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Encyclopedia > Swiss franc
Swiss franc
Franc suisse (French)
Schweizer Franken (German)
Franco svizzero (Italian)
Franc svizzer (Romansh)
10 francs 1 franc
10 francs 1 franc
ISO 4217 Code CHF
User(s) Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Campione d'Italia
Inflation 1.2% (Switzerland only)
Source The World Factbook, 2005 est.
Subunit
1/100 Rappen (German)
centime (French)
centesimo (Italian)
rap (Romansh)
Symbol CHF, Fr., SFr. (old)
Plural Franken (German)
francs (French)
franchi (Italian)
francs (Romansh)
Rappen (German)
centime (French)
centesimo (Italian)
rap (Romansh)
Rappen (German)
centimes (French)
centesimi (Italian)
raps (Romansh)
Coins
Freq. used 5, 10, 20 centimes, 1/2, 1, 2, 5 francs
Rarely used 1 centime
Banknotes 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 1000 francs
Central bank Swiss National Bank
Website www.snb.ch
Printer Orell Füssli Arts Graphiques SA (Zürich)
Mint Swissmint
Website www.swissmint.ch
CHF vs Euro (top) and Dollar (bottom) from June 2003 to 2006. CHF/EUR relativaly stable compared to CHF/USD
CHF vs Euro (top) and Dollar (bottom) from June 2003 to 2006. CHF/EUR relativaly stable compared to CHF/USD

The franc (ISO 4217: CHF or 756) is the currency and legal tender of Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Franc banknotes are issued by the central bank of Switzerland, the Swiss National Bank, while coins are issued by the federal mint, Swissmint. Image File history File links CHF10_8_front. ... 1 franco svizzero 1983 front File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Map showing the location of the Campione enclave near the center. ... In Switzerland, one-hundredth of one Swiss franc is called Rappen in German. ... Centime is French for cent, and is used in English as the name of the fraction currency in several Francophone countries (including Switzerland and formerly France), where it is one hundredth of a franc. ... The centesimo (plural centesimi) was an Italian coin. ... Look up Plural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Plural is a grammatical number, typically referring to more than one of the referent in the real world. ... In Switzerland, one-hundredth of one Swiss franc is called Rappen in German. ... Centime is French for cent, and is used in English as the name of the fraction currency in several Francophone countries (including Switzerland and formerly France), where it is one hundredth of a franc. ... The centesimo (plural centesimi) was an Italian coin. ... In Switzerland, one-hundredth of one Swiss franc is called Rappen in German. ... Centime is French for cent, and is used in English as the name of the fraction currency in several Francophone countries (including Switzerland and formerly France), where it is one hundredth of a franc. ... The Swiss National Bank is a central bank and responsible for the monetary policy of Switzerland. ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... Swissmint is the official mint of the Swiss Confederation. ... Image File history File links SwissFrancVsEuroDollar. ... Image File history File links SwissFrancVsEuroDollar. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt denominated in the same currency by virtue of law. ... A £20 Ulster Bank banknote. ... The Swiss National Bank is a central bank and responsible for the monetary policy of Switzerland. ... This article is about monetary coins. ... Swissmint is the official mint of the Swiss Confederation. ...


The Swiss franc is the only version of the franc still issued in Europe. Its name in the four official languages of Switzerland is Franken (German), franc (French and Rhaeto-Romanic), and franco (Italian). The smaller denomination, which is worth a hundredth of a franc, is called Rappen (Rp.) in German, centime (c.) in French, centesimo (ct.) in Italian and rap (rp.) in Rhaeto-Romanic. Users of the currency commonly write CHF (the ISO code), though SFr. is still common. SwF has been used in some publications[1] [2] but is not an official abbreviation. Romansh (also spelled Rumantsch, Romansch or Romanche) is one of the four national languages of Switzerland, along with German, Italian and French. ... In Switzerland, one-hundredth of one Swiss franc is called Rappen in German. ...


The current franc was introduced in 1850 at par with the French franc. It replaced the different currencies of the Swiss cantons, some of which had been using a franc (divided into 10 batzen and 100 rappen) which was worth 1½ French francs. French Franc. ... The twenty-six cantons of Switzerland are the states of the federal state of Switzerland. ...


