbol of virility. The Latin word for sword, "gladius", also means "penis".
  • The straight-bladed sword can be considered a representation of the Cross to Christian swordsmen, especially nobles and those who participated in the crusades.
  • Swords are also used as emblem or insignia (in or on formal dress such as uniforms, badges, various objects, even coats of arms), especially:
    • as symbol of power, such as a Sword of State, Sword of Mercy, Curtana and Sword of Justice (all can be used as regalia, in England five in total during the coronation);
    • as symbol of armed force, or of a corps entitled to use force as the strong arm of the law, as in military and police insignia, or of a unit (e.g. regiment) of such a corps - as these are numerous, inevitably many variations and combinations (two crossed swords, or with a laurel wreath, crown, national or founder/patron's emblem etcetera) are used.
    • as a part of military officer's uniform. In the U.S., they are worn by Army, Navy, and Coast Guard officers. Marine officers and NCOs also wear a sword. Chaplains of all services are excepted. The ceremonial use of swords stems from the time when only gentlemen wore swords, thus making it a symbol of rank or position, which most military officers held).
    • on the flag of Saudi Arabia.
  • Its symbolic meaning is also reflected in the existence of prestigious titles, linking people of valor to it, such as:
    • Sword of Allah, in Arabic Saifullah
    • Sword of Religion
    • Sword of the Faith
    • Sword of the State
    • Sword of War
  • It can be awarded as an honorary attribute, like a decoration, known as sword of honour
    • Being dubbed a knight is traditionally performed by being touched (originally, struck hard) on the shoulder with the flat of the sword of one's lord or another knight.
  • Crossed swords have their own particular symbolism, and are in the Miscellaneous Symbols area of Unicode at U+2694 (⚔):
  • It is also not unusual for swords to represent reason - as in "cutting through" a series of elements in a problem in order to leave only those with proven relevance, most famously of Alexander the Great cutting the Gordian Knot.
  • Symbol for bravery for fighting a just cause; the sword of Lady Justice symbolizes the strict application of justice in a neutral manner involving legal decisions.
  • The term double-edged sword can be used as an expression for anything that can simultaneously help and hinder, as when in swordfighting a person can increase his leverage by putting his hand on the blade, which might win the contest but also result in a wound.
  • The Japanese Daisho-- a pair of swords, Katana and Wakizashi or Tanto -- symbolised the Samurai's strength and honour.
  • In Finland a sword is given to doctors in the conformant ceremony. The sword symbolizes knowledge.

Some typical modern playing cards. ... Look up tarot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Spades is a trick-taking game somewhat akin to Hearts but more closely related to bridge. ... The four Anglo-American playing card suits: spades, hearts, clubs and diamonds. ... For the Russian group of artists, see Jack of Diamonds (artists). ... Tarocchi, also known as tarock, is a trick-taking game, and one of the oldest card games known. ... This article is about the general history, iconography, and uses of tarot cards. ... Manliness redirects here. ... The phallus usually refers to the male penis, or sex organ. ... Virility is part of the traditional idealized male gender role. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A sword of state is a sword, used as part of the regalia, symbolizing the power of a monarch (or his constitutional government) to use the might of the state against its enemies, and his duty to preserve thus right and peace. ... Coronation Chair and Regalia of England The collective term Crown Jewels denotes the regalia and vestments worn by the sovereign of the United Kingdom during the coronation ceremony and at various other state functions. ... Curtana, also Cortana or Courtain, is a latinized form of the Anglo-French curtein, from Latin curtus, shortened, used for a type of sword. ... REGALIA is a Latin plurale tantum for the privilegies and insignia, characterisic of a King or other sovereign. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... State and military flag and ensign (obverse). ... Sword of Allah, or in Arabic Saifullah, is an Islamic honorary title for Muslims of military valor, especially in (re-)establishing Islam against a giaur opponent, such as: 7th century general Khalid ibn al-Walid Osama bin Laden, founding leader of al-Qaeda, awarded in 2007 by Pakistani Islamic scholars... Daula means state. ... For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... The Miscellaneous Symbol plane of Unicode (2600–26FF) contains various glyphs representing things from a variety of categories: Astrological, Astronomical, Chess, Dice, Ideological symbols, Musical notation, Political symbols, Recycling, Religious symbols, Trigrams, Warning Signs and Weather. ... The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... For other uses, see Battle (disambiguation). ... Genealogy (from Greek: γενεα, genea, family; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Temporary grave of an American machine-gunner during the Battle of Normandy. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Alexander cuts the Gordian Knot, by Jean-Simon Berthélemy (1743–1811) The Gordian Knot is a legend associated with Alexander the Great. ... Lady Justice Lady Justice (Iustitia, the Roman Goddess of Justice and sometimes, simply Justice) is an allegorical personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system. ... An Edo-era daisho on its stand. ...