In 1865, France, Belgium, Italy, and Switzerland formed the Latin Monetary Union where they agreed to change their national currencies to a standard of 4.5 grams of silver or 0.290322 grams of gold. Even after the monetary union faded away in the 1920s and officially ended in 1927, the Swiss franc remained on that standard until 1967. The Latin Monetary Union (1865-1927) was a 19th century attempt to unify several European currencies into a single currency that could be used in all the member states, at a time when most national currencies were still made out of gold and silver. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ...


As of January 27, 2006, the Swiss franc was worth US$ 0.778695 or 0.643950. Since mid-2003, its exchange rate with the Euro has been stable at a value of about 1.55 CHF per Euro, so that the Swiss Franc has risen and fallen in tandem with the Euro against the U.S. dollar and other currencies. January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... ISO 4217 Code EUR User(s) European Union; eurozone: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain; outside eurozone: Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican City, Montenegro, Kosovo, French Guiana, Réunion, Saint-Pierre et Miquelon, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte. ...


The Swiss franc has historically been considered a safe haven currency with virtually zero inflation and a legal requirement that a minimum 40% is backed by gold reserves.[3] However this link to gold, which dates from the 1920s, was terminated on 1 May 2000 following an amendment to the Swiss Constitution.[4] The Swiss franc has suffered devaluation only once, on 27 September 1936 during the Great Depression, when the currency was devalued by 30% following the devaluations of the British pound, U.S. dollar and French franc. [5] A safe haven is any security or other investment that loses none or little of its value in case of a market crash. ... Gold reserves (or gold holdings) are held by central banks as a store of value. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The Swiss Constitution (Bundesverfassung in German, Constitution fédérale in French, Constituzione federale in Italian and Constituziun federala in Romansh) is at the highest level of Switzerlands judicial system. ... Devaluation is a reduction in the value of a currency. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late 1930) and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... French Franc. ...

Contents

History

Before 1850, about 75 entities were making coins in Switzerland, including the 25 cantons and half-cantons, 16 cities, abbeys, resulting in about 860 different coins in circulation, with different values and denominations. Moreover, less than 15% of the money in circulation in Switzerland in 1850 was local, with the rest being foreign money, mainly brought back by mercenaries. In addition, some private banks also started issuing the first banknotes, so that in total, at least 8000 different coins and notes were in circulation at that time, making the monetary system extremely complicated.[6][7] The twenty-six cantons of Switzerland are the states of the federal state of Switzerland. ...


In order to solve this problem, the new Swiss Federal Constitution of 1848 specified that the Federal Government would be the only entity allowed to make money in Switzerland. This was followed two years later by the first Federal Coinage Act, passed by the Federal Assembly on 7 May 1850, which introduced the franc as the monetary unit of Switzerland. The Swiss Constitution (Bundesverfassung in German, Constitution fédérale in French, Constituzione federale in Italian and Constituziun federala in Romansh) is at the highest level of Switzerlands judicial system. ... The Federal Assembly may be: Federal Assembly of Austria Federal Assembly of Germany Federal Assembly of Russia Federal Assembly of Switzerland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The current franc was introduced in 1850 at par with the French franc. It replaced the different currencies of the Swiss cantons, some of which had been using a franc (divided into 10 batzen and 100 rappen) which was worth 1½ French francs. French Franc. ... The twenty-six cantons of Switzerland are the states of the federal state of Switzerland. ...


In 1865, France, Belgium, Italy, and Switzerland formed the Latin Monetary Union where they agreed to change their national currencies to a standard of 4.5 grams of silver or 0.290322 grams of gold. Even after the monetary union faded away in the 1920s and officially ended in 1927, the Swiss franc remained on that standard until 1967. The Latin Monetary Union (1865-1927) was a 19th century attempt to unify several European currencies into a single currency that could be used in all the member states, at a time when most national currencies were still made out of gold and silver. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ...


Coins and banknotes

Swiss francs have been issued as coins since 1850, and as banknotes since 1907. Combinations of up to 100 usual Swiss coins (not including special or commemorative coins) are legal tender; banknotes are legal tender for any amount.[8]


As of December 2005, the total value of released Swiss coins and banknotes was 43,834.99 million Swiss francs.[9]

Value of Swiss coins and banknotes in circulation as of December 2005 (in millions of CHF)[9]
Coins 10 Francs 20 Francs 50 Francs 100 Francs 200 Francs 500 Francs 1000 Francs Total
2468.45 611.29 1293.11 1798.46 7977.21 6280.35 167.39 23,238.84 43,834.99

Coins

1 Swiss franc 1983 obverse
1 Swiss franc 1983 obverse
1 Swiss franc 1983 reverse
1 Swiss franc 1983 reverse

The first Swiss coins were released in 1850. Before this date, the different Swiss cantons had their own money, which different names and values. The technical details of Swiss coins, in particular the composition, have varied greatly over the years; however, the actual design of the coins has changed very little over their lifetime; for most of them, their design has not changed (except for minor details) since at least 1880. Among the notable changes, the design of the 1/2 and 5.- was modified and the colour of 5 centimes coins changed in 1980 following the use of a different alloy. Also, coins depicting a ring of stars (such as the 1.- franc coin seen beside this paragraph) were modified from 22 stars to 23 stars in 1979; since the stars represent the Swiss cantons, it was updated to represent 1979's expansion of the Swiss federation, when Jura seceded from Bern and became the 23rd canton. 1 franco svizzero 1983 front File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1 franco svizzero 1983 front File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1 franco svizzero 1983 back File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1 franco svizzero 1983 back File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Canton of Jura is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland in the northwestern part of Switzerland. ... The Swiss canton of (help· info) is bilingual (German: Kanton Bern; French Canton de Berne) and has a population of about 947,000. ...


Coins of 1/2 francs and above were made of silver until the mid-1960s; at that time, the price of silver raised significantly, so that the face value of the 1/2, 1 and 2 francs was below the value of the metal they were made of. Some people started to sell their silver coins abroad for melting, which prompted the federal government to make this practice illegal, and to require a new alloy to be used for these coins.[10] General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Atomic mass 107. ... Face Value is the title of Phil Collins debut solo album, released in February of 1981. ... The Swiss Federal Council (in German, Schweizerische Bundesrat; in French, Conseil fédéral suisse; in Italian, Consiglio federale svizzero; in Romansh, Cussegl federal svizzer) is the seven-member executive council which constitutes the government of Switzerland, as well as assuming functions corresponding to those of the head of state...


A 2 centimes coin also used to exist, but it was last manufactured in 1974 and is not legal tender anymore. The 1 centime coin is still produced, but it does not play any role in the monetary system anymore. People and groups who can justify the use of 1 centime coins for monetary purposes can obtain them at face value; any other user (such as collectors) must pay an additional 4 centimes per coin to cover the production costs.


In 2005, the federal government announced its intent to remove from circulation the 1 and 5 centime coins, as their production costs exceed their face value. However, in the consultation procedure, this drew opposition from retailers and consumer groups, who were worried that the subsequent rounding would lead to price increases. In February 2006, it was announced that only the 1 centime coin would be removed from circulation, while the 5 centimes coin would still be produced.[11] The Swiss Federal Council (in German, Schweizerische Bundesrat; in French, Conseil fédéral suisse; in Italian, Consiglio federale svizzero; in Romansh, Cussegl federal svizzer) is the seven-member executive council which constitutes the government of Switzerland, as well as assuming functions corresponding to those of the head of state... Face Value is the title of Phil Collins debut solo album, released in February of 1981. ...


All Swiss coins are language-neutral (at least with respect to Switzerland's four national languages), featuring only numerals, the abbreviation "Fr." for franc, and the Latin phrases "Helvetia" or "Confoederatio Helvetica" (depending on the denomination).