Famous swords

In this painting, Ravana is seen cutting the wings of Jatayu with his sword Chandrahas.
In this painting, Ravana is seen cutting the wings of Jatayu with his sword Chandrahas.
In Japanese mythology, Inari and her Kitsune (fox spirits) help the blacksmith Munechika forge the blade ko-kitsune-maru (Little Fox) in the late 10th century. This legend is the subject of the noh drama Sanjo Kokaji.
In Japanese mythology, Inari and her Kitsune (fox spirits) help the blacksmith Munechika forge the blade ko-kitsune-maru (Little Fox) in the late 10th century. This legend is the subject of the noh drama Sanjo Kokaji.

Apart from the aforementioned types of symbolic swords, the following individually named swords are noteworthy: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (489x694, 76 KB) Ravana kills Jathayu; the captive Sita despairs. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (489x694, 76 KB) Ravana kills Jathayu; the captive Sita despairs. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, Telugu: రావణాసురుడు IAST ; sometimes transliterated as Raavana or Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of Rama in the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... Ravana cuts Jatayus wings, by Ravi Varma In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Jatayu (Sanskrit: जटायू, jatāyū) is the son of Aruna and nephew of Garuda. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1573x2227, 692 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Katana ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1573x2227, 692 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Katana ... Japanese mythology is a very complex system of beliefs that embraces Shinto and Buddhist traditions as well as agriculture-based folk religion. ... Prince Hanzoku terrorized by a nine-tailed fox. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Swords in history

See also: Types of swords#History and mythology

This is a list of sword types found through history all around the world. ... The famed 2500-year-old Sword of Goujian, a first-level protected artifact of the Peoples Republic of China The Sword of Goujian (Traditional Chinese:越王勾踐劍 , Simplified Chinese: 越王勾践剑) is an archaeological artifact of the Spring and Autumn Period found in 1965 in Hubei, China. ... The Spring and Autumn Period (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) was a period in Chinese history, which roughly corresponds to the first half of the Eastern Zhou dynasty (from the second half of the 8th century BC to the first half of the 5th century). ... Zulfiqar, a fictional representation of the sword of Ali. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Ali ibn Abi Talib (علي بن أبي طالب) (c. ... This article is about Husayn ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib (626 – 680). ... Combatants Banu Hashim Commanders Umar ibn Saad Husayn ibn Ali Strength over 40 000 72 Casualties 5000+ 123 (72 Adult Men (Tabari)and 51 Children including a sixmonth old infant) The Battle of Karbala took place on Muharram 10, 61 AH (October 9 or 10, 680 CE)[1][2... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Masamune. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Jewelled Sword of Offering is a part of the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... The Seven-Branched Sword (in Japanese: nanatsusaya no tachi or shichishitō; in Korean: Chiljido) is one of the national treasures of Japan. ... Chinese character for Wō or Wa, formed by the person radical 亻and a wÄ›i or wa 委 phonetic element Japanese Wa Japan, Japanese, from Chinese Wō 倭), is the oldest recorded name of Japan. ... Baekje (October 18 BCE–August 660 BCE), originally Sipje, was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... Allegiance: Magadhan Empire Rank: Emperor Succeeded by: Dasaratha Maurya Reign: 273 BC-232 BC Place of birth: Pataliputra, India Battles/Wars Kalinga War Emperor Ashoka the Great (Devanagari: अशोक(:); IAST transliteration: , pronunciation: ) (304 BC–232 BC) (Imperial Title:Devanampiya Piyadassi ie He who is the beloved of the Gods who, in... Sword of Boabdil Boabdil (a corruption of the name Abu Abdullah, or, in full, Abu abd Allah Muhammad XII, Arabic: ‎) (1460?–1527) was the last Moorish king of Granada (of the Nasrid dynasty). ... Tizona is the sword carried by El Cid which was used to fight the Moors in Spain. ... Statue of El Cid in Burgos. ... A Mameluke Sword is a cross hilted, curved scimitar-like sword. ... Presley Neville O’Bannon (1784 – 12 September 1850) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps, famous for his exploits in the First Barbary War. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Combatants United States Barbary States (Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Murad Reis Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers Christian Mercenaries Arab Mercenaries 4000 Casualties 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded Christian/Arab Mercenaries killed and wounded uncertain Unknown The...