Overview of current Swiss coins[12]
Value Diameter
(mm)
Thickness
(mm)
Weight
(g)
Composition Remarks
1 centime 16 1.10 1.5 Bronze Remains legal tender, but not used in practice.
5 centimes 17.15 1.25 1.8 Aluminium bronze Made in Cupronickel or pure Nickel until 1980
10 centimes 19.15 1.45 3 Cupronickel
20 centimes 21.05 1.65 4 Cupronickel
1/2 franc
(50 centimes)
18.20 1.25 2.2 Cupronickel In silver until 1967
1 franc 23.20 1.55 4.4 Cupronickel In silver until 1967
2 francs 27.40 2.15 8.8 Cupronickel In silver until 1967
5 francs 31.45 2.35 13.2 Cupronickel In silver until 1967 and in 1969.

In addition to these general circulation coins, numerous series of commemorative coins have been issued, as well as gold coins including the well-known Vreneli. These coins generally remain legal tender, but are not used as such because their material or collector's value usually exceeds their face value. Assorted ancient bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... Aluminium bronze is a type of bronze in which aluminium is the main alloying metal added to copper. ... Cupronickel is an alloy of copper, nickel and strengthening impurities, such as iron and manganese. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nickel, Ni, 28 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 4, d Appearance lustrous, metallic Atomic mass 58. ... Cupronickel is an alloy of copper, nickel and strengthening impurities, such as iron and manganese. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Atomic mass 107. ... Gold coins are one of the oldest forms of coinage. ... Vreneli is the informal name for a range of legal tender gold coins produced in Switzerland. ...




Banknotes

Since 1907, when the first series of Swiss banknotes was printed, eight series have been printed, six of which have been released for use by the general public. The current (8th) series of banknotes was designed by Jörg Zintzmeyer around the theme of the arts and released starting in 1995. In addition to a new design, this series was different from the previous one on several counts. Probably the most important difference from a practical point of view was that the seldom-used 500 franc note was replaced by a new 200 francs note; this new note has indeed proved more successful than the old 500 francs note.[13] The base colors of the new notes were kept similar to the old ones, except the 20 francs note which was changed from blue to red to prevent a frequent confusion with the 100 francs note, and the 10 francs note which was changed from red to yellow. The size of the notes was changed as well, with all notes from the 8th series having the same height (74 mm); while the widths were changed as well, still increasing with the value of the note. The new series contains many more security features than the previous one[14]; many (but not all) of them are now visibly displayed and have been widely advertised, in contrast with the previous series where most of the features were kept secret. The first banknotes in Switzerland were issued in 1907. ...


All banknotes are quadrilingual, displaying all information in the four national languages, with German and Romansh on one side, French and Italian on the other. Furthermore, all banknotes depicting a Germanophone display German and Romansch on the same side as their picture, whereas banknotes depicting a Francophone or an Italophone display French and Italian on the same side as their picture.



Overview of banknotes in the current (8th) series of Swiss banknotes[15]
Image Value Dimensions Main Colour Obverse Date of issue Remarks
Obverse Reverse
10 francs 74 x 126 mm Yellow Le Corbusier 8 April 1997
20 francs 74 x 137 mm Red Arthur Honegger 1 October 1996
50 francs 74 x 148 mm Green Sophie Taeuber-Arp 3 October 1995
100 francs 74 x 159 mm Blue Alberto Giacometti 1 October 1998
200 francs 74 x 170 mm Brown Charles Ferdinand Ramuz 1 October 1997 Replaces the 500 franc
banknote in the previous series
1000 francs 74 x 181 mm Purple Jacob Burckhardt 1 April 1998
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.

The previous series (6th, 1976) designed by Ernst and Ursula Hiestand depicted personalities of the world of science. It has been recalled and replaced and will lose any value on 1 May 2020. As of 2006, a large number of notes from this series has not yet been exchanged, even though it has not been legal tender for more than 5 years; for example, the value of 500 francs banknotes still in circulation represents 167.4 millions Swiss Francs.[9] When the 5th series lost its validity, at the end of April 2000, the banknotes that had not been exchanged represented a total value of 244,3 millions Swiss francs; in accordance with Swiss law, this amount was transferred to the Swiss Fund for Emergency Losses in the case of non-insurable natural disasters.[16] Image File history File links CHF10_8_front_horizontal. ... Image File history File links CHF10_8_back_horizontal. ... Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, widely known as Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887–August 27, 1965), was a Swiss architect famous for his contributions to what is now called modernism, or the International Style. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links CHF20_8_front_horizontal. ... Image File history File links CHF20_8_back_horizontal. ... Arthur Honegger in 1921. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Image File history File links CHF50_8_front_horizontal. ... Image File history File links CHF50_8_back_horizontal. ... Taeuber-Arp on the 50 Swiss Francs note Sophie Taeuber-Arp (19 January 1889 - 13 January 1943) was a Swiss artist, painter, and sculptor. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links CHF100_8_front_horizontal. ... Image File history File links CHF100_8_back_horizontal. ... Alberto Giacometti (October 10, 1901 – January 11, 1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draftsman and printmaker. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Image File history File links CHF200_8_front_horizontal. ... Image File history File links CHF200_8_back_horizontal. ... Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz (September 24, 1878 – May 24, 1947) was a French-speaking Swiss writer. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links CHF1000_8_front_horizontal. ... Image File history File links CHF1000_8_back_horizontal. ... Jacob Burckhardt on One thousand Swiss francs banknote Jacob Burckhardt (May 25, 1818–August 8, 1897) was a Swiss historian of art and culture. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Science in the broadest sense refers to any system of knowledge attained by verifiable means. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2020 (MMXX) will be a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The seventh series was printed, but is kept as a "reserve series", ready to be used if, for example, wide counterfeiting of the current series suddenly happened. For security reasons, the Swiss National Bank has not published any description or picture of this series, apart from very small extracts. [17] A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ...


In February 2005, a competition was launched for the design of the 9th series planned to be released around 2010 on the theme Switzerland open to the world. The results were announced in November 2005, but the selected design drew widespread criticisms from the population.[18]



Overview of all series of Swiss banknotes[19]
Series Introduction Date recalled Valueless since Designer Remark Link to pictures and details
1st 1907 1 July 1925 1 July 1945 Josef Storck and Albert Walch Changeover notes, similar to notes used by earlier banks [1]
2nd 1911 1 October 1958 1 October 1978 Eugène Burnand, Ferdinand Hodler, S. Balzer [2]
3rd 1918 1 July 1925 1 July 1945 Orell Füssli War notes; only partially issued [3]
4th 1938 Victor Surbeck and Hans Erni Reserve series, never issued [4]
5th 1956 1 May 1980 1 May 2000 Pierre Gauchat and Hermann Eidenbenz [5]
6th 1976 1 May 2000 1 May 2020 Ernst and Ursula Hiestand [6]
7th Elisabeth and Roger Pfund Current reserve series; not issued [7]
8th 1995 Jörg Zintzmeyer Current series [8]
Current CHF exchange rates

As of 2 November 2006, the rate was
1 EUR = 1.58913 CHF
1 USD = 1.24503 CHF
1 GBP = 2.37587 CHF
1 CHF = 94.0064 JPY
edit this exchange rate July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Eugène Burnand was a French artist. ... Ferdinand Hodler (March 14, 1853 in Berne – May 19, 1918 in Geneva) was one of the best-known Swiss painters of the 19th century. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Hans Erni (born February 21, 1909 in Lucerne) is an important Swiss painter and sculptor. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2020 (MMXX) will be a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ISO 4217 Code EUR User(s) European Union; eurozone: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain; outside eurozone: Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican City, Montenegro, Kosovo, French Guiana, Réunion, Saint-Pierre et Miquelon, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code JPY User(s) Japan Inflation rate -0. ...

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Trivia

  • Swiss dinar is a common name for the old Iraqi currency, but not related to Swiss currency.
  • CHF stands for Confoederatio Helvetica franc. Latin was used as the neutral representation of the country, considering the fact that Switzerland speaks four national languages.

After the first Gulf War the Iraqi government issued a new currency. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...