Swords of myth and legend

See also: Types of swords#History and mythology

This is a list of sword types found through history all around the world. ... For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation) and Sir Lancelot (disambiguation). ... Attila redirects here. ... Caladbolg (hard belly, or possibly hard lightning), sometimes written Caladcholg (hard blade), is the sword of Fergus mac Róich from the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. ... In Irish mythology, Fergus (or Fearghus) mac Róich (or mac Róeg) is the former king of Ulster during the events of the Ulster Cycle. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, Telugu: రావణాసురుడు IAST ; sometimes transliterated as Raavana or Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of Rama in the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... In Irish mythology, Claíomh Solais (also known as The Sword of Light) was a sword that came from Gorias and belonged to Nuada Airgeadlámh (Nuada of the Silver hand), who was leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann and King of Ireland. ... Crocea Mors which is latin for Yellow Death was the name given to Julius Caesers sword. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Curtana, also Cortana or Courtain, is a latinized form of the Anglo-French curtein, from Latin curtus, shortened, used for a type of sword. ... H.P. Pedersen-Dans statue of Holger Danske at Kronborg castle, Denmark Ogier the Dane (Holger Danske) is a fictional Danish hero who first appears in the Old French chanson de geste. ... Alleged fragment of Durendal in Rocamadour As told in the Matter of France, Durendal or Durandal (Italian: Durlindana) is the sword of Charlemagnes paladin Roland (Orlando in Italian). ... This article is about the legendary figure. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... For other uses, see Excalibur (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... The Will of Heaven or Heavens Will(Vietnamese: Thuận Thiên) is the mythical sword of Vietnamese King Lê Lợi, sometimes attributed with magical powers, supposedly made Lê Lợi grow very tall when he used it and gave him the strength of many men, or associated... Look up king in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lê Lợi (1384? - 1433). ... In Irish mythology, Fragarach, known as The Answerer or The Retaliator was the sword of Manannan mac Lir and Lugh Lamfada. ... In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ... For other subjects with similar names, see Lug. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... Sigurd sculpture in Bremen Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr, German: Siegfried) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. ... The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... thaulatckew(or Halteclere) is the sword of Olivier, a character in the French epic, The Song of Roland. Categories: | | | | ... In the French epic The Song of Roland, Olivier was the title characters closest friend, advisor, and confidant. ... Eight phases of The Song of Roland in one picture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... The St-Denis Joyeuse Joyeuse was the name of Charlemagnes personal sword. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... For other uses, see Kusanagi (disambiguation). ... Susanoo, (Japanese: 須佐之男命, Susa-no-O-no-Mikoto; also romanized as Susanoo, Susa-no-O, and Susanowo) in Shinto is the god of the sea and storms. ... Shamshir-e Zomorrodnegar (Persian: شمشیر زمردنگار) The emerald-studded Sword is a sword in the Persian mythical story Amir Arsalan. ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses see Tyrfing (disambiguation) Tyrfing or Tirfing was a magic sword which figures in a poem from the Elder Edda called The Waking of Angantýr, and in Hervarar saga. ...

Swords of modern fiction

See also: Category:Fictional swords
See also: List of fictional swords
  • The Lightsaber is a sword concept featured in the Star Wars universe. Its popularity has inspired similar laser based swords to have been used in other works of science fiction media.
  • Various swords from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth, including Narsil (later Andúril), Sting, Guthwine (sword of Éomer), Herugrim (sword of King Théoden) and Glamdring, sword of Gandalf. Many, if not all, European fantasy swords found in literature today were inspired by these swords as Tolkien's works were unique for their time. However, similar mystical swords could be found far back into older mythology and religions.
  • The Zanbatō is an incredibly large type of Japanese sword with a mysterious historical background that has inspired various fictional swords found in a wide variety of today's media including anime television, books and video games. Most unrealistically large swords such as the Buster Sword or the Tessaiga found in Japanese media today are inspired by the zanbatō.
  • The Vorpal blade is a sword from the poem Jabberwocky. It has since been adopted into modern media as a type of magic sword. Similar magical swords have become common in fantasy literature, games, and art, but this particular sword has had its name continuously mentioned and spread among many works.