See also

It has been suggested that Soft currency be merged into this article or section. ... Swiss banks are world-renowned for their stability, privacy and protection of clients. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://fx.sauder.ubc.ca/currency_table.html
  2. ^ http://www.lonelyplanet.com/worldguide/destinations/europe/switzerland?a=facts
  3. ^ Declaration of the Swiss Government, through the Federal Finance and Customs Department, and the National Bank of Switzerland regarding the purchase and sale of gold, in Monetary History of Gold: volume 3 — After the Gold Standard
  4. ^ Federal Law on Currency and Legal Tender to enter into force on 1 May 2000, Press Release, 12 April 2000. Last accessed 2 March 2006.
  5. ^ Table of currency devaluations in the United States and Europe following the devaluation the pound in 1931, in Monetary History of Gold: volume 3 — After the Gold Standard
  6. ^ Otto Paul Wenger, p. 49–50.
  7. ^ 150 Years of Swiss coinage
  8. ^ Art. 3 of the Swiss law on Monetary Unit and means of payment. German, French and Italian versions.
  9. ^ a b c Swiss National Bank, Monthly Statistical Bulletin January 2006, A2: Banknotes and coins in circulation. Berne, January 2006
  10. ^ 150 Years of Swiss coinage: From silver to cupronickel, on the website of Swissmint. Last accessed 2 March 2006.
  11. ^ Pièce de cinq centimes: Hans-Rudolf Merz renonce à la supprimer, Swissinfo, 26 February 2006.
  12. ^ Circulation coins: Technical data, on the website of Swissmint. Last accessed 30 October 2006.
  13. ^ The global value of 200 francs notes in circulation in 2000 (5120.0 million francs) is larger than the value of 500.- notes in 1996 (3912.30), even when these figures are corrected for the global increase in total value of Swiss banknotes in circulation (+9%). Figures from the Monthly Statistical Bulletin of the Swiss National Bank, January 2006, Op cit
  14. ^ An overview of the security features, Swiss National Bank. Last accessed 26 February 2006.
  15. ^ Eighth banknote series 1995, on the web site of the Swiss National Bank. Last accessed 30 October 2006.
  16. ^ National Bank remits Sfr 244,3 million to the Fund for Emergency Losses, press release of the Swiss National Bank, 4 May 2000. Last accessed 26 February 2006.
  17. ^ Seventh banknote series; see http://www.snb.ch/e/banknoten/alle_serien/img/pic_siebte.gif for an extract. Last accessed 2 March 2005.
  18. ^ New banknotes project, on the website of the Swiss National Bank. Last accessed 2 March 2005.
  19. ^ All banknote series of the SNB, on the web site of the Swiss National Bank. Last accessed 30 October 2006.

May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location within Switzerland The city of Berne (German   , French Berne , Italian Berna , Romansh Berna , Bernese German Bärn ), is the Bundesstadt (administrative capital) of Switzerland and the fourth most populous Swiss city (after Zürich, Geneva and Basel). ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... SRG SSR idée suisse is the business name of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation -- in German: Schweizerische Radio- und Fernsehgesellschaft (SRG), in Romansh Societad svizra da radio e televisiun (SSR), in Italian: Società svizzera di radiotelevisione (SSR), in French: Société suisse de radiodiffusion et télévision (SSR). ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Bernard Lescaze, Une monnaie pour la Suisse. Hurter, 1999. ISBN 2-940031-83-5
  • Michel de Rivaz, The Swiss banknote: 1907–1997. Genoud, 1997. ISBN 2-88100-080-0
  • H.U. Wartenwiler, Swiss Coin Catalog 1798–2005, 2006. ISBN 3-905712-00-8
  • Otto Paul Wenger, Introduction à la numismatique, Cahier du Crédit Suisse, August 1978 (in French).
  • Swissmint, 150 Years of Swiss coinage: A brief historical discourse. Last accessed 2 March 2006.
  • Swissmint, Prägungen von Schweizer Münzen ab 1850 — Frappes des pièces de monnaie suisses à partir de 1850, 2000.