// Arthurs sword Caledfwlch (Excalibur). ... This article is about the weapon in Star Wars. ... This article is about the series. ... For other uses, see Laser (disambiguation). ... Tolkien redirects here. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... The shards of Narsil in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring. ... Image:Anduril large. ... An artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, Sting was an Elvish knife or dagger made in Gondolin in the First Age. ... The following list of weapons of Middle-earth includes all weaponry directly taken from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... An artists impression of Glamdring, the sword of Gandalf Glamdring is a sword in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... An illustration of a buster sword. ... Tessaiga (鉄砕牙) is a fictional sword in the anime and manga series InuYasha, wielded by half-human, half-yōkai (hanyō) InuYasha. ... For other uses of the name Jabberwocky, see Jabberwocky (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jabberwocky (disambiguation). ...

Misconceptions

Many medieval (and other) swords are depicted as large and heavy, on occasion reported to weigh as much as 20 kg or 44 pounds. However, according historical and archaeological finds, most swords weighed significantly less; swords weighing even as much as 2.5 kg (6 pounds) were unusually heavy and almost unused in battle. [4] Heavier swords may have served as Swords of State or Ornamental purposes, but it is unlikely they found use on the battle field.


Light swords such as a well-made cutlass weighed around one pound (450 g). Most real medieval European swords weighed between 2 and 4 pounds regardless of whether they were made to be used with one or two hands. Swords are constructed to be this lightweight not only because it is necessary for their use, but also because a sword has to be made deliberately fat and useless in order to weigh much more. The pommel acts far more as a counterweight rather than "plug" preventing the grip to slip, and even a badly balanced sword can be rendered much more usable by adjusting a new pommel. See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


See also

This is a list of sword types found through history all around the world. ... Swordsmanship refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword. ... The first page of the Codex Wallerstein shows the typical arms of 15th century fencing Historical European Martial Arts are martial arts of European origin which were formerly practiced, but have since died out or evolved into very different forms. ... page of Mscr. ... The sette spade Diagram from the Pisani facsimile of the Flos Duellatorum (fol. ... Kung fu redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... Kenjutsu ) is the Japanese martial art specializing in the use of the Japanese sword (katana). ... ... Drawing of a 15th century macahuitl The maquahuitl, an Aztec obsidian-edged sword-club, was a devastating cutting weapon capable of easily cleaving to bone (according to a Spanish account, it was capable of easily decapitating a horse), but lacked a point (and thus couldnt be used for thrusting... For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... Ewart Oakeshotts typology of the medieval sword is based on blade morphology. ... In terms of weapons and martial arts, a waster is typically a wooden replica of a particular weapon with which the user practices. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with swordsmith. ... Companies manufacturing sword replicas Albion Swords (USA) Angus Trim (USA) Arma Bohemia (Czech Republic) Armour Class (Scotland) Arms & Armor (USA) Cold Steel (USA) Darkwood Armory (USA) Del Tin (Italy) Hanwei/CAS Iberia (Taiwan) Lutel (Czech Republic) Pavel Moc (Czech Republic) TEMPL (Czech Republic) Vince Evans (USA) Windlass Steelcrafts (India) American... In Richard Westalls Sword of Damocles, 1812, the pretty boys of Ciceros anecdote have been changed to maidens for a neoclassical patron, Thomas Hope. ...

External links

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Further reading

  • Kao Ch'ü-hsün (1959/60). "THE CHING LU SHRINES OF HAN SWORD WORSHIP IN HSIUNG NU RELIGION." Central Asiatic Journal 5, 1959-60, pp. 221-232.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sword Forum International | swordforum.com (255 words)
An exploration of the most common types of swords carried by the British infantry officers between the American Revolution and the introduction of the 1822 pattern.
Sword Design, Provision and Use in the British Cavalry of the Napoleonic Era.
The Schiavona came from the 16th century sword of the Venetian Doge guard which largely consisted of Dalmatian Slavs (Schiavoni).
Sword - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2884 words)
The shinai, a practice sword, is also used in Japan as a spanking implement, more common in prized private extracurricular schools (illustrated in these 1975 and 1977 articles [2] and [3]) than the US school paddling; in fact hundreds of cases of illegal corporal punishment were reported from public schools as well.
The sword often functions as a symbol of masculinity and particularly -since its form lends itself to this, especially in erect position- as a phallic symbol of virility.
Durandal Sword of Roland, one of Charlemagne's knights.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m