The Credit Suisse Group is a financial services company, headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Swiss franc
  • (German) Swiss Franc Tracker


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Francs
Current Burundian franc | CFA franc | CFP franc | Comorian franc | Congolese franc | Djiboutian franc | Guinean franc | Rwandan franc | Swiss franc | UIC franc
Defunct Algerian franc | Belgian franc | Cambodian franc | French franc | Katangan franc | Gold-Franc | Luxembourgish franc | Malagasy franc | Malian franc | Monegasque franc | Moroccan franc | New Hebrides franc | Saar franc | Tunisian franc | Westphalian Frank
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The franc (ISO 4217 code is BIF) is the currency of Burundi. ... now. ... The CFP franc (in French: franc Pacifique or franc CFP ; CFP stood for Colonies françaises du Pacifique (i. ... ISO 4217 Code KMF User(s) Comoros Inflation rate 3% Source CIA World Fact Book, 2005 est. ... The Congolese Franc is the currency of the Democratic Republic of Congo. ... 500 Djibouti Franc note The Djiboutian franc is a currency used in the African nation of Djibouti. ... The Guinean franc (French: franc guinéen) is the currency used in the African nation of Guinea. ... The Rwandan franc is a currency used in the African nation of Rwanda. ... The UIC Franc is a currency unit used by the Union Internationale de Chemins des fer (in English, the International Union of Railways). ... An Algerian 5 franc note issued in 1939. ... The Belgian franc (Dutch Belgische frank, French franc belge) was the currency of Belgium, before the adoption of the euro. ... The franc was the currency of Cambodia between 1875 and 1885. ... French Franc. ... The franc (also franc katangais) was the separate currency of Katanga between 1960 and 1962. ... The Gold Franc was the unit of account for the Bank for International Settlements from 1930 until April 1, 2003. ... The franc was the currency of Luxembourg between 1854 and 1999 (except during the period 1940 and 1944). ... The Malagasy franc is the defunct currency of Madagascar. ... The franc was the independent currency of Mali between 1962 and 1984. ... The Monégasque franc was one of the official currencies of the Principality of Monaco until 2002, when it changed to the Euro. ... The franc became the currency of French Morocco in 1921. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... 100 Saar franken coin The franc or frank was the currency of Saar between 1918 and 1935, during the French League of Nations mandate, and again between 1954 and 1957 in the Saar protectorate. ... The franc was the currency of Tunisia between 1891 and 1960. ... The Frank was a currency of the Kingdom of Westphalia between 1808 and 1813. ...

Currencies of Europe
Eurozone Euro
Northern Danish krone | Faroese króna | Icelandic króna | Norwegian krone | Swedish krona
Baltic Estonian kroon | Latvian lats | Lithuanian litas
Western British pound | Guernsey pound | Jersey pound | Manx pound
Central Czech koruna | Hungarian forint | Polish złoty | Slovak koruna | Slovenian tolar | Swiss franc
Eastern Belarusian ruble | Kazakhstani tenge | Russian ruble | Ukrainian hryvnia
Southeastern Albanian lek | Bulgarian lev | Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark | Croatian kuna | Macedonian denar | Moldovan leu | Romanian leu | Serbian dinar
Mediterranean Cypriot pound | Gibraltar pound | Maltese lira | Turkish new lira
Transcaucasia Armenian dram | Azerbaijani manat | Georgian lari
Unrecognized Countries Transnistrian ruble
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Swiss Franc Currency- Swiss Franc future trading and Swiss Franc options trading (810 words)
Swiss franc currency futures are an attractive instrument that can add to portfolio diversification for both lenders and borrowers.
When the new European currency the “euro”; was introduced, the Swiss franc appreciated significantly against the euro in April to September 2000, and remains one of the world's strongest currencies, worth today around two-thirds of a euro.
Swiss franc currency futures trade on six months in the March quarterly cycle, Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec.; and also trades British pound/Swiss Franc, Euro FX/Swiss franc, and Swiss franc/Japanese yen as part of cross rate currency futures.
Swiss franc: Information from Answers.com (0 words)
Franc banknotes are issued by the central bank of Switzerland, the Swiss National Bank, while coins are issued by the federal mint, Swissmint.
The Swiss franc has historically been considered a safe haven currency with virtually zero inflation and a legal requirement that a minimum 40% is backed by gold reserves.
Coins of 1/2 francs and above were made of silver until the mid-1960s; at that time, the price of silver raised significantly, so that the face value of the 1/2, 1 and 2 francs was below the value of the metal they were made of.
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